Sociology

https://sociology.columbia.edu/

Department Office: 501 Knox Hall; 212-853-1909
http://www.sociology.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Teresa Sharpe, 501 Knox; ts2785@columbia.edu

Director of Academic Administration and Finance: Teresa Aguayo, 501C Knox Hall; 212-854-9890; ta2015@columbia.edu

Student Program Coordinator: Kiamesha Wilson, 501B Knox; kw2510@columbia.edu

Sociology is the study of society. In examining patterns of association, sociologists explore the interactions of people, communities, and organizations. In this sense, sociology is not the study of people; it is the study of the relationships among people. This study includes the associations between people and the products of human interaction, such as organizations, technologies, economies, cities, culture, media, and religion. In the kinds of questions it asks, sociology is a deeply humanist discipline and sociologists demand the analytic rigor of scientific investigation.

In training students in our department, we encourage them to ask big questions and we work to give them the tools to provide answers. These tools might mean ethnographic observation, pouring through historical archives, looking at census data, analyzing social networks, or interviewing people from various walks of life.

As a bridging discipline that seeks the scientific exploration of questions that matter to human communities, such as inequality and social injustice, sociology addresses many of the same areas of life as our neighboring social science disciplines. Yet we often approach these areas quite differently. For example, problems of economic and political life are a central concern to sociologists. Rather than explore these as independent or particular features of society, we seek to embed them within the complex whole of the social world. Students will find the Department of Sociology to be a broad, demanding department that provides its students with the conceptual and methodological tools to make sense of the opportunities and social problems of the global communities in which we live.

Grading

A letter grade of C- or better is needed in all Sociology courses in order to satisfy the program requirements.

Departmental Honors

In order to be considered for departmental honors, majors must have a minimum GPA of 3.6 overall and 3.8 in courses in the Department of Sociology. In addition, students must produce an exceptional honors thesis in the two-semester Senior Seminar (SOCI UN3995-SOCI UN3996 Senior Seminar).

In order to register for the Senior Seminar, students must have completed SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research and have had their research project accepted by the faculty member teaching the Senior Seminar. Submissions of research projects are due by May 1 preceding the seminar. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Professors

  • Peter Bearman
  • Courtney Bender (Religion)
  • Elizabeth Bernstein (Barnard)
  • Yinon Cohen
  • Jonathan R. Cole
  • Thomas A. DiPrete
  • Gil Eyal
  • Todd Gitlin (Journalism)
  • Shamus Khan (Chair)
  • Bruce Kogut (Business)
  • Jennifer Lee
  • Bruce Link (School of Public Health)
  • Debra C. Minkoff (Barnard)
  • Mignon Moore (Chair, Barnard)
  • Aaron Pallas (Teachers College)
  • Jonathan Rieder (Barnard)
  • Saskia Sassen
  • Seymour Spilerman
  • David Stark (also School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Julien Teitler (Social Work)
  • Diane Vaughan
  • Sudhir Alladi Venkatesh
  • Amy Stuart Wells (Teachers College)
  • Bruce Western
  • Andreas Wimmer

Associate Professors

  • Mark Hatzenbuehler (Sociomedical)
  • Jennifer Lena (Teachers College)
  • Desmond Upton Patton (School of Social Work)
  • Adam Reich (Director of Graduate Studies)
  • Emmanuelle Saada (French and Romance Philology)
  • Josh Whitford 

Assistant Professors

  • Maria Abascal
  • Debbie Becher (Barnard)
  • Christel Kesler (Barnard)
  • Yao Lu
  • Angela M. Simms (Barnard)
  • Gerard Torrats-Espinosa
  • Dan Wang (Business School)
  • Amy Yuan Zhou (Barnard)
  •  

Lecturers

  • Denise Milstein
  • Teresa Sharpe
  • Kristin Murphy

On Leave

  • Prof. Stark (2018 - 2019)
  • Prof. Whitford (2019 - 2020)

Major in Sociology

The major in sociology requires a minimum of 30-31 points as follows:

Core Courses
The following three courses are required (10 points):
The Social World
Social Theory
Methods for Social Research
Elective Courses
Select six courses (20-21 points) in the Department of Sociology, to include at least three lecture courses (2000- or 3000-level, 3 points each) and at least two seminars (4 points each). The sixth course could be either a lecture course (to a total of 30 points) or a seminar (to a total of 31 points). For students taking the two-semester Senior Seminar, the sixth course must be a seminar. Some examples of electives include: *
SOCI UN3020Social Statistics
SOCI UN3213Sociology of African American Life
SOCI UN3235Social Movements
SOCI UN3490Mistake, Misconduct, Disaster
SOCI UN3285Israeli Society and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
SOCI UN3264The Changing American Family
SOCI UN3900Societal Adaptations to Terrorism
SOCI UN3914Seminar in Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility
SOCI UN3931Sociology of the Body
SOCI UN3974Sociology of Schools, Teaching and Learning
SOCI UN3995Senior Seminar
SOCI UN3996Senior Seminar

Concentration in Sociology

The concentration in sociology requires a minimum of 20 points as follows:

Core Courses
The following three courses are required (10 points):
The Social World
Social Theory
Methods for Social Research
Elective Courses
Select three courses (10 points) in the Department of Sociology, one of which must be a seminar. Some examples of electives include:
SOCI UN3900Societal Adaptations to Terrorism
SOCI UN3914Seminar in Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility
SOCI UN3915Stigma and Discrimination
SOCI UN3931Sociology of the Body
SOCI UN3974Sociology of Schools, Teaching and Learning
SOCI UN3985Queer Practice
SOCI UN3995Senior Seminar
SOCI UN3996Senior Seminar

Spring 2020

SOCI UN1000 The Social World. 3 points.

Identification of the distinctive elements of sociological perspectives on society. Readings confront classical and contemporary approaches with key social issues that include power and authority, culture and communication, poverty and discrimination, social change, and popular uses of sociological concepts.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/42383 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Teresa Sharpe 3 301/350
Spring 2020: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/16112 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Adam Reich 3 300/300

SOCI UN3000 Social Theory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Required for all sociology majors.  Prerequisite: at least one sociology course of the instructor's permission.  Theoretical accounts of the rise and transformations of modern society in the19th and 20th centuries.  Theories studied include those of Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Max Weber, Roberto Michels.  Selected topics:  individual, society, and polity; economy, class, and status: organization and ideology; religion and society; moral and instrumental action.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 001/42225 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
330 River Side Church
Gil Eyal 3 49/60
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 003/00668 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Deborah Becher 3 59/70

SOCI UN3009 Contemporary Social Theory. 3 points.

This is a survey class that will familiarize students with the most important theoretical developments in post-war sociology.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3009 001/16171 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
Room TBA
Andreas Wimmer 3 23/60

SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI UN1000 The Social World or Instructor Permission

Required for all Sociology majors.  Introductory course in social scientific research methods. Provides a general overview of the ways sociologists collect information about social phenomena, focusing on how to collect data that are reliable and applicable to our research questions.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/42384 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Fayerweather
Maria Abascal 4 45/70
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/00002 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Amy Zhou 4 56/70

SOCI UN3011 METHODS FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH - DISC. 0 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI UN1000

Section Discussion for SOCI UN3010, METHODS FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3011 001/42280 W 6:10pm - 7:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Timothy Ittner 0 21/35
SOCI 3011 002/42281 Th 6:10pm - 7:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Mireia Triguero Roura 0 23/35
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3011 001/16172 W 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
0 11/30
SOCI 3011 002/16174 Th 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
0 10/30

SOCI UN3265 Sociology of Work and Gender. 3 points.

This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3265 001/16176 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Teresa Sharpe 3 101/150

SOCI UN3297 Sociology of Transnational Market Making. 4 points.

The course will introduce core theories and key concepts in economic and political sociology, plus international political economy to provide a broad overview about the debates linked to the coming about and development of transnational markets. Classes are organized around three topics. We will start with the discussion of the works of classics like Weber, Durkheim and Polanyi on the emergence and evolution of national markets, followed by reading  recent applications of the works of classics on the evolution of transnational markets. The third part of the course will explore the question  of how can one apply these theoretical approaches to the study of the politics of the Single European Market and use their tools of analysis for the better understanding of the evolution of core-periphery relations in the EU.


Students taking this course will acquire the capacity for informed participation in debates on the politics of transnational market making. They will gain the analytical tools to start independent research on issues linked to the politics of economic integration in Europe

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3297
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3297 001/16177 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Laszlo Bruszt 4 17/20

SOCI UN3909 Deviance and Social Control. 4 points.

In this seminar. we will trace the historic shifts in causal theories of deviance and their significance for the societal response. The readings are classics of social research that have been of great historical impact. They range from the early focus on individual pathologies to sociological explanations, the most recent being attempts to understand deviance as a product of organization factors that result in harmful outcomes. Examples are Katrina, the 2008 financial crisis, and school shootings.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3909
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3909 001/16183 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Diane Vaughan 4 20/20

SOCI UN3915 Stigma and Discrimination. 4 points.

This course considers stigma and discrimination as general processes that apply to a broad range of phenomena, from mental illness to obesity to HIV/AIDS to racial groups. We will use a conceptual framework that considers power and social stratification to be central to stigma and discrimination. We will focus on both macro- and micro-level social processes and their interconnections, and we will draw on literature from both sociology and psychology.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3915 001/16187 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Mark Hatzenbuehler 4 20/20

SOCI UN3921 HIGHER EDUCATION AND INEQUALITY. 4 points.

Prerequisites: (SOCI UN1000)

Higher education in the U.S. is going through a period of rapid change.  State support is shrinking, student debt is increasing, full-time faculty are being replaced by adjuncts, and learning outcomes are difficult to measure, at best. This class will try to makes sense of these changes. Among other questions, it will ask whether higher education is a source of social mobility or a means of class reproduction; how the college experience differs by race, class, and type of college attended; how the economics of higher education have led to more expensive college and more student loans; and how we might make college better. We will consider several different points of view on the current state of U.S. higher education: that of students who apply to and attend college, that of colleges and universities, and that of society at large.  As part of this course, students will conduct research on their own universities: Columbia College or Barnard College.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3921
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3921 001/16188 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Teresa Sharpe 4 20/20

SOCI UN3926 Race, Place and the United States . 4 points.

The course analyzes the relationship between race/ethnicity and spatial inequality, emphasizing the institutions, processes, and mechanisms that shape the lives of urban dwellers. It surveys major theoretical approaches and empirical investigations of racial and ethnic stratification in several urban cities, and their concomitant policy considerations.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3926
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3926 001/15483 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Kristin Murphy 4 16/22
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3926
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3926 001/16189 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Kristin Murphy 4 20/20

SOCI UN3937 Sociology of Human Rights. 4 points.

Sociology came to the study of human rights much later than law, philosophy, or political science. In this course, you’ll learn (1) what constitutes a sociology of human rights and (2) what sociology, its classics, and its diverse methods bring to the empirical study and theory of human rights.


We’ll explore the history, social institutions and laws, ideas, practices, and theories of human rights. We’ll become familiar with the social actors, social structures, and relationships involved in practices such as violation, claims-making, advocacy, and protection. We’ll consider how social, cultural, political, and economic forces affect human rights issues.


We’ll learn about the questions sociologists ask, starting with the most basic (but far from simple) question, “what is a human right?”


We’ll tackle key debates in the field, considering – for instance – whether human rights are universal and how human rights relate to cultural norms/values, national sovereignty, and national security.


Finally, we’ll apply the concepts we’ve learned to a wide range of issues (ex: how racial, ethnic, gender, and other social inequalities relate to human rights), rights (ex: LGBTQ rights, the rights of laborers, the rights of refugees), and cases (ex: enslavement, the separation of children from their families, circumcision, sterilization, the use of torture). We’ll consider human rights cases in the United States and across the globe, and how events and actions in one place relate to human rights violations in another.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3937
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3937 001/17807 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Rosemary McGunnigle-Gonzales 4 8/20
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3937
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3937 001/16190 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Rosemary McGunnigle-Gonzales 4 20/20

SOCI UN3960 Law, Science, and Society. 4 points.

This course addresses basic contemporary social issues from several angles of vision: from the perspective of scientists, social scientists, legal scholars, and judges. Through the use of case studies, students will examine the nature of theories, evidence, "facts," proof, and argument as found in the work of scientists and scholars who have engaged the substantive issues presented in the course.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3960 001/16192 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Jonathan Cole 4 20/20

SOCI UN3974 Sociology of Schools, Teaching and Learning. 4 points.

In this class we will examine the school as a central institution in modern society, and we will grapple with an important question in the sociology of education: what role to schools play in reinforcing or challenging broader patters of social inequality? We will pay special attention to the ways in which students' class, race/ethnicity and gender shape their educational experiences. We will also look at how schools are organized, how schools construct differences among students, and how schools sort kids into different (and unequal) groups. Finally we will explore the types of interventions - at both the individual and organizational levels - that can mitigate inequality in educational achievement and help low-income students to succeed.


One such intervention that has shown promise is tutoring in academic and social and behavioral skills, and interventions that strengthen self-affirmation. A major component of this class is your experience as a tutor. You will be trained as tutors to work with students from local high schools both through in-person tutoring and through tutoring using social networking technologies. Throughout the semester we will combine our academic learning with critical reflection on our experience sin the field. Because you will be working with NYC high school students, we will pay special attention to how NYC high schools are organized and how current issues in education play out in the context of NYC schools.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3974
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3974 001/13380 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Hamilton Hall
Jacquelyn Duran 4 14/30
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3974
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3974 001/16194 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Jacquelyn Duran 4 26/30

SOCI UN3980 Immigrant New York: The Changing American City. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

How has immigration transformed New York City? What are the major ethnic groups in the city? How are immigrants and their U.S.-born children incorporated into the city's schools, workplaces and neighborhoods? How will their integration reshape patterns of ethnic and racial inequality in the city? This course will focus on New York City as a case study to highlight how immigration has transformed the city's demographic, political, socioeconomic and spatial landscape.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3980 001/16275 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Kristin Murphy 4 20/20

SOCI UN3981 Migration and Development. 4 points.

This is a seminar course on the social structure of migration–the movement of people from place to place–and its developmental consequences.  The readings are organized by topic and include examples drawn from many countries, in order to highlight the commonality of migration processes across societies as well as specific societal differences that reflect national differences in social institutions, regional variations in economic development, etc.  Papers concerned both with internal migration and international migration are included; as we will see, the apparent distinction between these two forms of migration–the presence of institutional barriers with respect to international migration and the supposed absence of such barriers with respect to internal migration–breaks down in societies that impose institutional constraints on internal migration: China, the former Soviet Union, and apartheid-era South Africa, among others.

Spring 2020: SOCI UN3981
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3981 001/16253 Th 8:10am - 10:00am
Room TBA
Yao Lu 4 8/20

SOCI UN3996 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: required methods and theory courses for the major, and the instructor's permission.

Students wishing to qualify for departmental honors must take W3996y. Students carry out individual research projects and write a senior thesis under the supervision of the instructor and with class discussion. Written and oral progress reports.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3996 001/42361 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Adam Reich 4 11/18
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3996 001/16195 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Adam Reich 4 9/20

SOCI GU4701 CREATIVITY/TECH:WAR & COM. 4 points.

This course examines the ways that technological shifts have catalyzed innovation and social change in human societies. The focus is on the social basis for creativity. Analysis centers on the conflicts, disruptions and tensions that emerge in society when new and/or competing technologies are introduced. Students will explore two substantive spheres of social life. The first is war. Throughout recorded history, participants have sought to garner competitive advantages in battle via technological innovation. We look at several moments in which the development of a particular innovation helped bring about massive societal change. The second focus is on commerce. The class will examine the impact of digital technologies on those who work in creative industries undergoing transformation via technology and diffusion of tech-inspired ideas.The learning objectives for students are:

• To situate technology within a wider social and historical context.


• To consider creativity as a social activity, not only as individual aptitude.


• To place the contemporary period of so-called “fast paced technological progress” within a sociological framework of change and innovation.

Spring 2020: SOCI GU4701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4701 001/16254 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Sudhir Venkatesh 4 25/25

Fall 2019

SOCI UN1000 The Social World. 3 points.

Identification of the distinctive elements of sociological perspectives on society. Readings confront classical and contemporary approaches with key social issues that include power and authority, culture and communication, poverty and discrimination, social change, and popular uses of sociological concepts.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/42383 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Teresa Sharpe 3 301/350
Spring 2020: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/16112 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Adam Reich 3 300/300

SOCI UN1203 The Social Animal in the Digital Age. 3 points.

This course re-examines central theories and perspectives in the social sciences from the standpoint of digital technologies. Who are we in the digital age? Is the guiding question for the course. We consider the impact of modern technology on society including, forms of interaction and communication, possibilities for problem solving, and re-configurations of social relationships and forms of authority. The course integrates traditional social science readings with contemporary perspectives emerging from scholars who looking at modern social life.


The course is an introductory Sociology offering.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN1203
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1203 001/10583 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Ren Kraft Center
Sudhir Venkatesh 3 76/150

SOCI UN3000 Social Theory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Required for all sociology majors.  Prerequisite: at least one sociology course of the instructor's permission.  Theoretical accounts of the rise and transformations of modern society in the19th and 20th centuries.  Theories studied include those of Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Max Weber, Roberto Michels.  Selected topics:  individual, society, and polity; economy, class, and status: organization and ideology; religion and society; moral and instrumental action.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 001/42225 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
330 River Side Church
Gil Eyal 3 49/60
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 003/00668 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Deborah Becher 3 59/70

SOCI UN3001 Social Theory- DISC. 0 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI UN3000

Discussion section for Social Theory (SOCI UN3000).

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3001 001/17919 W 4:10pm - 5:00pm
1102 International Affairs Bldg
Nicholas Pang 0 26/30
SOCI 3001 002/17924 M 5:10pm - 6:00pm
606 Lewisohn Hall
Moyinoluwa Adetiba 0 19/30
SOCI 3001 003/18893 T 3:10pm - 5:00pm
501d Knox Hall
Daria Franklin 0 3/15
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3001 001/16941 W 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Room TBA
0 7/35
SOCI 3001 002/16947 M 5:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
0 7/35

SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI UN1000 The Social World or Instructor Permission

Required for all Sociology majors.  Introductory course in social scientific research methods. Provides a general overview of the ways sociologists collect information about social phenomena, focusing on how to collect data that are reliable and applicable to our research questions.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/42384 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Fayerweather
Maria Abascal 4 45/70
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/00002 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Amy Zhou 4 56/70

SOCI UN3011 METHODS FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH - DISC. 0 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI UN1000

Section Discussion for SOCI UN3010, METHODS FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3011 001/42280 W 6:10pm - 7:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Timothy Ittner 0 21/35
SOCI 3011 002/42281 Th 6:10pm - 7:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Mireia Triguero Roura 0 23/35
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3011 001/16172 W 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
0 11/30
SOCI 3011 002/16174 Th 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
0 10/30

SOCI UN3321 Global Urbanism Discussion Section. 0 points.

Discussion Section for "Global Urbanism" SOCI UN3324

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3321 001/42349 M 3:10pm - 4:00pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Seungwon Lee 0 24/24
SOCI 3321 002/42350 M 4:10pm - 5:00pm
409 International Affairs Bldg
Anthony Adams 0 16/24
SOCI 3321 003/42351 T 9:10am - 10:00am
201 80 Claremont
William Plews-Ogan 0 23/24
SOCI 3321 004/42352 T 3:10pm - 4:00pm
411 Hamilton Hall
Terrell Frazier 0 21/24
SOCI 3321 005/42353 W 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Room TBA
Martin Barnay 0 20/24
SOCI 3321 006/42354 W 3:10pm - 4:00pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Alexander Aleksanyan 0 25/24
SOCI 3321 007/42355 F 11:10am - 12:00pm
201 80 Claremont
Brittany Kenyon 0 16/24
SOCI 3321 008/42356 Th 4:10pm - 5:00pm
C01 Knox Hall
Jonathan Cleveland 0 21/24

SOCI UN3324 Global Urbanism. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Using classical texts about cities (do they still work for us?) and on the diverse new literatures on cities and larger subjects with direct urban implications, we ill use a variety of data sets to get a detailed empirical information, and draw on two large ongoing research projects involving major and minor global cities around the world (a total of over 60 cities are covered in detail as of 2008).  Students will need to register for a discussion section as well; details to be announced.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3324
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3324 001/42347 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
301 Pupin Laboratories
Saskia Sassen 3 203/190

SOCI UN3900 Societal Adaptations to Terrorism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing

Examines how countries have adjusted to the threat of terrorism. How the adaptation reflects the pattern of terrorist attacks, as well as structural and cultural features of the society. Adaptations by individuals, families, and organizational actors.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3900 001/42258 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501d Knox Hall
Seymour Spilerman 4 16/18

SOCI UN3926 Race, Place and the United States . 4 points.

The course analyzes the relationship between race/ethnicity and spatial inequality, emphasizing the institutions, processes, and mechanisms that shape the lives of urban dwellers. It surveys major theoretical approaches and empirical investigations of racial and ethnic stratification in several urban cities, and their concomitant policy considerations.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3926
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3926 001/15483 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Kristin Murphy 4 16/22
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3926
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3926 001/16189 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Kristin Murphy 4 20/20

SOCI UN3937 Sociology of Human Rights. 4 points.

Sociology came to the study of human rights much later than law, philosophy, or political science. In this course, you’ll learn (1) what constitutes a sociology of human rights and (2) what sociology, its classics, and its diverse methods bring to the empirical study and theory of human rights.


We’ll explore the history, social institutions and laws, ideas, practices, and theories of human rights. We’ll become familiar with the social actors, social structures, and relationships involved in practices such as violation, claims-making, advocacy, and protection. We’ll consider how social, cultural, political, and economic forces affect human rights issues.


We’ll learn about the questions sociologists ask, starting with the most basic (but far from simple) question, “what is a human right?”


We’ll tackle key debates in the field, considering – for instance – whether human rights are universal and how human rights relate to cultural norms/values, national sovereignty, and national security.


Finally, we’ll apply the concepts we’ve learned to a wide range of issues (ex: how racial, ethnic, gender, and other social inequalities relate to human rights), rights (ex: LGBTQ rights, the rights of laborers, the rights of refugees), and cases (ex: enslavement, the separation of children from their families, circumcision, sterilization, the use of torture). We’ll consider human rights cases in the United States and across the globe, and how events and actions in one place relate to human rights violations in another.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3937
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3937 001/17807 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Rosemary McGunnigle-Gonzales 4 8/20
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3937
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3937 001/16190 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Rosemary McGunnigle-Gonzales 4 20/20

SOCI UN3944 Work, Life, Time and Space: From the Factory to the Gig Economy. 4 points.

This 4-credit class will explore experiences and perspectives of work, life, and the often blurred boundary between them. We will focus on how work is situated in, and shaped through, space and time. We will begin with a set of theoretical and historical texts, and then turn to case studies of work and life. The goal is to understand and make sense of how work, and its relationship to home, has evolved historically and how it is experienced today. The theories of space, time, and work which we begin with provide frameworks for making sense of the varied cases we will explore.

The course as a whole will offer a lens for analyzing the world of work, along with the relationship between work and the rest of our lives. It may serve a springboard for you to tackle such questions as: What is the relationship between meaning and money, work time and leisure time? (Or, will I work to live or live to work?) How do historical and relatively fixed work temporalities and geographies compare to new structures of work? (or, what is my Uber driver’s life like, and why is it so different from my grandfather’s experience as a mail carrier?) What do changing structures of work mean for our future, in and beyond work? (or, will robots take all of our jobs? And if so, what should we do about it?)

SOCI UN3974 Sociology of Schools, Teaching and Learning. 4 points.

In this class we will examine the school as a central institution in modern society, and we will grapple with an important question in the sociology of education: what role to schools play in reinforcing or challenging broader patters of social inequality? We will pay special attention to the ways in which students' class, race/ethnicity and gender shape their educational experiences. We will also look at how schools are organized, how schools construct differences among students, and how schools sort kids into different (and unequal) groups. Finally we will explore the types of interventions - at both the individual and organizational levels - that can mitigate inequality in educational achievement and help low-income students to succeed.


One such intervention that has shown promise is tutoring in academic and social and behavioral skills, and interventions that strengthen self-affirmation. A major component of this class is your experience as a tutor. You will be trained as tutors to work with students from local high schools both through in-person tutoring and through tutoring using social networking technologies. Throughout the semester we will combine our academic learning with critical reflection on our experience sin the field. Because you will be working with NYC high school students, we will pay special attention to how NYC high schools are organized and how current issues in education play out in the context of NYC schools.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3974
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3974 001/13380 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Hamilton Hall
Jacquelyn Duran 4 14/30
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3974
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3974 001/16194 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Jacquelyn Duran 4 26/30

SOCI UN3995 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: required methods and theory courses for the major, and the instructor's permission.

Students wishing to qualify for departmental honors must take UN3996. Students carry out individual research projects and write a senior thesis under the supervision of the instructor and with class discussion. Written and oral progress reports.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3995
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3995 002/19138  
Rosemary McGunnigle-Gonzales 4 1/5
SOCI 3995 041/17876  
Jonathan Rieder 4 1/20

SOCI UN3996 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: required methods and theory courses for the major, and the instructor's permission.

Students wishing to qualify for departmental honors must take W3996y. Students carry out individual research projects and write a senior thesis under the supervision of the instructor and with class discussion. Written and oral progress reports.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3996 001/42361 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Adam Reich 4 11/18
Spring 2020: SOCI UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3996 001/16195 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Adam Reich 4 9/20

SOCI GU4043 WORKSHOP ON WEALTH & INEQUALITY. 1 point.

This Workshop is linked to the Workshop on Wealth & Inequality Meetings. This is meant for graduate students, however, if you are an advanced undergraduate student you can email the professor for permission to enroll.

Fall 2019: SOCI GU4043
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4043 001/42271 Th 2:00pm - 4:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Seymour Spilerman 1 5/20

SOCI GU4370 Processes of Stratification and Inequality. 3 points.

The nature of opportunity in American society; the measurement of inequality; trends in income and wealth inequality; issues of poverty and poverty policy; international comparisons.

Fall 2019: SOCI GU4370
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4370 001/42385 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501d Knox Hall
Seymour Spilerman 3 13/18

SOCI GU4411 Politics and Society in Central Eastern Europe. 3 points.

The goal of the course is to discuss different approaches to the study of developmental pathways in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) in a broad historical perspective drawing on various approaches from political science, sociology and economic history.  Students participating in the seminars will get an overview on the various approaches to explaining divergence in political, social and economic developments between the Eastern and Western parts of Europe, and within the region. The course aims to establish a dialogue between three types of scholarships: one dealing with the pre-regime change developmental pathways in the region, another dealing with factors that could account for persistent post-communist and post- enlargement developmental divergence and a third one that deals with issues of backwardness and core-periphery relations in transnational and global perspective.


 The course starts with a discussion of broad historical perspectives on East-West divergence in Europe. The second bloc deals with the various great transformations in the region: the remaking of states, polities and economies. The third bloc is devoted to the discussion of the transnationalization of states and economies in the region. Finally, the forth bloc deals with hybrid regimes and problems of democratic backsliding in the region.

Fall 2019: SOCI GU4411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4411 001/10178 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg
3 5/20

SOCI GU4600 Mystifications of Social Reality . 4 points.

The late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries were marked by the discovery of a new object of systematic inquiry in addition to Nature and the Individual:  Society.  First Economics, then Anthropology, Sociology, and Political Science developed strikingly new understandings of the actions, beliefs, and institutional arrangements of men and women in society, which were seen as obeying regular laws not derivable from, or reducible to, either the laws of nature or the laws of individual behavior.  But these new disciplines, which came to be called the Social Sciences, were different from their predecessors in one fundamental and centrally important way:  They revealed the study of society, and indeed society itself, to be mystified, ideologically encoded, shaped and distorted by the interests and beliefs of men and women even though those living in society or studying it often were oblivious of this fact.


In this course we shall read in depth a series of texts by authors who explored the ideological mystifications of social reality in their disciplines.  The goal of the course is not merely to inform students of these authors and their ideas but to strengthen the ability of students to understand their own involvement in, indeed complicity in, ideological mystification.

Fall 2019: SOCI GU4600
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4600 001/42275 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Todd Gitlin, Robert Wolff 4 19/20

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JOUR UN3100Journalism and Public Life
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SOCI BC3087Individual Projects for Seniors
SOCI BC3207Music, Race and Identity
SOCI BC3214Sociology of African American Life
SOCI BC3911The Social Contexts of U.S. Immigration Law and Policy
SOCI BC3920Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality
SOCI BC3932Climate Change, Global Migration, and Human Rights in the Anthropocene
SOCI BC3935Gender and Organizations
Women's and Gender Studies
WMST UN1001Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies