English and Comparative Literature

http://english.columbia.edu/

Departmental Office: 602 Philosophy; 212-854-3215
http://www.english.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Molly Murray, 406 Philosophy; 212-854-4016; mpm7@columbia.edu

Departmental Advisers:
Prof. Molly Murray, 406 Philosophy; mpm7@columbia.edu

Mr. Aaron Robertson, 602 Philosophy, ar3488@columbia.edu

The program in English fosters the ability to read critically and imaginatively, to appreciate the power of language to shape thought and represent the world, and to be sensitive to the ways in which literature is created and achieves its effects. It has several points of departure, grounding the teaching of critical reading in focused attention to the most significant works of English literature, in the study of the historical and social conditions surrounding literary production and reception, and in theoretical reflection on the process of writing and reading and the nature of the literary work.

The courses the department offers draw on a broad range of methodologies and theoretical approaches, from the formalist to the political to the psychoanalytical (to mention just a few). Ranging from the medieval period to the 21st century, the department teaches major authors alongside popular culture, traditional literary genres alongside verbal forms that cut across media, and canonical British literature alongside postcolonial, global, and trans-Atlantic literatures.

At once recognizing traditional values in the discipline and reflecting its changing shape, the major points to three organizing principles for the study of literature—history, genre, and geography. Requiring students not only to take a wide variety of courses but also to arrange their thinking about literature on these very different grids, the major gives them broad exposure to the study of the past, an understanding of the range of forms that can shape literary meaning, and an encounter with the various geographical landscapes against which literature in English has been produced.

Advising

Students are not assigned specific advisers, but rather each year the faculty members serving on the department’s Committee on Undergraduate Education (CUE) are designated undergraduate advisers (see above). Upon declaring a major or concentration in English, students should meet with the director of undergraduate studies or a delegated faculty adviser to discuss the program, especially to ensure that students understand the requirements.

Students must fill out a Major Requirements Worksheet early in the semester preceding graduation. The worksheet must be reviewed by an adviser and submitted to 602 Philosophy before the registration period for the final semester. The worksheet is available in the English Department or on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/undergraduate/major-requirements. It is this worksheet—not the Degree Audit Report (DAR)—that determines eligibility for graduation as an English major or concentrator.

Course Information

Lectures

Generally, lectures are addressed to a broad audience and do not assume previous course work in the area, unless prerequisites are noted in the description. The size of some lectures is limited. Senior majors have preference unless otherwise noted, followed by junior majors, followed by senior and junior non-majors. Students are responsible for checking for any special registration procedures on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/courses.

Seminars

The department regards seminars as opportunities for students to do advanced undergraduate work in fields in which they have already had some related course experience. With the exception of some CLEN classes (in which, as comparative courses, much material is read in translation), students’ admission to a seminar presupposes their having taken ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods. During the three weeks preceding the registration period, students should check http://english.columbia.edu/courses for application instructions for individual seminars. Applications to seminars are usually due by the end of the week preceding registration. Students should always assume that the instructor’s permission is necessary; those who register without having secured the instructor’s permission are not guaranteed admission.

Departmental Honors

Writing a senior essay is a precondition, though not a guarantee, for the possible granting of departmental honors. After essays are submitted, faculty sponsors deliver a written report on the essay to the department’s Committee on Undergraduate Education (CUE), with a grade for the independent study and, if merited, a recommendation for honors. CUE considers all the essays, including sponsor recommendations, reviews students’ fall semester grades, and determines which students are to receive departmental honors. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

The Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS)

The DAR is a useful tool for students to monitor their progress toward degree requirements, but it is not an official document for the major or concentration, nor should it replace consultation with departmental advisers. The department’s director of undergraduate studies is the final authority on whether requirements for the major have been met. Furthermore, the DAR may be inaccurate or incomplete for any number of reasons—for example, courses taken elsewhere and approved for credit do not show up on the DAR report as fulfilling a specific requirement.

Online Information

Other departmental information—faculty office hours, registration instructions, late changes, etc.—is available on the departmental website.

Professors

  • James Eli Adams
  • Rachel Adams
  • Branka Arsic
  • Christopher Baswell (Barnard)
  • Sarah Cole
  • Nicholas Dames
  • Jenny Davidson
  • Andrew Delbanco
  • Kathy Eden
  • Brent Edwards
  • Stathis Gourgouris
  • Farah Jasmine Griffin
  • Jack Halberstam
  • Saidiya Hartman
  • Marianne Hirsch
  • Jean E. Howard
  • Sharon Marcus
  • Edward Mendelson
  • Robert O’Meally
  • Julie Peters
  • Ross Posnock
  • Austin E. Quigley
  • Bruce Robbins
  • James Shapiro
  • Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (University Professor)
  • Alan Stewart
  • Colm Toibin
  • Gauri Viswanathan
  • William Worthen (Barnard)
  • David M. Yerkes

Associate Professors

  • Julie Crawford
  • Denise Cruz
  • Patricia Dailey
  • Michael Golston
  • T. Austin Graham
  • Erik Gray
  • Matt Hart
  • Eleanor Johnson
  • Molly Murray
  • Frances Negrón-Muntaner
  • Cristobal Silva
  • Joseph Slaughter
  • Maura Spiegel
  • Dennis Tenen
  • Jennifern Wenzel

Assistant Professors

  • Joseph Alvarez
  • Lauren Robertson
  • Dustin Stewart
  •  

Guidelines for all English and Comparative Literature Majors and Concentrators

Declaring a Major in English

Upon declaring a major in English, students should meet with either the director of undergraduate studies or a departmental adviser to discuss the program. Students declaring a major should obtain a Major Requirements Worksheet from 602 Philosophy or on-line, which outlines the requirements.

Additional information, including events and deadlines of particular relevance to undergraduates, is provided at http://english.columbia.edu/undergraduate, the department’s undergraduate homepage. The sidebar on this page provides links to pages with details about undergraduate advising, major and concentration requirements, course options and restrictions, registration procedures, the senior essay, and writing prizes, as well as links to downloadable worksheets for the major and concentration and to course distribution requirement lists, past and present. For detailed information about registration procedures, students should consult http://english.columbia.edu/courses, which explains the requirements and enables students to monitor their own progress.

Newly declared majors should contact the undergraduate assistant in 602 Philosophy Hall and request that their names be added to the department’s electronic mailing list for English majors and concentrators. Because important information now routinely is disseminated through e-mail, it is crucial that students be on this list.

Literary Texts, Critical Methods

The introductory course ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods, together with its companion seminar, ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar, is required for the English major and concentration. It should be taken by the end of the sophomore year. Fulfillment of this requirement is a factor in admission to seminars and to some lectures. This once-a-week faculty lecture, accompanied by a seminar led by an advanced graduate student in the department, is intended to introduce students to the study of literature. Students read works from the three major literary modes (lyric, drama, and narrative), drawn from premodern to contemporary literature, and learn interpretative techniques required by these various modes or genres. This course does not fulfill any distribution requirements.

Senior Essay

The senior essay program is an opportunity for students to explore in depth some literary topic of special interest to them, involving extensive background reading and resulting in an essay (8,000–15,000 words) that constitutes a substantial and original critical or scholarly argument. Students submit proposals in September of their senior year, with acceptance contingent upon the quality of the proposal and the student’s record in the major. Students who are accepted are assigned a faculty sponsor to supervise the project, from its development during the fall semester to its completion in the spring. It is for the spring semester, not the fall, that students officially register for the course, designated as ENGL UN3999 Senior Essay. Senior essays are due in early April.

Course Options and Restrictions

  1. No course at the 1000-level may be counted toward the major.

  2. Speech courses may not be counted toward the major.

  3. Two writing courses or two upper-level literature courses taught in a foreign language, or one of each, may count toward the major, though neither type of course fulfills any distribution requirement. Writing courses that may be applied toward the major include those offered through Columbia’s undergraduate Creative Writing Program and through Barnard College.

  4. Comparative literature courses sponsored by the department (designated as CLEN) may count toward the major. Those sponsored by other departments (e.g. CLFR - Comp Lit French, CPLS - Comp Lit and Society) are not counted toward the major without permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Literature courses taught in English in language departments do not count toward the major.

  5. No more than two courses taken during the summer session may be counted toward the major.

  6. Courses offered through the Barnard English Department may count toward the major or concentration. Before taking Barnard courses, students should verify with the director of undergraduate studies whether and how such courses may count toward the major.

  7. For courses taken abroad or at other American institutions to count toward the major, students must obtain approval of the director of undergraduate studies.

  8. To register for more than 42 points (including advanced standing credit) in English and comparative literature, a student majoring in English must obtain permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

  9. No more than five courses taken elsewhere may be applied to the major, four to the concentration.

  10. One independent study (for at least 3 points) may count toward the major but cannot satisfy any distribution requirements; likewise, the Senior Essay may count toward the major but fulfills no requirements. Students may not count both an Independent Study and the Senior Essay toward the major.

  11. Courses assigned a grade of D may not be counted toward the major.

  12. Only the first course taken to count toward the major can be taken Pass/D/Fail.


Major in English

Please read Guidelines for all English and Comparative Literature Majors and Concentrators above.

Ten departmental courses (for a minimum of 30 points) and, in the process, fulfillment of the following requirements. See course information above for details on fulfilling the distribution requirements.

  1. ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods and ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar
  2. Period distribution: Three courses primarily dealing with periods before 1800, only one of which may be a course in Shakespeare
  3. Genre distribution: One course in each of the following three generic categories:
    • Poetry
    • Prose fiction/narrative
    • Drama/film/new media
  4. Geography distribution: One course in each of the following three geographical categories:
    • British
    • American
    • Comparative/global (comparative literature, postcolonial, global English, trans-Atlantic, diaspora)

Course Distribution Lists are available in the department and on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/course-distribution-lists to help students determine which courses fulfill which requirements. A single course can satisfy more than one distribution requirement. For example, a Shakespeare lecture satisfies three requirements at once: not only does it count as one of the three required pre-1800 courses it also, at the same time, fulfills both a genre and a geography distribution requirement (drama and British, respectively). Courses not on the distribution list may count toward the major requirements only with the permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Two writing courses or upper-level literature courses taught in a foreign language, or one of each, may count toward the ten required courses.


Concentration in English

Please read Guidelines for all English and Comparative Literature Majors and Concentrators above.

Eight departmental courses and, in the process, fulfillment of the following requirements. See course information above for details on fulfilling the distribution requirements.

  1. ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods and ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar
  2. Period distribution: Two courses dealing with periods before 1800, only one of which may be a course in Shakespeare
  3. Genre distribution: Two courses, each chosen from a different genre category (see above)
  4. Geography distribution: Two courses, each chosen from a different geography category (see above)

See the Course Distribution Lists, available in the department or on-line at http://english.columbia.edu/course-distribution-lists, to determine which courses fulfill which requirements. All of the restrictions outlined for the English major also apply for the concentration in English.


Comparative Literature Program

Students who wish to major in comparative literature should consult the Comparative Literature and Society section of this Bulletin.

Fall 2018

Introduction to the Major

ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students who register for ENGL UN3001 must also register for one of the sections of ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods.

This course is intended to introduce students to the advanced study of literature. Students will read works from different genres (poetry, drama, and prose fiction), drawn from the medieval period to the present day, learning the different interpretative techniques required by each. The course also introduces students to a variety of critical schools and approaches, with the aim both of familiarizing them with these methodologies in the work of other critics and of encouraging them to make use of different methods in their own critical writing. This course (together with the companion seminar ENGL UN3011) is a requirement for the English Major and Concentration. It should be taken as early as possible in a student's career. Fulfillment of this requirement will be a factor in admission to seminars and to some lectures.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/75492 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Michael Golston 4 69/90
Fall 2018: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/61494 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Edward Mendelson 4 76/80

ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar. 0 points.

Prerequisites: Students who register for ENGL UN3011 must also register for ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods lecture.

This seminar, led by an advanced graduate student in the English doctoral program, accompanies the faculty lecture ENGL UN3001. The seminar both elaborates upon the topics taken up in the lecture and introduces other theories and methodologies. It also focuses on training students to integrate the terms, techniques, and critical approaches covered in both parts of the course into their own critical writing, building up from brief close readings to longer research papers.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/10067 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Martin Larson-Xu 0 15/18
ENGL 3011 002/67812 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Bernadette Myers 0 13/18
ENGL 3011 003/69683 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
402 Hamilton Hall
Therese Cox 0 17/18
ENGL 3011 004/72232 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Tiana Reid 0 12/18
ENGL 3011 005/20843 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Danielle Drees 0 10/18
Fall 2018: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/17984 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Li Qi Peh 0 14/20
ENGL 3011 002/10179 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
402 Hamilton Hall
Nicholas Mayer 0 17/20
ENGL 3011 003/13805 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Daniella Cadiz Bedini 0 14/20
ENGL 3011 004/14933 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Jonathan Reeve 0 15/20
ENGL 3011 005/67286 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Jessica Engebretson 0 16/18

Medieval

ENGL BC3154 Chaucer Before Canterbury. 3 points.

Chaucer's innovations with major medieval forms: lyric, the extraordinary dream visions, and the culmination of medieval romance, Troilus and Criseyde. Approaches through close analysis, and feminist and historicist interpretation. Background readings in medieval life and culture.

Fall 2018: ENGL BC3154
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3154 001/01268 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
409 Barnard Hall
Christopher Baswell 3 9

ENGL GU4793 English Translations of the Bible. 3 points.

English translations of the Bible from Tyndale to the present.

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4793
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4793 001/72546 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
503 Hamilton Hall
David Yerkes 3 32/40

ENGL GU4789 Writing the Nation: Ethnicity & Identity in Early Medieval England. 4 points.

Anglo-Saxon England was a political fiction, an imagined community of a single, distinct nation unified in identity by descent and religion that proved useful justification for rulers with expansionist aspirations and conquerors alike, but also for religious communities. This course will explore how authors of early Medieval England exploited history and literature to define social identities and make claims about their present moment through a range of materials, including vernacular poetry, chronicles, law, saints’ lives, and homilies.

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4789
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4789 001/12696 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Jay Gates 4 7/25

Renaissance

ENGL UN3335 Shakespeare I. 3 points.

Enrollment is limited to 60.

(Lecture). This course will cover the histories, comedies, tragedies, and poetry of Shakespeare’s early career. We will examine the cultural and historical conditions that informed Shakespeare’s drama and poetry; in the case of drama, we will also consider the formal constraints and opportunities of the early modern English commercial theater. We will attend to Shakespeare’s biography while considering his work in relation to that of his contemporaries. Ultimately, we will aim to situate the production of Shakespeare’s early career within the highly collaborative, competitive, and experimental theatrical and literary cultures of late sixteenth-century England.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3335
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3335 001/24711 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
602 Hamilton Hall
James Shapiro 3 55/60

ENGL UN3406 English Prose Fiction in the Renaissance . 4 points.

The rise of the English novel is routinely dated to the early eighteenth century, but there had been a thriving market for prose fiction for at least two centuries. This seminar course tracks the experiments in English prose fiction in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, through such genres as utopian travel narrative, picaresque, romance, spiritual autobiography, and criminal biography. Authors to be studied include Thomas More, George Gascoigne, Thomas Nashe, Philip Sidney, Francis Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, John Bunyan, Aphra Behn, and Daniel Defoe.


Each seminar will be based on one primary text that everyone should read. Secondary reading will be made available via Courseworks: designated students will take responsibility for presenting this material each week.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3406
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3406 001/88531 T 8:10am - 10:00am
612 Philosophy Hall
Alan Stewart 4 7/25

CLEN UN3806 Renaissance Women Writers: Gender, Sexuality, Textuality. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). This course examines literary and artistic works by and about women from the 16th and 17th centuries alongside recent historical and theoretical criticism on gender and sexuality in the Renaissance. We will cover a range of literary genres that reflect and produce early modern notions of sex and gender in England, France, Italy and Spain, as well as medical guides, self-portraits, conduct manuals, and scurrilous tracts on females behavior. Topics include Queens (rulers) and Queens (prostitutes); cross-dressing and biological difference; the status of work and school; separatist communities and same-sex eroticism; kinship, patronage and domesticity; the gender and economics of authorship; the sexuality of racial and national identity. Readings in the original language provided and strongly encouraged. Secondary readings or films will be provided each week. 

Fall 2018: CLEN UN3806
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3806 001/23198 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Bianca Calabresi 4 18/25

18th and 19th Century

ENGL UN3823 Jane Austen and the Enlightenment Mind. 4 points.

This course explores the conceptual origins of "sense" and "sensibility" in the work of the eighteenth-century's most radical thinkers. We will discover how Jane Austen responded to and reformulated major intellectual and political debates of the Enlightenment, and so brought the novel to full fruition as a philosophical medium. We will ground our approach to Austen's novels in contemporary theories of human behavior, psychology, and right--from Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who devised a system of education which might utterly subject the female spirit to male desire; to Mary Wollstonecraft and Ottobah Cugoano, whose philosophies respectively equate marriage with slavery, and urge slaves to rise and destroy their captors.  We will read in full most of Austen's completed novels and a sampling of her juveneilia, as well as extensive excerpts from major philosophical works of the Enlightenment. Interspersed throughout the course will be a handful of landmark critical texts addressing the role of gender and race in Austen's works. Students will leave the course Austen experts! They will also emerge well-versed in certain major arguments of Hume, Rousseau, and Wollstencraft, as well as a number of less-widely canonized authors whose works were nevertheless high highly influential in their time. The critical methods learned will provide students with a launching point for sophisticated, historically-based study of fascinating and challenging authors from any place and time.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3823
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3823 001/88746 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Katherine Bergevin 4 5/15

ENGL UN3855 Early American Ecologies. 4 points.

The course is a survey of the canonical texts of the Early Americas, with emphasis on how those writers experienced the natural world of their new country. Some of them had to cope with extreme cold, others with tropical heat. Some of them encountered abundance, others sparsity and famine. They all encountered new life forms – from marine life to birds, reptiles and animals. They had to cope with frequent earthquakes and hurricanes, and classify newly discovered species of vegetal life. What they saw, however, they read not only through the lenses of natural history, but also theologically and politically. For some, the natural world was rich with signs sent by God for them to interpret, for others it was a political space that they organized according to the logic either of a theocracy or the plantation. Addressing the early natural histories of the Americas, the class will also pay special attention to their politics, and investigate how the ecological spaces that the colonist encountered shaped their politics and ethics.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3855
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3855 001/85279 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Branka Arsic 4 15/25

ENGL UN3705 Sonnets and Elegies. 4 points.

This course examines two of the most important genres of Western lyric poetry.  We will begin our study of the elegiac tradition with classical pastoral elegies (Theocritus, Moschus, Bion, Virgil) before continuing with major English-language elegies from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, including works by Milton, Shelley, Whitman, Hardy, and Auden.  The second half of the course will explore the tradition of the amatory sonnet sequence that begins with Petrarch; we will read works by Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  The course concludes with Alfred Tennyson’s In Memoriam, which offers a combination of both genres.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3705
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3705 001/86396 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Erik Gray 4 9/25

ENGL GU4402 Romantic Poetry. 3 points.

Open to all undergraduates and graduate students.

(Lecture). This course examines major British poets of the period 1789-1830. We will be focusing especially on the poetry and poetic theory of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, and John Keats. We will also be reading essays, reviews, and journal entries by such figures as Robert Southey, William Hazlitt, and Dorothy Wordsworth.

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4402 001/18348 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
633 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Erik Gray 3 48/70

ENGL UN3994 Romanticism and the Experience of Freedom. 4 points.

“Freedom” was perhaps the central watchword of Romantic-era Britain, yet this concept remains exceedingly, notoriously difficult to pin down. Taking a cue from the sociologist and historian Orlando Patterson, who writes that “freedom is one those of values better experienced than defined,” this seminar will explore the variegated experiences of freedom (and its opposites) in the literature of British Romanticism. Romanticism unfolds alongside major revolutions in America, France, and Haiti, and we will begin by examining how the differing conceptions of freedom offered in the wake of these revolutions and their receptions galvanized writers and thinkers in Britain. From here, we will probe the expressions, possibilities, implications, and limits of freedom as outlined in various domains: political, individual, aesthetic, economic, philosophical, religious, and beyond. What does, say, Wordsworth’s claim to freedom to experiment in poetic form have to do with political and social freedom? In situating Romanticism alongside developments like revolution, the rise of globalization, and the Atlantic slave trade, we will be particularly interested in confronting how the explosion of claims to freedom in this period emerges together with and in response to the proliferation of enslaved, colonized, and otherwise constrained or hindered bodies.


As we read poems, novels, slave narratives, philosophical essays, political tracts, and more, a fundamental question for the course will concern the relation between seemingly oppositional terms: to what extent, and how, do notions of freedom in Romanticism depend on the necessary exclusion of the unfree? Since the Romantic age sees the birth of concepts of freedom still prevalent in our own day, this course will offer an opportunity to reflect critically on the present. To that end, we will take up some contemporary theoretical analyses and critiques of freedom, both directly in relation to Romanticism and reaching beyond.

ENGL GU4408 19th C British Novel. 3 points.

The nineteenth century is considered the heyday of the novel. By the end of this course, you will understand why. Novels to be read: Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey; Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre; Anthony Trollope, Barchester Towers; Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White; George Eliot, Daniel Deronda; Bram Stoker, Dracula. Our goals in this course will be:


1) to discuss what these novels teach us about life;


2) to learn how to relate literary works to their historical circumstances;


3) to define the novel as a genre;


4) to explore the relationship between realism and counter-realisms (gothic, melodrama, sensation, fantasy, the supernatural);


5) to acquire a technical understanding of novelistic form by analyzing how novelists use point of view and narrative voice; construct character, delineate space, and represent time; and establish symmetries that give even the baggiest monsters coherence.

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4408
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4408 001/19694 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Sharon Marcus 3 30/50

CLEN UN3934 The Bildungsroman in 19th C. 4 points.

The Bildungsroman (the novel of education or formation) was a dominant genre of nineteenth-century literature. Tracing the lives of characters through familiar coming-of-age plots—growing up, leaving home, and making one’s way in the world—the Bildungsroman showcases the novel’s ability to express both individual hopes and social constraints, youthful ideals and mature realizations, “great expectations” and “lost illusions.” In this seminar, we will undertake an in-depth study of several classics of the genre by Goethe, Austen, Charlotte Brontë, Flaubert, Hardy, and Wharton. Along the way we will touch on many of the topics and essential tensions of the Bildungsroman: love, desire, and courtship; the family and its substitutes; class, money, and social mobility; the shaping role of gender and the limited social choices afforded to women; and the vocation of art or writing as an alternative to more mainstream careers. We will read a selection of critical materials on the Bildungsroman, and on style and genre more broadly. We will also consider accounts of social and moral development as a way to think about the relationship between literature and historical change.

Fall 2018: CLEN UN3934
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3934 001/64030 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Daniel Williams 4 14/25

ENGL GU4593 Seduction, Slavery, Sublimity: The Early American Novel. 3 points.

We’ll trace the remarkable developments of the novel form in the U.S, from the decade after the Revolution (when Americans first begin to write long prose fictions) to the decade before the Civil War (when the American novel claimed its ascent to literary Art). All along the way, we will be reading “novels,” yes, but it will quickly become apparent how varied a thing this noun actually names; we’ll read a broad range of the novel’s different modes (the epistolary novel, the novel of seduction, the gothic, the historical novel, sentimental-domestic fiction, the Romance). We begin in the 1780s, when the American novel is just trying to find its feet, and yet sees itself as having a profound political duty to serve the national interest. Even fictional writings about sexual conduct—the seduction novels with which we begin the course—charged themselves with this grave nationalist purpose. We then follow the form through the early nineteenth century, as it becomes obsessed with the topics of race and violence that threaten to destroy the young nation. As strange as it may sound, these novelists seemed to believe that they could resolve massive real-world crises, particularly those surrounding slavery and white-Indian conflicts over land ownership, in fictional terms. We end in the 1850s, when American novels instead began to insist on their separateness and autonomy from poltics and the world as it is, boasting of their ability to transcend everyday life to achieve “Literature” with a capital L. We thus spend the last month of the course with the widely advertised literary masterworks of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville, asking ourselves how the novel had progressed from an openly didactic form of social consciousness to a species of writing that could open a world of sublime aesthetic experience. Readings will include works by: Hannah Webster Foster (The Coquette), Charles Brockden Brown (Edgar Huntly), James Fenimore Cooper (The Last of the Mohicans), Harriet Beecher Stowe (Uncle Tom’s Cabin), Martin Delany (Blake), Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter), and Herman Melville (Moby-Dick and “Benito Cereno”). 

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4593
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4593 001/92546 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Ezra Tawil 3 17/50

ENGL GU4299 London 1729-1779: Journalism, Empire, Theater. 4 points.

These days, the ubiquitous nexus of news and entertainment can elicit reactions ranging from an exasperated scowl to a surrendering shrug. But the phenomenon has a long history. When newspapers first appeared, in the early 1600s, the theater reacted with alarm, terrified that this upstart medium would deprive it of its status as sole oracle. In the 1700s, though, the two media discovered nearly limitless possibilities for synergy, collusive and competitive: ads, reviews, celebrity profiles, stage satires of news stories, show business, the news business, and the wide, overwhelmed, and overwhelming worlds—of power, commerce, and politics; of Britain, Europe, and empire—to which news-page and live stage laid equal, topical claim. We'll track these transactions in newspapers spanning half a century; in plays by John Gay, Henry Fielding, David Garrick, Elizabeth Inchbald, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, and Hannah Cowley; and in all the circumambient media that at once consumed, and were eagerly consumed by, steadily proliferating London publics. For better and for worse, infotainment begins here.

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4299
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4299 001/66597 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Stuart Sherman 4 16/25

20th and 21st Century

ENGL UN3712 Henry James & Edith Wharton. 4 points.

James & Wharton, America's two greatest novelists in the half century after the civil war and the eve of the first world war, were friends and fellow cosmopolitans, at home in the US  & Europe, chroniclers of an emerging transatlantic urban modernity traversing New York, London, Paris, Rome, Geneva. Their fiction often portrays glamorous surfaces and intricate social texts that their brilliant heroines --Isabel Archer  of The Portrait of a Lady & Lily Bart of The House of Mirth,  for example--negotiate with wit and subtlety, confusion and daring,  amidst fear and fascination. They find themselves immersed in bruising plots--crafted by society's disciplinary imperatives and by their creators, the latter standing in uneasy complicity with the social order even as they seek its transformation.  Giving female protagonists unprecedented boldness and ambition, Wharton & James chart how intense exertion of will and desire collides with "the customs of the country," to cite the title of a great Wharton novel. We will read the three novels mentioned above as well as Wharton's Summer & Ethan Frome and James's "Daisy Miller," Washington Square & The Ambassadors.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3712
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3712 001/96796 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Ross Posnock 4 17/25

CLEN UN3740 The Thirties: Metropole and Colony. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.

(Seminar). This course focuses on the tumultuous 1930s, which witnessed the growth of anticolonial movements, the coming to power of totalitarian and fascist regimes, and calls for internationalism and a new world vision, among other developments. Even as fascism laid down its roots in parts of Europe, the struggle for independence from European colonial rule accelerated in Asia and Africa, and former subjects engaged with ideas and images about the shape of their new nations, in essays, fiction, poetry, and theater. Supporters and critics of nationalism existed on both sides of the metropole-colony divide, as calls for internationalism sought to stem the rising tide of ethnocentric thinking and racial particularism in parts of Europe as well as the colonies. We'll read works from the metropole and the colonies to track the crisscrossing of ideas, beginning with writers who anticipated the convulsive events of the 1930s and beyond (E.M. Forster, H.G. Wells, Gandhi), then moving on to writers who published some of their greatest work in the 1930s (Huxley, Woolf, C.L.R. James, Mulk Raj Anand), and finally concluding with authors who reassessed the 1930s from a later perspective (George Lamming). Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Viswanathan (gv6@columbia.edu) by noon on Wednesday, April 13th, with the subject heading, "The Thirties seminar." In your message, include basic information: name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

Fall 2018: CLEN UN3740
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3740 001/26541 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Gauri Viswanathan 4 11/25

CLEN UN3933 Postcolonial Literature. 4 points.

In this course, we will consider postcolonial literary texts through three main lenses: how they narrate the nation, how they negotiate the idea of displacement, and how they rewrite dominant European narratives. We will consider tropes such as family, exile, hybridity, and marginality as we investigate texts through these lenses. Some organizing questions for our investigations include—but are not limited to—the following: how is the idea of national belonging figured in these texts? How are ideas of home and its loss configured in these contexts? How do they interrogate “master texts,” and what do these interrogations accomplish? What can we understand by considering the interplay of these questions? Throughout the semester, we will reflect on what makes “postcolonial literature” cohere as a field of inquiry.


Authors we will read include Salman Rushdie, V.S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Yvette Christiansë, Bapsi Sidwa, and Jean Rhys. While this course’s primary focus is literature, we will also read selections from postcolonial theorists such as Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak, Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, Paul Gilroy, and Chandra Mohanty to direct and deepen our readings of literary texts.

Fall 2018: CLEN UN3933
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3933 001/87797 W 2:00pm - 4:00pm
303 Union Theological Seminary
Sailaja Sastry 4 18/25

ENGL UN3662 African American Novelists and the Question of Justice. 4 points.

This course asks, “What conceptions of Justice emerge from a selection of works by canonical African American writers?  Are there other moral/ethical/social values that emerge as more significant than Justice ?” We open with an exploration of Justice in the works of the Greek dramatist, Aeschylus, the Hebrew Bible and recent scholarship on Pre-Colonial West Africa in order to consider what concepts of Justice African-American writers have inherited or that have informed them in less formal ways.  We then turn to texts by Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ernest Gaines, James Baldwin and Toni Morrison,  to examine the way these writers engage, negotiate and critique the relationship between Justice and Race in the United States. 

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3662
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3662 001/75881 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Farah Griffin 4 25/25

ENGL UN3635 Speculative Fiction and the Environment in 20th-Century America. 4 points.

The act of speculation is central to our thinking about the environment, be it through projections of catastrophe, visions of a more sustainable society, or conceptualizations of vast and complex planetary systems. This course will explore this form of speculation by tracing the intersection of speculative fiction and environmentalism in the American twentieth century, the setting for the maturation of the genre and the movement alike. For the purposes of this course, “speculative fiction” (SF) will be taken to include the commonly accepted genre of science-fiction and fantasy as well as any work of fiction based on a counterfactual present world, an extrapolative future, an alternative past, or a reality entirely imagined. More conceptually, we will consider SF in the expansive sense Donna Haraway proposes: “science fiction, speculative fabulation, string figures, speculative feminism, science fact, so far,” asking what these distinct but related acts of mind can reveal about environmental thought. The semester will be divided into pre-1960 and post-1960 works, a boundary that on one hand divides the Golden Age and New Wave periods of science fiction, and on the other hand roughly marks the birth of the modern environmental movement. As the course moves chronologically through representative works of environmental SF, it will also trace the development of foundational concepts in ecology and environmentalism by cross-referencing works of SF with texts in ecology and environmentalist theory that either established or discuss contemporaneous theories. This exploration will touch on topics such as: ecofeminism, ecological economics, ecological succession and the climax community, the Gaia hypothesis, environmental justice, and early recognitions of climate change.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3635
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3635 001/28279 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Phillip Polefrone 4 13/15

CLEN UN3771 The Literary History of Atrocity. 3 points.

Sometime around the publication of Garcia Marquez’s classic novel One Hundred Years of Solitude in 1967, novelists who wanted to make a claim to ethical and historical seriousness began to include a scene of extreme violence that, like the banana worker massacre in Garcia Marquez, seemed to offer a definitive guide to the moral landscape of the modern world. This course will explore both the modern literature that was inspired by Garcia Marquez’s example and the literature that led up to this extraordinary moment—for example, the literature dealing with the Holocaust, with the dropping of the atomic bomb, with the Japanese invasion of China in the 1930s, and with the Allied bombing of the German cities. It will also ask how extraordinary this moment in fact was, looked at from the perspective of literature as a whole, by inspecting earlier examples of atrocities committed in classical antiquity, in the Crusades, against Native Americans and (in Tolstoy) against the indigenous inhabitants of the Caucasus. Before the concept of the non-combatant had been defined, could there be a concept of the atrocity? Could a culture accuse itself of misconduct toward the members of some other culture? In posing these and related questions, the course offers itself as a major but untold chapter both in world literature and in the moral history of humankind.

Fall 2018: CLEN UN3771
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3771 001/82996 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Bruce Robbins 3 45/54

ENGL UN3520 Introduction To Asian American Literature and Culture. 3 points.

This course is a survey of Asian North American literature and its contexts.  To focus our discussion, the course centers on examining recurring cycles of love and fear in Asian North American relations from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. We will first turn to what became known as “yellow peril,” one effect of exclusion laws that monitored the entrance of Asians into the United States and Canada during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the corresponding phenomenon of Orientalism, the fascination with a binary of Asia and the West. The second section of the course will focus on how Asian North American authors respond to later cycles of love and fear, ranging from the forgetting of Japanese internment in North America and the occupation of the Philippines; to the development of the model minority mythology during the Cold War. The final section will examine intimacies and exclusions in contemporary forms of migration, diaspora, and community communities.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3520
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3520 001/60030 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Denise Cruz 3 45/60

ENGL GU4603 Urban Modernism: Realism & Naturalism. 3 points.

(Lecture). The course will provide a trans-atlantic comparative perspective on the emergent world of urban modernity and mass market capitalism, including the pleasures and perils of city life--department stores, prostitution, hotels, railway cars. In addition to some of the great American novelists after the Civil War--Henry James,Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton--we will also read the great French novelist Emile Zola and Georg Simmel, the Berlin theorist of urban phenomenology.

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4603
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4603 001/98147 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Ross Posnock 3 29/54

ENGL GU4708 British Modernist Novel. 3 points.

Against the backdrop of dizzying advances in technology, an array of newly emerging social and political forces, and an unprecedented wave of invention across the arts, the first decades of the twentieth century witnessed a series of dramatic innovations in the novel form. This course examines some of the most compelling representatives of this transformation from Britain and its empire. Close examination of these texts’ formal intricacies will be complemented by attention to the history and theory of prose fiction and to intellectual, artistic, and other historical developments these works address. Authors studied may include Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Rebecca West, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bowen, Raja Rao, George Lamming, and Samuel Beckett.

Fall 2018: ENGL GU4708
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4708 001/96999 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201a Philosophy Hall
Douglas Mao 3 20/30

ENGL UN3850 Fiction, Intersubjectivity, and Relationality . 4 points.

We begin in relation, helpless and dependent. "You, reader, are alive today, reading this, because someone once adequately policed your mouth exploring," writes Maggie Nelson. This course will explore the "relational turn," which proposes a shift from the model of an autonomous, discrete, self-determining individuality, to an understanding of the self as comprehensible only within a tapestry of relationships, past and present, historical and contextual. In this light, the basic '"unit of study" is not the individual as a separate entity, but as an interactional field, one that craves mutual recognition. In a parallel move, Mikhail Bakhtin offers that every utterance is a "two-sided act;" it is a "territory shared," the product of "the reciprocal relationship between the addresser and addressee."  As we read, we too are read. Indeed, stories, novels and films present us with complex interactional fields in which we learn to ruminate on the subjective meanings humans attach to their behavior.  Reading fiction is one of the ways we develop intersubjective capacities, what Max Weber calls interpretive understanding or Verstehen.  Fictions have much to teach us about the under-examined relational features of our own lives.  They locate readers in a shaped world where we feel the cumulative weight of things left unsaid, where we fill in the narrative gaps, where we are confronted with the dynamics of self and other, connection and rupture, perception and evaluation. This course offers a deep dive into theories of intersubjectivity and psychoanalytic writings on object relations and relational theory.  We will single out works by Max Weber, Martin Buber, Mikhail Bakhtin, D.W. Winnicott, Franz Fanon, Judith Butler, Stephen A. Mitchell, Edouard Glissant and a few others toward readings of fictions by Bechdel, Coetzee, Dostoevsky, Ishiguro, Kurtz, Morrison, Sebald, Rankine, Woolf, and films by Michael Roemer, Mike Leigh, Spike Jonz, and Lance Hammer. 

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3850
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3850 001/69695 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Maura Spiegel 4 8/25

Special Topics

ENGL UN3002 Humanities Texts, Critical Skills. 4 points.

This course aims to equip students with critical tools for approaching, reading, and striving with literary and philosophical texts—ancient as well as modern. To this end, we will be working closely with a set of texts that range in date from the 8th/7th c. BCE to the 20th century C, including: Homer, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Du Bois, Nabokov and Rankine. Our seminar will operate on the assumption that we cannot know “what” these texts say or “what” their authors mean unless we come to grips with how they say what they say and how they mean what they mean. In pursuit of some answers, we will master the skill of reading quickly but carefully, balancing attention to the literary craft of our texts with scrutiny of their underlying arguments and agendas.
Requires Instructor’s permission— please write to Richard Roderick rr3059@columbia.edu to set up a meeting with instructors

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3002 001/66297 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Amy Johnson 4 20/25
Fall 2018: ENGL UN3002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3002 001/12847 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Emily Bloom 4 12/25

ENTA UN3701 Drama, Theatre, Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.

(Seminar). Theatre typically exceeds the claims of theory. What does this tell us about both theatre and theory? We will consider why theatre practitioners often provide the most influential theoretical perspectives, how the drama inquires into (among other things) the possibilities of theatre, and the various ways in which the social, spiritual, performative, political, and aesthetic elements of drama and theatre interact. Two papers, weekly responses, and a class presentation are required. Readings include Aristotle, Artaud, Bharata, Boal, Brecht, Brook, Castelvetro, Craig, Genet, Grotowski, Ibsen, Littlewood, Marlowe, Parks, Schechner, Shakespeare, Sowerby, Weiss, and Zeami. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Austin Quigley (aeq1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Drama, Theatre, Theory seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2018: ENTA UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3701 001/18523 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Austin Quigley 4 11/20

CLEN UN3983 WRITING ACROSS MEDIA. 4 points.

This course is structured as a comparative investigation of innovative modernist and postmodernist strategies for conjoining or counterpoising literature with other media, such as photography, painting, film, music, and dance. We will focus on experimental writing practices that deliberately combine disciplines and genres — mixing political commentary with memoir, philosophy with ethnography, journalism with history — with special attention to the ways that formal innovation lends itself to political critique. The course will be especially concerned with the ways that the friction among media seems to allow new or unexpected expressive possibilities. The syllabus is structured to allow us to consider a variety of edges between literature and other media — spaces where writing is sometimes taken to be merely raw material to be set, or ancillary comment on a work already composed (e.g. libretto, screenplay, gloss, caption, song lyric, voiceover, liner note). Examples may include lecture-performances by Gertrude Stein, John Cage, Spalding Gray, and Anne Carson; talk-dances by Bill T. Jones and Jerome Bel; sound poems by Kurt Schwitters, Langston Hughes, and Amiri Baraka; graphic novels by Art Spiegelman, Joshua Dysart, and Alison Bechdel; language-centered visual art by Vito Acconci, Carl Andre, Martha Rosler, and Jean-Michel Basquiat; texts including photographs or drawings by Wallker Evans and James Agee, Roland Barthes, W. G. Sebald, Aleksandar Hemon, Theresa Cha, John Yau, and John Keene; and hypertext/online compositions by Shelley Jackson, among others. Requirements will include in-class presentations and regular short structured writing assignments, as well as a 10-12 page final research paper. 

Fall 2018: CLEN UN3983
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3983 001/86346 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Brent Edwards 4 17/17

ENGL BC3151 Bad Feelings: The Uses of Literature in Difficult Times. 4 points.

This course will explore the purposes of literary study--and, by extension, humanistic education--during periods of turmoil. Working in sustained dialogue with one another, we will explore the treatment of emotions such as despair, anxiety, loss, fury & ecstasy in a wide variety of literary texts, ranging from literature that is ancient (e.g., Sophocles, Euripides) to early modern (William Shakespeare, Margaret Cavendish) to modern (Virginia Woolf, Ralph Ellison, Elena Ferrante). In the process, we will explore various schools of critical theory, such as Aristotle’s Poetics (including the ancient theory of catharsis), psychoanalysis, and feminism, in a context where the stakes of these intellectual traditions will come to the fore. ​

ENGL UN3950 Poetics of the Warrior. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.

(Seminar). This course of distinguished poetry about warriors and warfare goes to the intersection of disciplines, where warrior and poet together compete and excel--ingeniously, formally, passionately, consequentially--as allies in dire contest against annihilation and despair. Homer's Iliad heads our list of exemplary titles selected from ancient and classical, mediaeval and early modern sources, including, among others, Sophocles' Ajax, and Philoctetes; Beowulf; Song of Roland; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; The Tale of the Heike; Shakespeare's Henry V; and Milton's Paradise Lost. We also will read histories, memoirs, oratory, and guidebooks, from Yuzan's Budoshoshinshu to General Patton's "The Secret of Victory," from Vegetius' De Re Militari to U.S. Army Field Manual (FM) 6-22. Our reading is historically broad enough to prove the range of virtues, precepts, codes and rules of martial character and action. Yet our poetry also excels in vision and in virtuosity quite apart from how it might cultivate the norms of aristeía, chivalry, or bushido, so that certain of our questions about form and style or imaginative effects might differ in kind from other questions about the closeness or disparity of the practical warrior and the poetic warrior, and the extent to which the latter elevates and inspires the former's conception of himself in times of war and peace. We shall consider how battle narratives which excel as poetry and ring true for the warrior, appealing to his wit and outlook, might replenish the aggrieved and battle-weary mind; how a war poem's beautifully formed and lucidly rendered chaos remembers and regains for him the field of action. Toward my interest in the range of possibilities for military literature as a discipline of study, I welcome not only the novice whose interest is avid but the student knowledgeable about military topics in literature, history, political and social philosophy, and especially the student, who, having served in the Armed Forces, can bring to the seminar table a contemporary military perspective and the fruits of practical wisdom. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Giordani (mg2644@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Poetics of Warrior seminar." In your message, include your name, school, major, year of study, relevant courses taken, and a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Fall 2018: ENGL UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3950 001/13396 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
212d Lewisohn Hall
Marianne Giordani 4 16/15

CLEN GU4559 Literature and Intersectional Feminisms. 4 points.

The term “intersectional feminism” has seen renewed currency in the last year or so, but the methodologies and theories of intersectional feminisms have a much longer history. Kimberlé Crenshaw first theorized “intersectional feminism” as a critical framework in the 1990s. Crenshaw’s initial formation, however (as she herself has recognized), was conversant with a longer history of woman-of-color, transnational, and postcolonial feminisms. This seminar focuses on historicizing and examining contemporary literature through an intersectional approach that combines woman-of-color feminisms, transnational and global feminisms, postcolonial studies, queer studies, and disability studies. How do these texts imagine these crossings? What possible complexities, conflicts, or coalitions emerge? Since formal innovation has long been critical to foundational work in gender and sexuality studies scholars and writers, who often weave together art, practice, and politics, we will read theory as literature and literature as theory, and we will closely analyze links between intersectional feminisms and form, aesthetics, and genre.

Fall 2018: CLEN GU4559
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4559 001/66246 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Denise Cruz 4 15/25

ENTA UN3973 WAR PLAYS. 4 points.

Dramatic art arose as a means of reckoning with war. The first known plays dramatized episodes from the Trojan War, for ancient Athenian festivals celebrating the city-state's territorial expansion, and promoting universal military conscription. Renaissance drama, emerging shortly after the invention of state-centered "modern war," took the "war story" as its meta-plot, and helped construe war as an intelligible, rule bound, and legitimate means of defining and defending the early modern state. More recently, the rise of "New Wars," which blur the distinction between inter-state war, organized crime, and human rights violations, has been a primary subject for the "Post-Dramatic Theatre" that decomposes the traditional logics and structures of dramatic narratives, characters, and worlds. This course proceeds from the premise that drama -- which typically involves dialogic conflict in a bracketed space, lasting a certain duration and leading to recognition, purgation, and the establishment of a new order -- has always been a privileged form, site, and medium for thinking through a culture's relationship to war. And it surveys major works from 2500 years of theatre history, to interrogate how the artform has been used to stage, aestheticize, exact, critique, and come to terms of war -- in its complex interplay of violence and imagination, affect and structure, narrative and space. 

Fall 2018: ENTA UN3973
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3973 001/26396 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Warren Kluber 4 9/15

ENGL UN3792 Film and Law. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

From its beginnings, film has been preoccupied with law: in cops and robbers silent films, courtroom drama, police procedural, judge reality show, or all the scenes that fill our media-saturated world. What do films and other audio-visual media tell us about what it’s like to come before the law, or about such substantive issues as what counts as murder, war crimes, torture, sexual abuse? How do films model the techniques that lawyers use to sway the passions of their audiences? How do they model the symbolism of their gestures, icons, images? If films and other audio-visual media rewrite legal events, what is their effect: on law? on legal audiences? How is the experience of being a film spectator both like and unlike the experience of being a legal subject? This course investigates such questions by looking at representations of law in film and other audio-visual media. We will seek to understand, first, how film represents law, and, second,how film attempts to shape law (influencing legal norms, intervening in legal regimes). The seminar’s principal texts will be the films themselves, but we will also read relevant legal cases and film theory in order to deepen our understanding of both legal and film regimes.

ENTA GU4732 American Plays and Musicals, 1940-Present. 3 points.

Cultural education usually occurs piecemeal: a novel from this period, a poem from that. Cultural works are not, however, truly isolated from each other, but rather appear as artifacts of cultural systems. This course uses cultural works to understand a single cultural system: Broadway since 1940. Comparative analyses of musical and non-musical plays will illuminate how Broadway has changed over the past 75 years. We will attend to economic, social, technological, and other transformations in how Broadway makes, markets, and measures its shows. Through our explorations of some of those shows, we will grasp the system’s effects on major dramaturgical strategies including approaches to plot, characterization, and staging. The course thus simultaneously surveys major works of the commercial American theater, narrates a history of Broadway since 1940, and models how to think about the relationship between that history of the Broadway system and the works it produces.

Fall 2018: ENTA GU4732
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 4732 001/22698 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Derek Miller 3 20/40

University Writing

ENGL GS1010 University Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL GS1010.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in Music (sections in the 070s). Features essays that analyze the politics, histories, communities, philosophies, and techniques of music-making, from the classical to the contemporary. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2018: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/69656 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
502 Northwest Corner
Matthew Fernandez 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 002/28620 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
502 Northwest Corner
Allaire Conte 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 003/63608 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
502 Northwest Corner
Jeremy Stevens 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 004/21487 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
502 Northwest Corner
Elizabeth Bowen 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 007/70858 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Will Glovinsky 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 008/68556 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Kent Szlauderbach 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 010/11754 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Eugene Petracca 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 014/16274 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Amanda Lowe 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 015/60526 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Brian Bartell 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 018/14456 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Mor Sheinbein 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 019/27530 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Michael Darnell 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 020/29345 M W 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Katherine Bergevin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 021/10740 T Th 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Valerio Amoretti 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 075/24761 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 101/71804 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Trevor Corson 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 201/13056 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Allen Durgin 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 401/12675 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 501/77056 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Sierra Eckert 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 601/73692 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 901/21458 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 902/61249 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
423 Kent Hall
Yea Jung Park 3 13/14
Fall 2018: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/65498 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
307 Mathematics Building
Gianmarco Saretto 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 003/68388 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
411 Hamilton Hall
David Jamieson 3 15/14
ENGL 1010 011/12164 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Katherine McIntyre 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 012/23542 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Valerio Amoretti 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 022/73948 M W 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Marcus Creaghan 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 023/75900 T Th 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Theresa Jefferson 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 117/29284 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Allen Durgin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 215/97198 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Chelsea Spata 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 216/89033 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
308a Lewisohn Hall
Jack Lowery 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 304/92097 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
337 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Allaire Conte 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 313/72199 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Simon Porzak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 405/87530 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 408/28550 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Ameya Tripathi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 418/13013 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Kevin Windhauser 3 17/17
ENGL 1010 502/19696 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Abigail Nehring 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 506/15897 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Shelby Wardlaw 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 607/22746 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Avia Tadmor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 709/20957 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 710/27533 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Buck Wanner 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 719/87599 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
405 Kent Hall
Elleza Kelley 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 914/86098 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 920/62700 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Yea Jung Park 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 921/71949 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
405 Kent Hall
Anya Lewis-Meeks 3 13/14

ENGL CC1010 University Writing. 3 points.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 099). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in Music (sections in the 070s). Features essays that analyze the politics, histories, communities, philosophies, and techniques of music-making, from the classical to the contemporary. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and the Performance Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze the politics, histories, communities, philosophies, and techniques of the various art forms. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. UW: Readings in Law and Justice (sections in the 700s). Features essays that study core questions of law and justice and that have important implications for our lives. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these themes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2018: ENGL CC1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/14709 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Theresa Jefferson 3 10/14
ENGL 1010 002/65664 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Nicholas Mayer 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 003/70127 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Meadhbh McHugh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 005/71728 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 006/73734 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Akua Banful 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 007/10986 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Olivia Rutigliano 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 011/70006 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Daniella Cadiz Bedini 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 015/77282 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
522d Kent Hall
Montana Ray 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 017/68951 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Elleza Kelley 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 019/76536 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Daniel Lefferts 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 025/64082 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Jack Lowery 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 026/15001 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Elizabeth McIntosh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 027/21383 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Julia Sirmons 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 028/74990 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
David Jamieson 3 9/14
ENGL 1010 029/29773 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Adam Winters 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 030/71150 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Iris Cushing 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 032/64568 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Ameya Tripathi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 035/64032 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Jessica Engebretson 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 037/63498 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 038/28566 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Francois Olivier 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 040/11789 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Walter Gordon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 042/21500 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Nitzan Rotenberg 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 046/75251 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Jason Ueda 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 047/24870 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
G'Ra Asim 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 048/20067 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Adam Horn 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 049/19020 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Shoshana Akabas 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 051/15669 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Marcus Creaghan 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 054/23029 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Synne Borgen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 075/12635 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 076/11815 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Aidan Levy 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 091/18709 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Aaron Ritzenberg 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 092/64583 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Avia Tadmor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 101/61087 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Trevor Corson 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 102/10979 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Lisa Foad 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 103/24530 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Samuel Carpenter 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 104/12575 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Dennis Tang 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 201/12193 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Alessia Palanti 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 202/25399 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Chelsea Spata 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 203/77730 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Olivia Ciacci 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 204/13047 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Emma de Beus 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 205/69513 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Allen Durgin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 401/73978 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 402/13294 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Timothy Lundy 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 403/62812 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Kevin Windhauser 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 404/72301 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Stephen Preskill 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 501/75858 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Marianna Staroselsky 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 502/77601 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Jonathan Reeve 3 8/14
ENGL 1010 503/71726 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
307 Mathematics Building
Jenna Schoen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 504/72205 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Shelby Wardlaw 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 601/17047 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Tibo Halsberghe 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 602/29114 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 603/74819 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Li Qi Peh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 901/65018 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Rebecca Sonkin 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 902/61287 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Anya Lewis-Meeks 3 14/14
Fall 2018: ENGL CC1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 002/12850 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Gabrielle DaCosta 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 003/64200 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Laura Gruszka 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 007/25926 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Ami Yoon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 011/16179 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Akua Banful 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 015/72516 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Synne Borgen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 018/17413 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Zoe Pollak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 021/16252 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Sonkin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 022/69042 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Veronica Belafi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 023/70954 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Christina McCausland 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 024/15008 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Brianne Baker 3 15/14
ENGL 1010 025/71136 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Emily Hunt Kivel 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 026/74548 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Theresa Lin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 027/29259 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Patrick Moran 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 028/60792 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Austin Mantele 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 029/72374 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
307 Mathematics Building
Sumati Dwivedi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 033/65417 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Meadhbh McHugh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 037/15575 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Milan Terlunen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 041/13118 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Walter Gordon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 044/14661 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Nitzan Rotenberg 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 045/14027 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Adam Horn 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 047/68552 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Emma Styles-Swaim 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 048/26860 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Lindsey Cienfuegos 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 049/12218 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Anna Waller 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 051/11436 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Francois Olivier 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 052/18986 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Samuel Grabiner 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 053/22786 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Naomi Michalowicz 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 101/88015 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Lisa Foad 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 140/16398 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Olivia Rutigliano 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 143/28250 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Dennis Tang 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 146/87697 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Emily Weitzman 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 213/78747 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Lisa Del Sol 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 217/13787 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Samuel Carpenter 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 230/62049 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Frances Wood 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 235/65896 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Diana Newby 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 238/95948 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Allen Durgin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 308/13446 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Anne Potter 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 331/73497 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Alessia Palanti 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 404/64532 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 409/62699 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Chloe Howe Haralambous 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 419/60849 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Taleen Mardirossian 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 505/97049 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Brianna Williams 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 512/68699 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Simon Porzak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 532/77530 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Charlee Dyroff 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 536/81049 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Marianna Staroselsky 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 614/16996 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Antoinette Bumekpor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 639/82780 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Tibo Halsberghe 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 642/67447 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Avia Tadmor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 650/13280 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Shoshana Akabas 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 716/62784 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 720/96898 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Daniel Lefferts 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 906/11346 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Lauren Horst 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 910/75516 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Hannah Kauders 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 934/16447 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14

Spring 2018 - please see the department website for curriculum summary. 

Introduction to the Major

ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students who register for ENGL UN3001 must also register for one of the sections of ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods.

This course is intended to introduce students to the advanced study of literature. Students will read works from different genres (poetry, drama, and prose fiction), drawn from the medieval period to the present day, learning the different interpretative techniques required by each. The course also introduces students to a variety of critical schools and approaches, with the aim both of familiarizing them with these methodologies in the work of other critics and of encouraging them to make use of different methods in their own critical writing. This course (together with the companion seminar ENGL UN3011) is a requirement for the English Major and Concentration. It should be taken as early as possible in a student's career. Fulfillment of this requirement will be a factor in admission to seminars and to some lectures.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/75492 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Michael Golston 4 69/90
Fall 2018: ENGL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3001 001/61494 W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Edward Mendelson 4 76/80

ENGL UN3011 Literary Texts, Critical Methods seminar. 0 points.

Prerequisites: Students who register for ENGL UN3011 must also register for ENGL UN3001 Literary Texts, Critical Methods lecture.

This seminar, led by an advanced graduate student in the English doctoral program, accompanies the faculty lecture ENGL UN3001. The seminar both elaborates upon the topics taken up in the lecture and introduces other theories and methodologies. It also focuses on training students to integrate the terms, techniques, and critical approaches covered in both parts of the course into their own critical writing, building up from brief close readings to longer research papers.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/10067 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Martin Larson-Xu 0 15/18
ENGL 3011 002/67812 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Bernadette Myers 0 13/18
ENGL 3011 003/69683 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
402 Hamilton Hall
Therese Cox 0 17/18
ENGL 3011 004/72232 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Tiana Reid 0 12/18
ENGL 3011 005/20843 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Danielle Drees 0 10/18
Fall 2018: ENGL UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3011 001/17984 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Li Qi Peh 0 14/20
ENGL 3011 002/10179 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
402 Hamilton Hall
Nicholas Mayer 0 17/20
ENGL 3011 003/13805 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Daniella Cadiz Bedini 0 14/20
ENGL 3011 004/14933 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Jonathan Reeve 0 15/20
ENGL 3011 005/67286 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Jessica Engebretson 0 16/18

Medieval

ENGL BC3155 Canterbury Tales. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Chaucer as inheritor of late-antique and medieval conventions and founder of early modern literature and the fiction of character.  Selections from related medieval texts.

Spring 2018: ENGL BC3155
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3155 001/00414 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
302 Barnard Hall
Christopher Baswell 3 34

ENGL UN3919 English Translations of the Bible. 4 points.

A survey on English translations of the Bible from Tyndale to the present.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3919
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3919 001/10529 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
David Yerkes 4 15/25
ENGL 3919 002/79281 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
David Yerkes 4 17/25

ENGL GU4790 Advanced Old English: Anglo-Saxon Spirituality. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Students must have previous knowledge of Old English -- minimum one semester.

The aim of this course is twofold: one, to provide an advanced-level course in Old English literature involving weekly translation; and two, to explore the shape and possibilities of what “Anglo-Saxon spirituality” might be. The primary texts we will be translating will consist in homilies, poetry, treatises, sermons, hymns, prayers, penitentials, letters, and so called “secular” poetry like riddles. We will aim at covering selected materials from the four main manuscripts of Anglo-Saxon poetry (Vercelli, Junius, Nowell, and Exeter) to examine the extent to which they celebrate or veil theological interests. Part our time will involve assessing the prevalent distinction between secular and religious cultures, the relation between materiality and the spiritual, the role of affect in cultivating belief and piety, and the relation between Christian and non-Christian cultures and beliefs. Secondary theological materials will be read in translation including Paschasius Radbertus, Ratramnus, Hincmar, Alcuin, Aldhelm, Jerome, Gregory, and Augustine. Selections of Old Norse mythology and runic texts will also be included. The class will explore the of the role of the church in Anglo-Saxon England, debates about the impact of the Benedictine Reform, and the relation between art and theology.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4790
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4790 001/92399 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
602 Philosophy Hall
Patricia Dailey 3 6/25

Renaissance

ENGL UN3336 Shakespeare II. 3 points.

(Lecture). Shakespeare II examines plays from the second half of Shakespeare’s dramatic career, primarily a selection of his major tragedies and his later comedies (or “romances”).

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3336
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3336 001/62165 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Fayerweather
Jean Howard 3 46/78

ENGL UN3343 The Surveillance of Women in Renaissance Drama & Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Concentrating on the drama of early modern England, this course will investigate a culture of surveillance regarding women’s bodies in the period. We will give special focus to the fear of female infidelity, the theatrical fascination with the woman’s pregnant body, and the cultural desire to confirm and expose women’s chastity. We will read plays in which women are falsely accused of adultery, in various generic contexts (such as William Shakespeare’s 


Cymbeline and Much Ado About Nothing), along with plays in which women actually commit infidelity (such as the anonymous Arden of Faversham and Thomas Middleton’s A Chaste Maid in Cheapside). Focusing on a different play each week, we will ask: what does it take, ultimately, to believe women about their fidelity? At the same time, what is the effect of being doubted on women themselves? We will also give consideration to the particular resources of dramatic form, paying attention to moments in plays that coerce spectators themselves into mistaken judgments about women.


We will supplement our reading of drama with pamphlets, advice literature, poems, church court cases, and ballads, in order to place these plays within a broader and more varied culture of female surveillance in early modern England. Finally, we will work to recover past strategies of liberation from this surveillance in the plays we read, in women’s writing that warns against male betrayal, and in dramatic and historical instances of female cross-dressing.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3343
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3343 001/88398 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Lauren Robertson 4 11/25

ENGL GU4104 Renaissance Literature and (the History of) Sexuality. 4 points.

This class is an introduction both to the study of the literature of the English Renaissance or early modern period, and to the study of the history of sexuality. While we will be looking at issues of sexuality in the literary texts that are at the center of this class, we will also be thinking about the history of sexuality as a field of study in its own right, how it’s been conceived of and practiced, its promises and pitfalls. We will be examining the humanist histories and methodologies that inform much Renaissance thought about  human sexuality – theories about bodies, desire, relationships between and among the sexes, materialism, and spirituality – as well as more recent critical approaches. We will think closely about the genres that (we think) privilege sexuality – eclogues, plays (especially those performed by boy players), erotic verse, verse letters, utopia and creation stories.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4104
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4104 001/90948 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Julie Crawford 4 13/25

ENGL GU4209 16th Century Poetry. 3 points.

This lecture class offers an introduction to the century that witnessed the flowering of vernacular poetry in English.  We will read shorter poems in their cultural and historical contexts, as well as considering their formal and theoretical innovations.  The first half of the course will cover a wide range of poets, both canonical and lesser-known, while the latter half will focus on the four most significant poets of the century:  Marlowe, Sidney, Shakespeare, and Spenser.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4209
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4209 001/86848 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
5ab Kraft Center
Molly Murray 3 33/90

18th and 19th Century

ENGL UN3852 Temporal Relocations: Narrations of Time and Body in Early American Literature. 4 points.

This course begins with texts from the first wave of European colonists, moving from exploration of what is now Texas with de Vaca to Ralph Lane’s and Thomas Harriot’s Virginia and William Bradford’s Plymouth. We will then focus our attention on the space of Massachusetts, theorizing how the religious narratives of women and native peoples written by Mary Rowlandson, John Eliot, and Thomas Shepard demonstrate the limitations of the governing Puritan male order. In the weeks following, we will turn to the genre of natural history in the space of the Caribbean and Virginia, where we will probe the relationship of the body and the natural in the works of Hans Sloane, James Grainger, and Thomas Jefferson. The course will close with an examination of narratives of slavery with the works of Aphra Behn, Britton Hammon, James Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, and William Earle, as well as Édouard Glissant’s more contemporary Poetics of Relation.

CLEN UN3741 Literature of Lost Lands. 4 points.

This course hopes to entice you into readings in the literature of lost and submerged continents, as well as of remote lands hidden from history. While now often relegated to the stuff of science fiction, accounts of submerged land-masses were among the most serious popular literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and readers were riveted by the enduring mystery about the lost continents of Atlantis and Lemuria. Works about these and other lost lands inspired a form of “occult ethnography.” Novels such as The Coming Race (1871) drew on the popular fascination with buried land-masses in order to re-imagine alternative narratives in which the “imperial English” would be colonized by a new race of people rising from the forgotten depths of the earth. At one level, the use of ethnographic details in such novels provided an ironic commentary on the European ethnographies of colonized peoples. But at another level it also offered a visionary description of a world as yet unseen and unknown, so that the idea of the past itself becomes less stable in the cultural imagination.


In animating the details of a rediscovered people, occult ethnography both drew on and subverted evolutionary models of development by showing these “lost” people, in some instances, to have reached the highest perfection possible, both in technological capability and human potential. The unsettling of established and familiar conceptions of nation, history, and cultural identity through the exploration of lost or drifting lands reaches an apex in José Saramago’s The Stone Raft (1986). In probing the enduring fascination with lost or separated lands in the cultural imagination, the course hopes to illuminate the importance of such literature in unveiling the processes of colonization, ethnography, nationalism, evolution, and technology, as well as understanding the writing of history itself: i.e., what is included in mainstream accounts and what is left out.

Spring 2018: CLEN UN3741
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3741 001/61197 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Gauri Viswanathan 4 9/25

ENGL UN3932 The American Renaissance. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

In this seminar, we will aim to do two things at once: first and most importantly, to read the literary texts inside--and one or two lying outside--the tradition of the "American Renaissance" or the category of "Classic American Literature." But we will also analyze some works of recent criticism that have produced, defended, and/or contested this tradition. What texts, or parts of texts do critics valorize or emphasize, or devalue and ignore, in order to make and maintain a tradition such as this one? When and with what effects are works of literary criticism themselves structured and emplotted like the literary texts they describe?

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3932
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3932 001/64694 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
602 Philosophy Hall
Branka Arsic 4 11/25

ENFR GU4800 The Writer in 19th-C British & French Fiction. 4 points.

A study of what it meant to write— or to be a writer— at the moment when the novel began to stake its claim to be a major or high art form, seen through the lens of British and French realist novels that tell the story of a writer’s personal and career development.  At the center of the seminar will be the question of the novel and its relation to the worlds of journalism and art, and how novels negotiated (through the figure of the writer) their overlap with the newspaper and the lyric poem, or exterior and interior worlds. Class to be conducted in English, with readings from Balzac, Dickens, Maupassant, and Gissing, and possibly other examples.

Spring 2018: ENFR GU4800
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENFR 4800 001/26282 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Elisabeth Ladenson, Nicholas Dames 4 11/25

ENGL UN3948 19th Century Thrillers. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). This seminar will investigate the ways in which the nineteenth-century novel is shaped by the forces of horror, sensation, suspense and the supernatural. We will ask how the melodramatic imagination, the rhetoric of monstrosity and the procedures of detection mark high narrative realism with the signs of cultural anxieties building up around nineteenth-century revolution, industrialization, capitalism, Catholicism, bigamy and immigration. Looking at representative samples of the Romantic neo-gothic novel, mid-century ghost stories, the highly popular and controversial sensation novels of the 1860s, aestheticism, and fin-de siècle psychological thrillers, we will come away with a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the intersection between the novel and popular entertainment. Readings will include Austen's Northanger Abbey, Brontë's Villette, Braddon's Lady Audeley's Secret, Collins's The Woman in White, Dickens's Bleak House, Du Maurier's Trilby (or Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray), Stoker's Dracula, James's Turn of the Screw, and a selection of ghost stories by Gaskell, Mulock, Hood, Edwards and Riddell. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Monica Cohen (mlf1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "19thC Thrillers seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3948
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3948 001/13903 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Monica Cohen 4 24/25

ENGL GU4601 Early Caribbean Literature. 3 points.

This course is an introductory survey of early Caribbean Literature. Focusing primarily on the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Anglophone Caribbean, we will ask what the region signified for writers across the Atlantic world and how it shaped natural and political spaces in that world. Given that the Caribbean was a rapidly shifting zone of economic, linguistic, racial, and class interests, we will consider the various ways that we might narrate a literary history of the region— either distinct from or conjoined with familiar histories of England and the United States. While working toward this goal, we will be conscious of the national, generic, and temporal frameworks that have traditionally shaped literature departments, and ask how our texts resist or reaffirm those frameworks. How and to what degree, we will ask, does the Caribbean disrupt our modes of literary analysis?

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4601 001/16396 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
503 Hamilton Hall
Cristobal Silva 3 16/40

ENGL GU4300 Religion and the Novel 1660-1840. 4 points.

Literary historians often insist that the novel is a secular form. Yet authors of early novels in English claimed to be motivated by religious reasons, and many defenders of these fictional works described the experience of reading them (and their affection for them) in religious terms. A whole host of English novels from the long eighteenth century also took religion as a topic, imagining religious characters and wrestling with religious subjects. In this seminar, we will read Enlightenment-era narratives that consider the problem of evil, the challenge of modern faith, the drama of conversion, the frustrations of religious history, the dangers of religious institutions, and the difficulties of interfaith exchange. We will learn about some different categories of religious identity and about the historical and political circumstances that intensified the process of religious self-definition. We will also try out some different strategies for using religion to interpret novels. But mostly we’ll immerse ourselves in the rich and varied religious worlds of the novels themselves, where we will encounter devils as well as angels, the skeptical as well as the faithful, unabashed sinners as well as reluctant saints. Some figures in these books come out strongly against religion, but more of them call for new ways of defining religion or putting it into practice, sometimes for radical political ends. We will frequently see that these early novels didn’t simply inherit religious sensibilities from the past; they also had to invent new forms of religious life and practice, including new ways of reading. More than a few of these patterns are still with us. Some people still agree that reading a novel can be a religious experience, even if they disagree about what that means.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4300 001/27198 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Dustin Stewart 4 9/16

CLEN GU4822 19th Century European Novel. 3 points.

The 19th Century European Novel in the field of the emotions and in the cultural context of the major thinkers and the major historical events of the era.We will examine feelings, emotions, and passions in the novels from the perspectives of affective neuroscience, psychoanalysis, and philosophy in order to lay bare more clearly what is known and believed versus what is unknown, ignored or latent about human emotional reality at this time.  Reading: Austen, Kleist (novella), Emily Bronte, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Hardy, D.H. Lawrence.  No reading outside of the novels will be required on your part.

,

Further, my aim is to expand our cultural knowledge of the era by including the conceptual contributions and formative ideas of major 19th century thinkers in my lectures on the novels. Optional Reading of short selections from: Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Darwin, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Freud. Those who wish to read and write in a comparative way or on any of the optional writers will be able to do so in lieu of one or, possibly, two novels.

Spring 2018: CLEN GU4822
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4822 001/05719 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Maire Jaanus 3 20/50

ENGL GU4858 Multimedia Blake. 3 points.

A close study of the historic and material conditions, readerly effects, and subsequent influence of William Blake's illuminated books. This course examines the interplay of poetry and illustration in these remarkable works, paying close attention to Blake's idiosyncratic method of self-publishing. Approaching Blake's plates through digital technology, we will be particularly attuned to the ways they seem to welcome and resist new forms of representation and engagement. Illuminated works we will study in depth include The Book of Thel, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Visions of the Daughters of Albion, America a Prophecy, Songs of Innocence and of Experience, Europe a Prophecy, The First Book of Urizen, and extracts from Milton a Poem and Jerusalem. We will trace allusions that these works make to the Bible, Dante, Milton, and eighteen-century mystics, writers, and artists; we will also consider later evocations of Blake by poets, filmmakers, musicians, and online communities. To facilitate close reading and collaboration, this seminar will make use of Mediathread, a multimedia analysis platform developed at Columbia by the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4858
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4858 001/78282 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Mark Phillipson 3 11/50

20th and 21st Century

ENGL UN3739 Memoir & Social Justice. 4 points.

The rise of social media has proliferated new forms of life writing inflected with the rhetoric of social justice as individuals broadcast their concerns to “friends” and “followers.” This contemporary phenomenon has precedent in a long history of life writing that normalized social justice ideals. In reading memoirs of the twentieth and twenty-first century, we will ask what social justice has meant during different eras and for different groups while thinking critically about the problems and possibilities of identity politics. Particular attention will be paid to how social justice narratives are inflected by indigeneity, race, class, gender, sexuality, and (dis)ability. The course is equally invested in the formal qualities of narrative; we will consider testimonial, diary, poetry, personal essay, graphic memoir, speech, social media entries, and the more traditional book-length prose. Each week we will read one memoir paired with scholarly articles and commentary on current social justice movements. In addition to more traditional academic writing, students will also have opportunities to experiment with their own life writing. There are no prerequisites for the course. 

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3739
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3739 001/83529 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
1102 International Affairs Bldg
Meredith Shepard 4 13/15

CLEN UN3904 Cinematic Modernism. 4 points.

Virginia Woolf famously opined that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” In this class, we will drag the clock back to 1895 (or thereabouts), when the first moving images were successfully projected: an event singularly plural, as it occurred near-contemporaneously in Germany, France, England, and New Jersey. What we (tenuously) call Modernism has been revised many times over, with ever more elastic parameters proposed for period, place, and idiom. But only recently have scholars such as Laura Marcus and David Trotter begun to think of the cinema as essentially constitutive of, rather than merely adjacent to, the new grammars, styles, and ambitions of literary modernism. In short: those we call Modernists were also the first generation of moviegoers, yet little has been done with this extraordinary historical fact.


In addition to analyses of critical films (at least one per week), we will take “the cinematic” as an invitation, puzzle, problem, and principle for writers of the early twentieth century. Some, like Richardson and H.D., exuberantly lauded and incorporated film. Some, like Woolf, had greater caution, ambivalence, sometimes disdain. Taking the cinematic as both dispositif and inclination, both system and idea, we will be examining the implicit and explicit engagements writers staged with the vocabulary, syntax, and atmosphere of cinema – while familiarizing ourselves with filmmakers such as Eisenstein, Chaplin, Méliès, and Micheaux.


We will be asking questions big and small, concrete and abstract. How do close-ups and soft focus, montage and tracking, the ticket-vendor and the nickelodeon surface or remain submerged in literature of the era? What brought people to the movies, and what kept them in their seats? Who wrote about the cinema first, and why? What ethical imperatives did warfare, routinization, and other aspects of modernity pose for filmmakers? How did race and racism impact the production and reception of cinema? How did femininity and feminism, queers and queerness, immigrants and immigration alter audiences and expectations? How did novelists and poets make use of the movies while investigating interiority, authenticity, desire, and perception?

Spring 2018: CLEN UN3904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3904 001/23319 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Nolan Gear 4 11/15

ENTA UN3970 Ibsen and Pinter. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). The course will trace the pattern of the evolving theatrical careers of Henrik Ibsen and Harold Pinter, exploring the nature of and relationships among key features of their emerging aesthetics. Thematic and theatrical exploration involve positioning the plays in the context of the trajectories of modernism and postmodernism and examining, in that context, the emblematic use of stage sets and tableaux; the intense scrutiny of families, friendships, and disruptive intruders; the experiments with temporality, multi-linearity, and split staging; the issues raised by performance and the implied playhouse; and the plays' potential as instruments of cultural intervention. Two papers are required, 5-7 pages and 10-12 pages, with weekly brief responses, and a class presentation. Readings include major plays of both writers and key statements on modernism and postmodernism.  Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Austin Quigley (aeq1@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Ibsen and Pinter seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2018: ENTA UN3970
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3970 001/77288 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
423 Kent Hall
Austin Quigley 4 11/25

ENGL UN3968 IRISH LIT:20TH C.IRISH PROSE. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar course looks at the idea of Language and Form in Irish writing in the Twentieth Century. It will examine writing from the Irish Literary Renaissance, including work by Yeats and Synge, and writing by Irish Modernist writers, including Joyce, Beckett and Flann O’Brien. It will also study certain awkward presences in the Irish literary canon, such as Elizabeth Bowen. The class will then read work from later in the century, including the novels of John Banville and John McGahern and the poetry of Seamus Heaney and Eavan Boland.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3968
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3968 001/63490 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Colm Toibin 4 15/25

ENGL UN3286 Freaks & Aesthetes in Fifties Families. 4 points.

Prerequisites: E-mail Professor Ross Posnock (rp2045@columbia.edu ) with the subject heading "seminar application." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

We will read J.D. Salinger's Glass Family fiction, which features a group of hyper-articulate New York prodigies who experiment with Eastern religion, Robert Lowell's prose and poetry in  Life Studies, a breakthrough in "confessional" subject matter, and Carson McCuller's novel A Member of the Wedding,about the coming of age of a Southern tomboy. We will also watch and discuss Nicholas Ray's film Rebel Without a Cause with James Dean, the most famous portryal of teenage rage and angst. All these works narrate crises of conformity in postwar America--the much advertised sense of "alienation"--and dramatize the possibility of alternative values and improvised families.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3286
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3286 001/67247 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Ross Posnock 4 10/25

ENGL UN3396 Literature of Fact in a Postfactual World. 4 points.

In 2016, the Oxford Dictionary chose as its word of the year, “post-truth,” which it defines as “relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief.” Since the country’s founding, American writers have troubled the relationship between gathering facts from first-hand experiences and representing them in both nonfiction and fictional works. In his posthumously published Autobiography (1793), Benjamin Franklin advises those seeking to contribute to public knowledge to offer their ideas with diffidence and leave plenty of room for disagreement: “If you wish information and improvement from the knowledge of others, and yet at the same time express yourself as firmly fix'd in your present opinions, modest, sensible men, who do not love disputation, will probably leave you undisturbed in the possession of your error.” In the 20th and 21st centuries, writers and scholars of creative nonfiction’s many subgenres continue to explore the ethical and aesthetic risks and obligations in the enterprise of writing truth. In this course, we will study American literary works primarily from the 20th and 21st centuries that enact and reflect on the problems for writers and readers in representing the truth of their experiences. How do American writers of nonfiction and fiction signal, occlude, or complicate readers’ sense of the truth in a story or event? How do writers craft a presence for themselves and others in their texts with which to test warrants about the facts they are communicating? How can theories of authorship, approaches to nonfiction storytelling, and publics formation help us to account for writers’ strategies in their works? Finally, what can an examination of these questions tell us about the roles and value of truth-telling in imaginative works across genres in the 21st century?

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3396
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3396 001/62049 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Nicole Wallack 4 4/25

CLEN UN3935 Third World Bildungsroman. 4 points.

This course in the contemporary international novel looks at the rise of the bildungsroman, the novelistic genre in some sense defined by the development and maturation of the protagonist, in the context of twentieth-century political, cultural, and social developments of (post)colonialism, imperialism, human rights discourse, and globalization. This course will trace some of the philosophical formulations of the teleology of human development, and the attendant notions of individuality and sociality, to study the ways in which these novels from the so-called "Third World" variously, and sometimes simultaneously, subscribe to, resist, and renegotiate the fundamental conceptions of human development through creative engagement with the bildungsroman and its generic formulations.

ENTA UN3939 Caryl Churchill. 4 points.

This undergraduate seminar looks at the entire dramatic career of Caryl Churchill, arguably England’s leading feminist dramatist. Beginning in the 1970s, when she wrote a series of plays on class and gender struggles in contemporary Britain and at earlier moment in England’s history, Churchill has staged explorations of some of the most pressing issues of our time: the destruction of the environment, the enduring and pernicious legacies of empire, the human suffering caused by unfettered capitalism, and the myriad ways in which women remain “the second sex.” Churchill’s feminism is intersectional, taking up questions of sex and gender in relation to other axes of social difference such as race and class. A committed theatrical experimentalist, Churchill constantly rethinks her theatrical practice while encouraging actors and directors, musicians and choreographers, to take an active role in shaping the final theatrical event.


The class will explore Churchill’s canon for its themes and its stagecraft and will attend the spring production of her marvelous early play, Light Shining in Buckinghamshire, at The New York Theater Workshop.

Spring 2018: ENTA UN3939
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3939 001/80947 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
522d Kent Hall
Jean Howard 4 7/13

ENGL UN3710 The Beat Generation. 4 points.

Limited to seniors. Priority given to those who have taken at least one course in 20th-century American culture, especially history, jazz, film, and literature.Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

(Seminar). Surveys the work of the Beats and other artists connected to the Beat movement. Readings include works by Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Amiri Baraka, and Joyce Johnson, as well as background material in the post-World War II era, films with James Dean and Marlon Brando, and the music of Charlie Parker and Thelonius Monk. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Ann Douglas (ad34@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "The Beat Generation". In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3710
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3710 001/20996 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Ann Douglas 4 18/25

CLEN UN3930 Caribbean Diaspora Literature. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will examine texts by writers from the Spanish, French, and English-speaking Caribbean whose work has been in some way marked by exile, emigration and colonial migration. Additionally, the course will investigate the impact of displacement and transculturation on the production of new cultural subjects, the articulation of alternative definitions of nationhood, citizenship and/or sovereignty, and the contradictions of literary reception in metropolitan capitals. Among the writers that the course will engage with are Reinaldo Arenas, Piri Thomas, Maryse Condé, Edwidge Danticat, V.S. Naipaul, and Jamaica Kincaid.

Spring 2018: CLEN UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3930 001/60596 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Frances Negron-Muntaner 4 32/35

ENGL GU4504 Yeats, Eliot, Auden. 3 points.

(Lecture). Many poems and a few essays by W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, and W. H. Auden.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4504
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4504 001/17808 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
702 Hamilton Hall
Edward Mendelson 3 66/80

ENGL UN3270 BRITISH LITERATURE 1950-PRESENT. 3 points.

The class on post-war British literature focuses on fiction written since the end of the Cold War, with a particular emphasis on the twenty-first century. Lectures are structured around the theme of “Britain and its Belongings,” with three main historical and thematic emphases. First, the question of “the contemporary” or “belonging together in time”: What, if anything, makes the period since the 1990s hang together as a cultural, and more narrowly literary-historical, category? Second, the question of Europe: Is British literature a subset of European literature? How, in the era of Brexit and the ongoing migration crisis in Europe, have British novelists represented the country’s relationship to the continent? Finally, the linked problems of economic globalization and Britain’s complex post-imperial history: How have British novelists attempt to represent a world in which “domestic” experiences seem inextricably, if inconceivably, linked to events taking place thousands of miles away? Our answers to these questions will be aesthetic, as well as historical, focusing particularly on how novelists have thought to reimagine their sense of belonging by innovating at the level of narrative structure, point of view, and generic form.


Authors discussed include a mixture of established and emerging writers, with a particular emphasis on novels by women and by members of ethnic and national minority communities. Assignments include weekly reading, a midterm, a final, and two critical essays.

ENGL GU4625 Ralph Ellison . 4 points.

In this seminar we will read virtually everything by Ralph Ellison—leaving aside for now the posthumous novel published as Three Days Before the Shooting. We will concentrate on his achievements as an essayist, short story writer, and novelist. We will explore his literary training and aesthetic values as well as his shifting political philosophies and--to use a keystone Ellisonian word--his stances. As we read Ellison’s fiction and his essays, let us be watchful for Ellison’s positions on current cultural questions: parody and pastiche; technology and the modern; the importance of place—region, city or country, nation; internationality; complex definitions of individuality and sociality; race; vernacular art and culture; and the role of the politically engaged artist.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4625
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4625 001/75946 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Robert O'Meally 4 16/25

ENGL GU4613 The 1960s. 3 points.

This course is devoted to “literature of the 1960s,” in both senses of the phrase: in the semester ahead, we will study authors who wrote during and about that most tumultuous of decades. We will approach the period thematically, reading texts that address distinct historical topics from week to week (the civil rights movement, the war in Vietnam, drugs, environmentalism, and so on). We will also take a broad view of what constitutes the “literature of the 1960s,” reading works in familiar literary genres like poetry, drama, and the novel, but additionally making time for essays, journalism, and songs. 

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4613
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4613 001/93197 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Austin Graham 3 58/86

ENGL GU4622 African-American Literature II. 3 points.

(Lecture). This survey of African American literature focuses on language, history, and culture. What are the contours of African American literary history? How do race, gender, class, and sexuality intersect within the politics of African American culture? What can we expect to learn from these literary works? Why does our literature matter to student of social change? This lecture course will attempt to provide answers to these questions, as we begin with Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) and Richard Wright's Native Son (1940) and end with Melvin Dixon's Love's Instruments (1995) with many stops along the way. We will discuss poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose. Ohter authors include Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Malcom X, Ntzozake Shange, Audre Lorde, and Toni Morrison. There are no prerequisites for this course. The formal assignments are two five-page essays and a final examination. Class participation will be graded.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4622
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4622 001/71294 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Farah Griffin 3 26/60

Special Topics

ENGL UN3002 Humanities Texts, Critical Skills. 4 points.

This course aims to equip students with critical tools for approaching, reading, and striving with literary and philosophical texts—ancient as well as modern. To this end, we will be working closely with a set of texts that range in date from the 8th/7th c. BCE to the 20th century C, including: Homer, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Du Bois, Nabokov and Rankine. Our seminar will operate on the assumption that we cannot know “what” these texts say or “what” their authors mean unless we come to grips with how they say what they say and how they mean what they mean. In pursuit of some answers, we will master the skill of reading quickly but carefully, balancing attention to the literary craft of our texts with scrutiny of their underlying arguments and agendas.
Requires Instructor’s permission— please write to Richard Roderick rr3059@columbia.edu to set up a meeting with instructors

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3002 001/66297 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Amy Johnson 4 20/25
Fall 2018: ENGL UN3002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3002 001/12847 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Emily Bloom 4 12/25

ENGL UN3724 Melodrama, Horror, Crime, Vaudeville. 4 points.

The great pioneer of early film, Georges Méliès, claimed that his principal aim was the creation of “stage effects” in his films.  In their 1920 manual, How to Write Photoplays, John Emerson and Anita Loos imagine motion pictures as a sequence of “scenes” modeled on stage plays.  In the first decades of the twentieth century, the new medium of cinema attempted to replicate such popular theatrical genres as melodrama, horror, crime, vaudeville, and circus.  But it also transformed these through its distinctive apparatus.  In this seminar we will study the first half century of (largely) British and American cinema, analyzing popular films (most of them classics of their genre) as they both emerged from and broke with the theatre.  With a focus on narrative and genre (and the ideologies embedded in these), we will be asking broad questions about popular and mass culture, the politics of spectatorship, medium and technology, the psychology of social space, the representation of identity (national, racial, sexual...), and more.  At the same time, much of the work of the seminar will be devoted to close reading—both of the films’ theatrical features (mise-en-scène, pictorial composition, gesture, facial and bodily expression, blocking...) and of their specifically cinematic features (light and shadow, camera movement, editing and sound effects...)—treating these as keys to understanding both technique and broader meaning.  While our primary texts will be the films themselves, we will also read selected works of film history and criticism in order to gain an understanding of current debates, assess critical methodologies, and develop analytic tools.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3724
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3724 001/61146 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Julie Peters 4 13/25

ENGL UN3394 How Writers Think: Pedagogy and Practice. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

(Seminar). This course uses contemporary philosophies of research and writing to train students to become writing center and library consultants. Readings will highlight major voices in rhetoric and composition research, with an emphasis on collaborative learning theory. We will ground our study in hands-on teaching experiences: students will shadow Columbia Writing Center consultants and research librarians and then practice strategies they learn in consultation with other students. Those who successfully complete this course will be eligible to apply for a peer writing consultant job in the Columbia Writing Center. This course is co-taught by the director of the Writing Center and the undergraduate services librarian.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3394
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3394 001/72175 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
201 80 Claremont
Susan Mendelsohn 4 13/15

ENGL UN3738 Philanthropy and Social Difference. 4 points.

Philanthropy and Social Difference will introduce students to the history of Anglo-American philanthropy, as described in both historical and literary texts by writers including Jane Addams, James Agee, Andrew Carnegie, and George Orwell.  Through reading these texts, students will receive an experiential perspective on the social problems that philanthropy seeks to address.  The course will also focus on best practices in contemporary philanthropy, teaching students how to make informed decisions in making grants to nonprofit organizations.  In addition, students will have the opportunity to practice philanthropy directly by making grants from course funds to nonprofit organizations selected by the class.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3738
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3738 001/14095 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
612 Philosophy Hall
Victoria Rosner, Rachel Adams 4 17/25

ENTA UN3972 Disaster Plays. 4 points.

With the onset of the Great War of 1914-19, the human race entered an historical period characterized by the very real possibility—and, therefore, insistent imagination—of disaster on an apocalyptic scale. Not only nations but entire peoples, and even the species itself, began to see themselves under threat from total warfare, totalitarianism, genocide, nuclear holocaust, global warming, and more. This course will consider theatrical attempts to reckon with this newly fragile world, to give shape and meaning to a modernity characterized by total disaster. With the exception of a brief detour to Japan, our texts will derive from twentieth and twenty-first century European and U.S. drama. Because catastrophe is by definition the transformation of what is real, normal, and everyday into something impossible to imagine, much of this course will be devoted to experiments beyond dramatic realism. Questions we will ask include: How do these artists understand the role of theatre in the face of such dire threats, and what role can it play in our own attempts to live with these threats? What techniques does catastrophe demand from designers, actors, directors, writers, and even publishers of playtexts? What sorts of political claims do these plays make, and how do they make them? What does the source of the catastrophe being represented (bomb, climate change, dictatorship) determine about theatrical form, theme, and plot? How has the age of disaster forced theatremakers to reconsider their understandings of the future, history, war, the body politic, human nature, the role of the intellectual in the public sphere, science, art, and other topics?

Spring 2018: ENTA UN3972
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTA 3972 001/11246 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Jason Fitzgerald 4 11/25

ENGL UN3980 Writing Machines. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

(Seminar). In Jack London's 1906 short story "The Apostate," an exposé of child labor, the narrator notes of a young millworker: "There had never been a time when he had not been in intimate relationship with machines." Drawing on novels, short stories, dramas, and essays by American and English writers from 1880 to WWII, this course seeks to understand what it means to become "intimate with machines." How did technology shape perception, consciousness, identity, and the understanding of the human in fin de siècle literature? What were the effects of new "writing machines," like the telegraph, phonograph, and typewriter, on traditional conceptions of authorship? How did technology intersect with class, race, and gender politics? What fears and fantasies did new inventions inspire? We will discuss how writers represented the cultural and social impact of technology and why they often felt compelled to invent new literary styles, forms, and movements--such as realism, aestheticism, and modernism--in order to do so. Texts by Herman Melville, Bram Stoker, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jack London, Sophie Treadwell, Thomas Alva Edison, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and others. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Biers (klb2134@columbia.edu) with the subject heading, "Writing Machines seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3980 001/61285 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
201 80 Claremont
Katherine Biers 4 6/25

CLEN GU4199 Literature and Oil. 3 points.

This course will investigate the connections between literary/cultural production and petroleum as the substance that makes possible the world as we know it, both as an energy source and a component in the manufacture of everything from food to plastic. Our current awareness of oil's scarcity and its myriad costs (whether environmental, political, or social) provides a lens to read for the presence (or absence) of oil in texts in a variety of genres and national traditions. As we begin to imagine a world "beyond petroleum," this course will confront the ways in which oil shapes both the world we know and how we know and imagine the world. Oil will feature in this course in questions of theme (texts "about" oil), of literary form (are there common formal conventions of an "oil novel"?), of interpretive method (how to read for oil), of transnational circulation (how does "foreign oil" link US citizens to other spaces?), and of the materiality (or "oiliness") of literary culture (how does the production and circulation of texts, whether print or digital, rely on oil?). 

Spring 2018: CLEN GU4199
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4199 001/22750 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Jennifer Wenzel 3 7/25

CLEN GU4414 History of Literary Criticism: Plato to Kant. 3 points.

The principal texts of literary theory from antiquity through the 18th century, including Plato, Aristotle, Horace, Longinus, Augustine, Aquinas, Boccaccio, Sidney, and Kant.

Spring 2018: CLEN GU4414
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4414 001/89695 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
517 Hamilton Hall
Kathy Eden 3 32/80

ENGL GU4561 Children's Literature. 3 points.

This is a historical survey of literature written principally for children (primarily narrative), which will explore not only the pleasures of imagination but the varieties of narrative and lyric form, as well as the ways in which story-telling gives shape to individual and cultural identity. Drawing on anonymous folk tale from a range of cultures, as well as a variety of literary works produced from the late 17 th century to the present, we’ll attend to the ways in which changing forms of children’s literature reflect changing understandings of children and childhood, while trying not to overlook psychological and formal structures that might persist across this history. Readings of the primary works will be supplemented by a variety of critical approaches—psychoanalytic, materialist, feminist, and structuralist—that scholars have employed to understand the variety and appeal of children’s literature.

Spring 2018: ENGL GU4561
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4561 001/22298 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
702 Hamilton Hall
James Adams 3 36/50

CLEN GU4565 Postcolonial Theory. 4 points.

This course will examine the major debates, contested genealogies, epistemic and political interventions, and possible futures of the body of writing that has come to be known as postcolonial theory. We will examine the relationships between postcolonial theory and other theoretical formations, including post-structuralism, feminism, Marxism, and Third Worldism. We will also consider what counts as “theory” in postcolonial theory: in what ways have novels, memoirs, or revolutionary manifestos, for example, offered seminal, generalizable statements about postcoloniality? How can we understand the relationship between the rise of postcolonial studies in the United States and the role of the U.S. in the post-Cold War era? How do postcolonial theory and its insights about European imperialism contribute to analyses of contemporary globalization?

Spring 2018: CLEN GU4565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4565 001/94696 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
201a Philosophy Hall
Joseph R Slaughter 4 14/25

CLEN GU4905 The Antigone Project. 4 points.

Colm Toibin and the actress Lisa Dwan will be examining the various translations of Antigone and the way that this text and story have been dealt with over the centuries. The class will analyze some translations of the play and also versions by Seamus Heaney, Anne Carson, Brecht, Anouilh and Athol Fugard. We will also work with creative writing students as they make their own versions, and performance students as they work out how the play in its versions could be produced. The class will be inviting in teachers from classical studies and other disciplines, including classical studies, literary studies and law.

Spring 2018: CLEN GU4905
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4905 001/11000 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
754 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Colm Toibin, Lisa Dwan 4 15/20

CLEN GU4910 Metaphor and Media. 3 points.

This course offers a survey of major works on metaphor, beginning with Aristotle and ending with contemporary cognitive and media theory. Appropriate for both undergraduate and graduate students, our sessions will involve weekly discussion and an occasional “lab” component, in which we will test our theoretical intuitions against case studies of literary metaphor and metaphor in the fields of law, medicine, philosophy, and design.


I am particularly interested in ways metaphors “break” or “die,” whether from disuse, overuse, or misapplication. In their classical sense, metaphors work by ferrying meaning across from one domain to another. For example, by calling a rooster “the trumpet of the morn,” Shakespeare means to suggest a structural similarity between horn instruments and birds. Note that this similarity cannot pertain to the objects in their totality. The analogy applies to the call of the bird only or perhaps to the resemblance between a beak and the flute of a trumpet. The metaphor would fail yet again if there were no perceivable analogies between birds and trumpets. Similarly, computer users who empty their virtual “trash bins,” are promised the erasure of underlying data. The course will conclude by examining the metaphors implicit such media transformations.

Spring 2018: CLEN GU4910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 4910 001/25785 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Dennis Tenen 3 17/50

ENGL UN3999 Senior Essay. 3 points.

Open to those who have applied and been accepted into the department's senior essay program only.

Prerequisites: the department's permission.

This course is open only to those who have applied and been accepted into the department's senior essay program. For information about the program, including deadline for application, please visit http://english.columbia.edu/undergraduate/senior-essay-program.

Spring 2018: ENGL UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3999 001/25945  
Michael Golston 3 16/25

University Writing

ENGL CC1010 University Writing. 3 points.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 099). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in Music (sections in the 070s). Features essays that analyze the politics, histories, communities, philosophies, and techniques of music-making, from the classical to the contemporary. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and the Performance Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze the politics, histories, communities, philosophies, and techniques of the various art forms. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. UW: Readings in Law and Justice (sections in the 700s). Features essays that study core questions of law and justice and that have important implications for our lives. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these themes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2018: ENGL CC1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/14709 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Theresa Jefferson 3 10/14
ENGL 1010 002/65664 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Nicholas Mayer 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 003/70127 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Meadhbh McHugh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 005/71728 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 006/73734 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Akua Banful 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 007/10986 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Olivia Rutigliano 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 011/70006 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Daniella Cadiz Bedini 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 015/77282 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
522d Kent Hall
Montana Ray 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 017/68951 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Elleza Kelley 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 019/76536 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Daniel Lefferts 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 025/64082 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Jack Lowery 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 026/15001 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Elizabeth McIntosh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 027/21383 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Julia Sirmons 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 028/74990 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
David Jamieson 3 9/14
ENGL 1010 029/29773 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Adam Winters 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 030/71150 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Iris Cushing 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 032/64568 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Ameya Tripathi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 035/64032 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Jessica Engebretson 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 037/63498 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 038/28566 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Francois Olivier 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 040/11789 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Walter Gordon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 042/21500 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Nitzan Rotenberg 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 046/75251 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Jason Ueda 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 047/24870 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
G'Ra Asim 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 048/20067 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Adam Horn 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 049/19020 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Shoshana Akabas 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 051/15669 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Marcus Creaghan 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 054/23029 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Synne Borgen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 075/12635 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 076/11815 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Aidan Levy 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 091/18709 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Aaron Ritzenberg 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 092/64583 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Avia Tadmor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 101/61087 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Trevor Corson 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 102/10979 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Lisa Foad 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 103/24530 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Samuel Carpenter 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 104/12575 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Dennis Tang 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 201/12193 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Alessia Palanti 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 202/25399 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Chelsea Spata 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 203/77730 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Olivia Ciacci 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 204/13047 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Emma de Beus 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 205/69513 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Allen Durgin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 401/73978 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 402/13294 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Timothy Lundy 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 403/62812 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Kevin Windhauser 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 404/72301 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Stephen Preskill 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 501/75858 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Marianna Staroselsky 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 502/77601 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Jonathan Reeve 3 8/14
ENGL 1010 503/71726 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
307 Mathematics Building
Jenna Schoen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 504/72205 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Shelby Wardlaw 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 601/17047 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Tibo Halsberghe 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 602/29114 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 603/74819 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Li Qi Peh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 901/65018 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Rebecca Sonkin 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 902/61287 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Anya Lewis-Meeks 3 14/14
Fall 2018: ENGL CC1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 002/12850 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Gabrielle DaCosta 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 003/64200 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Laura Gruszka 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 007/25926 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Ami Yoon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 011/16179 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Akua Banful 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 015/72516 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Synne Borgen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 018/17413 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Zoe Pollak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 021/16252 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Sonkin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 022/69042 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Veronica Belafi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 023/70954 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Christina McCausland 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 024/15008 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Brianne Baker 3 15/14
ENGL 1010 025/71136 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Emily Hunt Kivel 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 026/74548 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Theresa Lin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 027/29259 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201b Philosophy Hall
Patrick Moran 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 028/60792 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201d Philosophy Hall
Austin Mantele 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 029/72374 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
307 Mathematics Building
Sumati Dwivedi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 033/65417 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201b Philosophy Hall
Meadhbh McHugh 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 037/15575 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Milan Terlunen 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 041/13118 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Walter Gordon 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 044/14661 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Nitzan Rotenberg 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 045/14027 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Adam Horn 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 047/68552 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Emma Styles-Swaim 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 048/26860 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Lindsey Cienfuegos 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 049/12218 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Anna Waller 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 051/11436 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Francois Olivier 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 052/18986 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Samuel Grabiner 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 053/22786 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Naomi Michalowicz 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 101/88015 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Lisa Foad 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 140/16398 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Olivia Rutigliano 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 143/28250 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Dennis Tang 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 146/87697 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Emily Weitzman 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 213/78747 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Lisa Del Sol 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 217/13787 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Samuel Carpenter 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 230/62049 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Frances Wood 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 235/65896 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Diana Newby 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 238/95948 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Allen Durgin 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 308/13446 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Anne Potter 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 331/73497 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Alessia Palanti 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 404/64532 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 409/62699 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Chloe Howe Haralambous 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 419/60849 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Taleen Mardirossian 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 505/97049 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
408a Philosophy Hall
Brianna Williams 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 512/68699 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Simon Porzak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 532/77530 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Charlee Dyroff 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 536/81049 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Marianna Staroselsky 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 614/16996 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Antoinette Bumekpor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 639/82780 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Tibo Halsberghe 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 642/67447 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Avia Tadmor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 650/13280 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Shoshana Akabas 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 716/62784 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 720/96898 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408a Philosophy Hall
Daniel Lefferts 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 906/11346 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Lauren Horst 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 910/75516 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Hannah Kauders 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 934/16447 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14

ENGL GS1010 University Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL GS1010.

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields. UW: Readings in Music (sections in the 070s). Features essays that analyze the politics, histories, communities, philosophies, and techniques of music-making, from the classical to the contemporary. UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Spring 2018: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/69656 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
502 Northwest Corner
Matthew Fernandez 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 002/28620 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
502 Northwest Corner
Allaire Conte 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 003/63608 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
502 Northwest Corner
Jeremy Stevens 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 004/21487 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
502 Northwest Corner
Elizabeth Bowen 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 007/70858 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Will Glovinsky 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 008/68556 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Kent Szlauderbach 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 010/11754 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
307 Mathematics Building
Eugene Petracca 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 014/16274 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Amanda Lowe 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 015/60526 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Brian Bartell 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 018/14456 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Mor Sheinbein 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 019/27530 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Michael Darnell 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 020/29345 M W 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Katherine Bergevin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 021/10740 T Th 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Valerio Amoretti 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 075/24761 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Simon Porzak 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 101/71804 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Trevor Corson 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 201/13056 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Allen Durgin 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 401/12675 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 501/77056 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Sierra Eckert 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 601/73692 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Abigail Rabinowitz 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 901/21458 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 902/61249 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
423 Kent Hall
Yea Jung Park 3 13/14
Fall 2018: ENGL GS1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/65498 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
307 Mathematics Building
Gianmarco Saretto 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 003/68388 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
411 Hamilton Hall
David Jamieson 3 15/14
ENGL 1010 011/12164 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Katherine McIntyre 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 012/23542 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Valerio Amoretti 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 022/73948 M W 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Marcus Creaghan 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 023/75900 T Th 7:10pm - 8:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Theresa Jefferson 3 12/14
ENGL 1010 117/29284 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Allen Durgin 3 13/14
ENGL 1010 215/97198 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Chelsea Spata 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 216/89033 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
308a Lewisohn Hall
Jack Lowery 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 304/92097 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
337 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Allaire Conte 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 313/72199 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Simon Porzak 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 405/87530 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201d Philosophy Hall
Rebecca Wisor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 408/28550 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Ameya Tripathi 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 418/13013 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Kevin Windhauser 3 17/17
ENGL 1010 502/19696 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
408a Philosophy Hall
Abigail Nehring 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 506/15897 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Shelby Wardlaw 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 607/22746 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Avia Tadmor 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 709/20957 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Valerie Jacobs 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 710/27533 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Buck Wanner 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 719/87599 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
405 Kent Hall
Elleza Kelley 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 914/86098 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Vanessa Guida 3 14/14
ENGL 1010 920/62700 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
502 Northwest Corner
Yea Jung Park 3 11/14
ENGL 1010 921/71949 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
405 Kent Hall
Anya Lewis-Meeks 3 13/14