English and Comparative Literature

http://english.columbia.edu/

Departmental Office: 602 Philosophy; 212-854-3215
http://www.english.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Michael Golston, 407 Philosophy; 212-854-4707; mg2242@columbia.edu

Departmental Advisers:
Prof. Michael Golston, 407 Philosophy; mg2242@columbia.edu
Prof. Farah Griffin, 508B Philosophy; fjg8@columbia.edu
Prof. David Yerkes, 615 Philosophy; dmy1@columbia.edu
Prof. Eleanor Johnson, 408J Philosophy; ebj2117@columbia.edu

The program in English fosters the ability to read critically and imaginatively, to appreciate the power of language to shape thought and represent the world, and to be sensitive to the ways in which literature is created and achieves its effects. It has several points of departure, grounding the teaching of critical reading in focused attention to the most significant works of English literature, in the study of the historical and social conditions surrounding literary production and reception, and in theoretical reflection on the process of writing and reading and the nature of the literary work.

The courses the department offers draw on a broad range of methodologies and theoretical approaches, from the formalist to the political to the psychoanalytical (to mention just a few). Ranging from the medieval period to the 21st century, the department teaches major authors alongside popular culture, traditional literary genres alongside verbal forms that cut across media, and canonical British literature alongside postcolonial, global, and trans-Atlantic literatures.

At once recognizing traditional values in the discipline and reflecting its changing shape, the major points to three organizing principles for the study of literature—history, genre, and geography. Requiring students not only to take a wide variety of courses but also to arrange their thinking about literature on these very different grids, the major gives them broad exposure to the study of the past, an understanding of the range of forms that can shape literary meaning, and an encounter with the various geographical landscapes against which literature in English has been produced.

Advising

Students are not assigned specific advisers, but rather each year the faculty members serving on the department’s Committee on Undergraduate Education (CUE) are designated undergraduate advisers (see above). Upon declaring a major or concentration in English, students should meet with the director of undergraduate studies or a delegated faculty adviser to discuss the program, especially to ensure that students understand the requirements.

Students must fill out a Major Requirements Worksheet early in the semester preceding graduation. The worksheet must be reviewed by an adviser and submitted to 602 Philosophy before the registration period for the final semester. The worksheet is available in the English Department or on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/undergraduate/major-requirements. It is this worksheet—not the Degree Audit Report (DAR)—that determines eligibility for graduation as an English major or concentrator.

Course Information

Lectures

Generally, lectures are addressed to a broad audience and do not assume previous course work in the area, unless prerequisites are noted in the description. The size of some lectures is limited. Senior majors have preference unless otherwise noted, followed by junior majors, followed by senior and junior non-majors. Students are responsible for checking for any special registration procedures on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/courses.

Seminars

The department regards seminars as opportunities for students to do advanced undergraduate work in fields in which they have already had some related course experience. With the exception of some CLEN classes (in which, as comparative courses, much material is read in translation), students’ admission to a seminar presupposes their having taken ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods. During the three weeks preceding the registration period, students should check http://english.columbia.edu/courses for application instructions for individual seminars. Applications to seminars are usually due by the end of the week preceding registration. Students should always assume that the instructor’s permission is necessary; those who register without having secured the instructor’s permission are not guaranteed admission.

Departmental Honors

Writing a senior essay is a precondition, though not a guarantee, for the possible granting of departmental honors. After essays are submitted, faculty sponsors deliver a written report on the essay to the department’s Committee on Undergraduate Education (CUE), with a grade for the independent study and, if merited, a recommendation for honors. CUE considers all the essays, including sponsor recommendations, reviews students’ fall semester grades, and determines which students are to receive departmental honors. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

The Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS)

The DAR is a useful tool for students to monitor their progress toward degree requirements, but it is not an official document for the major or concentration, nor should it replace consultation with departmental advisers. The department’s director of undergraduate studies is the final authority on whether requirements for the major have been met. Furthermore, the DAR may be inaccurate or incomplete for any number of reasons—for example, courses taken elsewhere and approved for credit do not show up on the DAR report as fulfilling a specific requirement.

On-Line Information

Other departmental information—faculty office hours, registration instructions, late changes, etc.—is available on the departmental website.

Professors

  • James Eli Adams
  • Rachel Adams
  • Branka Arsic
  • Christopher Baswell (Barnard)
  • Sarah Cole
  • Susan Crane
  • Nicholas Dames
  • Jenny Davidson
  • Andrew Delbanco
  • Kathy Eden
  • Brent Edwards
  • Stathis Gourgouris
  • Farah Jasmine Griffin
  • Saidiya Hartman
  • Marianne Hirsch
  • Jean E. Howard
  • Sharon Marcus
  • Edward Mendelson
  • Robert O’Meally
  • Julie Peters
  • Ross Posnock
  • Austin E. Quigley
  • Bruce Robbins
  • James Shapiro
  • Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (University Professor)
  • Alan Stewart
  • Gauri Viswanathan
  • Jennifer Wenzel
  • William Worthen (Barnard)
  • David M. Yerkes

Associate Professors

  • Marcellus Blount
  • Julie Crawford
  • Patricia Dailey
  • Michael Golston
  • Erik Gray
  • Eleanor Johnson
  • Molly Murray
  • Frances Negrón-Muntaner
  • Joseph Slaughter
  • Maura Spiegel

Assistant Professors

  • Katherine Biers
  • John Gamber
  • Austin Graham
  • Matt Hart
  • Cristobal Silva
  • Dustin Stewart
  • Dennis Yi Tenen

Guidelines for all English and Comparative Literature Majors and Concentrators

Declaring a Major in English

Upon declaring a major in English, students should meet with either the director of undergraduate studies or a departmental adviser to discuss the program. Students declaring a major should obtain a Major Requirements Worksheet from 602 Philosophy or on-line, which outlines the requirements.

Additional information, including events and deadlines of particular relevance to undergraduates, is provided at http://english.columbia.edu/undergraduate, the department’s undergraduate homepage. The sidebar on this page provides links to pages with details about undergraduate advising, major and concentration requirements, course options and restrictions, registration procedures, the senior essay, and writing prizes, as well as links to downloadable worksheets for the major and concentration and to course distribution requirement lists, past and present. For detailed information about registration procedures, students should consult http://english.columbia.edu/courses, which explains the requirements and enables students to monitor their own progress.

Newly declared majors should contact the undergraduate assistant in 602 Philosophy Hall and request that their names be added to the department’s electronic mailing list for English majors and concentrators. Because important information now routinely is disseminated through e-mail, it is crucial that students be on this list.

Literary Texts, Critical Methods

The introductory course ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods, together with its companion seminar, ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar, is required for the English major and concentration. It should be taken by the end of the sophomore year. Fulfillment of this requirement is a factor in admission to seminars and to some lectures. This once-a-week faculty lecture, accompanied by a seminar led by an advanced graduate student in the department, is intended to introduce students to the study of literature. Students read works from the three major literary modes (lyric, drama, and narrative), drawn from premodern to contemporary literature, and learn interpretative techniques required by these various modes or genres. This course does not fulfill any distribution requirements.

Senior Essay

The senior essay program is an opportunity for students to explore in depth some literary topic of special interest to them, involving extensive background reading and resulting in an essay (8,000–15,000 words) that constitutes a substantial and original critical or scholarly argument. Students submit proposals in September of their senior year, with acceptance contingent upon the quality of the proposal and the student’s record in the major. Students who are accepted are assigned a faculty sponsor to supervise the project, from its development during the fall semester to its completion in the spring. It is for the spring semester, not the fall, that students officially register for the course, designated as ENGL UN3999 Senior Essay. Senior essays are due in early April.

Course Options and Restrictions

  1. No course at the 1000-level may be counted toward the major.

  2. Speech courses may not be counted toward the major.

  3. Two writing courses or two upper-level literature courses taught in a foreign language, or one of each, may count toward the major, though neither type of course fulfills any distribution requirement. Writing courses that may be applied toward the major include those offered through Columbia’s undergraduate Creative Writing Program and through Barnard College.

  4. Comparative literature courses sponsored by the department (designated as CLEN) may count toward the major. Those sponsored by other departments (e.g. CLFR - Comp Lit French, CPLS - Comp Lit and Society) are not counted toward the major without permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Literature courses taught in English in language departments do not count toward the major.

  5. No more than two courses taken during the summer session may be counted toward the major.

  6. Courses offered through the Barnard English Department may count toward the major or concentration. Before taking Barnard courses, students should verify with the director of undergraduate studies whether and how such courses may count toward the major.

  7. For courses taken abroad or at other American institutions to count toward the major, students must obtain approval of the director of undergraduate studies.

  8. To register for more than 42 points (including advanced standing credit) in English and comparative literature, a student majoring in English must obtain permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

  9. No more than five courses taken elsewhere may be applied to the major, four to the concentration.

  10. One independent study (for at least 3 points) may count toward the major but cannot satisfy any distribution requirements; likewise, the Senior Essay may count toward the major but fulfills no requirements. Students may not count both an Independent Study and the Senior Essay toward the major.

  11. Courses assigned a grade of D may not be counted toward the major.

  12. Only the first course taken to count toward the major can be taken Pass/D/Fail.


Major in English

Please read Guidelines for all English and Comparative Literature Majors and Concentrators above.

Ten departmental courses (for a minimum of 30 points) and, in the process, fulfillment of the following requirements. See course information above for details on fulfilling the distribution requirements.

  1. ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods and ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar
  2. Period distribution: Three courses primarily dealing with periods before 1800, only one of which may be a course in Shakespeare
  3. Genre distribution: One course in each of the following three generic categories:
    • Poetry
    • Prose fiction/narrative
    • Drama/film/new media
  4. Geography distribution: One course in each of the following three geographical categories:
    • British
    • American
    • Comparative/global (comparative literature, postcolonial, global English, trans-Atlantic, diaspora)

Course Distribution Lists are available in the department and on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/course-distribution-lists to help students determine which courses fulfill which requirements. A single course can satisfy more than one distribution requirement. For example, a Shakespeare lecture satisfies three requirements at once: not only does it count as one of the three required pre-1800 courses it also, at the same time, fulfills both a genre and a geography distribution requirement (drama and British, respectively). Courses not on the distribution list may count toward the major requirements only with the permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Two writing courses or upper-level literature courses taught in a foreign language, or one of each, may count toward the ten required courses.


Concentration in English

Please read Guidelines for all English and Comparative Literature Majors and Concentrators above.

Eight departmental courses and, in the process, fulfillment of the following requirements. See course information above for details on fulfilling the distribution requirements.

  1. ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods and ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar
  2. Period distribution: Two courses dealing with periods before 1800, only one of which may be a course in Shakespeare
  3. Genre distribution: Two courses, each chosen from a different genre category (see above)
  4. Geography distribution: Two courses, each chosen from a different geography category (see above)

See the Course Distribution Lists, available in the department or on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/course-distribution-lists, to determine which courses fulfill which requirements. All of the restrictions outlined for the English major also apply for the concentration in English.


Comparative Literature Program

Students who wish to major in comparative literature should consult the Comparative Literature and Society section of this Bulletin.

Fall 2017

Introduction to the Major

ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods. 4 points.

Corequisites: students who register for ENGL W3001 must also register for one of the sections of ENGL W3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods.

This course is intended to introduce students to the advanced study of literature. Students will read works from different genres (poetry, drama, and prose fiction), drawn from the medieval period to the present day, learning the different interpretative techniques required by each. The course also introduces students to a variety of critical schools and approaches, with the aim both of familiarizing them with these methodologies in the work of other critics and of encouraging them to make use of different methods in their own critical writing. This course (together with the companion seminar ENGL W3011) is a requirement for the English Major and Concentration. It should be taken as early as possible in a student's career. Fulfillment of this requirement will be a factor in admission to seminars and to some lectures.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/17220 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Michael Golston 4 57/80
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/62539 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Jenny Davidson 4 51/80

ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar. 0 points.

Corequisites: students who register for ENGL W3011 must also register for ENGL W3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods lecture.

This seminar, led by an advanced graduate student in the English doctoral program, accompanies the faculty lecture ENGL W3001. The seminar both elaborates upon the topics taken up in the lecture and introduces other theories and methodologies. It also focuses on training students to integrate the terms, techniques, and critical approaches covered in both parts of the course into their own critical writing, building up from brief close readings to longer research papers.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/22186 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Taarini Mookherjee 0 11/25
ENGL 3011 002/23538 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Rebecca Pawel 0 11/25
ENGL 3011 003/19467 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
307 Mathematics Building
Gianmarco Saretto 0 12/25
ENGL 3011 004/21452 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Seth Williams 0 13/25
ENGL 3011 005/65707 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Alexis Fabrizio 0 9/25
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/21435 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 10/18
ENGL 3011 002/17754 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 7/18
ENGL 3011 003/20144 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 3/18
ENGL 3011 004/14561 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 3/18
ENGL 3011 005/70512 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
0 14/18

Medieval

ENGL UN3920 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH TEXTS. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Application Instructions: E-mail Professor David Yerkes (dmy1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Medieval English Texts." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3920 001/70159 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
David Yerkes 4 8/25
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3920 001/70001 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
David Yerkes 4 12/25

ENGL GU4091 Introduction to Old English Language & Literature. 3 points.

(Lecture). This class is an introduction to the language and literature of England from around the 8th to the 11th centuries. Because this is predominantly a language class, we will spend much of our class time studying grammar as we learn to translate literary and non-literary texts. While this course provides a general historical framework for the period as it introduces you to the culture of Anglo-Saxon England, it will also take a close look at how each literary work contextualizes (or recontextualizes) relationships between human and divine, body and soul, individual and group, animal and human. We will be using Mitchell and Robinson's An Introduction to Old English, along with other supplements. We will be looking at recent scholarly work in the field and looking at different ways (theoretical, and other) of reading these medieval texts. Requirements: Students will be expected to do assignments for each meeting. The course will involve a mid-term, a final exam, and a final presentation on a Riddle which will also be turned in.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4091
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4091 001/75076 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Patricia Dailey 3 13/25

ENGL GU4791 Visionary Drama. 3 points.

(Lecture). This class is designed to interrogate the genre-boundary that has traditionally separated visionary writings from dramatic ones in the study of English medieval literature. Although this separation has long existed in scholarship, it is deeply problematic, and produces an understanding of the relationship between private devotion and publically performed religious ritual that is untenable, and does considerable violence to our understanding of the medieval imagination. As we will see, notionally "private" visionary writings and notionally "public" dramatic writings have a great deal in common, not just in terms of their overt content, but also in terms of their formal construction, their poetic devices, their favorite rhetorical maneuvers, and their articulated relationship with history and English literature. The works we will read this term are all phenomenally strange, many of them extremely difficult because of their unfamiliarity. For this reason, we will divide the semester into three sections: the first will deal with the famous medieval cycle dramas, which narrate events from the New Testament. The second section will transition to examine three important visionary texts that were written between 1370 and 1430, contemporaneous with the efflorescence of dramatic composition and performance in England, and two late Antique visionary texts that inspired them. The final section of class will turn to examine the so-called "morality plays," which emerge just slightly after the cycle dramas and after the visionary works we will have read. Since all of these works are linguistically challenging, we will work with translations in certain instances (Piers Plowman, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe). For all of the other works, we will be reading in Middle English, but you are welcome to consult translations, online summaries, or anything else that helps you get up to speed on what´s going on in the plays. Bear in mind, however, that your midterm and final will be based on the Middle English texts, so you do need to make a serious effort to read them (except in the case of Piers Plowman, which will be in modern English).

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4791
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4791 001/76359 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Eleanor Johnson 3 39/100

ENGL UN3992 Call to Adventure: The Lure of Romance from Camelot to Star Wars. 4 points.

Immensely popular and highly derided, romance as a genre has captivated audiences for centuries. Romance enchants, seduces, and ensnares its audience with narratives that envision a world that is at once fantastical and familiar, distant and immediate, impossible and yet full of endless possibilities. Over the course of the semester, we will explore romance conventions—such as the quest and venturing out into the unknown, love and desire, honor and chivalry—that persist from the medieval period to the present day, attempting to identify what exactly makes romance so appealing. We will read a wide cross-section of medieval verse romances from the French, German, and English traditions. While some of the texts will be provided for you in translation, we will make a concerted effort to learn Middle English as we examine the various poetic forms of insular romance. Toward the end of the semester, we will turn our attention to post-medieval iterations of the genre in gothic fiction, courtship novel, and romantic comedy.  Assignments include short response papers, in-class presentations, an analytical essay, and a final project on a modern romance text. Application Instructions: E-mail Aaron Robertson (ar3488@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Romance Seminar Application" In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3992
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3992 001/62447 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Lydia Kertz 4 1/25

Renaissance

ENGL UN3335 Shakespeare I. 3 points.

Enrollment is limited to 60.

(Lecture). This course will cover the histories, comedies, tragedies, and poetry of Shakespeare’s early career. We will examine the cultural and historical conditions that informed Shakespeare’s drama and poetry; in the case of drama, we will also consider the formal constraints and opportunities of the early modern English commercial theater. We will attend to Shakespeare’s biography while considering his work in relation to that of his contemporaries. Ultimately, we will aim to situate the production of Shakespeare’s early career within the highly collaborative, competitive, and experimental theatrical and literary cultures of late sixteenth-century England.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3335
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3335 001/15836 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Lauren Robertson 3 62/100

ENGL GU4210 Writing Early Modern London. 3 points.

(Lecture) This course explores the literature that represented, was created for, and was inspired by the city of London in the early modern period.  It will encourage students to analyze the ways in which literature relates to its geographical, social, cultural, religious and political contexts -- in this case, the very specific contexts provided by a single city in the period from 1500 to 1700. It will cover such topics as London's experience in the Reformation; London's suburban expansion; the Civil War and Restoration; the Great Fire and the subsequent rebuilding; London's government, and relations with the Crown; social issues including immigration, unrest, the place of women, the place of strangers, the plague and prostitution.  The course will highlight the importance of London as the hub of print publication, and as the site for the public theatre -- it will therefore deal predominantly with drama but also draw on prose pamphlets, entries, maps, diaries, prospects and poetic mock-will.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4210
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4210 001/15988 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Alan Stewart 3 11/50

ENGL GU4211 Milton in Context. 3 points.

(Lecture). This course will look at the major works of John Milton in the context of 17th-century English religious, political and social events. In addition to reading Milton's poems, major prose (including The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, Areopagitica, and The Ready and Easy Way to Establish a Free Commonwealth), and the full texts of Paradise Lost and Sampson Agonistes (the course text will be Orgel and Goldberg, eds. John Milton), we will look at the authors and radicals whose activities and writings helped to provide the contexts for Milton's own: poets and polemicists, sectarians and prophets, revolutionaries and regicides, Diggers and Levelers. Requirements for this course include two short primary research papers (3 pp.) and an exam. Graduate students will also be required to write a seminar paper.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4211
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4211 001/70508 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Julie Crawford 3 43/90

ENGL UN3341 Law and Disorder in Early Modern England. 4 points.

This seminar course examines representations of early modern Engish law, primarily on the English Renaissance stage.  We will explore the investigation, prosecution and punishment of crimes including treason, petty treason, adultery, witchcraft, sodomy, rape, and usury in their early modern contexts, and pay attention to the debates surrounding marriage and sumptuary legislation.   Dramatic texts will include works by William Shakespeare, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Dekker, William Rowley, and John Webster; we will also be reading broadsheets, legal documents, statutes, ballads, and real court cases, alongside wide-ranging critical literature. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Stewart (ags2105@COLUMBIA.EDU) with the subject heading "Law and Disorder seminar." In your message, include your name, school, major, year of study, relevant courses taken, and a brief statement about why you are interested in taking t

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3341
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3341 001/80946 T 8:10am - 10:00am
612 Philosophy Hall
Alan Stewart 4 1/25

18th and 19th Century

ENGL GU4402 Romantic Poetry. 3 points.

Open to all undergraduates and graduate students.

(Lecture). This course examines major British poets of the period 1789-1830. We will be focusing especially on the poetry and poetic theory of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, and John Keats. We will also be reading essays, reviews, and journal entries by such figures as Robert Southey, William Hazlitt, and Dorothy Wordsworth.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4402 001/74433 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Erik Gray 3 74/90

ENGL UN3451 Imperialism and Cryptography. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). This course focuses on plots of empire in the British novel of the 19th and early 20th centuries. It examines not only how empire was represented but also how the novel form gave visibility to the strategies of empire and also showed the tacit purposes, contradictions, and anxieties of British imperialism. The seminar is structured around the themes of: the culture of secrecy; criminality and detection; insurgency, surveillance, and colonial control; circulation and exchange of commodities; messianism and political violence. Specifically, the course will focus on how the culture of secrecy that accompanied imperial expansion defined the tools of literary imagination in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While most studies of culture and imperialism examine the impact of colonial expansion on the geography of narrative forms, this seminar looks more closely at the language of indirection in English novels and traces metaphors and symbols to imperialism's culture of secrecy. It begins with the simple observation that both colonizers and colonized felt the need to transmit their communications without having their messages intercepted or decoded. Translated into elusive Masonic designs and prophecy (as in Kim), codes of collective action (as in Sign of Four), or extended dream references (as in The Moonstone), the English novel underscores the exchange of information as one of the key activities of British imperialism. Forcing hidden information into the open also affects the ways that colonial ‘otherness' is defined (as in The Beetle). How espionage and detection correlate with impenetrability and interpretation will be one among many themes we will examine in this course. The seminar will supplement courses in the nineteenth-century English novel, imperialism and culture, and race, gender, and empire, as well as provide a broad basis for studies of modernism and symbolism. Readings include Rudyard Kipling, Kim and "Short Stories"; Arthur Conan Doyle's Sign of Four; Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone; Richard Marsh, The Beetle; RL Stevenson, Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Rider Haggard, She; Haggard, King Solomon's Mines; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent. Course requirements: One oral presentation; two short papers, each 4-5 pages (double-spaced); and a final paper, 7-10 pages (double-spaced). Application instructions: E-mail Professor Viswanathan (gv6@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Imperialism and Cryptography seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

ENGL UN3933 Jane Austen. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

(Seminar). An intensive study of the career of Jane Austen, including important recent criticism. We’ll be especially interested in the relations between narrative form and the social dynamics represented in her fiction. We’ll try to cover all six novels, but we can adjust our pace in response to the interests of seminar members.

,

Application instructions: E-mail Prof. Adams (jea2139@columbia.edu) with your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3933
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3933 001/13314 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
James Adams 4 5/25

ENGL UN3946 Movement and Feeling in the 18th Century. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Literature, we like to say, moves us. We also say that it makes us feel for others, moved on their behalf. This seminar asks what it means to think of literary experience as both feeling for someone (but whom?) and traveling to someplace (but where?). We will trace the history of this connection between motion and emotion back to the Restoration and eighteenth century, an age of remarkable expansion for the British Empire. Though travel and sentiment are often kept separate in studies of this exuberant period, we will find that British writers working across a range of genres—novels, plays, poems, sermons, journals, and philosophical treatises—frequently drew the two together. Their works raise questions about empire and relocation even as they contribute to a new psychological and textual emphasis on the sympathetic heart. Slaves, prisoners, servants, and political or religious outliers test this emphasis, and we’ll discuss how our authors by turns facilitate and foreclose emotional identification with them.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3946
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3946 001/70656 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Dustin Stewart 4 8/15

ENGL GU4801 History of Novel I. 3 points.

(Lecture). When people talk about the “rise” of the novel, where do they imagine it rose from and to? We will read some of eighteenth-century Britain's major canonical fictions alongside short critical selections that provide vocabularies for talking about the techniques of realism and the connections between literature, history and culture; other topics for discussion include identity, sex, families, politics— in short, all the good stuff. 

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4801
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4801 001/17650 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Jenny Davidson 3 33/60

ENGL UN3991 Romantic Margins. 4 points.

British literature of the Romantic period, from the late eighteenth to the early nineteenth century, displays a fascination with what is on the margins.  This manifests itself most memorably in the unprecedented focus on socially marginalized figures – the beggars, madmen, abandoned women, and solitary wanderers who populate the pages of Romantic poetry and fiction.  The author too is often figured as an outsider in this period, someone whose authority derives specifically from his or her position of marginality, looking in from the fringes.  Geographically, the peripheries of the island of Great Britain (Wales and especially Scotland) were major sites of literary experimentation in the Romantic era, while the south coast of England attracted particular interest because of the constant threat of invasion from France during these years.  And of course Romantic writers famously exploited textual margins: many of the major literary works of the period make innovative use of footnotes, glosses, and other paratextual apparatus.  This course considers these various aspects of Romantic marginality and the intersections between them.  In addition to the work of more canonical authors (William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Walter Scott, Mary Shelley), we will be reading poems, novels, essays, and letters by writers, especially women, whose work has historically been marginalized.  Application instructions: E-mail Prof. Gray (eg2155@columbia.edu) with your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a statement (one paragraph, no more than one page) about why you are interested in taking the course. Please also attach a recent paper from a literature course — or, if this is your first such course, on any humanities subject. (**NOTE: Please do not spend any time or effort worrying about or revising the paper you submit. It will be consulted ONLY if the course is oversubscribed, so please just attach whatever you have.) Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3991 001/77646 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Erik Gray 4 15/25

ENGL GU4512 Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot. 3 points.

This course will investigate the three Victorian novelists who were most successful in imagining how to narrate the new, complex forms of social interaction that emerged most fully in the nineteenth century, and that we live with still.  Their essential questions— how are individuals altered by such facts as credit economies and finance, rapid scientific progress, more fluid class boundaries, technologies of rapid transport and rapid information dispersal (the railroad, telegraphs, newspapers and mass media), imperial rule?— required the large, multiplot, serially-published novel format that was the Victorian period’s primary way of confronting modernity and modern consciousness.  At the heart of the course are the three most notable examples of the genre: Thackeray’s Vanity Fair (1847-8), Dickens’s Little Dorrit (1855-7), and Eliot’s Middlemarch (1871-2).  The recurrent topics of these novels, such as financial fraud, debt, crime, social ambition, class conflict, and the role of women in modernity, will be described in detail, as will the formal solutions— the intertwined set of multiple plots, the analytic narrator, the sketch set-piece— that expressed them.  Our concern throughout, however, will be how these novels imagine the possible shapes of human interaction and human self-consciousness in a society governed above all not by family, or nation, or religion, but by money and its exchange.  We will therefore be looking at these novelists as, in the largest sense, the storytellers of capitalism, intent on finding the right combination of themes and formal means by which to express the shape of the world capitalism creates.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4512
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4512 001/11096 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Nicholas Dames 3 51/100

20th and 21st Century

ENGL GU4628 U.S. Latinx literature. 3 points.

This course will focus on Latinx literature in the United States from the mid-twentieth century to the present and provide a historical, literary, and theoretical context for this production. It will examine a wide range of genres, including poetry, memoir, essays, and fiction, with special emphasis on works by Cubans, Dominicans, Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans. Among the authors that the course will study are Richard Rodríguez, Esmeralda Santiago, Rudolfo Anaya, Julia Alvarez, Cristina García, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Piri Thomas.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4628
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4628 001/21001 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Frances Negron-Muntaner 3 23/50

CLEN GU4550 Narrative and Human Rights. 3 points.

(Lecture). We can't talk about human rights without talking about the forms in which we talk about human rights. This course will study the convergences of the thematics, philosophies, politics, practices, and formal properties of literature and human rights. In particular, it will examine how literary questions of narrative shape (and are shaped by) human rights concerns; how do the forms of stories enable and respond to forms of thought, forms of commitment, forms of being, forms of justice, and forms of violation? How does narrative help us to imagine an international order based on human dignity, rights, and equality? We will read classic literary texts and contemporary writing (both literary and non-literary) and view a number of films and other multimedia projects to think about the relationships between story forms and human rights problematics and practices. Likely literary authors: Roberto Bolaño, Miguel de Cervantes, Assia Djebar, Ariel Dorfman, Slavenka Drakulic, Nuruddin Farah, Janette Turner Hospital, Franz Kafka, Sahar Kalifeh, Sindiwe Magona, Maniza Naqvi, Michael Ondaatje, Alicia Partnoy, Ousmane Sembène, Mark Twain . . . . We will also read theoretical and historical pieces by authors such as Agamben, An-Na'im, Appiah, Arendt, Balibar, Bloch, Chakrabarty, Derrida, Douzinas, Habermas, Harlow, Ignatieff, Laclau and Mouffe, Levinas, Lyotard, Marx, Mutua, Nussbaum, Rorty, Said, Scarry, Soyinka, Spivak, Williams.

Fall 2017: CLEN GU4550
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4550 001/16203 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Joseph R Slaughter 3 60/90

ENGL GU4635 Science Fiction Poetics. 3 points.

(Lecture). "A book of philosophy should in part be a kind of science fiction. How else can one write but of those things which one doesn't know, or knows badly? It is precisely there that we imagine having something to say. We write only at the frontiers of our knowledge, at the border which separates our knowledge from our ignorance and transforms the one into the other." -- Gilles Deleuze, Difference and Repetition.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4635
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4635 001/70174 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Michael Golston 3 48/60

ENTA UN3948 African Drama. 4 points.

This seminar is an introduction to writing for the theater by African dramatists, from the mid 20th Century to the present. Assigned readings are mainly major plays by canonical Anglophone writers. Primary texts are read in conversation with secondary readings which introduce major critical debates in the study of African literature and provide cultural and political context. Surveys of African literature typically center the novel. This course instead takes drama as the starting point for engaging key questions about modern African literary production. The major theme of the class is the relationship between work by African dramatists and oppressive social structures. Students are encouraged to reflect on different theories of theater as articulated by African writers.  Readings are organized more or less chronologically around a series of topics. These include the lived experience of colonialism, anti-colonial thought, the emergence of new nation states, neo-colonialism, gender and sexuality, the problem of apartheid, the antiapartheid struggle, transitional justice, human rights and humanitarianism. No specific prior training or expertise in these areas is required.

Fall 2017: ENTA UN3948
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3948 001/61446 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Elliot Ross 4 0/15

ENGL UN3269 British Literature 1900-1950. 3 points.

(Lecture). The beginning of the twentieth century ushered in a feeling of excitement and transformation, a desire to break with the past, and an optimism about how technology would shape the future. At the same time, devastating political and social events contributed to a sense that everything was falling apart, falling into fragments. Modernism was a movement born of crisis and conflict, and its literature struggled to redefine what art could mean in times of anxiety, alienation, or even madness. Writers to include Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, Ford, Rhys.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3269
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3269 001/73357 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Victoria Rosner 3 22/60

CLEN GU4550 Narrative and Human Rights. 3 points.

(Lecture). We can't talk about human rights without talking about the forms in which we talk about human rights. This course will study the convergences of the thematics, philosophies, politics, practices, and formal properties of literature and human rights. In particular, it will examine how literary questions of narrative shape (and are shaped by) human rights concerns; how do the forms of stories enable and respond to forms of thought, forms of commitment, forms of being, forms of justice, and forms of violation? How does narrative help us to imagine an international order based on human dignity, rights, and equality? We will read classic literary texts and contemporary writing (both literary and non-literary) and view a number of films and other multimedia projects to think about the relationships between story forms and human rights problematics and practices. Likely literary authors: Roberto Bolaño, Miguel de Cervantes, Assia Djebar, Ariel Dorfman, Slavenka Drakulic, Nuruddin Farah, Janette Turner Hospital, Franz Kafka, Sahar Kalifeh, Sindiwe Magona, Maniza Naqvi, Michael Ondaatje, Alicia Partnoy, Ousmane Sembène, Mark Twain . . . . We will also read theoretical and historical pieces by authors such as Agamben, An-Na'im, Appiah, Arendt, Balibar, Bloch, Chakrabarty, Derrida, Douzinas, Habermas, Harlow, Ignatieff, Laclau and Mouffe, Levinas, Lyotard, Marx, Mutua, Nussbaum, Rorty, Said, Scarry, Soyinka, Spivak, Williams.

Fall 2017: CLEN GU4550
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4550 001/16203 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Joseph R Slaughter 3 60/90

ENGL UN3305 Gender and Sexuality in the Irish Novel. 4 points.

This course will chart changing attitudes towards gender and sexuality from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in terms of the development of novelistic genres. These genres include marriage plot novels in which the 1800 Act of Union was figured as a marriage between a feminized Ireland and a masculine England, the Big House novel—an Irish variant of the country house novel—pioneered by women writers, the gothic novel by writers like Oscar Wilde, the modernist novels of James Joyce and Elizabeth Bowen, banned books that were silenced by national censorship boards, and finally the queer Irish novel of the late twentieth century. 

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3305
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3305 001/22646 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Emily Bloom 4 12/25

ENGL UN3726 Virginia Woolf. 4 points.

Six novels and some non-fictional prose: Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, The Waves, Between the Acts; A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas.  Applications on paper only (not e-mail) in Professor Mendelson's mailbox in 602 Philosophy, with your name, e-mail address, class (2017, 2018, etc.), a brief list of relevant courses that you've taken, and one sentence suggesting why you want to take the course.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3726
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3726 001/88946 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Edward Mendelson 4 0/25

American

ENGL GU4619 African-American Literature I. 3 points.

(Lecture). This lecture course is intended as the first half of the basic survey in African-American literature. By conducting close readings of selected song lyrics, slave narratives, fiction, poetry, and autobiography, we will focus on major writers in the context of cultural history. In so doing, we will explore the development of the African- American literary tradition. Writers include, but are not limited to, Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Jacobs, Harper, Dunbar, Chestnutt, Washington, Du Bois, and Larsen. Course requirements: class attendance, an in-class midterm exam, a five-page paper, and a final exam.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4619
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4619 001/12357 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Saidiya Hartman 3 30/60

ENGL GU4604 American Modernism. 3 points.

(Lecture). This course surveys cultural responses to the historical, technological, intellectual, and political conditions of modernity in the United States. Spanning the period from the turn of the century to the onset of World War II, we will consider the relationship between key events (U.S. imperialism, immigration, World War I, the Jazz age, the Great Depression); intellectual and scientific developments (the theory of relativity, the popularization of Freudian psychoanalysis, the anthropological concept of culture, the spread of consumer culture, Fordism, the automobile, the birth of cinema, the skyscraper); and cultural production. Assigned readings will include novels, short stories, and contemporary essays. Visual culture--paintings, illustrations, photography, and film--will also play an important role in our investigation of the period. Past syllabus (which will be somewhat revised).

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4604
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4604 001/71235 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Ross Posnock 3 25/60

ENGL UN3506 Sexuality in America: Poetic Encounters. 4 points.

This course views American poetry through the lenses of formal questions and issues of identity politics.  It also combines a number of theoretical approach from New Criticism to Deconstruction to a more socially informed political formalism.  Focus on issues of sexual identities, adding to Adrienne Rich’s famous formulation--in Of a Woman Born--about gender and race this complex question of why sexuality matters in American poetry. We will proceed in terms of what I’m calling “poetic encounters’--moments of intertextuality and influence from Whitman to Audre Lorde.  Along the way we as readers we ourselves will encounter Whitman (again and again as a site of “adhesive” relations.   Poets include Hart Crane, Elizabeth Bishop, Langston Hughes, Mae Cowdery, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, T. S. Eliot, Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, Marilyn Hacker, Cheryl Clarke, Melvin Dixon, Essex Hemphill, Paul Monette, John Ashbery,  Elizabeth Alexander, and Audre Lorde. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Blount (mb33@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Poetic Encounters seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3506
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3506 001/83442 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Marcellus Blount 4 6/25

ENGL UN3662 African American Novelists and the Question of Justice. 4 points.

This course asks, “What conceptions of Justice emerge from a selection of works by canonical African American writers?  Are there other moral/ethical/social values that emerge as more significant than Justice ?” We open with an exploration of Justice in the works of the Greek dramatist, Aeschylus, the Hebrew Bible and recent scholarship on Pre-Colonial West Africa in order to consider what concepts of Justice African-American writers have inherited or that have informed them in less formal ways.  We then turn to texts by Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ernest Gaines, James Baldwin and Toni Morrison,  to examine the way these writers engage, negotiate and critique the relationship between Justice and Race in the United States. 

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3662
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3662 001/73197 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Farah Griffin 4 1/25

ENGL UN3716 American Literary Realism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). In this course we encounter a variety of nineteenth and twentieth century American literary works that have a strong comic edge. We also read a few critical works, both by writers and by scholars, which explore the forms and functions of American humor. Henry James has called humor “our native gift,” a stance toward life that compensates for what he detected to be the nation’s drastic lack of cultural traditions. Can one still speak of an “American character?” If so, what makes this character (or this cast of American characters) —as presented by Mark Twain, Ralph Ellison, and Mary Gordon—so distinctive and so laughable? What makes him and her so very ready to “crack corn,” to break into the comic mode? What is the relation of American humor to the tragic sense of life that also seems to define the national type? These questions define this course as an exploration of American identity, which, as many observers have noted, stands at the center of American intellectual and aesthetic life. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor O'Meally (rgo1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading, "American Humor seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3716
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3716 001/25075 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Robert O'Meally 4 0/25

ENGL UN3852 Temporal Relocations: Narrations of Time and Body in Early American Literature. 4 points.

This course begins with texts from the first wave of European colonists, moving from exploration of what is now Texas with de Vaca to Ralph Lane’s and Thomas Harriot’s Virginia and William Bradford’s Plymouth. We will then focus our attention on the space of Massachusetts, theorizing how the religious narratives of women and native peoples written by Mary Rowlandson, John Eliot, and Thomas Shepard demonstrate the limitations of the governing Puritan male order. In the weeks following, we will turn to the genre of natural history in the space of the Caribbean and Virginia, where we will probe the relationship of the body and the natural in the works of Hans Sloane, James Grainger, and Thomas Jefferson. The course will close with an examination of narratives of slavery with the works of Aphra Behn, Britton Hammon, James Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, and William Earle, as well as Édouard Glissant’s more contemporary Poetics of Relation.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3852
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3852 001/63014 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Kimberly Takahata 4 0/15

ENGL UN3734 American Literature and Corporate Culture. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). "It is not expected of critics as it is of poets that they should help us to make sense of our lives; they are bound only to attempt the lesser feat of making sense of the ways we try to make sense of our lives." - Frank Kermode This seminar will focus on American literature during the rise of U.S. corporate power in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The legal and economic entity of the corporation established new social hierarchies and systems of power, changed the roles of government and families, and wrought new forms of relationships between individuals. American culture demonstrated both an enchantment with the possibilities of a growing economy and a looming anxiety about the systematization of personal relationships. Authors and critics grappled with an American society that seemed to offer unprecedented opportunity for social rise but only within a deeply threatening and impersonal structure. We'll examine the ways that literary and popular culture depicted corporations and the ways that corporate structure influenced literary aesthetics and form. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Aaron Ritzenberg (ajr2186@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "American Literature and Corporate Culture seminar". In your message, include basic information: name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they'll automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3734
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3734 001/18986 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Aaron Ritzenberg 4 10/25

ENGL UN3744 Edgar Allan Poe. 4 points.

The course will examine in detail the poetry and prose of Edgar Allan Poe. We will look at different facets of Poe's brief, remarkable career, from his role as magazine editor and reviewer in Richmond, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York, to his relation to slavery and abolition, and his influence on French poetry and aesthetics in the years following his death. We will proceed more or less chronologically, from his early contributions to the Southern Literary Messenger (with some comparison of Poe's work in this magazine with British magazines like Blackwood's), to major tales like “The Black Cat,” The Pit and the Pendulum,” “the Fall of the House of Usher,” and the first detective story “The Murders in the Rue Morgue.” We will also read a good amount of Poe's practical criticism, from his influential book reviews of Nathaniel Hawthorne, to his attacks on the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow to his often scathing incidental pieces on the “New York Literati”. We will also spend time looking closely at Poe's only novel-length work, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym . Finally we will turn to Poe's poetry and poetics, and consider in detail his literary theory, as put forth in “The Rationale of Verse” “The Philosophy of Composition” and “The Poetic Principle”, in relation to the metrical innovations of poems like “Annabel Lee” “The Bells” and “The Raven”. 

ENGL UN3984 Film and Politics. 4 points.

A survey of American film and politics.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3984
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3984 001/76896 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Maura Spiegel 4 20/25

Special Topics

ENTA UN3701 Drama, Theatre, Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Theatre typically exceeds the claims of theory. What does this tell us about both theatre and theory? We will consider why theatre practitioners often provide the most influential theoretical perspectives, how the drama inquires into (among other things) the possibilities of theatre, and the various ways in which the social, spiritual, performative, political, and aesthetic elements of drama and theatre interact. Two papers, weekly responses, and a class presentation are required. Readings include Aristotle, Artaud, Bharata, Boal, Brecht, Brook, Castelvetro, Craig, Genet, Grotowski, Ibsen, Littlewood, Marlowe, Parks, Schechner, Shakespeare, Sowerby, Weiss, and Zeami. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Austin Quigley (aeq1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Drama, Theatre, Theory seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2017: ENTA UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3701 001/72362 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Austin Quigley 4 4/25

CLEN UN3775 Narrating Rape: Testimony, Gender and Violence. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Despite the fact that intimate violence destroys the frameworks of identity and community, testimony and truth, memory and justice, rape has been a fundamental and globally pervasive literary theme and trope, often the very act that engenders narrative and plot. This seminar will explore how rape has been written in the face of its unspeakability and the silences surrounding it, and how the act of bearing witness can become an act of resistance, rebuilding voice, subjectivity and community. Literary texts will be read alongside feminist theoretical work on embodiment, trauma, testimony, and law. Requirements: class attendance and participation, weekly one-page postings on the readings, two 8-10 page papers. Application instructions:E-mail Professor Marianne Hirsch (mh2349@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Narrating Rape seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

ENGL UN3689 The Logic of the Secular Confession. 4 points.

This course is divided into two parts. The first is an overview of the 19th century tradition of literary confession. We begin by returning to Augustine — whose Confessions
most of you have read in your Literature Humanities section — as the text that inaugurated autobiographical writing in the West. We will then read three pivotal confessional narratives by Rousseau, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy along with critical materials intended to both further our understanding of the texts and to showcase the kind of inquiries into history, law, and logic that the study of secular confession can give rise to.


In the second part, we trace how, at the beginning of the 20th century), psychoanalysis became, in the words of Peter Brooks, the main form of “professionalized secular confessional practice”. We will take a close look at two major milestones in the early history of psychoanalytic thinking: Freud’s initial “repressive hypothesis” — which continues to be the central tenet of the ‘vulgar’ reading of psychoanalytic theory, and the later theory of the “death drive”. We will read the psychoanalytic quasi-confessional practices as both predicated upon the 19th century’s mindset of confessional discourse and as precursors of a newer, and more complex, paradigm of the interaction of language, self-knowledge and desire. We will finally explore the 20th century paradigm of secular confession through a selection of four novels, each showcasing a different aspect of confessional discourse today
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3689
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3689 001/21697 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Valerio Amoretti 4 2/15

ENGL UN3950 Poetics of the Warrior. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission. (Seminar). This course of distinguished poetry about warriors and warfare goes to the intersection of disciplines, where warrior and poet together compete and excel--ingeniously, formally, passionately, consequentially--as allies in dire contest against annihilation and despair. Homer's Iliad heads our list of exemplary titles selected from ancient and classical, mediaeval and early modern sources, including, among others, Sophocles' Ajax, and PhiloctetesBeowulfSong of RolandSir Gawain and the Green KnightThe Tale of the Heike; Shakespeare's Henry V; and Milton's Paradise Lost. We also will read histories, memoirs, oratory, and guidebooks, from Yuzan's Budoshoshinshu to General Patton's "The Secret of Victory," from Vegetius' De Re Militari to U.S. Army Field Manual (FM) 6-22. Our reading is historically broad enough to prove the range of virtues, precepts, codes and rules of martial character and action. Yet our poetry also excels in vision and in virtuosity quite apart from how it might cultivate the norms of aristeía, chivalry, or bushido, so that certain of our questions about form and style or imaginative effects might differ in kind from other questions about the closeness or disparity of the practical warrior and the poetic warrior, and the extent to which the latter elevates and inspires the former's conception of himself in times of war and peace. We shall consider how battle narratives which excel as poetry and ring true for the warrior, appealing to his wit and outlook, might replenish the aggrieved and battle-weary mind; how a war poem's beautifully formed and lucidly rendered chaos remembers and regains for him the field of action. Toward my interest in the range of possibilities for military literature as a discipline of study, I welcome not only the novice whose interest is avid but the student knowledgeable about military topics in literature, history, political and social philosophy, and especially the student, who, having served in the Armed Forces, can bring to the seminar table a contemporary military perspective and the fruits of practical wisdom. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Giordani (mg2644@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Poetics of Warrior seminar." In your message, include your name, school, major, year of study, relevant courses taken, and a brief statement about why you are interested in taking t

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3950 001/93747 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
522a Kent Hall
Marianne Giordani 4 7/25
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3950 001/61444 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Marianne Giordani 4 9/25

ENTA UN3338 Shakespeare and Film. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Hamlet as a video student whose uncle has become CEO of “Denmark Corporation.”  As You Like It in nineteenth-century Japan after the Meiji Restoration.  A voodoo Macbeth in Haiti during the reign of the slave-turned-emperor Henri Christophe.  Antony and Cleopatra in a village in Karala, where antagonists stage a cock fight to win a local beauty with magical powers.  In this course, we will examine a wide array of film versions of Shakespeare’s plays, looking at them in relationship to Shakespeare’s texts and traditional interpretations of the plays.  We will investigate the ways in which large-scale transformations (for instance, location, historical period, or narrative order) alter the meaning of the plays.  At the same time, the course will help students develop tools for the close reading of performance (gesture, expression, movement) and of the particular language of film (image, scenography, camera work, sound, and more).  Discussion will be supplemented by creative exercises (dramatic readings, brainstorming directorial ideas, the creation of short films, etc).  Previous familiarity with the plays we’ll be examining is helpful but not required.

Fall 2017: ENTA UN3338
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3338 001/82779 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Julie Peters 4 0/25

CLEN GU4560 Backgrounds to Contemporary Theory. 3 points.

Intended for both undergraduates and graduate students.

(Lecture). In chapter 4 of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Mind, a story is told about a confrontation between a Lord (Herr) and a Bondsman (Knecht). The story conveys how consciousness is born. This story, subsequently better known as the confrontation between Master and Slave, has been appropriated and revised again and again in figures like Marx and Nietzsche, Sartre, De Beauvoir, and Fanon, Freud and Lacan, Emmanuel Levinas, Carl Schmitt, Slavoj Zizek, and Judith Butler. The premise of this course is that one can understand much of which is (and isn’t) most significant and interesting in contemporary cultural theory by coming to an understanding Hegel’s argument, and tracing the paths by which thinkers revise and return to it as well as some of the arguments around it. There are no prerequisites, but the material is strenuous, and students will clearly have an easier time if they start out with some idea of what the thinkers above are doing and why. Helpful preparatory readings might include Genevieve Lloyd, The Man of Reason: “Male” and “Female” in Western Philosophy and Judith Butler, Gender Trouble. Requirements: For undergraduates: two short papers (6-8 pages). For graduate students, either two short papers or one longer paper (12-15 pages).

Fall 2017: CLEN GU4560
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4560 001/28380 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Bruce Robbins 3 18/60

ENGL GU4911 Technologies of Dissent. 3 points.

(Lecture). Our engagement with technology entails political, not just instrumental choices. Email clients, social networks, and word processors have a profound effect on the way we relate to each other: work, organize, relax, or make art. Yet, we rarely have a chance to reflect on the civic, cultural virtues implicit in numerous everyday acts of computation: connecting to a wi-fi access point, sending a text message, or sharing a photograph online.

,

This course will introduce humanities students to foundational concepts in computer literacy. We will pry open many “black boxes”---personal computers, routers, mobile phones---to learn not just how they work, but to interrogate them critically. Readings in ethics, philosophy, media history, and critical theory will ground our practical explorations.

,

This course advances research in computational culture studies understood both as the study of computational culture and as computational approaches to the study of culture and society. In addition to traditional reading, discussion, and writing components of the class, participants are expected to work on a semester-long data-driven lab-based research project. Students and scholars from any field, at any stage of their academic or professional career, and at all levels of technical and critical proficiency are welcome to attend.

Fall 2017: ENGL GU4911
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4911 001/25948 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Dennis Tenen 3 15/60

ENGL UN3203 The Sonnet in English. 4 points.

The sonnet form has captured the imagination of so many of the great poets composing in English from the time the form was imported into England in the sixteenth century to the present day among poets composing in English around the globe. This seminar will focus on the close-reading of sonnets composed in English from a wide range of periods and nationalities, as well as on questions of why the sonnet tradition in English has been so vibrant for so long and why it developed in the ways it has. The syllabus will include sonnets by poets such as Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, E.B. Browning, Poe, Millay, Yeats, Cummings, Bishop, Moore, Stevens, Lowell, Walcott and Heaney. 

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3203
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3203 001/90942 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Richard Sacks 4 5/25

ENTA UN3338 Shakespeare and Film. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Hamlet as a video student whose uncle has become CEO of “Denmark Corporation.”  As You Like It in nineteenth-century Japan after the Meiji Restoration.  A voodoo Macbeth in Haiti during the reign of the slave-turned-emperor Henri Christophe.  Antony and Cleopatra in a village in Karala, where antagonists stage a cock fight to win a local beauty with magical powers.  In this course, we will examine a wide array of film versions of Shakespeare’s plays, looking at them in relationship to Shakespeare’s texts and traditional interpretations of the plays.  We will investigate the ways in which large-scale transformations (for instance, location, historical period, or narrative order) alter the meaning of the plays.  At the same time, the course will help students develop tools for the close reading of performance (gesture, expression, movement) and of the particular language of film (image, scenography, camera work, sound, and more).  Discussion will be supplemented by creative exercises (dramatic readings, brainstorming directorial ideas, the creation of short films, etc).  Previous familiarity with the plays we’ll be examining is helpful but not required.

Fall 2017: ENTA UN3338
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3338 001/82779 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Julie Peters 4 0/25

ENGL UN3853 Narratives of Contagion. 4 points.

(Seminar) This seminar asks us to consider what a literary history of early America looks like if we pay as close attention to the bodies and pathogens that bound Native American, African, and European communities as we do to their writings. In doing so, we will inquire into the specific relations between immunology and theology, science and exploration, liberty and violence—all with an eye to theorizing the narrative forms and conventions that gave voice to American and Creole identities in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The class will necessarily be transatlantic and interdisciplinary in scope, so we will build a critical framework to guide our readings, while attending to the rigors and rewards of such work. We will read a range of texts, including exploration narratives, journals, diaries, pamphlets, poems, and novels focusing on continental North America and the Caribbean. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Silva (cs2889@columbia.edu  ) with the subject heading "Seminar application." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

Fall 2017: ENGL UN3853
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3853 001/68596 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Cristobal Silva 4 2/25

University Writing

ENGL GS1010 University Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL F1010.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections below 100). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Women's and Gender Studies (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Sustainable Development (sections in the 300s). Features essays that ask how we can develop global communities that meet people's needs now without diminishing the ability of people in the future to do the same. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2017: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/63043 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Hannah Rogers 3 10/14
ENGL 1010 002/63044 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Miranda Pennington 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 005/69291 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Elizabeth Walters 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 008/69292 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Matthew Margini 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 009/69293 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Warren Kluber 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 011/69294 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 012/60962 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Tana Wojczuk 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 013/60963 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Alexandra Watson 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 015/60964 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Leah Zander 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 016/98347 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Michael Darnell 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 018/62215 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
306 Hamilton Hall
Noah Shannon 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 019/62216 M W 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Ida Tvedt 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 020/62217 T Th 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Susan Hanrahan 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 021/60980 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Kathleen Savino 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 101/63460 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Aaron Ritzenberg 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 201/63461 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Allen Durgin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 301/63463 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 10/14
ENGL 1010 401/64710 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 501/64711 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 902/64712 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Kristen Martin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 903/64713 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Harald Sundt 3 14/14
Fall 2017: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 201/92076 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Glenn Gordon 3 1/14
ENGL 1010 401/62547 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Nicole Wallack 3 0/14

ENGL CC1010 University Writing. 3 points.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections below 100). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Sustainable Development (sections in the 300s). Features essays that ask how we can develop global communities that meet people's needs now without diminishing the ability of people in the future to do the same. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2017: ENGL CC1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 002/69287 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
302 Hamilton Hall
Katherine Bergevin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 003/69288 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Martin Larson-Xu 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 004/69289 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Hamilton Hall
Elliot Ross 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 007/75539 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Meadhbh McHugh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 008/75540 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 010/75541 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Raluca Albu 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 013/81782 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 014/81783 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
104 Knox Hall
Buck Wanner 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 016/81784 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 017/81785 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Montana Ray 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 018/88025 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Kent Szlauderbach 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 021/88026 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Jeremy Stevens 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 022/88027 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Elizabeth McIntosh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 023/94275 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Nolan Gear 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 025/94276 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Justin Snider 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 026/94277 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Nolan Gear 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 027/94278 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Heather Radke 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 030/73341 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
302 Hamilton Hall
Emily Ciavarella 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 031/73342 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
G'Ra Asim 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 034/73343 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Will Glovinsky 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 036/73345 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Glenn Gordon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 037/93660 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
601b Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Elizabeth Bowen 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 039/93661 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Harald Sundt 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 040/93662 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Allen Durgin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 041/13028 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Carina Schorske 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 045/13036 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 049/13037 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Jason Ueda 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 050/13038 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Jessica Stevens 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 051/19277 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Li Qi Peh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 052/19278 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Sara Novic 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 053/19279 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Allen Durgin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 101/25542 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Carin White 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 102/25543 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Erica Richardson 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 103/25544 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
502 Northwest Corner
Kimberly Takahata 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 104/29610 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Tana Wojczuk 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 105/29611 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Michael Kideckel 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 201/29612 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Kristin Slaney 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 202/60862 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Danielle Drees 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 203/60865 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Olivia Ciacci 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 204/60866 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Liza St. James 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 301/60867 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Bernadette Myers 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 302/92102 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Phillip Polefrone 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 303/92103 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Adam Winters 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 401/92104 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
301 Hamilton Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 402/23355 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Timothy Lundy 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 403/23356 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
613 Hamilton Hall
Stephen Preskill 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 404/23357 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Daniel Pearce 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 501/23358 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Sierra Eckert 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 502/88971 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Jenna Schoen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 503/88972 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Susan Mendelsohn 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 504/88973 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
306 Hamilton Hall
Avery Erwin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 901/88974 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Avia Tadmor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 902/63042 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Mor Sheinbein 3 14/14

Spring 2017 - please see the department website for curriculum summary. 

Introduction to the Major

ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods. 4 points.

Corequisites: students who register for ENGL W3001 must also register for one of the sections of ENGL W3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods.

This course is intended to introduce students to the advanced study of literature. Students will read works from different genres (poetry, drama, and prose fiction), drawn from the medieval period to the present day, learning the different interpretative techniques required by each. The course also introduces students to a variety of critical schools and approaches, with the aim both of familiarizing them with these methodologies in the work of other critics and of encouraging them to make use of different methods in their own critical writing. This course (together with the companion seminar ENGL W3011) is a requirement for the English Major and Concentration. It should be taken as early as possible in a student's career. Fulfillment of this requirement will be a factor in admission to seminars and to some lectures.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/17220 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Michael Golston 4 57/80
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/62539 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Jenny Davidson 4 51/80

ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar. 0 points.

Corequisites: students who register for ENGL W3011 must also register for ENGL W3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods lecture.

This seminar, led by an advanced graduate student in the English doctoral program, accompanies the faculty lecture ENGL W3001. The seminar both elaborates upon the topics taken up in the lecture and introduces other theories and methodologies. It also focuses on training students to integrate the terms, techniques, and critical approaches covered in both parts of the course into their own critical writing, building up from brief close readings to longer research papers.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/22186 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Taarini Mookherjee 0 11/25
ENGL 3011 002/23538 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Rebecca Pawel 0 11/25
ENGL 3011 003/19467 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
307 Mathematics Building
Gianmarco Saretto 0 12/25
ENGL 3011 004/21452 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Seth Williams 0 13/25
ENGL 3011 005/65707 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Alexis Fabrizio 0 9/25
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/21435 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 10/18
ENGL 3011 002/17754 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 7/18
ENGL 3011 003/20144 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 3/18
ENGL 3011 004/14561 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
0 3/18
ENGL 3011 005/70512 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
0 14/18

Medieval

ENGL UN3900 Diabolical Drama of the Middle Ages. 4 points.

Hell bursts onto European the stage at the end of the Middle Ages. Satan and his attendant devils, although present in earlier forms of Christian drama, become a defining feature of the dramatizations of Christian history and morality in Late Medieval England. The devils of these plays are disruptive, anarchic, seductive and repulsive. They are rhetorically bewitching and morally dangerous. This course will pay close attention to these devils and their devilry. What to they do? How do they speak? What do they know and what choice do they have in being so diabolical? Rather than viewing devils simply as spiritual antagonists, instead we will investigate them as complex creatures doing serious theological work in the difficult and spiritually tumultuous towns of late medieval England. Through close critical inquiry, contextual reading and some of our own imaginative stagings, we will explore the central role of the ‘diabolic’ in late medieval drama and its sometimes troubling vision of Christian life. 

ENGL UN3920 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH TEXTS. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Application Instructions: E-mail Professor David Yerkes (dmy1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Medieval English Texts." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3920 001/70159 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
David Yerkes 4 8/25
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3920 001/70001 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
David Yerkes 4 12/25

ENGL GU4901 History of the English Language. 3 points.

(Lecture). A survey of the history of the English language from before Old English to 21st Century Modern English, with no background in linguistics required. Grammar, dialectal variety, and social history will be covered to roughly equal extents. Requirements include three examinations, one of them an extended take-home exercise. Lecture format with some discussion depending on the topic.

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4901 001/13183 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
301 Pupin Laboratories
John McWhorter 3 104/120

ENGL GU4729 Canterbury Tales. 3 points.

(Lecture). Beginning with an overview of late medieval literary culture in England, this course will cover the entire Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English.  We will explore the narrative and organizational logics that underpin the project overall, while also treating each individual tale as a coherent literary offering, positioned deliberately and recognizably on the map of late medieval cultural convention.  We will consider the conditions—both historical and aesthetic—that informed Chaucer’s motley composition, and will compare his work with other large-scale fictive works of the period.  Our ultimate project will be the assessment of the Tales at once as a self-consciously “medieval” production, keen to explore and exploit the boundaries of literary convention, and as a ground-breaking literary event, which set the stage for renaissance literature.

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4729
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4729 001/22204 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
702 Hamilton Hall
Chelsea Spata, Eleanor Johnson, Adam Horn 3 70/100

Renaissance

ENGL UN3336 Shakespeare II. 3 points.

(Lecture). Shakespeare II examines plays from the second half of Shakespeare’s dramatic career, primarily a selection of his major tragedies and his later comedies (or “romances”).

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3336
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3336 001/73664 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
420 Pupin Laboratories
Natasha Korda 3 35/50

ENGL UN3337 Shakespeare's Poetry. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). In this seminar we will examine Shakespeare's plays alongside those written by his fellow playwrights Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Kyd, and John Lyly. Shakespeare is in some ways sui generis, yet he was very much a part of the London theatre scene. He both inspired and was shaped by these writers -- he saw their performances, acted in their plays, and co-wrote dramas with them. To understand better Shakespeare's idiosyncratic craft we will read his plays grouped with those of other writers. For explorations of revenge tragedy, for instance, we will read Hamlet after Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy; for portrayals of Jews, The Merchant of Venice with Marlowe's The Jew of Malta; the hazards of kingship, Richard II and Marlowe's Edward II; the perils of ambition, Macbeth and Dr. Faustus. Reading Shakespeare in context will also enable us to see how different Renaissance dramatists contributed to an evolving stagecraft of ghosts, disguises, war, the supernatural, the exotic- and to the maturity of blank verse itself. The course will be limited to fifteen students and will require regular participation, response postings each class, a review of a play, a presentation, and a fifteen-page seminar paper. Application instructions: E-mail Prof. Shapiro (js73@columbia.edu) with your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3337
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3337 001/22718 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
James Shapiro 4 11/15

CLEN GU4122 The Renaissance in Europe II: Figuring Eros. 3 points.

(Lecture). How did Renaissance writers imagine Eros? What obstacles does he meet? How does he relate to other kinds of love? To loss and to wit? Readings include Plato, Ovid, and Petrarch for background, then Stampa, Ariosto, Rabelais, Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, Ronsard, Rabelais, Wyatt, Marlowe, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, and Donne.

Spring 2017: CLEN GU4122
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4122 001/13597 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
602 Hamilton Hall
Kathy Eden 3 26/35

18th and 19th Century

ENGL UN3950 Poetics of the Warrior. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission. (Seminar). This course of distinguished poetry about warriors and warfare goes to the intersection of disciplines, where warrior and poet together compete and excel--ingeniously, formally, passionately, consequentially--as allies in dire contest against annihilation and despair. Homer's Iliad heads our list of exemplary titles selected from ancient and classical, mediaeval and early modern sources, including, among others, Sophocles' Ajax, and PhiloctetesBeowulfSong of RolandSir Gawain and the Green KnightThe Tale of the Heike; Shakespeare's Henry V; and Milton's Paradise Lost. We also will read histories, memoirs, oratory, and guidebooks, from Yuzan's Budoshoshinshu to General Patton's "The Secret of Victory," from Vegetius' De Re Militari to U.S. Army Field Manual (FM) 6-22. Our reading is historically broad enough to prove the range of virtues, precepts, codes and rules of martial character and action. Yet our poetry also excels in vision and in virtuosity quite apart from how it might cultivate the norms of aristeía, chivalry, or bushido, so that certain of our questions about form and style or imaginative effects might differ in kind from other questions about the closeness or disparity of the practical warrior and the poetic warrior, and the extent to which the latter elevates and inspires the former's conception of himself in times of war and peace. We shall consider how battle narratives which excel as poetry and ring true for the warrior, appealing to his wit and outlook, might replenish the aggrieved and battle-weary mind; how a war poem's beautifully formed and lucidly rendered chaos remembers and regains for him the field of action. Toward my interest in the range of possibilities for military literature as a discipline of study, I welcome not only the novice whose interest is avid but the student knowledgeable about military topics in literature, history, political and social philosophy, and especially the student, who, having served in the Armed Forces, can bring to the seminar table a contemporary military perspective and the fruits of practical wisdom. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Giordani (mg2644@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Poetics of Warrior seminar." In your message, include your name, school, major, year of study, relevant courses taken, and a brief statement about why you are interested in taking t

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3950 001/93747 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
522a Kent Hall
Marianne Giordani 4 7/25
Fall 2017: ENGL UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3950 001/61444 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Marianne Giordani 4 9/25

ENGL UN3955 The Bildungsroman in Europe. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). A survey of major works in the tradition of the European Bildungsroman, from what is traditionally taken as its founding example (Goethe's Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship) to early 20th-century revisions to the genre. The seminar will be oriented around charting the ways in which these novels imagined, or refused to imagine, a compromise between individual aspiration and social integration. Subsidiary topics will include: the negotiation of erotic energies; the role of the nation-state in promoting or hindering individual 'development'; professionalism and selfhood; the relationship between the economic, social, and geographical mobility; the characteristic spaces of the form (family; school; 'bohemia'); alternatives to the form required by the consideration of women. Texts include works by Goethe, Balzac, Bronte, Alain-Fournier, Joyce. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Nicholas Dames (nd122@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Bildungsroman in Europe seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3955
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3955 001/77653 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Nicholas Dames 4 15/25

ENTA UN3970 Ibsen and Pinter. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). The course will trace the pattern of the evolving theatrical careers of Henrik Ibsen and Harold Pinter, exploring the nature of and relationships among key features of their emerging aesthetics. Thematic and theatrical exploration involve positioning the plays in the context of the trajectories of modernism and postmodernism and examining, in that context, the emblematic use of stage sets and tableaux; the intense scrutiny of families, friendships, and disruptive intruders; the experiments with temporality, multi-linearity, and split staging; the issues raised by performance and the implied playhouse; and the plays' potential as instruments of cultural intervention. Two papers are required, 5-7 pages and 10-12 pages, with weekly brief responses, and a class presentation. Readings include major plays of both writers and key statements on modernism and postmodernism.  Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Austin Quigley (aeq1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Ibsen and Pinter seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: ENTA UN3970
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3970 001/72385 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Austin Quigley 4 14/25

ENGL UN3989 The 19th Century Historical Novel and Social Justice. 4 points.

.......This course investigates how the historical novel wrested its central themes and rhetorical strategies from the voices of the disenfranchised in its purposeful address of pressing social problems: infanticides, poverty, industrial exploitation, class and gender inequality, radical violence, polygamy........

ENGL GU4405 Literature at the Boundaries of the Human. 4 points.

Application instructions: See department website.Because understandings of the human often work by opposition – to be human means not to be something else – the boundaries of humanity shift as different versions of the nonhuman take imaginative priority.  To some degree your vision of humanity depends on whether you need to define yourself against a god, for instance, or a goat.But any such boundary between human and nonhuman is as much an interface as a wall, facilitating exchange as well as marking difference.You probably share at least a little in common with your god or your goat.  This seminar examines the role of literature – largely but not exclusively British, ranging from the mid-seventeenth century to the late twentieth – in setting, policing, testing, and revising such boundaries.  Among the many groups against which humans have historically defined themselves, the course singles out four for investigation: angels, animals, androids (including artificial intelligence more broadly), and aliens (extraterrestrials, that is).Each unit centers on one of these nonhuman others, reading literary works that explore its fluctuating relation to the human.Around two-thirds of the readings date to before 1800, but each unit brings older texts together with newer (often twentieth-century) works. Student work includes active participation, a presentation (tracing the boundary between theoretical and archival material), a short essay (joining old concepts with new writings), and a long seminar paper (pursuing an argument about redefinitions or crossed boundaries).

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4405
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4405 001/21810 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Dustin Stewart 4 11/15

20th and 21st Century

ENGL UN3730 Modern Texts: Yeats, Eliot, Auden. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Selected poems, plays, and prose. Application Instructions: Leave a note (printed on paper only, absolutely not by e-mail) in Prof. Mendelson's mailbox in the English Department office, 602 Philosophy Hall. Title it "Modern Texts seminar," and provide basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. If you cannot physically deliver this to the department office, mail it (on paper) to Prof. Edward Mendelson, Mail Code 4927, Columbia University, New York NY 10027.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3730
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3730 001/66510 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Edward Mendelson 4 19/25

ENGL UN3737 Dystopian Postwar Fiction. 4 points.

In 1868, John Stuart Mill first used the word “dystopia” (in Greek, literally “bad
place”) to describe society in cataclysmic moral decline. Since then, writers from H. G. Wells to
Margaret Atwood have imagined a range of devastating conditions and consequences of dystopia, from
the dehumanization of the individual to the rise of surveillance and state control, from widespread
violence to the impact of environmental disaster. Starting with the critical moment of 1945—after the
dropping of the atomic bomb and the second “war that will end war” failed to live up to its utopian
promise—and continuing forward into the 21st century, we will read a selection of significant works by
George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, Samuel Beckett, J. G. Ballard, Margaret Atwood, and more. While
emphasizing the novel, we will also examine a selection of poetry, plays, film, radio, music, criticism,
and graphic novels. Through practices of close reading and research, we will ask what dystopian fictions
can teach us about violence, technology, war, control, paranoia, and decline—but also resilience,
inventiveness, companionship, and resistance—in our contemporary world.

CLEN UN3906 Poetic Modernism. 0 points.

(Seminar). Modernism can find its roots anywhere from the fall of Constantinople in 1453 to the turn of the 20th century; and it finds them differently depending on whether one refers to "modernism" or "modernity." For the purposes of this class, modernism's beginning will be situated in about the middle of the nineteenth century, in Baudelaire's use of the neologism modernité to describe the new urban (and colonialist) sensibility that emerged in the Paris of the time, and more particularly in the seismic poetic shifts that then began to take place. And although many versions or trajectories of poetic modernism can be traced, we will attempt to follow a series of lines that tie the French version of it to the emergence of diverse American voices. Poets to be discussed will include Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Ponge, Crane, Hughes, Eliot, Moore, Stevens and Williams. Application instructions: E-mail Aaron Robertson (ar3488@columbia.edu) with your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: CLEN UN3906
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3906 001/21647 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
David Wills 0 17/25

ENGL UN3851 Indian Writing in English. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). As the great imperial powers of Britain, France, and Belgium, among others, ceded self-rule to the colonies they once controlled, formerly colonized subjects engaged in passionate discussion about the shape of their new nations not only in essays and pamphlets but also in fiction, poetry, and theatre. Despite the common goal of independence, the heated debates showed that the postcolonial future was still up for grabs, as the boundary lines between and within nations were once again redrawn. Even such cherished notions as nationalism were disputed, and thinkers like the Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore sounded the alarm about the pitfalls of narrow ethnocentric thinking. Their call for a philosophy of internationalism went against the grain of ethnic and racial particularism, which had begun to take on the character of national myth. The conflict of perspectives showed how deep were the divisions among the various groups vying to define the goals of the postcolonial nation, even as they all sought common cause in liberation from colonial rule.

,

Nowhere was this truer than in India. The land that the British rulers viewed as a test case for the implementation of new social philosophies took it upon itself to probe their implications for the future citizenry of a free, democratic republic. We will read works by Indian writers responding to decolonization and, later, globalization as an invitation to rethink the shape of their societies. Beginning as a movement against imperial control, anti-colonialism also generated new discussions about gender relations, secularism and religious difference, the place of minorities in the nation, the effects of partition on national identity, among other issues. With the help of literary works and historical accounts, this course will explore the challenges of imagining a post-imperial society in a globalized era without reproducing the structures and subjectivities of the colonial state. Writers on the syllabus include Rabindranath Tagore, M.K. Gandhi, B.R. Ambedkar, Mulk Raj Anand, Raja Rao, Mahasweta Devi, Bapsi Sidwa, Rohinton Mistry, Amitav Ghosh, and Arundhati Roy.

,

Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Viswanathan (gv6@columbia.edu ) with the subject heading "Indian Writing in English seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3851
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3851 001/73411 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Gauri Viswanathan 4 13/25

ENGL UN3968 IRISH LIT:20TH C.IRISH PROSE. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar course looks at the idea of Language and Form in Irish writing in the Twentieth Century. It will examine writing from the Irish Literary Renaissance, including work by Yeats and Synge, and writing by Irish Modernist writers, including Joyce, Beckett and Flann O’Brien. It will also study certain awkward presences in the Irish literary canon, such as Elizabeth Bowen. The class will then read work from later in the century, including the novels of John Banville and John McGahern and the poetry of Seamus Heaney and Eavan Boland.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3968
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3968 001/14675 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Colm Toibin 4 15/25

CLEN GU4564 Plagiarism and Post Colonialism. 3 points.

This course examines practices of literary plagiarism, piracy, kidnapping, cultural appropriation, forgery, and other disparaged textual activities to consider their implication in the power/knowledge complex of (neo)imperial international relations under current capitalist copyright and intellectual property regimes that constitute the so-called "World Republic of Letters.".....

Spring 2017: CLEN GU4564
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4564 001/87698 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Joseph R Slaughter 3 36/60

American

ENGL UN3267 Foundations of American Literature. 3 points.

(Lecture). This course is an introduction to American thought and expression from the first English settlements to the eve of the Civil War. The course will proceed through a combination of lecture and discussion-with the aim of deepening our understanding of the origins and development of literature and culture in the United States.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3267
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3267 001/10062 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Andrew Delbanco 3 80/75

ENGL UN3715 Bellow, Ellison, and Roth. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). These three major post-war American novelists are each challenging and transgressive in their own way; they comprise a natural grouping given their common preoccupations that grew out of high personal regard. Bellow and Ellison were close friends and Roth was a friend of Bellow's and a great admirer of Ellison. Indeed, Roth's The Human Stain is a sustained meditation upon and homage to Ellison's Invisible Man. These shared concerns include a resistance to the pressure to be representative of one's racial or ethnic group, skepticism of the political and ideological uses of art, and fascination with how an ethnic or racial outsider makes his way into WASP American high culture. One does so by a process of initiation that proceeds less by the sacrifice demanded by assimilation and more by playing the "game" of "appropriation" in which culture is conceived as public, open and accessible to anyone, and culture goods are available to be enjoyed and re-worked for one's own creative purposes. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Ross Posnock (rp2045@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Bellow, Ellison, and Roth seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3715
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3715 001/68967 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Ross Posnock 4 13/25

ENGL UN3985 Film Noir. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

(Seminar). Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Douglas (ad34@columbia.edu) with the subject heading, "Film Noir" In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3985
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3985 001/76276 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Ann Douglas 4 22/25

ENGL UN3742 American Slavery in Black and White. 4 points.

.........This seminar examines those binaristic articulations that underwrite the concept of racial difference in the nineteenth-century African American literary and political thought.  Through a survey approach that considers the ways in which antebellum and post-bellum fiction both contest and reinforce the logic of racial dualism, students will develop critical acumen for the divisive origins of our nation's literary heritage.  We will especially chart the development of African American literature by focusing on those social and aesthetic practices that are particularly relevant to our current political fascination with black lives and white privilege.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3742
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3742 001/20897 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Radiclani Clytus 4 15/25

ENGL UN3747 Early Indigeneities. 4 points.

This seminar seeks to understand how historians and literary critics can position themselves
to better understand indigeneity in the early colonial era (ca. 1580–1790). Specifically, we
will identify a number of primary texts through which we can begin to apprehend indigenous
epistemologies and modes of signification, and build new modes of literacy in the twentyfirst
century. We will draw on a range of material—historical and contemporary, “textual”
and non—produced by European and Indigenous sources. As we read this material, we will
inquire into their formal and thematic legacies, strategies for producing and effacing
knowledge, and we will continually revisit the fundamental terms of our own analysis,
including “authorship,” “memory,” “textuality,” “writing,” “reading,” “signification,” and
“communication.” Finally, we will consider how these terms shape our understanding of
literary history, settler colonialism, and indigeneity.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3747
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3747 001/11048 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Cristobal Silva 4 11/25

ENGL GU4201 Voices of the Early Black Atlantic. 3 points.

This survey will investigate how the voices of the early Black Atlantic constitute themselves in the literary and historical imagination of the era.  Drawing primarily from Anglophone texts written by eighteenth century authors of African and European descent, we will consider the various forms that these voices inhabit, their modes of expression, and the major tropes and figures associated with them......

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4201 001/29961 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
214 Pupin Laboratories
Cristobal Silva 3 20/45

ENGL GU4622 African-American Literature II. 3 points.

(Lecture). This survey of African American literature focuses on language, history, and culture. What are the contours of African American literary history? How do race, gender, class, and sexuality intersect within the politics of African American culture? What can we expect to learn from these literary works? Why does our literature matter to student of social change? This lecture course will attempt to provide answers to these questions, as we begin with Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) and Richard Wright's Native Son (1940) and end with Melvin Dixon's Love's Instruments (1995) with many stops along the way. We will discuss poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose. Ohter authors include Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Malcom X, Ntzozake Shange, Audre Lorde, and Toni Morrison. There are no prerequisites for this course. The formal assignments are two five-page essays and a final examination. Class participation will be graded.

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4622
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4622 001/11427 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
6ab Kraft Center
Robert O'Meally 3 34/50

ENGL GU4634 American Fiction as American History. 3 points.

(Lecture). What does the history of the United States look like when novelists write it? To find out, this course will join American authors as they duel with the Founding Fathers, prosecute the Civil War, witness the Holocaust, and otherwise journey to the past. Most of our reading will be historical novels by twentieth-century writers. But we will also consult professional historians along the way, and ask several comparative questions about method. What can novelists do that historians can't, and vice-versa? How accurate is historical fiction, and should its readers care? And have the historical insights of literary artists tended to be ahead of or behind the times? Possible authors are Crane, Dreiser, Cather, Dos Passos, Faulkner, Styron, Roth, Pynchon, Vidal, Morrison, and Delillo. Assignments will include papers and a final exam.

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4634
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4634 001/27719 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
428 Pupin Laboratories
Austin Graham 3 54/75

ENGL GU4650 Novels of Immigration, Relocation, Diaspora. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

(Lecture). The master narrative of the United States has always vacillated between valorizations of movement and settlement. While ours is a nation of immigrants, one which privileges its history of westward expansion and pioneering, trailblazing adventurers, we also seem to long for what Wallace Stegner called a "sense of place," a true belonging within a single locale. Each of these constructions has tended to focus on individuals with a tremendous degree of agency in terms of where and whether they go. However, it is equally important to understand the tension between movement and stasis within the communities most frequently subjected to spatial upheavals. To that end, this course is designed to examine narratives of immigration, migration, relocation, and diaspora by authors of color in the United States.

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4650
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4650 001/24891 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
5ab Kraft Center
John Gamber 3 68/90

ENTA GU4731 American Drama. 3 points.

Survey of American drama, theater, and performance focusing on depictions of factory, office, and domestic work, as well as, more recently, “immaterial” or “affective” labor. What kind of work does theater and performance do and how does it challenge or conform to other kinds of work in the world at large? What does it mean to make theater--or to “perform”--in the context of American and global capitalism, with its concentrations of wealth, consumerism, ubiquitous visual media, conflicts over class, immigration and race, and often exploitative divisions of labor? While the course moves from 1900 to the present, we will devote considerable attention to the pre-1960s period, and its significant engagement with themes of class and capital. Texts and performances by The Provincetown Players, Elmer Rice, Sophie Treadwell, Clifford Odets, The Federal Theater Project, Arthur Miller, The Living Theater, Edward Albee, Sam Shepard, The Performance Group, and Charles Mee.

Special Topics

ENGL UN3394 How Writers Think: Pedagogy and Practice. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

(Seminar). This course uses contemporary philosophies of research and writing to train students to become writing center and library consultants. Readings will highlight major voices in rhetoric and composition research, with an emphasis on collaborative learning theory. We will ground our study in hands-on teaching experiences: students will shadow Columbia Writing Center consultants and research librarians and then practice strategies they learn in consultation with other students. Those who successfully complete this course will be eligible to apply for a peer writing consultant job in the Columbia Writing Center. This course is co-taught by the director of the Writing Center and the undergraduate services librarian.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3394
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3394 001/74499 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Susan Mendelsohn 4 11/15

ENTA UN3785 Studies in Drama: Modern Drama and the Culture of Performance. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). "All the world's a stage" according to Shakespeare, but also according to twentieth century philosophers, sociologists, cultural critics, media theorists, and even corporate executives, who have frequently turned to theater and performance as resonant metaphors for modern culture. These metaphors have come to pervade the way we describe our lives: we "perform" workplace tasks and social "roles;" we describe ourselves as "drama queens", "players"," or just "acting out"; we "stage" ourselves daily on social media for intimate friends and strangers alike, who follow our doings like an audience of fans. But how useful or accurate is this language for describing the world we inhabit? And what distinguishes theater and drama as art forms if life itself has now become a performance? To answer these questions, we will consult some of the most influential theories of theatricality and performance as a condition of modern life. We will also read modern and post-modern drama on the same theme by playwrights such as Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Albee, and Parks.Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Biers (klb2134@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Drama seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2017: ENTA UN3785
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3785 001/29714 F 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Jonathan Robinson-Appels 4 33/25

CLEN UN3792 Film and Law. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.
From its beginnings, film has been preoccupied with law: in cops and robbers silent films, courtroom drama, police procedural, judge reality show, or all the scenes that fill our media-saturated world. What do films and other audio-visual media tell us about what it’s like to come before the law, or about such substantive issues as what counts as murder, war crimes, torture, sexual abuse? How do films model the techniques that lawyers use to sway the passions of their audiences? How do they model the symbolism of their gestures, icons, images? If films and other audio-visual media rewrite legal events, what is their effect: on law? on legal audiences? How is the experience of being a film spectator both like and unlike the experience of being a legal subject? This course investigates such questions by looking at representations of law in film and other audio-visual media. We will seek to understand, first, how film represents law, and, second,how film attempts to shape law (influencing legal norms, intervening in legal regimes). The seminar’s principal texts will be the films themselves, but we will also read relevant legal cases and film theory in order to deepen our understanding of both legal and film regimes

Spring 2017: CLEN UN3792
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3792 001/24056 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Julie Peters 4 15/25

ENGL UN3872 Independent Study. 4 points.

If a student wishes to pursue a research project or a course of study not offered by the department, he or she may apply for an Independent Study. Application: 1. cover sheet with signatures of the professor who will serve as the project sponsor and departmental administrator or director of undergraduate studies; 2. project description in 750 words, including any preliminary work in the field, such as a lecture course(s) or seminar(s); 3. bibliography of primary and secondary works to be read or consulted. Please visit the English and Comparative Literature Department website at http://english.columbia.edu/undergraduate/forms for the cover sheet form or see the administrator in 602 Philosophy Hall for the cover sheet form and to answer any other questions you may have.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3872
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3872 001/72208  
Branka Arsic 4 2

ENGL UN3999 Senior Essay. 3 points.

Open to those who have applied and been accepted into the department's senior essay program only.

Prerequisites: the department's permission.

This course is open only to those who have applied and been accepted into the department's senior essay program. For information about the program, including deadline for application, please visit http://english.columbia.edu/undergraduate/senior-essay-program.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3999 001/85798  
Michael Golston 3 15/25

ENGL GU4011 Scholarly Editing. 3 points.

Introduction to scholarly editing.  Please see department for full description.

Spring 2017: ENGL GU4011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4011 001/80035 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
411 Hamilton Hall
David Yerkes 3 7/20

ENGL UN3980 Writing Machines. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). In Jack London's 1906 short story "The Apostate," an exposé of child labor, the narrator notes of a young millworker: "There had never been a time when he had not been in intimate relationship with machines." Drawing on novels, short stories, dramas, and essays by American and English writers from 1880 to WWII, this course seeks to understand what it means to become "intimate with machines." How did technology shape perception, consciousness, identity, and the understanding of the human in fin de siècle literature? What were the effects of new "writing machines," like the telegraph, phonograph, and typewriter, on traditional conceptions of authorship? How did technology intersect with class, race, and gender politics? What fears and fantasies did new inventions inspire? We will discuss how writers represented the cultural and social impact of technology and why they often felt compelled to invent new literary styles, forms, and movements--such as realism, aestheticism, and modernism--in order to do so. Texts by Herman Melville, Bram Stoker, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jack London, Sophie Treadwell, Thomas Alva Edison, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and others. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Biers (klb2134@columbia.edu) with the subject heading, "Writing Machines seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

Spring 2017: ENGL UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3980 001/14038 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Katherine Biers 4 10/15

University Writing

ENGL CC1010 University Writing. 3 points.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections below 100). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Sustainable Development (sections in the 300s). Features essays that ask how we can develop global communities that meet people's needs now without diminishing the ability of people in the future to do the same. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2017: ENGL CC1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 002/69287 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
302 Hamilton Hall
Katherine Bergevin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 003/69288 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Martin Larson-Xu 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 004/69289 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Hamilton Hall
Elliot Ross 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 007/75539 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Meadhbh McHugh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 008/75540 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 010/75541 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Raluca Albu 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 013/81782 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 014/81783 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
104 Knox Hall
Buck Wanner 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 016/81784 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 017/81785 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Montana Ray 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 018/88025 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Kent Szlauderbach 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 021/88026 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Jeremy Stevens 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 022/88027 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Elizabeth McIntosh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 023/94275 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Nolan Gear 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 025/94276 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Justin Snider 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 026/94277 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Nolan Gear 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 027/94278 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Heather Radke 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 030/73341 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
302 Hamilton Hall
Emily Ciavarella 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 031/73342 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
G'Ra Asim 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 034/73343 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Will Glovinsky 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 036/73345 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Glenn Gordon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 037/93660 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
601b Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Elizabeth Bowen 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 039/93661 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Harald Sundt 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 040/93662 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Allen Durgin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 041/13028 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Carina Schorske 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 045/13036 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 049/13037 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Jason Ueda 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 050/13038 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Jessica Stevens 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 051/19277 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Li Qi Peh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 052/19278 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Sara Novic 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 053/19279 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Allen Durgin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 101/25542 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Carin White 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 102/25543 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Erica Richardson 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 103/25544 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
502 Northwest Corner
Kimberly Takahata 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 104/29610 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Tana Wojczuk 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 105/29611 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Michael Kideckel 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 201/29612 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Kristin Slaney 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 202/60862 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Danielle Drees 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 203/60865 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Olivia Ciacci 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 204/60866 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Liza St. James 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 301/60867 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Bernadette Myers 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 302/92102 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Phillip Polefrone 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 303/92103 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Adam Winters 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 401/92104 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
301 Hamilton Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 402/23355 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Timothy Lundy 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 403/23356 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
613 Hamilton Hall
Stephen Preskill 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 404/23357 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Daniel Pearce 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 501/23358 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Sierra Eckert 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 502/88971 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Jenna Schoen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 503/88972 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Susan Mendelsohn 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 504/88973 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
306 Hamilton Hall
Avery Erwin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 901/88974 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Avia Tadmor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 902/63042 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Mor Sheinbein 3 14/14

ENGL GS1010 University Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL F1010.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections below 100). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Women's and Gender Studies (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Sustainable Development (sections in the 300s). Features essays that ask how we can develop global communities that meet people's needs now without diminishing the ability of people in the future to do the same. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2017: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/63043 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Hannah Rogers 3 10/14
ENGL 1010 002/63044 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Miranda Pennington 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 005/69291 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Elizabeth Walters 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 008/69292 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Matthew Margini 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 009/69293 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Warren Kluber 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 011/69294 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 012/60962 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Tana Wojczuk 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 013/60963 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Alexandra Watson 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 015/60964 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Leah Zander 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 016/98347 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Michael Darnell 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 018/62215 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
306 Hamilton Hall
Noah Shannon 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 019/62216 M W 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Ida Tvedt 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 020/62217 T Th 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Susan Hanrahan 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 021/60980 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Kathleen Savino 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 101/63460 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Aaron Ritzenberg 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 201/63461 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Allen Durgin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 301/63463 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 10/14
ENGL 1010 401/64710 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 501/64711 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 902/64712 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Kristen Martin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 903/64713 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Harald Sundt 3 14/14
Fall 2017: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 201/92076 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Glenn Gordon 3 1/14
ENGL 1010 401/62547 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Nicole Wallack 3 0/14