Human Rights and Humanitarian Policy (HRHP)

Human Rights & Humanitarian Policy Curriculum

The Human Rights and Humanitarian Policy concentration prepares students for careers addressing human rights issues in both the public and the private sector. It includes two focus areas while maintaining a common core curriculum. The Human Rights Policy focus area prepares students for careers that require knowledge of areas such as corporate social responsibility, genocide prevention, gender and globalization, or rights-based development policy. The Humanitarian Policy focus area leads to careers that might focus on the management of complex emergencies, early recovery, peacekeeping and peacebuilding, aid coordination, or resource mobilization.

Many students bring substantial experience to the program, enriching the classroom dynamics. Previous graduates have pursued a wide variety of careers and now work in various government agencies, the United Nations and other international organizations, NGOs, corporations, community organizations, think tanks, and service organizations

The concentration is designed to allow flexibility for students’ specialty within Human Rights and Humanitarian Policy, offering courses in development, corporate social responsibility, climate change, gender rights, refugee rights, and so forth. Students may also choose to focus more generally on the fields of Human Rights or Humanitarian Policy.

View or print the HRHP Audit Form

Elazar Barkan, Professor of International and Public Affairs; Director of the Human Rights and Humanitarian Policy Concentration

Dirk Salomons, Special Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time); Humanitarian Policy Focus Area Director (fall semester)

Susannah Friedman, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time); Humanitarian Policy Focus Area Director (spring semester)


Alexander T. Aleinikoff, Visiting Professor of Law

Jessica Alexander, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Allison Anderson, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Betsy Apple, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Joanne Bauer, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jo Becker, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Rainer Braun, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Judith Cheng-HopkinsAdjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Dennis Dijkzeul, Adjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Michael Doyle, University Professor

Yasmine Ergas, Lecturer in the Discipline of International and Public Affairs

Horst Fischer, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Robert Benedict Fleming, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Susannah FriedmanLecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Judith Gearhart, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Brian Grogan, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jenik Radon, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Dirk SalomonsSpecial Lecturer in the Discipline of International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Roy WilliamsAdjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jan Wouters, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

The Human Rights & Humanitarian Policy (HRHP) Program requires a minimum of 15 points of graduate coursework, consisting of five three-point courses, plus a recommended additional three points for the workshop.

Core Course

Points
INAF U6751International Human Rights Law3

Concentration Focus Area

Students must take two or more courses from either Category A: Human Rights Policy or Category B: Humanitarian Policy

Category A: Human Rights Policy Focus Area (6 Points)

Select at least two courses from the following:

Points
INAF U6041Corporations and Human Rights3
INAF U6143Gender, Globalization and Human Rights3
INAF U8180Human Rights Skills and Advocacy3
INAF U8166Rethinking Human Rights and Humanitarism3
INAF U8189The Politics of History and Reconciliation3

Category B: Humanitarian Policy Focus Area (6 Points)

Select at least two courses from the following:

Points
INAF U6190Complex Emergencies: Root Causes to Rebuilding3
INAF U8166Rethinking Human Rights and Humanitarism3
INAF U8690Managing Humanitarian Emergencies3
INAF U6173Migration and Human Development3

Electives

Select at least 1-2 of the following for 6 points1:

Points
SIPA - Human Rights:
INAF U4420Oil, Rights and Development1
INAF U4759Human Rights Practicum1
INAF U6144Media Campaigning and Social Change3
INAF U6405Human Rights Development Policy3
INAF U6765The European Union, the United States and International Human Rights1.5
INAF U8189The Politics of History and Reconciliation3
INAF U8785Gender, Politics, and Development3
INAF U8886Conflict Assessment1
INAF U8892Business and Human Rights Clinic I3
INAF U8893Business and Human Rights Clinic II3
SIPA - Humanitarian Policy:
INAF U4090Accountability in Humanitarian Assistance1
INAF U6141Humanitarian Response Simulation1
INAF U6174Forced Migration: Concepts and Policy3
INAF U6381Gender Armed Conflict: Contemporary Theory and Practice for Advocates 3
INAF U6490International Humanitarian Law and International Criminal Law1.5
INAF U6495Politics Practice of Humanitarian Assistance in the New Millennium1.5
INAF U6497Humanitarian Crisis in the Eastern DRC1
INAF U8559Building Peace After Conflict1.5
INAF U8690Managing Humanitarian Emergencies3
INAF U8882Practicum on Education in Emergencies1.5
Institute for the Study of Human Rights: 2
HRTS GU4230Refugees, Forced Migration, and Displacement3
HRTS GU4270 Social Media and Human Rights: Actors, Advocacy and Analytics3
HRTS GU4500SOCIO-ECONOMIC RIGHTS3
HRTS GU4600Human Rights in the Anthropocene3
HRTS GU4700Ethical Dilemmas in Healthcare: A Human Rights Approach3
HRTS GU4810Religion and Human Rights3
HRTS GU4900UN HUMAN RIGHTS BODIES: IMPACT – REFORM – ADVOCACY4
HRTS GU4915Human Rights and Urban Public Space3
HRTS GU4930International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights4
HRTS GU49504
HRTS GU4215NGOs and the Human Rights Movement: Strategies, Successes and Challenges3
HRTS GR5300Economic and Social Rights in Policy and Practice3
HRTS GR5400Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Human Rights3
HRTS GR5404Human Rights of Women3
HRTS GR5410Children's Rights: Selected Issues3
HRTS GR6020Introduction to Human Rights3
HRTS GR6800International Human Rights Law3
HRTS GR6990Human Rights Research Seminar3
Public Health: 3
POPF P8607Health and Human Rights Advocacy3
POPF P8620Protection of Children in Disaster War1.5
POPF P8625Communicable Disease in Complex Emergencies1.5
POPF P8639Gender-based Violence in Complex Emergencies1.5
POPF P8648Food and Nutrition in Complex Emergencies1.5
POPF P8651Water and Sanitation in Complex Emergencies1.5
POPF P8673Refugee Reproductive Health1.5
POPF P8679Investigative Methods in Complex Emergencies3
POPF P8683Psychosocial and Mental Health Issues in Forced Migration1.5
POPF P8687Public Health and Humanitarian Action3
Law: 4
LAW L6250Immigration Law2
LAW L6276Human Rights3
LAW L6333Refugee Law and Policy3
LAW L6459The Law of Genocide2
LAW L6506Gender Justice3
LAW L8829International Human Rights Advocacy2
LAW L8284Critical Human Rights Theory2
LAW L8044Human Rights at Home: Advancing US Social Justics2
LAW L8887September 11 and the Rights of Non-Citizens2
LAW L9165Transitional Justice.2
LAW L9183Nuremberg Trials War Crimes Law2
LAW L9252Human Rights, Law and Development Workshop2
LAW L9383International Humanitarian Law2
LAW L9832Seminar: Human Rights Reparations under Domestic International Law2
Other:
EMPA U6036Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility3
REGN U6149Energy, Corporate Responsibility Human Rights3
REGN U6545Human Rights in the Western Balkans1.5
REGN U6546Human Rights Civil Society in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia3
RELI W4612Religion and Humanitarianism4
POLS W4474Politics and Justice in Southeast Asia4
INAF U8890Model International Mobility Treaty3
INAF U6802International Law3
INAF U6374Mainstreaming Gender in Global Affairs3
INAF U6376LGBT Rights Internationally: Contemporary Issues and Fundamental Principles1.5
1

The elective courses below are suggestions only. Students may choose from elective courses not listed below that are related to their area of specialty within human rights, as long as approved by the Concentration Director.

2

For more detailed course information, please go to the Institute for the Study of Human Rights website at http://hrcolumbia.org/hrstudies/courses

3

For more detailed course information, please go to Mailman School of Public Health Courses website at: http://www.mailman.hs.columbia.edu/academics/courses

4

For more detailed course information, please go to the Law School Curriculum Guide ahttp://www.law.columbia.edu/courses/search

All students are encouraged to discuss their proposed schedule with their advisor.

Human Rights Focus Area

Year 1
FallPointsSpringPoints
Core: Conceptual Foundations (MIA) or Politics of Policy Making (MPA)14SIPA U4201 or U640113
INAF U675123SIPA U65003
SIPA U40400.5Concentration HR Focus Area Course 13
SIPA U4200 or U640013Specialization Course 13
Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3Elective3
 13.5 15
Year 2
FallPointsSpringPoints
Elective3Core: Capstone Workshop 3
Concentration HR Focus Area Course 23Concentration Elective 2 3
Concentration Elective 1 3Specialization Course 3 3
Specialization Course 23Internship Registration (Optional) 1.5, 3
Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3Elective 3
 15 13.5-15
Total Points: 57-58.5

Humanitarian Policy Focus Area

Year 1
FallPointsSpringPoints
Core: Conceptual Foundations (MIA) or Politics of Policy Making (MPA)14SIPA U4201 or U640113
INAF U675123SIPA U65003
SIPA U40400.5Concentration HP Focus Area Track Course 13
SIPA U4200 or U640013Specialization Course 13
Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3Elective3
 13.5 15
Year 2
FallPointsSpringPoints
Elective3Core: Capstone Workshop 3
Concentration HP Focus Area Course 23Concentration Elective 2 3
Concentration Elective 1 3Specialization Course 3 3
Specialization Course 23Internship Registration (Optional) 1.5, 3
Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3Elective 3
 15 13.5-15
Total Points: 57-58.5
1

 Course must be taken in the semester listed.

2

 Satisfies MIA Interstate Relations requirement.

Year 1

Foreign Language - For MIA students and EPD concentrators who need to take language courses to fulfill the degree/concentration requirement, your schedule may need to be adjusted accordingly.

EMPA U6036 Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility. 3 Points.

Category: EMPA, EMPA: Advanced Management & Finance, EMPA: International Economic Policy & Management, HRHP, Management, EPD, EPD:Sustainable

This course will introduce students to the global context of CSR through comparative business perspectives. After considering the theoretical frameworks for undertaking CSR activities the course will addresses a number of public policy issues facing globalizing companies through a series of case studies. Under examination is the manner in which business and ethical considerations have impacted upon different social, labor, and environmental challenges. We will be asking students to consider: to what extent such factors have been, and will be, part of the corporate strategy decision-making process; why companies are having to adapt (or not) to different pressures; and whether they might sometimes be going above and beyond the standards required by regulation.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 83096 Todd Jacobson M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

HRTS G4410 Children's Rights: Selected Issues. 3 points.

Category: HRHP
Priority given to human rights studies HRSMA students. Open to 3rd and 4th year undergraduates on first day of term.

This course will focus on both the theories surrounding, and practices of, children's rights. It will start from the foundational question of whether children should be treated as rights-holders and whether this approach is more effective than alternatives for promoting children's well-being. Consideration will be given to the major conceptual and developmental issues embedded within the framework of rights in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The course will cover issues in both the domestic and international arenas, including but not limited to: children's rights in the criminal justice; children's rights to housing and health care; inequities in education systems; child labor; children and armed conflict; street children; the rights of migrant, refugee, homeless, and minority children; and the commodification of children. Case studies will be used to ensure that students have a solid understanding of current conditions. The course will also explore the US ratification of the CRC and offer critical perspectives on the advocacy and education-based work of international children's rights organizations.

INAF U4090 Accountability in Humanitarian Assistance. 1 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Social, HRHP
Spring 2017 Course Dates: April 8 & 9

This short course will explore the concept of accountability within humanitarian intervention. In particular it will look at the contemporary significance of accountability for humanitarian response – when and why it has become an important concept for humanitarian intervention, and specific events that have led to a shift from donors to recipients of aid as the agents of accountability and how it is being implemented in the field. Key questions that will be explored include:  To whom are humanitarian agencies accountable? What are the competing accountabilities and how do these influence program decisions and agency performance? Why is accountability to affected people important during a humanitarian response? Aside from ideological views, why should the humanitarian sector be concerned with accountability to affected people? What are its end goals? What does an effective accountability mechanism look like? How do agencies implement it? Do these work? In what contexts? How is their effectiveness being measured? By whom? Through an exploration of case studies from the field (including 2005 South East Asian tsunami, Pakistan earthquake and flood response, Haiti earthquake, European Migration of 2015/2016), a mix of lecture, group exercise, video presentation, the course will address the above questions. Guest speakers will be brought in to discuss the issues with those who are grappling with the accountability debates in the field.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 66446 Jessica Alexander Sa S 9:00am - 5:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U4420 Oil, Rights and Development. 1 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EE, EE: GEMP, HRHP
Spring 2017 Course Dates: April 7 & 8; IMPORTANT: The final day to drop this course, without receiving a failing grade, is March 31. Students who have a legitimate and unforeseen emergency after the final drop date, must get written permission from Professor Jenik Radon (jr2218@columbia.edu).

This multi-layered role-playing simulation, based on a fictitious country, allows exploration of the challenges associated with initiation of a major industrial venture in a developing country as regards any or all of the following: macro-economic and political factors; identification of priorities; environmental management; complications arising from ethnic and religious conflicts; health management (including HIV/AIDS); community development aspects; reconciliation of the interests of a wide variety of stakeholders; media management; achievement of the largest possible Circle of Consensus. The simulation is conducted over two consecutive days and some 50 to 80 participants role-play up to twenty separate entities, including an international industrial company and its competitor, government factions, opposition groups, a local community and wide varieties of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and of media. As in real life, some more general knowledge of the situation is available to all entities, but each one has sole access to information (which may overlap with that of others) which is unique to its own perspective. The emphasis is therefore on sharing and on cooperation to make progress against tight deadlines, on managing information of various degrees of reliability and of balancing conflicting demands. There is no "single right answer" but through the process participants have an opportunity to explore the interplay of a very wide range of factors and develop strategies which are based on a holistic appreciation of the problems involved and on creation of alliances which are by no means obvious at the beginning of the simulation. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 93497 Jenik Radon F Sa 8:00am - 8:00pm
1501 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U4759 Human Rights Practicum. 1 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, HRHP
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 17 - Feb. 28

The Human Rights Practicum is a forum where human rights practitioners and academics share their professional experiences and insights on the modern development of international human rights law, policy, and practice. The Practicum plays an important role in the Human Rights Concentration as a means by which students examine current trends in the human rights field and remain informed about the different roles that human rights actors play in a variety of contexts. The Practicum is designed, therefore, to enhance students’ abilities to think critically and analytically about current problems and challenges confronting the field, and to do so in the context of a vibrant community of their peers. Whereas most courses integrate conceptual and theoretical perspectives of human rights, the Human Rights Practicum is meant to emphasize the processes of implementing human rights from the practitioner’s perspective. A secondary goal of this class will be to make valuable contacts with practitioners in your field. The practitioners invited to join the class will also speak about their career trajectory and available opportunities within their particular area.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 86196 Elazar Barkan T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6041 Corporations and Human Rights. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, EPD:Social, HRHP

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to learn about the growing importance of human rights and their impact in the world today. Through an in-depth examination of the field of business and human rights students will gain an understanding of the existing and emerging international human rights framework relevant to business, learn ways in which business and human rights intersect, and be exposed to the range of methods and tactics being employed by human rights advocates and businesses to address their human rights impacts. By the end of the course, the student will have a firm grasp of the current business and human rights debates, and be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of applying human rights standards to corporations and the effect of corporate practices on human rights. Classroom discussion will include a review of trends in human rights; the development of human rights principles or standards relevant to corporations; human rights issues facing business operations abroad; the growing public demand for greater accountability; strategies of civil society advocacy around business and human rights; collaborative efforts between business and non-profit organizations; and other issues managers must deal with. Through guest lectures, students will have the opportunity to engage first hand with business managers and advocacy professionals dealing with these issues. Attendance is mandatory in the first class session.

INAF U6144 Media Campaigning and Social Change. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, TMAC, EPD, EPD:Social

This course will examine the role that different kinds of media have played in raising awareness about human rights, labor issues and political change over time and across countries. We will look at how media, social media and NGOs can take on a campaigning role in raising awareness about social problems and holding governments accountable. We will plan and execute advocacy campaigns, write letters and op-eds and tweet about contemporary human rights problems. We will also discuss how to measure impact and spend time learning hands-on skills such as scraping data from social media to see the response to major campaigns. This semester our course will emphasize labor rights, media freedom and women in sports. Students can choose which of these subjects they want to focus on.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 29569 Anya Maria Schiffrin W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6143 Gender, Globalization and Human Rights. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, GPP, USP, USP:Social, EPD, EPD:Social

Prerequisites: Students who have not taken either International Human Rights Law or International Law must obtain instructor permission to enroll

From the ‘feminization of migration' to labor market effects of trade agreements, from the recognition of rape as a war crime to the emergence of transnational advocacy movements focused on women's and LGBTQ rights, globalization is being shaped by and reshaping gender relations. Human rights norms are directly implicated in these processes. The development of global and regional institutions increases the likelihood that national policies affecting gender relations will be subject to international scrutiny. At the same time, local activists redefine international norms in terms of their own cultural and political frameworks with effects that impact general understandings. What ‘human rights' can women claim, where, how and from whom? What human rights can LGBT people claim? How can we craft effective and fair policies on the basis of the existing human rights framework?

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 26946 Yasmine Ergas W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6145 Journalism, Human Rights and Social Change. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, IMAC
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine the role that different kinds of media have played in raising awareness about human rights, labor issues and political change over time and across countries. The first part of the course will look at some of the history of campaigning journalism and then move to current examples of how social media can take on a campaigning role in raising awareness about social problems and holding governments accountable.

INAF U6154 Humanitarian Communications. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, IMAC
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In an era of increased political and cultural upheaval, armed conflict, natural disasters, and more, humanitarian issues are confronting societies across the globe like never before. But how are these important events being understood, and communicated, on the local level? How are people in the line of fire getting essential messages that help maintain the well being of their families? This course will take a close look at the information systems that play a role in the development and understanding of humanitarian situations around the world

INAF U6190 Complex Emergencies: Root Causes to Rebuilding. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, IO

This course forms an introduction to the broader program on humanitarian affairs. We will address the root causes of complex humanitarian emergencies, the practices of humanitarian intervention, the main actors, and the opportunities and dilemmas for rebuilding. We will also discuss the main critiques of humanitarian action and possible alternatives. The course advocates the principle that humanitarian aid should be provided from a (long-term) development perspective? otherwise it can reinforce conflict and exclusion.

INAF U6352 United Nations and Globalization. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, HRHP, IO

  The course will explore the multiple dimensions of the impact of globalization on the role of the United Nations. The new millennium has seen a vigorous debate take shape on global governance. Every aspect of global governance is currently the subject of review and debate : the financial system, security and the role and composition of the Security Council, a new climate change architecture, the trade regime and the future of the Doha round, human rights, the future of development assistance and the provision of global public goods, and the need for a new multilateralism. It has been over half a century since so many core issues at the heart of effective global governance have been on the drawing board simultaneously.  This course will analyse the implications of a range of these issues for the current work of the UN and for its future role.  The session headings indicate the specific issues that will be covered.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 82646 Bruce Jenks M 11:00am - 12:50pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6373 Gender Policy Practicum. 1.5 Point.

Category: EPD, EPD:Social, HRHP, GPP
Spring 2017 Course Dates: March 7 - April 25

The Gender Policy Practicum creates a forum in which policy experts from different academic disciplines and fields of practice can share their experiences and perspectives with SIPA students. Through the Practicum, students will explore gender integration in various SIPA concentrations and specializations, as well as in multiple arenas of policy development and implementation. Students will be introduced to current trends and debates related to the promotion of gender equality in different fields of policy practice and will be encouraged to think critically about these issues and their relevance to their academic and professional goals.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 61529 Yasmine Ergas T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6374 Mainstreaming Gender in Global Affairs. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, GPP, Management, USP, USP:Social, EPD, EPD:Social

This course introduces students to gender mainstreaming, gender analysis and intersectionality as theory and method, as well as the associated set of strategies, tools and skills applicable to international and public policy contexts. Through a combination of empirical research, structural theorizing, social critique, and case studies, students will become acquainted with the global dimensions of feminist organizing and policy-making necessary for working in a variety of specialty policy fields such as education, public health, international finance, sustainable development, peace and security, organizational management and economic development.

INAF U6375 Gender and Livelihoods: From Displacement to Early Recovery. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Social, HRHP, GPP, USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will address the effects of conflict on livelihoods, how livelihoods can be re-vitalized during population displacement, how promoting economic self-reliance underpins all other humanitarian work, the impact on the protection of women and men, and how these programs are prerequisite for and can be linked with post-conflict recovery and development. The impact of conflict, displacement and livelihoods on gender, gender norms, and gender power relations will be addressed throughout.

INAF U6405 Human Rights & Development Policy. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP

Human rights can provide a framework for shaping development policies. How will the observance of human rights criteria in planning, implementing and evaluating development projects and policies contribute to their effectiveness and sustainability? The class will examine development policy choices and their impact by juxtaposing the interests and points-of-view of the various stakeholders involved in designing and implementing development policies.

INAF U6440 Peace Operations in Fragile States. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, EPD, EPD:Political
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will focus on peace operations and the stabilization of fragile states. It will assess the various tools used by the International community and the evolution in their use: the deployment of military forces, transitional authorities, multidimensional operations, security sector reform, rule of law and transitional justice, support to political processes. It will conclude with an examination of the evolving broader political context and the growing challenge it poses to effective stabilization strategies: an increasingly divided international community, limited consent of host countries, obstacles to effective reform of the United Nations. The course will be entirely based on case studies drawn from operations of the last 20 years.  Assignments and classroom discussion are designed to prepare students for professional work in developing or implementing stabilization strategies in fragile states.

INAF U6490 International Humanitarian Law and International Criminal Law. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, HRHP, EPD, EPD:Political
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Mar 24, 25 & Apr 1

The course will be competent in the critical questioning of international humanitarian law (IHL) and international criminal law (ICL) system. Participants will gain an understanding of the historical development and system of international humanitarian law in the context of its political and technological environment. They will study the methods for interpretation of IHL treaties and the identification of customary IHL-law and they will learn to apply IHL to actual conflicts such as the conflicts in Syria, Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Sudan and Ukraine. Students will develop and understanding of the preconditions for the punishment of war crimes under ICL. They analyze judgements in fundamental crimes cases.  Students will be able to determine which treaty and customary rules need to be applied to actual wars. They will be able select and use the appropriate IHL-rules to determine whether violations have taken place and how perpetrators could be punished.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 76746 Horst Fischer F Sa 9:00am - 5:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6495 Politics & Practice of Humanitarian Assistance in the New Millennium. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, HRHP, IO
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Mar. 9 - Apr. 27

Humanitarian agencies became major players in the intra-state conflicts that characterized the 1990s. However, this prominence also led to critical examination, both from within and outside these agencies. The dilemmas of field workers led to new questions: How can the challenges presented by the fragmentation of state authority be addressed? Is there a way to link relief to development? Is there a relationship between humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution/peace-building activities? How can relief agencies manage their relations with the parties to a conflict? How do human rights and humanitarian aid intersect? The experience of the 1990s has made it clear to humanitarian agencies that technical skills were no longer sufficient - their staff also needed political and analytical skills to navigate in insecure environments.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 91997 Bradley Foerster Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6497 Humanitarian Crisis in the Eastern DRC. 1 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, HRHP, Regional
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Feb. 24 & 25

Over the past decades, perhaps no area of the world has seen such violent transformations and complex conflicts as Africa's Great Lakes Region. This 1-credit course focuses on the conflicts and humanitarian assistance in two Eastern Congolese provinces, Kivu Sud and Kivu Nord. Extrapolations based on IRC studies estimate an excess mortality in Eastern DR Congo of over 4 million people out of a total population of about 20 million over the last twenty years. The neighboring countries of DR Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, and Uganda all play a role in this conflict. Moreover, they have also endured their own forms of traumatic upheaval and are still searching for a form of stability. This course asks why these conflicts endured for so long? What are the root causes? What happens when a state bureaucracy breaks down? What happens to the health care and educational systems? Can solutions be found? What is the role of the humanitarian organizations vis-à-vis the local population, civil society, and the local administration?

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 73496 Dennis Dijkzeul Sa 10:00am - 2:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 001 73496 Dennis Dijkzeul F 1:00pm - 5:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6751 International Human Rights Law. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP

This course introduces students to international human rights law (IHRL). In what sense are internationally-defined human rights "rights" and in what sense can the instruments which define them be considered "law"? How do we know that a claim is actually a "human right"? What are the relations among international, regional and national institutions in establishing and enforcing (or not) IHRL? Does IHRL represent an encroachment on national sovereignty? Is the future of IHRL regional? What enforcement mechanisms can we use, and who can decide upon their use? Finally, what redress is there for human rights violations, and how effective is it? Attendance is required in the first class.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 80896 Betsy Apple Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
402b International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 82246 M 1:00pm - 2:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6760 Managing Risk in Natural and Other Disasters. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, EPD:Sustainable, HRHP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The aim of this one-semester 3-point course is to provide students with insights and skills they need to respond to and manage 'natural' and man-made disasters during their future professional careers. The course provides a conceptual framework that should allow students to develop and include policies into their future professional activities with the aim to minimize the exposure of people or entire populations to disasters and foster the populations' disaster resilience.

INAF U8166 Rethinking Human Rights and Humanitarism. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP

The goal of the course is to examine predicaments of rights through a variety of topics and perspectives. This is not an introductory course (it is meant for students who have previously taken international law, or other "fundamental" human rights classes), yet we will explore human rights broadly: the challenges facing human rights as an ethical and a social justice framework; the multiplicity of rights, and the tension of universality and localism.

INAF U8172 Theory, History, and Practice of Human Rights. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is intended to introduce student to key debates in the field of human rights. It will require extensive reading as background to a focused discussion of key theoretical issues. Historically, we shall distinguish between two epochs in the development of human rights discourse: (a) the politically-centered articulation of human rights, an epoch that began with the French Revolution and the Rights of Man and closed with Eleanor Roosevelt's 1948 Declaration that provided the intellectual foundation for the 20th century welfare state, and (b) the ethically-centered call, 'Never Again', as the lesson of the Holocaust, which provides the foundation for a programmatic Responsibility to Protect (R2P). What has changed and what has remained the same as the focus of human rights has shifted from a call for resistance to one for rescue and intervention? We shall compare and contrast two specific contexts in which human rights discourse has become dominant: (a) survivor states: the United States (and South Africa) ; (b) victim states: Israel (and Rwanda). What was the lesson of Auschwitz (and Hiroshima)? And what is the lesson of the South African transition? Instructor permission is required to register for this course. Please attend the first class if you are interested in registering.

INAF U8178 Rethinking Human Rights. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP

The course is aimed at graduate students in all Columbia schools and programs who have substantial expertise or experience in human rights. It seeks to discuss problematic, troubling, or controversial topics within human rights theory, discourse and practice, as a way of forging new understandings, new ideas, and new practices. The course is built around discussion of selected writings that bring to the surface contested and controversial issues.

INAF U8180 Human Rights Skills and Advocacy. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, TMAC, IO

This course is designed to develop practical advocacy skills to protect and promote human rights. A focus will be developing an advocacy strategy on a current human rights issue, including the identification of goals and objectives, appropriate advocacy targets and strategies, and the development of an appropriate research methodology. Students will explore broad-based human rights campaigns, use of the media, and advocacy with UN and legislative bodies. Over the course of the semester, students will become familiar with a variety of tools to apply to a human rights issue of their choosing. Case studies will illustrate successful advocacy campaigns on a range of human rights issues."  

INAF U8183 Tools for Advocacy. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, IMAC

"Tools for Advocacy: Understanding How the Media Works and How to Use it to Promote a Cause or Institution" provides students of international affairs and public policy with a set of practical communications skills for use in their everyday work. Students will learn how to function effectively in our fast-changing contemporary media environment. Students will learn how to craft powerful messages, create compelling material for the media and refine their presentations techniques for interviews. They learn how to use the media to deliver messages to key audiences and how to conceive and execute an advocacy campaign as part of an organizational mission. Communications professionals from a variety of fields visit the class during the course of the semester. Students produce advocacy materials including an a press release, an op-ed and some form Internet content

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 64029 Michael Vachon, Laura Silber M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8189 The Politics of History and Reconciliation. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, TMAC

Since the end of the Cold War historical memory has come to play an increasing role in international and intranational conflicts. In addition numerous countries which are transitioning from dictatorship to democracy have focused on the gross historical violations of the previous regime. But not all. The question is how does a focus on the past facilitate present reconciliation? Societies are faced with the expectation that they will attend to the crimes of previous regimes. But what are crimes in historical perspective? And what are the standards for historical responsibility? How does historical conflict and reconciliation differ from approaches to immediate accountability for the past in newly democratic societies? The course examines these political and ethical dilemmas in a comparative historical perspective.

INAF U8507 The Security Council and Peacekeeping in Africa in the 21st Century. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, Regional

This course, which will be taught by a practitioner, will focus on United Nations peacekeeping operations as one of the main conflict management tools of the Security Council (SC) in Africa. Through an extensive series of case studies (Somalia, Rwanda, South Sudan, Libya, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, the Central African Republic and Cote d'Ivoire), It will closely examine the tool of peace keeping, the context in which it operates, the evolution of its doctrine, the lessons learned, and the challenges ahead. Drawing on the recent report of the High-level Independent Panel on peace operations (HIPPO), and the cases studies above, it will elaborate on the many issues in peacekeeping today,in particular the limits of the use of force, the protection of civilians, the nexus peacekeeping/peacebuilding, and the increased partnership with regional and subregional organizations.

INAF U8559 Building Peace After Conflict. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, Management
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Oct. 24 - Dec. 12

This short course traces the outlines of the international community's steep learning curve in addressing the challenges of post-conflict peace building. It will examine some of the early UN and World Bank experiments in restoring nation states, follow the institutional changes meant to build capacity in the field of post-conflict recovery, look at the methodological and funding tools developed to strengthen field operations, and review some case studies illustrating the impact of this evolution. 

INAF U8690 Managing Humanitarian Emergencies. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, Management

This course focuses on the actual management problems of humanitarian interventions and helps students obtain the professional skills and insight needed to work in complex humanitarian emergencies, and to provide oversight and guidance to humanitarian operations from a policy perspective. It is a follow-up to the fall course that studied the broader context, root causes, actors, policy issues, and debates in humanitarian emergencies.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 93096 Susannah Friedman Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
402b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8785 Gender, Politics, and Development. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, EPD:Social, HRHP, GPP, IO, USP, USP:Social

Gender equality, and women’s and girls’ empowerment, are now widely accepted as development goals in their own right, and essential to inclusive and sustainable development. But despite progress in many areas, gender gaps and discrimination persist. How did gender equality move from the periphery to the center of development discourse, and what difference has this made? Is gender equality a human right, an essential aspect of human development, or “smart economics”? What are the implications of a gender equality agenda for men and boys, and for broader understandings of gender identities and sexualities? What policies, strategies and practices have been effective – or ineffective – in narrowing gender gaps and improving outcomes for both women and men in particular development settings? In this course, we approach gender, politics and development in terms of theory, policy and practice. We apply a critical gender lens to a wide range of development sectors and issue areas, including economic development, political participation, education and health, environment and climate change, and conflict and displacement. We also consider current debates and approaches related to gender mainstreaming and gender metrics in development practice. Students engage with the course material through class discussion, exercises and case studies, and the development of a gender-related project proposal.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 98146 Maxine Weisgrau, Eugenia McGill M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8818 Topics in International Ethics. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, HRHP, ISP, EPD, EPD:Political
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar begins with an examination of how moral philosophers have considered the problem of the ethics of policy choice. In the next part of the seminar we explore human rights and the role of ethics in international politics. We then focus on problems in contemporary international ethics, wars, massacres and terrorism; international intervention; and global economic justice. We conclude with a discussion of the debate between the proponents of cosmopolitan justice, on the one hand, and the defenders of national self-determination, on the other, over the conditions of world order.

INAF U8882 Practicum on Education in Emergencies. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Social, HRHP, IO, ICR
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 23 - Mar. 6

This seven-week practicum is designed to give students from a variety of disciplines a background in education in emergency contexts, from preparedness to response and recovery. Class sessions will explore the multiple roles of education, including critical linkages to sectors like health and protection, in each of these phases; introduce students to the major education actors within the international humanitarian architecture; and prepare students to utilize best practices and minimum standards for education programming and policy-making. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 86546 Allison Anderson M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8882 Practicum on Education in Emergencies. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Social, HRHP, IO, ICR
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 23 - Mar. 6

This seven-week practicum is designed to give students from a variety of disciplines a background in education in emergency contexts, from preparedness to response and recovery. Class sessions will explore the multiple roles of education, including critical linkages to sectors like health and protection, in each of these phases; introduce students to the major education actors within the international humanitarian architecture; and prepare students to utilize best practices and minimum standards for education programming and policy-making. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 86546 Allison Anderson M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg

POPF P8639 Gender-based Violence in Complex Emergencies. 1.5 point.

SIPA: EPD, SIPA: USP- Social Policy Track, SIPA: Humanitarian Affairs, SIPA: Electives

This is a Public Health Course.  Public Health classes are offered on the Health Services Campus at 168th Street.

For more detailed course information, please go to Mailman School of Public Health Courses website at http://www.mailman.hs.columbia.edu/academics/courses

REGN U6149 Energy, Corporate Responsibility & Human Rights. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Social, EPD:Sustainable, EE, EE: ERM, HRHP, Regional, ICR

This class examines how to reconcile the differing/conflicting interests/goals of energy, and mining, companies and the public interest (e.g. governments); how to negotiate PPP agreements; understand the function/impact of laws and international trade agreements; and determine how CSR, especially environment and anti-corruption, and human rights apply. Case studies of multi-billion international energy pipeline projects, including TAP in Albania and Greece, TAPI in Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India, BTC in Georgian and the Caucasus and , for comparative purposes, the controversial Keystone in US and Canada, will be the prism/focus for analysis. The class is dynamic and cross-disciplinary.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 87779 Jenik Radon T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

REGN U6545 Human Rights in the Western Balkans. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, HRHP, Regional
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Oct. 18 - Dec. 6

This Human Rights practicum course focuses on the Western Balkans of the Former Yugoslavia in a contemporary context.  The course focuses on war crimes and their respective consequences that have occurred during the most recent Balkan Wars 1991-1999 in the Former Yugoslav states and will include a detailed review and examination of human rights policies and practices carried out by international, regional and national bodies, laws, organizations, frameworks of transitional justice and evaluative tools employed in an effort to stabilize a post-war, post-Communist, post-conflict scenario.  The course will present and examine in detail policies and practices deployed by international and national state structures to address the legacies of war crimes and the emergence of new human rights issues that are currently present in the Former Yugoslav space. The course will require students to prepare a 10-page paper on a human rights issue in the region, analyze the issues, review implementation to date and recommend policy initiatives that will address the problem (75 percent of the grade).  Students are expected read weekly assignments and regularly participate and attend the class, which will constitute  25 percent of their final grade. Failure to attend class without a justifiable explanation will be penalized by a reduction of one grade letter.