Political Science

Departmental Office: 710 International Affairs Building; 212-854-3707
http://www.polisci.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies:
Prof. Andrew J. Nathan, 931 International Affairs Building; 212-854-6909; ajn1@columbia.edu

Economics-Political Science Advisers:
Economics: Prof. Susan Elmes, Director of Undergraduate Studies, 1006 International Affairs Building; se5@columbia.edu
Political Science: Prof. Carlo Prato, 702 International Affairs Building; 212-854-3646; cp2928@columbia.edu

Political Science-Statistics Advisers:
Political Science: Prof. Robert Shapiro, 730 International Affairs Building; 212-854-3944; rys3@columbia.edu
Statistics: Prof. Banu Baydil, 612 West 115th Street, Room 611; 212-853-1397; bb2717@columbia.edu
Statistics: Prof. Ronald Neath, 612 West 115th Street, Room 612; 212-853-1398; rcn2112@columbia.edu
 

The discipline of political science focuses on issues of power and governance and, in particular, on political institutions, both formal and informal. It also focuses on political behavior, political processes, political economy, and state-society relations.

The field consists of four substantive subfields: American politics, which covers such topics as national and local politics, elections, and constitutional law; comparative politics, which aims at understanding the political systems of other countries, both by studying individual states and by engaging in cross-national comparisons; international relations, which deals with the ways that states and other political actors behave in the international arena, including such topics as security, foreign policies, international organizations, and international economic relations; and political theory, which analyzes the history of normative political thought as well as of analytic concepts such as the nature of justice or liberty.

Other broad topics, such as “political economy,” or the study of the relationships between economic and political processes, overlap with the subfields, but also constitute a separate program (see below). Methodology, including statistical analysis and formal modeling, also occupies an important place in the discipline.

Advanced Placement

The department grants credit toward the major for work completed under the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Advanced Placement Program. Students receive 3 academic credits and exemption from POLS UN1201 Introduction To American Government and Politics or POLS UN1501 Introduction to Comparative Politics for scores of 5 in the United States and Comparative Government and Politics AP Exams.

Advising

The Department of Political Science offers a variety of advising resources to provide undergraduate majors and concentrators with the information and support needed to successfully navigate through the program. These resources are described below.

Undergraduate Advising Office

Students should take questions or concerns about the undergraduate program to the department's undergraduate advising office first. If advisers cannot answer a student's question, they then refer the student to the appropriate person.

The undergraduate advising office is staffed by a political science Ph.D. student who holds open office hours at least once per week (the schedule can be found on-line at http://polisci.columbia.edu/academic-programs/undergraduate-programs/advising). Students should stop by during these hours with questions about requirements, course selection, course of study, transfer and study abroad credit, and any other aspect of the program. Students may also reach the adviser by email at polisciadvising@columbia.edu.

Students should also visit the undergraduate advising office for assistance in completing the political science program planning form (available in the office, or on-line at http://polisci.columbia.edu/academic-programs/undergraduate-programs/planning-forms). The advisers must sign and date this form in the approval column next to any listed class that requires approval to be counted toward the program (transfer courses, non-traditional courses, etc.). These forms cannot be completed by faculty advisers. Each student's planning form is kept on file in the department, so that each semester they may meet with an adviser to update it.

The advisers are also available to speak with students about more substantive issues, including research interests, internships, and post-college plans. Since the advisers have been through the graduate school application process, they are great resources with whom students may discuss the process. Also, because they are current Ph.D. students in the department, they are familiar with the research interests of political science faculty  and can therefore refer students to a professor for thesis advice, a research assistant job, or a faculty member whose research corresponds to the student's interests.

Requesting a Faculty Adviser

Often the best way for students to obtain advising from a faculty member is to contact a professor with whom they have taken a class in an area of interest. Students also have the option of having a faculty adviser assigned by the department. To request a faculty adviser, students should complete the Faculty Adviser Request Form and submit it to the undergraduate coordinator during the first two weeks of the semester.

Students may consult with their faculty adviser for any substantive issue, but still must visit walk-in advising hours to have courses approved, to fill out and update planning forms, and to discuss departmental requirements and regulations.

Director of Undergraduate Studies

The director of undergraduate studies oversees the undergraduate program and is available during office hours. While a student's first stop for advising should be the undergraduate advising office, the director of undergraduate studies is available to answer any questions that the undergraduate advisers or the undergraduate coordinator cannot. In such cases, the undergraduate coordinator and advisers refer students to the director of undergraduate studies.

Economics–Political Science Adviser

Economics–political science majors may consult with the economics-political science adviser during office hours. Please note that students should also see an undergraduate adviser to discuss major requirements and fill out a planning form. For any questions about the economics–political science program that an undergraduate adviser cannot answer, students are referred to the economics-political science adviser.

Political Science–Statistics Adviser

Political science–statistics majors may consult with the political science-statistics adviser during office hours. Please note that students should also see an undergraduate adviser to discuss major requirements and fill out a planning form. For any questions about the political science–statistics program that an undergraduate adviser cannot answer, students are referred to the political science-statistics adviser.

Faculty At-Large

Students are encouraged to contact any professor for advice during his or her office hours, or by appointment, to discuss interests in political science, course selection, and other academic or post-college issues. The faculty may provide advice about graduate schools, suggest literature that the student might consult as sources for research, recommend specific courses or professors based on the student's interests, or offer information about research opportunities with faculty. However, students should note that any issues surrounding departmental regulations and requirements, major certification, course approvals, etc., are addressed at the undergraduate advising office.

Honors Program

The department offers the Honors Program for a limited number of seniors who want to undertake substantial research projects and write honors theses. The honors thesis is expected to be at least 75 pages in length and of exceptional quality.

Honors students perform research as part of a full-year honors seminar (POLS UN3998-POLS UN3999, 8 points total) during their senior year, in place of the seminar requirement for majors. Honors students may, however, take regular seminars to fulfill other course requirements for the major. Theses are due in late March or early April. To be awarded departmental honors, the student must satisfy all the requirements for the major, maintain a 3.6 GPA in the major, and complete a thesis of sufficiently high quality to merit honors.

The honors seminar director provides general direction for the seminar. The honors seminar director supervises all students; each student also works with a faculty member in his or her major subfield (American politics, comparative politics, international relations, or political theory) and a preceptor. The honors seminar meets weekly for part of the year and addresses general issues involved in research and thesis writing, such as how to develop research questions and projects, methodology, sources of evidence, and outlining and drafting long papers. The sessions are also used for group discussions of students’ research and thesis presentations. Students are also expected to meet periodically with the supervising professor and preceptor.

Students who wish to apply to the Honors Program must notify the department in writing by the end of the spring semester of the junior year. Please check the department website for the official deadline. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year. Applicants are required to have already completed the methods requirement for the major.

Application Materials

Applications to the Honors Program must include the following:

  1. A cover page with the student’s name, CUID number, e-mail address, and school (Columbia College or General Studies);
  2. An official transcript, which may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar in Kent Hall, or from Student Services Online (SSOL);
  3. A writing sample, preferably a paper written for a political science course;
  4. A brief description (no more than one page) of a possible thesis topic. For guidelines for writing a proposal, please review the Guidelines for Honors Seminar Proposals.

Complete applications should be sent to:

Department of Political Science
Attn: Departmental Honors
420 West 118th Street
Mail Code 3320
New York, NY 10027

In addition, students are encouraged to find a faculty sponsor for their thesis proposal. Students who have identified a faculty sponsor should indicate the sponsor in the proposal; students without a faculty sponsor should identify a faculty member with whom they would like to work. Research areas for the political science department faculty are listed on the department's website. Students will be notified by e-mail of the decision taken on their applications before fall registration.

Students who are not accepted into the honors seminar, or who decide after the application deadline that they would like to write an honors thesis may take one or two semesters of Special Reading and Research in order to write a thesis to submit for honors consideration.

Students who are not accepted into the honors seminar or who decide after the application deadline that they would like to write an honors thesis may take one or two semesters of Independent Study in order to write a thesis to submit for honors consideration.

For registration information and more details about this process, students should contact the undergraduate coordinator. Students may also submit for honors consideration a paper written for a class. Note that most honors theses are at least 75 pages in length. All theses must be submitted along with a confidential assessment of the paper by the supervising instructor in order to be considered for departmental honors. Students who choose this path must also complete all the requirements for the major and maintain a minimum major GPA of 3.6. Theses are due in late March or early April, and decisions about departmental honors are announced in May.

Departmental Prizes and Fellowships

The Department of Political Science administers the following prizes and awards. Unless otherwise noted, students do not play an active part in the nomination process. Rather, faculty members nominate students at their own discretion. Departmental prizes are reserved for political science majors.

Charles A. Beard Prize

A cash prize awarded every other year to the student who writes the best paper in political science during the academic year.

Caroline Phelps Stokes Prize

A cash prize established at the bequest of Caroline Phelps Stokes is awarded to a student who has been a degree candidate at Columbia College or Barnard College for at least one academic year, and who has written the best essay in course or seminar work on the general subject of human rights.

Allan J. Willen Memorial Prize

A cash prize awarded to the Columbia College student who writes the best seminar paper on a contemporary American political problem.

Edwin Robbins Academic Research/Public Service Fellowship

The Robbins Fellowship provides a stipend each summer for at least two political science students in Columbia College who will be engaged in research in important matters of politics or policy making or who will be working, without other compensation, as interns in a governmental office, agency, or other public service organization. Each spring, the department invites students to submit fellowship proposals. Awards are announced in late April or early May.

The Arthur Ross Foundation Award

A cash prize awarded to GS students for excellence in the field of political science.

Phyllis Stevens Sharp Fellowship in American Politics

The Phyllis Stevens Sharp Endowment Fund provides stipends each year during either academic semester or the summer for one or more Columbia College or School of General Studies students majoring or concentrating in political science to support research in American politics or policy making, or otherwise uncompensated internships in a government office, agency, or other public service organization. Each spring, the department invites students to submit fellowship proposals. Awards are announced in late April or early May.

Early Admission to the Master's Degree Program in Political Science for Columbia and Barnard Political Science Undergraduates

While the Department of Political Science does not offer a joint bachelor of arts/master’s degree, it does allow Columbia and Barnard undergraduates to apply for early admission to its master’s degree program. This enables qualified undergraduates majoring or concentrating in political science to obtain the B.A. degree and M.A. degree in fewer than five years (ten semesters) from the time of their entrance into Columbia or Barnard, if they fulfill the M.A. course and residency requirements through summer course work after receiving the B.A. or accelerated study during the course of their undergraduate career.

Students should apply during the fall semester of their senior year for admission to the M.A. program in the following fall semester, after completion of the B.A. degree. The department and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences may award up to one-half residence unit of advanced standing and/or up to three courses (nine to twelve credits) of transfer credit for graduate courses (4000-level and above) taken at Columbia in excess of the requirements for the Columbia bachelor's degree, as certified by the dean of the undergraduate school awarding the bachelor's degree.

For further information about the application process and minimum qualifications for early admission, please contact the director of undergraduate studies.

For further information about requirements for the M.A. degree, see http://gsas.columbia.edu/content/academic-programs/political-science.

Professors

  • Richard K. Betts
  • Jagdish Bhagwati (also Economics)
  • Alessandra Casella (also Economics)
  • Partha Chatterjee (Anthropology)
  • Jean L. Cohen
  • Rodolfo de la Garza (also School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Michael Doyle (also School of International and Public Affairs; Law School)
  • Jon Elster
  • Robert Erikson
  • Virginia Page Fortna
  • Timothy Frye (Chair)
  • Ester Fuchs (School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Andrew Gelman (also Statistics)
  • Donald P. Green
  • Bernard Harcourt (Law)
  • Fredrick Harris
  • Jeffrey Henig (Teachers College)
  • John Huber
  • Macartan Humphreys
  • Robert Jervis
  • David C. Johnston
  • Ira Katznelson (also History)
  • Sudipta Kaviraj (Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies)
  • Jeffrey Lax
  • Mahmood Mamdani (Anthropology)
  • Isabela Mares
  • M. Victoria Murillo (also School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Andrew J. Nathan
  • Sharyn O'Halloran (also School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Kenneth Prewitt (School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Robert Y. Shapiro
  • Jack Snyder
  • Michael Ting (also School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Nadia Urbinati
  • Gregory Wawro
  • Andreas Wimmer (Sociology)
  •  

Associate Professors

  • Shigeo Hirano
  • Kimuli Kasara
  • Justin Phillips
  • Tonya Putnam
  •  
  • Assistant Professors

  • Allison Carnegie
  • Daniel Corstange (also School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Nikhar Gaikwad
  • Turkuler Isiksel
  • John Marshall
  • Carlo Prato
  • Joshua Simon

Lecturers

  • Michelle Chun
  • Kevin Elliott
  • Jessica Kimpell Johnson
  • Chiara Superti

On Leave 

  • Profs. de la Garza, Doyle, Kasara, and Katznelson (2017-2018)
  • Profs. Casella, Corstange, and Hirano (Fall 2017)
  • Profs. Cohen, Lax, and Wawro (Spring 2018)

Guidelines for all Political Science Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors

Planning Forms

Major Planning forms are available on the departmental website: http://polisci.columbia.edu/academic-programs/undergraduate-programs/planning-forms.

Policy on Double-Counting Courses

  • Policies about double-counting courses to fulfill requirements in more than one major may be found here:
  • Courses in the Core Curriculum do not fulfill requirements for the Political Science major.


Policy on Counting Credits outside the Department of Political Science

  • Courses taken at other institutions or other Columbia departments may not be used to meet the requirement of a major or concentration in political science without the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the department’s undergraduate adviser. Students should secure such approval in advance of registration.


Pass/D/Fail and Grading Policy

  • A grade of “Pass” is acceptable only for the first course taken toward the major or concentration.
    • The course used to fulfill the research methods requirement cannot be taken Pass/D/Fail.
  • Students must receive a grade of at least C- in order for a course to count towards the major or concentration.


AP Credit Policy

  • Students who receive transfer credit for one or more AP exams in political science may count a maximum of one AP course toward the major or concentration, contingent upon completing an upper-level (3000 or higher) course with a grade of C or higher in the subfield in which the AP exam was taken. All transfer credits must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the undergraduate adviser.


Transfer Credit Policy

  • A maximum of three 3-point or 4-point courses in Political Science may be transferred from other institutions toward the major; a maximum of two courses in Political Science may be transferred toward the concentration and the two interdepartmental joint majors. This includes study abroad and AP credit. All transfer credits must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the undergraduate adviser.
  • Students wishing to count transfer credits toward the major or concentration should send the Director of Undergraduate Studies their transfer credit report, the syllabi of the courses they want to count toward departmental requirements, and a statement of how they want to apply the transfer credits to the requirements.


Independent Study Policy

  • Independent Study (POLS UN3901 Independent Reading and Research I in the fall or POLS UN3902 Independent Reading and Research II in the spring) taken in fulfillment of course requirements for the major/concentration must be taken for at least 3 points of credit.

Major in Political Science

Program of Study

To be planned with the department as soon as the student starts to register for courses toward the major. Students should not wait until they formally declare the major before meeting with an undergraduate adviser during the registration period to plan their programs for the major.

Course Requirements

Students must choose a Primary Subfield and a Secondary Subfield to study. The subfields are as follows:

  • American Politics (AP)
  • Comparative Politics (CP)
  • International Relations (IR)
  • Political Theory (PT)

The major in political science requires a minimum of 9 courses in political science, to be distributed as follows:

Introductory Courses
Students must take two of the following introductory courses:
Introduction To American Government and Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Introduction to International Politics
Political Theory I
NOTE: Introductory courses taken that do not fit into the Primary or Secondary Subfield will be counted in the Political Science Elective category.
Primary Subfield
Minimum three courses.
Minor Subfield
Minimum two courses.
Seminars
Two 4-point 3000-level seminars, at least one of which is in the student’s Primary Subfield.
(See "Seminars" section below for more information)
Research Methods *
Minimum one course in research methods. Courses that satisfy the research methods requirement are:
Logic of Collective Choice
Data Analysis and Statistics for Political Science Research
Empirical Research Methods
Scope and Methods
Principles of Quantitative Political Research
Analysis of Political Data
Multivariate Political Analysis
Game Theory and Political Theory
Research Topics in Game Theory
Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys
Experimental Research: Design, Analysis and Interpretation
Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research
Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research: Models for Panel and Time-Series Cross-Section Data
Political Science Electives
Minimum one course (in any subfield).
*

A student may take another course inside or outside the department that provides relevant training in research methods to satisfy this requirement only with the written permission in advance of the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the department’s undergraduate adviser. If a course outside the political science department is used to satisfy the research methods requirement, this same course cannot be used toward other majors/concentrations or programs.

Seminars

Students are expected to take two 4-point seminars: one in their junior year and another in their senior year (with exceptions made for students on leave or studying abroad). They may choose from among the seminars offered, though at least one of the seminars taken must be in the student’s Primary Subfield (that in which at least 9 other points have been completed). Entry into seminars requires instructor's permission.

For detailed seminar registration guidelines, see http://polisci.columbia.edu/undergraduate-programs/seminar-registration-guidelines. Seminars cannot be taken for R credit or Pass/D/Fail.

Barnard colloquia are open to students with the permission of the instructor. However, Barnard colloquia can only count for seminar credit at the discretion of the director of undergraduate studies. Note that admission to Barnard colloquia is by application to the Barnard Political Science Department only. Please consult with the Barnard Political Science Department for more information.

Recommended Courses

In addition to political science courses, students are strongly advised, but not required, to take six points in a related social science field.


Major in Economics–Political Science

The major in economics-political science is an interdisciplinary major that introduces students to the methodologies of economics and political science and stresses areas of particular concern to both. This program is particularly beneficial to students planning to do graduate work in schools of public policy and international affairs.

Two advisers are assigned for the interdepartmental major, one in the Department of Economics and one in the Department of Political Science. Please note that the economics adviser can only advise on economics requirements and the political science adviser can only advise on political science requirements.

Course Requirements

For the political science part of the major, students must choose a Primary Subfield and a Secondary Subfield to study. The corresponding introductory courses in both subfields must be taken, plus two electives in the Primary Subfield and one in the Secondary Subfield. The subfields are as follows:

  • American Politics (AP)
  • Comparative Politics (CP)
  • International Relations (IR)
  • Political Theory (PT)

The economics–political science major requires a minimum of 17 courses in economics, mathematics, statistics, and political science, to be distributed as follows:

Core Requirements in Economics
Students must take all of the following core economics courses:
Principles of Economics
Intermediate Microeconomics
Intermediate Macroeconomics
Introduction To Econometrics
Political Economy
Core Requirements in Mathematics and Statistics
Students must take all of the following core mathematics and statistics courses:
Calculus I
Calculus III
Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
Economics Electives
Students must take two electives at the 3000 level or higher in the Department of Economics.
Political Science Courses
Students must choose a Primary Subfield and a Secondary Subfield to study. The subfields are as follows: American Politics (AP), Comparative Politics (CP), International Relations (IR), and Political Theory (PT).
Primary Subfield: Minimum three courses, one of which must be the subfield’s introductory course.
Secondary Subfield: Minimum two courses, one of which must be the subfield’s introductory course.
Seminars
Students must take the following two seminars:
Seminar In Political Economy
and a Political Science Department seminar, in the student's Primary Subfield. Please select one of the following: *
Seminar in Political Theory
Seminar in Political Theory
Seminar in American Politics
Seminar in American Politics
Seminar in Comparative Politics
Seminar in Comparative Politics
International Politics Seminar
Seminar in International Politics
*

Students who wish to count toward the political science seminar requirement a course that is not in the above list of approved seminars must obtain permission from the political science Director of Undergraduate studies.

Barnard colloquia can count for seminar credit only with the written permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Note that admission to Barnard colloquia is by application to the Barnard political science department only.

Major in Political Science–Statistics

The interdepartmental major of political science–statistics is designed for students who desire an understanding of political science to pursue advanced study in this field and who also wish to have at their command a broad range of sophisticated statistical tools to analyze data related to social science and public policy research.

Students should be aware of the rules regarding the use of the Pass/D/Fail option. Courses in which a grade of D has been received do not count toward the major requirements.

Political science–statistics students are eligible for all prizes reserved for political science majors.

The political science-statistics major requires a minimum of 15 courses in political science, statistics, mathematics, and computer science, to be distributed as follows:

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Primary Subfield
-Students must choose a Primary Subfield to study. Within the subfield, students must take a minimum of three courses, including the subfield's introductory course. The subfields and their corresponding introductory courses are as follows:
American Politics:
Introduction To American Government and Politics
Comparative Politics:
Introduction to Comparative Politics
International Relations:
Introduction to International Politics
Political Theory:
Political Theory I
-Additionally, students must take one 4-point 3000-level seminar in their Primary Subfield.
Research Methods
-Students must take the following two research methods courses:
Principles of Quantitative Political Research
Data Analysis and Statistics for Political Science Research
Analysis of Political Data
STATISTICS
-Students must take one of the following sequences:
Sequence A — recommended for students preparing for graduate study in statistics 1
Calculus I
Calculus II
Linear Algebra
Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
PROBABILITY THEORY
Statistical Inference
Linear Regression Models
Statistical Computing and Introduction to Data Science
or
Sequence B — recommended for students preparing to apply statistical methods to other fields
Introduction to Statistics
Applied Statistical Computing
Applied Linear Regression Analysis
Applied Categorical Data Analysis
Applied Statistical Methods
Applied Data Mining
Statistics Elective
-Students must take an approved elective in a statistics or a quantitatively oriented course in a social science.
1.

Students taking Statistics Sequence A may replace the mathematics requirements with both MATH UN1207 Honors Mathematics A and MATH UN1208 Honors Mathematics B.

Concentration in Political Science

Program of Study

To be planned with the department as soon as the student starts to register for courses toward the concentration. Students should not wait until they formally declare the concentration before meeting with an undergraduate adviser during the registration period to plan their programs for the concentration.

Concentration Requirements

Students must choose a Primary Subfield and a Secondary Subfield to study. The subfields are as follows:

  • American Politics (AP)
  • Comparative Politics (CP)
  • International Relations (IR)
  • Political Theory (PT)

The concentration in political science requires a minimum of 7 courses in political science, to be distributed as follows:

Introductory Courses
Students must take two of the following introductory courses:
Introduction To American Government and Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Introduction to International Politics
Political Theory I
NOTE: Introductory courses taken that do not fit into the Primary or Secondary Subfield will be counted in the Political Science Elective category.
Primary Subfield
Minimum two courses.
Secondary Subfield
Minimum two courses.
Research Methods *
Minimum one course in research methods. Courses that satisfy the methods requirement are:
Logic of Collective Choice
Data Analysis and Statistics for Political Science Research
Empirical Research Methods
Scope and Methods
Principles of Quantitative Political Research
Analysis of Political Data
Multivariate Political Analysis
Game Theory and Political Theory
Research Topics in Game Theory
Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys
Experimental Research: Design, Analysis and Interpretation
Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research
Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research: Models for Panel and Time-Series Cross-Section Data
Political Science Electives
Minimum two courses (in any subfield).
*

A student may take another course inside or outside the department that provides relevant training in research methods to satisfy this requirement only with the written permission in advance of the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the department’s undergraduate adviser. If a course outside the political science department is used to satisfy the research methods requirement, this same course cannot be used toward other majors/concentrations or programs.

Recommended Courses

In addition to courses in political science, students are strongly advised, but not required, to take six credits in a related social science field.

American Politics

POLS UN3213 American Urban Politics. 3 points.

This course examines the pattern of political development in urban America, as the country's population has grown in urbanized locations. It explores the process by which cities and suburbs are governed, how immigrants and migrants are incorporated, and how people of different races and ethnicities interact in urbanized settings as well as the institutional relations of cities and suburbs with other jurisdictions of government. The course focuses both on the historical as well the theoretical understandings of politics in urban areas.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3213 001/14027 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Carlos Vargas-Ramos 3 70/70

POLS UN3225 American Constitutional History. 3 points.

This course looks at key developments of American History through the prism of Supreme Court decisions and their aftermath.  A. How did the Supreme Court reflect, and affect, and effect, historic patterns of U.S. growth, expansion and development?  B. How did the Supreme Court respond to, or exacerbate, crises in U.S. history, and how did it impact the legal and economic framework that underpins what the U.S. has become, and is becoming?  C. How did the perception of individual and collective rights and liberties, and of the function and role of governments -- both federal and state -- evolve over time?

Spring 2018: POLS UN3225
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3225 001/61021 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Robert Tortoriello 3 30/30

American Politics Seminars

POLS UN3921 Seminar in American Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in American Politics. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3921
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3921 003/13606 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Martha Zebrowski 4 8/18
POLS 3921 004/65591 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Brigitte Nacos 4 15/22
POLS 3921 005/77679 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
317 Hamilton Hall
Robert Amdur 4 20/20
POLS 3921 007/22344 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Judith Russell 4 17/21
POLS 3921 011/28382 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Michael Ting 4 8/18
POLS 3921 013/17750 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Vanessa Perez 4 19/18
POLS 3921 014/23050 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Carlos Vargas-Ramos 4 12/18
POLS 3921 015/73346 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
522b Kent Hall
Gerrard Bushell 4 5/18
POLS 3921 016/79785 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Lincoln Mitchell 4 3/18

POLS UN3922 Seminar in American Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in American Politics. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3922
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3922 001/71800 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Shigeo Hirano 4 0/18
POLS 3922 002/12164 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Robert Erikson 4 0/18
POLS 3922 003/23542 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
106b Lewisohn Hall
Fredrick Harris 4 3/18
POLS 3922 004/13569 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
John Sivolella 4 0/18
POLS 3922 005/17174 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Brigitte Nacos 4 0/18
POLS 3922 006/63521 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
507 Lewisohn Hall
Martha Zebrowski 4 0/18
POLS 3922 007/18462 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
317 Hamilton Hall
Robert Amdur 4 0/18
POLS 3922 008/70909 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
106b Lewisohn Hall
Judith Russell 4 3/18

POLS UN3930 Constitutional Law Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar explores major features of U.S. constitutional law through close examination of selected decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Through student discussion and some lecturing, the seminar addresses issues arising from the Constitution's allocation of power among the three branches of government; the allocation of powers between the National and State governments, including, in particular, the scope of Congress' regulatory powers; and the protection of the individual from arbitrary and discriminatory government conduct, including the protections of the Fifth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments against unequal treatment based on race, gender and sexual orientation, the evolution of the concept of liberty from its protection of economic interests before the New Deal to its current role in protecting individual autonomy and privacy, and some aspects of the First Amendment's protection of freedom of speech and press. More generally the seminar aims to enhance understanding of some main aspects of our constitutional tradition and the judicial process by which it is elaborated.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3930 001/73831 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Sidney Rosdeitcher 4 17/18

Comparative Politics

POLS UN1501 Introduction to Comparative Politics. 4 points.

This course provides a broad overview of the comparative politics subfield by focusing on important substantive questions about the world today. The course is organized around four questions. First, why can only some people depend upon the state to enforce order? Second, how can we account for the differences between autocracies and democracies? Third, what different institutional forms does democratic government take? Finally, are some institutions more likely than others to produce desirable social outcomes such as accountability, redistribution, and political stability?

Spring 2018: POLS UN1501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1501 001/27000 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
4 140/140

POLS UN3528 New and Old Forms of Political Protest. 3 points.

This course will introduce the students to the important topic of political protest. Each week we will address different aspects of the phenomenon: from the determinant to the actors and strategies of protest. We will discuss how the forms of protest have changed and the current role of the internet in general and social media in particular. Finally, we will discuss the role of the state and state repression, in particular censorship in the dynamics of protest. Since this is a comparative politics course, we will cover a range of different countries, including the United States, as well as both democratic and authoritarian regimes.

POLS UN3556 The Rise of India & China. 3 points.

This course examines the rise of India and China since the mid-twentieth century in terms of interaction of states, markets and globalization as our conceptual framework. It examines the emergence of two distinct developmental pathways in the two countries, focusing on their political economies, in comparative historical perspective. It also evaluates the implications of the rise of China and India on the global economy.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3556
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3556 001/63596 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Lewisohn Hall
Rumela Sen 3 30/30

POLS GU4405 Insurgencies and Conflicts in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

A number of countries in Southeast Asia have recently faced violent conflicts, often linked to separatist or regionalist demands from territorially concentrated ethnic or religious minorities. This course examines a range of conflicts in Southern Thailand (Patani), Southern Philippines (Mindanao), Indonesia (notably Aceh) and Burma, through a variety of different lenses and comparative perspectives. These include security and (counter)insurgency perspectives, the comparative character of militant movements, perspectives based on minority rights and identity politics, explorations of the salience of religion, studies of language politics, questions of autonomy and decentralization, and the issue of peace negotiations and dialogue processes. These themes and issues have a broader relevance to wider debates in comparative politics, which students will be encouraged to explore in their papers.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4405
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4405 001/64361 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Duncan McCargo 4 13/18

POLS GU4406 Politics in Contemporary China. 4 points.

This course will be taught in Chinese.

This course focuses on the evolution of Chinese politics since the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) took power in 1949. It introduces and discusses the relationship between the two “three decades” (the three decades under Mao and the three decades of “reform and opening up”). More specifically, the course aims to (1) clarify some important historical facts, (2) analyze the ideological consideration of the “official” history sanctioned by the CCP and its epistemological impact, (3) make a comparison between official view and that of independent scholars about the history; (4) try to respond to some urgent problems faced by contemporary China, and (5) provide suggestions and principles for the reconstruction of the historiography of contemporary China. Students will learn how to understand the recent development Chinese politics, how to analyze the complex contemporary history and reality of China, and how to approach issues about China from a systematic perspective.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4406
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4406 001/11510 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
602 Lewisohn Hall
Boshu Zhang 4 25/25

POLS GU4428 European Political Development. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Course in European history or political science or relevant comparative politics courses.

This is an upper-level course in European political development. It is designed for undergraduates who already have some exposure to European history and politics and graduate students. The course will analyze important theoretical works, and debates about, the evolution of European political systems and institutions since the early modern period and place the European experience in comparative perspective

Spring 2018: POLS GU4428
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4428 001/00521 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Sheri Berman 4 20/20

POLS GU4434 Ethnic Politics Across Post-Soviet Eurasia. 4 points.

Various forms of ethnic politics have characterized politics in many states throughout Eurasia since 1991, from nationalist separatism to violent conflict to political competition among ethnic minorities and majorities. This course is designed to encourage students to think deeply about the relationship between ethnicity and politics. We will consider several questions. First, why does ethnicity become politicized? We investigate this question by examining nationalist secessionism and ethnic conflict—phenomena that mushroomed at the end of the Cold War. We will focus on East Central Europe and the former Soviet Union, devoting special attention to the cases of Yugoslavia, the USSR, Moldova, Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and Chechnya. However, we will also study cases in which the dog didn’t bark, i.e. places where nationalist mobilization and ethnic violence either did not occur, or emerged and then receded as in the ethnic republics of the Russian Federation (including the “Muslim” regions of Tatarstan and Bashkortostan, etc.). In the second part of the course, we will analyze ethnic politics after independent statehood was achieved throughout the post-Soviet space. How do nationalist state-builders try to construct a nation and a state at the same time? Have they incorporated or discriminated against minorities living within “their” states? How have ethnic minorities responded? We will study Ukraine, the Baltics and Kazakhstan where ethnic Russians and Russian-speaking populations form large portions of the population, devoting particular attention to the crisis in Ukraine. We will also examine how the post-conflict regions of Bosnia and Kosovo have dealt with ethnic pluralism. These cases allow us to gain greater understanding of how multi-ethnic states use forms of federalism, consociationalism, and power-sharing as state-building strategies.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4434
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4434 001/63169 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
602 Lewisohn Hall
Elise Giuliano 4 21/25

POLS GU4449 Cleavages, Conflicts and Bridges in Israeli Politics and Foreign Policy. 4 points.

Prerequisites: INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

Conflicts, cleavages and contentiousness are a common feature of a democratic system of government in general. In this respect Israel is no exception. Apart from being the Start Up

Nation and the Holy Land, in the minds of many around the world Israel is associated with
conflict. Indeed, both internally and externally, Israeli politics is suffused with conflict and
continuously has to live up to the challenge of preserving democracy in the presence of conflict.
The achievements of Israel in the political, economic, international and social arenas were
facilitated by the emergence of a pattern of politics, indeed, a political culture, that puts a strong emphasis on the pursuit of political accommodation among social groupings, political parties and

ideological strands even at the expense of compromising their respective manifest interests,
aspirations and programs. Moreover, the mobilization capabilities of Israel's governments have
been remarkable by any standard. They were capable of inducing the citizens to accept willingly
such burdens as high taxation, harsh economic measures and long conscript and reserve military
service. Israel has done all these without loss of public support for its central political and social
institutions.
This class will focus on conflicts, external and internal. We will examine social, economic and
political cleavages within the state of Israel. We will study the Arab-Israeli conflict and in
particular the interaction of Israel with the Palestinians over the years. Finally, we will examine
broader circles in which Israeli foreign policy applies and in particular in the context of US-Israel
relations and in regional conflicts in the aftermath of the Arab Spring and the Iran Deal.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4449
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4449 001/23721 M 8:10am - 10:00am
610 Lewisohn Hall
Ehud Sommer 4 18/18

POLS GU4474 Politics and Justice in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

The course starts from the premise that questions of justice are essentially political, and their study cannot be safely left in the sole hands of lawyers and legal experts. In recent years, a number of important global trends have become evident in the study of justice. These include a growing focus on transitional justice – especially how the transition from an authoritarian regime, or from conditions of violent conflict, may best be handled. Another important trend is the so-called ‘new constitutionalism’ – efforts to strengthen checks and balances through establishing new institutions such as constitutional courts. A third trend concerns disturbing developments in the use of the criminal justice system for essentially political purposes. This course will explore how these recent trends are being played out in various parts of Southeast Asia.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4474
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4474 001/21782 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Duncan McCargo 4 17/18

POLS GU4478 Domestic Russian Politics Since the Collapse of the Soviet Union. 3 points.

Over the last twenty-five years, Russia has transformed from a state weakened by years of economic decline and dominated by competing powerful actors into an authoritarian regime with imperial aspirations and global reach. Yet headlines seldom tell the whole story. Who is Vladimir Putin and what does the political system he presides over – often called the power vertical – consist of? What explains the electoral dominance of United Russia? Why are there massive but rare protests in Russia? What role does masculinity play in public politics in Russia? What motivated and what was gained by the annexation of the Crimea? This class will answer these questions and others by examining issues relevant to contemporary Russian politics. Students will begin with an overview of the collapse of the Soviet Union and the painful transition of the 1990s. Students will then examine Russia’s current political regime as well as the political career of Vladimir Putin. The course will devote significant time to the topic of elections, protest and civil society in Russia before concluding with a look at Russia’s foreign policy ambitions. 

Spring 2018: POLS GU4478
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4478 001/87898 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Yana Gorokhovskaya 3 23/30

Comparative Politics Seminars

POLS UN3951 Seminar in Comparative Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted. Please see here for detailed seminar registration guidelines: http://polisci.columbia.edu/undergraduate-programs/seminar-registration-guidelines.

Seminar in Comparative Politics. For most seminars, interested students must attend the first class meeting, after which the instructor will decide whom to admit.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3951
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3951 001/18670 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Hande Mutlu-Eren 4 7/18
POLS 3951 002/75387 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 International Affairs Bldg
Rumela Sen 4 5/18

POLS UN3952 Seminar in Comparative Politics. 4 points.

Seminar in Comparative Politics. Interested students must attend the first class meeting after which the instructor will decide whom to admit.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3952
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3952 001/60921 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Chiara Superti 4 8/18
POLS 3952 003/64695 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Isabela Mares 4 16/18

International Relations

POLS UN1601 Introduction to International Politics. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Lecture and discussion. The basic setting and dynamics of global politics, with emphasis on contemporary problems and processes.

Spring 2018: POLS UN1601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1601 001/15008 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Jervis 4 305/350
POLS 1601 002/05524 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Katelyn Jones 4 101/100

POLS UN3630 Politics of International Economic Relations. 3 points.

This upper-level undergraduate course examines the intersection of politics and economics at primarily the international level. The course involves the careful reading and evaluation of the dominant theoretical and methodological approaches as currently used in the IPE field, as well as examination of prominent debates within the major IPE subject areas of trade, finance, development and globalization.  This class does not have an economics or a specific political science prerequisite, but assumes a general understanding of historical and contemporary political and economic events. As a 3000-level course, this class would not be an appropriate choice for students who have not already taken introductory courses in political science, including international relations and comparative politics.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3630
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3630 001/26860 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Jennifer Dwyer 3 70/70

POLS UN3680 Topics in International Security. 3 points.

This course explores how and why states and non-state actors use violent and non-violent strategies in international politics. While not all topics in international security can be covered thoroughly in one semester, this course will give a sampling of many of the topics, including military doctrines and strategies, diplomatic policies, social forces, civil wars, and roles of individuals. Though historical and current events will be used as examples to illustrate how various theories work, students should keep in mind that this is not a course on current events.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3680
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3680 001/12218 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Zachary Shirkey 3 30/30

POLS UN3690 International Law. 4 points.

What is public international law, and what does it influence the behavior of states, corporations, and individuals in the international system? This introductory course engages these questions as well as the politics of applying and enforcing public international law in various contexts and issue areas. An understanding of basic international legal principles, institutions, and processes is developed through exploration of foundational cases, and by means of (required) participation in a multi-week group simulation of an international legal dispute.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3690
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3690 001/64731 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
407 International Affairs Bldg
Tonya Putnam 4 60/60

POLS GU4828 Rising Powers and the Transformation of Global Politics. 3 points.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the world entered a unipolar moment, with the United States remaining the sole superpower. But more recently the global order has undergone transformations, with non-Western powers playing an increasing role. This module examines the “rise of the rest,” most notably China, Russia, Brazil and India, the so-called BRICS. These states account for 40% of the world’s population and 22% of the global economy. As we move toward a post-unipolar world, the norms of global governance, including liberal peacebuilding, intervention and development, are becoming an increasingly contested terrain. Not only have the rising powers challenged some of these notions and deployed their own non-liberal responses to them, but disillusionment with the liberal international order has grown in the West, with the election of Trump and Brexit having further shaken confidence in the durability of the current liberal order.


In this module, students will define and explore the concept of “Rising Powers,” and examine the recent history and foreign policy of the BRICS countries. Students will examine their positions on central tenets of the liberal order. In the final sessions, students will debate the consequences of the rise of new powers in the international system. Where some analysts have argued that these rising powers will integrate smoothly into the international system causing minimal disruption, others are alarmed about the shifting dynamics in the international system and the decline in American power, predicting future conflicts.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4828
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4828 001/75898 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
607 Lewisohn Hall
Edward Lemon 3 30/30

POLS GU4845 National Security Strategies of the Middle East: A Comparative Perspective. 4 points.

At the crossroads of three continents, the Middle East is home to many diverse peoples, with ancient and proud cultures, in varying stages of political and socio-economic development, often times in conflict. Now in a state of historic flux, the Arab Spring has transformed the Middle Eastern landscape, with great consequence for the national security strategies of the countries of the region and their foreign relations. The primary source of the world's energy resources, the Middle East remains the locus of the terror-WMD-fundamentalist nexus, which continues to pose a significant threat to both regional and international security. The course surveys the national security challenges facing the region's primary players (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria and Lebanon, Israel, the Palestinians and Turkey, Jordan) and how the revolutions of the past year will affect them. Unlike many Middle East courses, which focus on US policy in the region, the course concentrates on the regional players' perceptions of the threats and opportunities they face and on the strategies they have adopted to deal with them. It thus provides an essential vantage point for all those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of a region, which stands at the center of many of the foreign policy issues of our era. The course is designed for those with a general interest in the Middle East, especially those interested in national security issues, students of comparative politics and future practitioners, with an interest in "real world" international relations and national security.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4845
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4845 001/62552 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
606 Lewisohn Hall
Charles Freilich 4 20/20

POLS GU4852 Insurgencies and Civil Wars. 3 points.

Terrorism is a tactic most often employed in the context of broader conflicts and armed struggles. Of these, civil wars have become the predominant type of conflict in recent years and decades, as exemplified by the civil wars in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, or Yemen, among others. Invariably, these civil wars feature insurgencies, i.e., organized, protracted politico-military struggles designed to weaken control and legitimacy of an established government, occupying power, or other political authority, while increasing insurgent control.


The purpose of this course is to examine the causes, nature, and termination of civil wars and the insurgencies that characterize them. Special emphasis is placed on the conduct of civil wars—the nature of insurgency and counterinsurgency (COIN). The course offers different theoretical perspectives and provides historical and contemporary case studies.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4852
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4852 001/68397 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Assaf Moghadam 3 23/30

POLS GU4871 Chinese Foreign Policy. 4 points.

The course describes the major elements of Chinese foreign policy today, in the context of their development since 1949. We seek to understand the security-based rationale of policy as well as other factors - organizational, cultural, perceptual, and so on - that influence Chinese foreign policy. We analyze decision-making processes that affect Chinese foreign policy, China's relations with various countries and regions, Chinese policy toward key functional issues in international affairs, how the rise of China is affecting global power relations, and how other actors are responding. The course pays attention to the application of international relations theories to the problems we study, and also takes an interest in policy issues facing decision-makers in China as well as those facing decision-makers in other countries who deal with China.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4871
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4871 001/69757 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Andrew Nathan 4 132/170

International Relations Seminars

POLS UN3961 International Politics Seminar. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS UN1601 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.
International Politics Seminar. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.,Topics for Fall 2017:,Section 001: NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY; Instructor: Richard K Betts,Section 002: CONTEMPORARY DIPLOMACY; Instructor: Rebecca S Murphy,Section 003: INTERNATIONAL LAW; Instructor: Jean Krasno,Section 005: INEQUALITY WITHIN AND BTWN NATIONS:Instructor: David E Spiro,Section 006: THE COLD WAR; Instructor: Robert L Jervis,Section 007: POLITICAL VIOLENCE; Instructor: Linda M Kirschke,Section 008: NORTH KOREA AND WMD; Instructor: Joel Stephen Wit

Fall 2017: POLS UN3961
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3961 001/18554 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Richard Betts 4 15/18
POLS 3961 002/26410 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Rebecca Murphy 4 19/21
POLS 3961 003/67627 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jean Krasno 4 19/19
POLS 3961 005/89284 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
David Spiro 4 14/18
POLS 3961 006/25267 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Jervis 4 15/22
POLS 3961 007/23329 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
270b International Affairs Bldg
Linda Kirschke 4 6/18
POLS 3961 008/66270 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Joel Stephen Wit 4 9/18

POLS UN3962 Seminar in International Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Seminar in International Relations. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3962
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3962 001/69636 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Virginia Page Fortna 4 0/18
POLS 3962 002/73948 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Allison Carnegie 4 18/18
POLS 3962 003/75900 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Shahrough Akhavi 4 0/18
POLS 3962 004/21138 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Jack Snyder 4 0/18
POLS 3962 005/13277 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
405a International Affairs Bldg
Dawn Brancati 4 0/18
POLS 3962 006/68314 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
106b Lewisohn Hall
Stephanie Schwartz 4 0/18
POLS 3962 007/10033 M Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Zachariah Mampilly 4 0/18

Political Theory

POLS UN3173 Power, Rights, and Social Change: Achieving Justice. 4 points.

This lecture course, accompanied by its weekly discussion section, will introduce students to the field of justice. It will combine an intellectual history of conceptions of justice and modes of political change with an exploration of the main areas of public interest and advocacy. The course is intended to serve as a bridge from the Columbia Core to present issues of social justice. Throughout, the discussion will question how we—contemporary subjects and citizens—can improve our social and political condition and achieve justice.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3173
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3173 001/88952 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Bernard Harcourt 4 33/75

POLS UN3176 Liberalism: Origins and Challenges. 3 points.

Liberalism is a moral and political outlook that stresses the equal worth of individuals and advocates a range of rights protecting individual conscience, speech, association, movement, and property. This course explores the historical origins, moral claims, and contemporary controversies of liberal thought. Students will investigate the conceptual foundations of liberalism and consider several contemporary critical challenges liberals face. The course is divided into topics that each focus on a particular type of challenge. How, if at all, can liberals accommodate the claims of equality, community, national, multiculturalism, feminism, value pluralism, and moral skepticism?

Spring 2018: POLS UN3176
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3176 001/90997 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Luke MacInnis 3 30/30

POLS GU4134 Modern Political Thought. 4 points.

Interpretations of civil society and the foundations of political order according to the two main traditions of political thought--contraction and Aristotelian. Readings include works by Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Montesquieu, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Saint-Simon, Tocqueville, Marx, and Mill.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4134
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4134 001/64697 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
717 Hamilton Hall
Turkuler Isiksel 4 29/40

Political Theory Seminars

POLS UN3911 Seminar in Political Theory. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in Political Theory. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3911
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3911 001/61251 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jon Elster 4 14/18
POLS 3911 002/21825 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
402 International Affairs Bldg
Luke MacInnis 4 10/18

POLS UN3912 Seminar in Political Theory. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in Political Theory. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3912 001/16983 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Jon Elster 4 1/18
POLS 3912 002/28668 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Maria Kowalski 4 14/18

Research Methods

POLS UN3704 Data Analysis and Statistics for Political Science Research. 3 points.

This course examines the basic methods data analysis and statistics that political scientists use in quantitative research that attempts to make causal inferences about how the political world works. The same methods apply to other kinds of problems about cause and effect relationships more generally.  The course will provide students with extensive experience in analyzing data and in writing (and thus reading) research papers about testable theories and hypotheses.  It will cover basic data analysis and statistical methods, from univariate and bivariate descriptive and inferential statistics through multivariate regression analysis. Computer applications will be emphasized.   The course will focus largely on observational data used in cross-sectional statistical analysis, but it will consider issues of research design more broadly as well.  It will assume that students have no mathematical background beyond high school algebra and no experience using computers for data analysis.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3704
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3704 001/65498 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Robert Shapiro 3 100/100

POLS UN3720 Scope and Methods. 4 points.

This class introduces students to a variety of statistical methods used to investigate political phenomena. We will address the principles behind these methods, their application, and their limitations. The course aims to provide anyone interested in political science with a proficient understanding of the intuitions behind several of the methods most commonly used to analyze political data and identify causal paths. By the end of the course, students will have acquired important analytical and practical skills and will be able to evaluate the quality and reliability of scholarly and journalistic work done using quantitative methods. Students will also learn basic statistical software skills (R).

Fall 2017: POLS UN3720
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3720 001/14011 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Chiara Superti 4 68/70
Spring 2018: POLS UN3720
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3720 001/25108 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
517 Hamilton Hall
Daniel Corstange 4 70/70

POLS GU4712 Analysis of Political Data. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W4710 or the equivalent.

Multivariate and time-series analysis of political data. Topics include time-series regression, structural equation models, factor analysis, and other special topics. Computer applications are emphasized.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4712
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4712 001/71657 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Mark Lindeman 4 26/70

POLS GU4730 Game Theory and Political Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W4760 or equivalent level of calculus.

Application of noncooperative game theory to strategic situations in politics. Solution concepts, asymmetric information, incomplete information, signaling, repeated games, and folk theorems. Models drawn from elections, legislative strategy, interest group politics, regulation, nuclear deterrence, international relations, and tariff policy.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4730
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4730 001/74033 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
304 Hamilton Hall
John Huber 4 36/40

POLS GU4768 Experimental Research: Design, Analysis and Interpretation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: one or two semesters of statistics; basic understanding of probability, hypothesis testing, and regression are assumed. Basic familiarity with statistical software (Stata and R) is helpful but not required.

In this course, we will discuss the logic of experimentation, its strengths and weaknesses compared to other methodologies, and the ways in which experimentation has been -- and could be -- used to investigate social phenomena. Students will learn how to interpret, design, and execute experiments.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4768
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4768 001/18887 T Th 7:40pm - 8:55pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Donald Green 4 29/40

POLS GU4790 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research. 4 points.

Instruction in methods for models that have dependent variables that are not continuous, including dichotomous and polychotomous response models, models for censored and truncated data, sample selection models and duration models.

Senior Honors Seminar

POLS UN3998 Senior Honors Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: admission to the departmental honors program.

A two-term seminar for students writing the senior honors thesis.

POLS UN3999 Senior Honors Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: admission to the departmental honors program.

A two-term seminar for students writing the senior honors thesis.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3999 001/18109 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg
John Huber 4 0/20

Independent Reading and Research

POLS UN3901 Independent Reading and Research I. 1-6 points.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3901 001/18844  
Nadia Urbinati 1-6 2/20
POLS 3901 002/87696  
Bernard Harcourt 1-6 1
POLS 3901 003/23300  
Robert Shapiro 1-6 3
POLS 3901 004/26648  
Paula Franzese 1-6 1
POLS 3901 005/82797  
Severine Autesserre 1-6 1
POLS 3901 006/86705  
Rounaq Jahan 1-6 1
POLS 3901 007/81847  
Robert Jervis 1-6 1
POLS 3901 008/21248  
Sharyn O'Halloran 1-6 2
POLS 3901 009/72397  
Justin Phillips 1-6 1
POLS 3901 010/73335  
Fredrick Harris 1-6 1

POLS UN3902 Independent Reading and Research II. 1-6 points.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3902
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3902 001/68821  
Robert Jervis 1-6 3

Of Related Interest

Economics
ECPS GU4921Seminar In Political Economy
Human Rights
HRTS UN3001Introduction to Human Rights
HRTS W3930International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights