Urban Policy Focus Area

The Urban Policy focus area is designed to provide students with an understanding of the policy challenges and opportunities that are particular to cities in both the developed and developing world. SIPA focuses on the traditional urban policy fields like city management, urban planning, land use, housing urban education, transit, as well as the most recent urban policy innovations in environmental sustainability, technological integration, globalization and business development.

More than half of the world’s population resides in an urban areas.  Cities now have responsibilities in virtually every policy arena including: infrastructure development, safety and security, environmental sustainability, economic development and job creation, education, healthcare, housing, and social welfare.  Global urbanization is guaranteed to continue over the course of the 21st century and this policy track prepares students to understand how economic, social, political, geo-physical, and technological factors shape cities.

The range of policies that fall under the umbrella category of urban policy is extensive.  For this reason, students are encouraged to develop specialized policy knowledge within one of the Suggested Urban Policy Focus Areas listed below. The focus area categories are to be used as a guide to help students structure their elective coursework around a particular policy field. Although it is encouraged, students are not required to choose one focus area and have the flexibility to take courses in several focus areas based on their interests.

  • Urban Politics and Governance
  • Management in Urban Public Sector or Not For Profits
  • Urban Social Policy (includes: Family, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Immigration & Poverty)
  • Economic Development Policy, Urban Planning and Land Use
  • Sustainability and Environmental Policy
  • Housing Policy
  • Education Policy
  • Health Policy
  • Crime, Safety and Security Policy
  • Employment and Labor Policy

Students must complete a total of 15 points, with at least 3 points from the menu of core courses. Students must then complete 12 credits from the focus areas listed below, regardless of their category. The purpose of the urban policy focus areas is to encourage students to develop specialized policy knowledge, but it is only a guide. Students have the flexibility to take courses in one or several of the focus areas:

Please note:

  • USP short courses (1.5 credits) can count towards your elective requirement.
  • A second core course can count towards your elective requirement.  
  • Two specialization courses can be double counted for elective requirement

Core Courses

Select one or more of the following:

Points
PUAF U4260Critical Issues in Urban Public Policy3
PUAF U6239Comparative Urban Policy: Global Developing Cities3
PUAF U8232Seminar in Urban Politics and Policy3
PUAF U8238Practical Problems in Urban Politics3
PUAF U8250Governing the Twenty First Century City3
Other (requires approval)

     Urban Politics and Governance - Focus Area

Points
INAF U6512Data Driven Approaches for Campaigns and Advocacy3
INAF U6515Technology and the Future of Governance and Public Policy1.5
PUAF U4260Critical Issues in Urban Public Policy3
PUAF U4400Campaign Management in the United States3
PUAF U6239Comparative Urban Policy: Global Developing Cities3
PUAF U6246Practicum in Urban Public Policy1.5
PUAF U6850Local Global Corruption: Maneuvering Toward Good Governance3
PUAF U8232Seminar in Urban Politics and Policy3
PUAF U8238Practical Problems in Urban Politics3
PUAF U8250Governing the Twenty First Century City3
PUAF U6132Politics and Policies of Community Planning and Participation3
PUAF U8244Municipal Finance in the U.S.3
PUAF U8206Advocacy and the Legislative Process1.5
PUAF U8243The Politics and Policies of Public Pension Funds1.5
SIPA U6003Analysis of Public Sector Organizations Course Video3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
ARCH A4688Public Space & Recombinant Urbanism3
EDPP 5041 (TC)Politics of Centralization & Decentralization3
EDPP 6540 (TC)Seminar: Politics & Education3
ORLJ 5340 (TC)Basic Practicum Conflict Resolution3
ECON GU42283
SOCI W33243

     Management in Urban Public Sector or Not-For-Profits - Focus Area 

Points
SIPA U6003Analysis of Public Sector Organizations Course Video3
SIPA U6320Budgeting and Financial Management for Government3
INAF U6898Program Evaluation and Design3
INAF U6016Cost-Benefit Analysis3
INAF U6132Aiming for Social Impact: Managing, Measuring, and Investing to Achieve Results3
SIPA U6310Nonprofit Financial Management3
PUAF U8244Municipal Finance in the U.S.3
PUAF U6033Decision Models Management3
SIPA U6005Effective Management in the Public Service Course Video3
PUAF U6028Public-Private Partnerships to Foster Effective, Sustainable and Scalable Nonprofits1.5
PUAF U8203Project Management3
PUAF U8243The Politics and Policies of Public Pension Funds1.5
EMPA U8200Effective Management in the Public Service3
PUAF U8260Generating Financial Support to Grow Social Enterprises1.5
PUAF U6135Civic Innovation and Building a People-Centered Government1.5
INAF U6508Using Big Data to Develop Public Policy3
ENVP U8201Financial Management3
INAF U6515Technology and the Future of Governance and Public Policy1.5


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
SUMA PS4100Sustainability Management3
ARCH A4818Hacking the Urban Experience1.5
EDPA 4048 (TC)Education Policy Analysis/Implementation3
HBSS 4162 (TC)Health Services Administration3
HPMN P6530Issues and Approaches in Health Policy and Management3
ORLA 4876 (TC)School Finance: Resource Allocation for Non-profit Organizations3
SOCW T6416Program Evaluation in Social Services3

     Urban Social Policy - Focus Area 

Points
INAF U6053Creating a Social Enterprise3
PUAF U6123Immigration Politics and Policy3
PUAF U8355Politics of Race, Crime and Criminal Justice3
INAF U6510Managing Data Analytics for Development and Social Impact1.5
INAF U8161Economics, Law and Public Policy3
INAF U6175Global Perspectives on Migration3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
ANTH UN3989Introduction to Urban Anthropology (Additional graduate coursework required. Consult USP staff before registering)4
ECON W4438Economics of Race in the U.S. (Additional graduate coursework required. Consult USP staff before registering)3
LAW L6250Immigration Law3
LAW L6252Family Law3
SOCW T6416Program Evaluation - Social Service3
SOCW T6801Social Welfare Policy3

     Economic Development Policy, Urban Planning, and Land Use - Focus Area  

Points
PUAF U6132Politics and Policies of Community Planning and Participation3
PUAF U6190Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development3
ENVP U6275GIS for International Studies3
INAF U6257Land Use Planning and Public Policy3
INAF U6051Infrastructure Investment and Development1.5
INAF U6186Community Economic Development: Origins, Policy and Practice3
INAF U6602Economic Development for International Affairs3
INAF U8145Advanced Economic Development for International Affairs3
PUAF U6427Technology, Innovation and Economic Development in Cities1.5
PUAF U6234Planning and Implementing Urban Public Policy3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
ARCH A4430Urban History I3
ARCH A4688Public Space/Recombinant Urbanism3
ARCH A4356Contemporary Chinese City3
ARCH A6769History of the American City3
ARCH A6779Philosophies of the City3
ECON GU4230Economics of New York City3
HIST W453520th Century New York City History4
LAW L6272Land Use3
PLAN A4579Intro to Environmental Planning3
PLAN A6216NYC Land Use Approvals3
PLAN A6434Intro. To Transportation Planning3
PLAN A4340Sustainable Zoning + Land Use3
PLAN A4112Physical Structure of Cities3
PLAN A4381Sustainable Urban Development - International Perspectives3
PLAN A4620Public Financing of Urban Development3
PLAN A6108Land Use Planning3
ARCH A6454Arab Cities in Evolution3
PLAN A4579Introduction to Environmental Planning3
LAW L8454Extractive Industry and Sustainable Development2

     Urban Sustainability and Environmental Policy - Focus Area  

Points
ENVP U6239The Politics and Policy of Urban Sustainability3
PUAF U6190Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development3
INAF U8778Distributed Energy Economics, Technology, and Policy3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
SUMA K4030Hungry City Workshop3
SUMA K4169Sustainability Metrics3
SUMA PS4100Sustainability Management3
SUMA PS4190Economics of Sustainability Management3
SUMA PS4235The Science of Urban Ecology3
ARCH A4330Urban History I3
PLAN A4340Sustainable Zoning + Land Use3
PLAN A4381Sustainable Urban Development - International Perspectives3
PLAN A4579Intro to Environmental Planning3
PLAN A6065Environmental Impact Assessment3
CNAD K4130Green Building and Sustainability: Tools and Tech3
LAW L8454Extractive Industry and Sustainable Development2

     Housing Policy - Focus Area   

Points
PUAF U6245Housing Policy and the City3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
PLAN A6212Developing Affordable Housing1.5
PLAN A6568Public-Private Partnerships in Real Estate Development3

     Education Policy - Focus Area   

Points
INAF U8201Innovations in K-12 Education1.5
INAF U6653Higher Education, Policy and Development in Asia3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
A&HH 4060 (TC)History of Education in NYC3
A&HF 4094 (TC)School and Society3
EDPA 4025 (TC)Higher Education Policy3
EDPA 4048 (TC)Education Policy Analysis/Implementation3
EDPA 4013 (TC)Education Policy and the Management of Instruction3
EDPP 5042 (TC)Urban Politics and Education3
EDPP 6540 (TC)Seminar: Politics and Education3
EDPS 4000 (TC)Education and Public Policy3
EDPS 4022 (TC)Sociology of Urban Education3
ITSF 4060 (TC)Latinos in Urban Schools3
MGMT B8558Education Leadership3
SOCW T6960School-Based Services3
EDPA 5023 (TC)Policies for Efefctive High School to College Transition3
A&HH 4076 (TC)History of Urban Education3
ITSF 4025 (TC)Languages, Society and Schools3

     Health Policy - Focus Area    


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
SUMA K4030Hungry City Workshop3
EHSC P8371Public Health GIS3
HBSS 4162 (TC)Health Services Adminstration3
HBSS 4114 (TC)Competence with Multicultural Populations3
HPMN P6503Introduction to Health Economics3
HPMN P6508Health Policy and the Political System3
HPMN P8517Management Challenges in Health Care & Insurance Systems3
HPMN P8549Interest Group Politics and Health Policy1.5
HPMN P8561Managing Public Health Non-Profits1.5
HPMN P8575Cross-National Health Policy1.5
HPMN P8584Transforming the Delivery of Healthcare Systems1.5
HPMN P8580Global Health Governance1.5
LAW L6357Public Health Law3
POPF P8648Food and Nutrition in Complex Emergencies1.5
POPF P8651Water and Sanitation in Complex Emergencies1.5
SOCW T6910The Health Care System3
SOSC P8705Evaluation of Health Programs3
SOSC P8717Urban Space & Health3
SOSC P8737Emerging Topic - Urban/Community Health1.5
SOSC P8745Social and Economic Determinants of Health3
SOSC P8750Race and Health3
SOSC P8762Chronic Disease, Urban and Community Health3
SOSC P8773Social History of American Public Health3
HIST W3523History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States3

     Crime, Safety and Security - Focus Area   

Points
INAF U6388Modern Urban Terrorism3
PUAF U8355Politics of Race, Crime and Criminal Justice3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
HIST G6999Politics of Crime and Policing in the United States3
SOCI UN3900Societal Adaptations to Terrorism (Additional graduate coursework required. Consult USP staff before registering)4

     Employment and Labor Policy - Focus Area    

Points
INAF U6475Social Policy and Inclusive Development3


Courses offered at affiliate Columbia Schools - Enrollment not guaranteed. Please see Cross-Registration instructions. Many courses will require instructor permission.

Points
LAW L6473Labor Law3

All students are encouraged to discuss their proposed schedule with their advisor.

Year 1
FallPointsSpringPoints
Core: Conceptual Foundations (MIA) Politics of Policy Making (MPA)14SIPA U4201 or U640113
Concentration Core Course (choose one):3SIPA U65003
 Concentration Elective Course 3
 Concentration Elective Course3
 Specialization Course 1 3
  
Other (requires concentration director approval)
  
SIPA U40400.5 
SIPA U4200 or U640013 
Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3 
 13.5 15
Year 2
FallPointsSpringPoints
Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3Core: Capstone Workshop3
Concentration Elective Course3Internship Registration (Optional) 3
Specialization Course 2 3Specialization Course 31.5, 3
Elective 3Concentration Elective Course3
Elective 3Elective3
 15 13.5-15
Total Points: 57-58.5
1

 Courses must be taken in the semester listed.

Year 1

Foreign Language - For MIA students and EPD concentrators who need to take language courses to fulfill the degree/concentration requirement, your schedule may need to be adjusted accordingly.

Year 2

Core- MIA students are required to take one Interstate Relations course.

USP - Urban Policy Track Courses

EMPA U8200 Effective Management in the Public Service. 3 Points.

Category: EMPA, EMPA: Core, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social
Open to EMPA Students Only

The course is designed to introduce you to the field of public management. It is a practical course organized around the tools managers may use to influence the behavior of their organizations. The course also discusses the political environment in which public managers must interact.

EMPA U9225 Public Management Innovation. 3 Points.

Category: EMPA
Summer 2017 Course Dates: May 24 - July 26

Analysis of public management literature on innovation covering such topics as engineering, team based management, privatization, public private partnership, contracting, benchmarking, quality management, and strategic planning. Emphasis is on advantages and disadvantages of these techniques in a point counterpoint format.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Summer 2017 001 60820 William Eimicke, Howard Buffett W 6:30pm - 9:30pm
404 International Affairs Bldg

ENVP U6236 Origins of Environmental Law: Regulation & Evolution. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-ESP, USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This unique course will focus on the process that led to the seminal federal environmental laws of the 1970s and the political and social dynamics and setting of the era. Over the course of a single decade, Congress enacted a series of environmental laws that created the direction and character of federal environmental laws, not to mention a sea change in the relationship between the Congress, the Courts and the Executive branch.

ENVP U6239 The Politics and Policy of Urban Sustainability. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-ESP, USP, USP:Urban, EE, EE: EPM

Cities are increasingly recognized as a key level of government for environmental and sustainability policy. As at all levels, politics and policy are intensely intertwined, and perhaps moreso at the local level because the decisions involved often affect constituents directly and intimately -- in their neighborhoods, in their homes, in their commutes. This colloquium explores both the politics and the policy of sustainability in the municipal context. Covering a range of sustainability issues -- such as air quality, public health, and transportation -- it looks at the dynamics of making change happen at the local level, including variations in power among municipal governments; how issues get defined and allocated; how stakeholder management takes place (or doesn't); how agencies and levels of government interfere with each other; and how best practices can (and cannot) be transferred internationally. The course is reading-intense and includes case studies by historians rather than political scientists. The focus of most readings is on the United States, but students' research projects will require looking beyond the US and transferring practices to a US city.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 12797 Rohit Aggarwala Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
410 International Affairs Bldg

ENVP U6275 GIS for International Studies. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-ESP, EE, EE: EPM, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and remote sensing technologies as they are used in a variety of social and environmental science applications. Through a mixture of lectures, readings, focused discussions, and hands-on exercises, students will acquire an understanding of the variety and structure of spatial data and databases, gain a knowledge of the principles behind raster and vector based spatial analysis, learn basic cartographic principles for producing maps that effectively communicate a message, and develop sound practices for GIS project design and management. The class will focus on the application of GIS to assist in the development, implementation and analysis of environmental and social policy and practices at the global and regional scale.

INAF U6003 Coding for Development and Social Change. 1 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management, USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this 3-day workshop, students will learn design thinking and basic coding. This course is an introduction to technology and analytics for social good. At the end of the workshop, students will have the resources and knowledge to build/develop a framework.

INAF U6016 Cost-Benefit Analysis. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, USP, USP:Urban, APEA, Management

Prerequisites: SIPA U4200 or SIPA U6400 or SIPA U6401

This course aims to provide an introduction to cost-benefit analysis and the economic evaluation of government or development programs, projects and policies. The course consists of two parts: theory/methodology in the first half of the semester and application of the learned concepts through an analysis of various case studies in the second half. Case studies will cover the full range of possible applications of CBA -from early education, social policy, health, urban planning, transportation and energy to environmental regulations. Case studies will cover both the US and developing country contexts. In the second half of the semester students will be expected to apply what they have learned by carrying out a cost-benefit analysis on a topic of their choice. The project is expected to include all components of a professional CBA - description of policy or program scenarios to be evaluated, compilation and monetization of the main costs and benefits, development of an Excel model including discounting and sensitivity analysis.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 88029 Eva Weissman M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 93631 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 93631 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
411 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6051 Infrastructure Investment and Development. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, MPA-DP, EPD, EPD:Economic, USP, USP:Urban
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 23 - Mar. 6

Key question: How to harmonize the diverse objectives of private investors, public sector officials, multilateral institutions and other key actors in the development of international infrastructure projects. This course will examine the principles underlying global infrastructure investment and explore effective strategies to encourage development of facilities for transportation, water, energy, healthcare and education. The classes will focus primarily upon three or more specific case studies of recent projects. Subjects of examination will include Linha Quatro of the Metrô de São Paulo, the Kenya-Uganda Rift Valley Railway and the Guangdong Province water system. The projects will be examined from the perspectives of financial investors, industrial operators, creditors, including commercial banks and multilateral institutions, government policymakers and the public. Issues discussed will include risk allocation, delivery methods and the evolving cast of global investors. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 86346 Joel Moser M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6053 Creating a Social Enterprise. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Social, Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social

The course will focus primarily on the knowledge and skills required to launch a social enterprise.  The class will include an overview of Social Enterprises around the globe and will look at various enterprise models (for profit, non-profit) and their role in the broader market economy.  Class time will focus on the analysis of Case Studies and the vetting of real social enterprise business plans.  The course will center on a Group Project where teams of three (3) will work together to build a plan for launching their own, new Social Enterprise. In the process, students will learn how to define, design, market, sustain and scale their concept.  At the end of the course, students will submit a formal business plan and budget and will present their plan to a panel of experts in the field.

INAF U6058 Public Finance & Debt Management. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP, USP, USP:Urban, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Students should have a working knowledge of Excel and basic quantitative concepts such as present and future value calculations.

The course is intended to enable students to understand the history and functioning of the capital and debt markets that facilitate financing on behalf of governmental units. The syllabus will cover all facets of public sector financing including the legal and financial construct and also examine at length the role of independent rating agencies in the marketplace.

INAF U6132 Aiming for Social Impact: Managing, Measuring, and Investing to Achieve Results. 3 Points.

Category: Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Social

This course is designed to give students the skills to translate an ambitious mission statement into a set of results that have the potential to constitute real impact; recognize and work through common trade-offs (financial, organizational and strategic) that decision makers confront when they align their organizations around impact; understand the difference between performance management and impact measurement; why social enterprises need both of these systems and the organizational prerequisites for implementing them; how to identify measures that can truly inform critical decisions; and analyze and assess the strengths and weaknesses of prominent approaches to achieving and scaling impact across all three sectors: social/philanthropic, public, and private/for-profit

INAF U6186 Community Economic Development: Origins, Policy and Practice. 3 Points.

Category: Management, USP, USP:Urban

This course will provide an overview of the community development industry. Tracing the evolution from a nascent movement to organize blighted inner-city neighborhoods to today's multi-billion dollar industry, the course will examine how community development happens, the way communities set development priorities, the financial tools used to accomplish projects, and how key partners interact. The course will explore how affordable housing, health care, schools, childcare, and retail development projects interact to turn neglected neighborhoods into communities of choice. The level of financial and underwriting analysis will not require previous real estate finance experience. Particular attention will be paid to the role of community development corporations, community development financial institutions, direct public subsidies, and the role of banks and the Community Reinvestment Act.

INAF U6257 Land Use Planning and Public Policy. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar combines reading about the interplay among three fundamental forces that underlie decisions about the use of land and that also explain the results of those decisions.   The first fundamental factor is physical phenomena – including topography, geology, vegetation and climate.The second factor is human – the socio-economic and cultural patterns of land use.  And the third factor is legal/political – ownership and political authority affecting the use of specific parcels of land. We will devote the semester to learning how to answer five important questions posed by the essential text for this course: (1) What are the important features of a tract of land?  (2) Where is it located with respect to other places and other land uses? (3) Why is it used in a particular way? (4) How can it be better used to avoid harmful unintended consequences and promote beneficial ones? (5) Who has the authority to cause beneficial changes in land use practices?  By answering these questions, we can analyze what has been built, what is likely to be built, and what consequences will be the result.  Ultimately, the class provides understandings that can lead to better land-use decisions wherever they’re made. 

INAF U6388 Modern Urban Terrorism. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, USP, USP:Urban

This course will focus on contemporary urban Islamist terrorism, as it is most relevant to New York City. The first part of this course will be more theoretical starting with a historical perspective, methodology on how to approach to problem, the importance of ideology and the evolution of this wave of terrorism, including the role of the Internet. In the second half of the course, several case studies relevant to New York City will be analyzed. Finally, the course will end with a discussion of disengagement from terrorism

INAF U6475 Social Policy and Inclusive Development. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Social, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban

This course will explore the comparative and global political economy of contemporary systems of social and labor protection in developing (including post-socialist) countries, known as "welfare regimes." Economic globalization, struggles over democratization, shifting and competing policy paradigms at the international level, and the assistance strategies of international financial institution and non-governmental donors will all be discussed as important contextual, and at times decisive, influences.

INAF U6510 Managing Data Analytics for Development and Social Impact. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management
Spring 2016 Course Dates: TBDNot offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Statistics suggested

This course provides a hands-on introduction to data analytics thinking, analytics management and the process of delivering data-driven innovation in development and social impact environments. The course emphasizes the business side of data science and the success factors for creating effective results: clarity in scope, stakeholder engagement, access to domain knowledge, understanding impact and success, selecting relevant data sources, iterative thinking, teamwork, focus on actionable results and effective communication of insights. Knowledge of basic statistics and spreadsheets is required. The course is also useful for data scientists looking to apply their skills effectively for social impact. Addressing today's complex social problems with data is a team effort requiring conceptual clarity and a variety of skills spanning from business intelligence, project management, data management, data analysis and communications. Success depends on proper management towards the goal of delivering useful, actionable results. This course is designed to bridge the gap between statistical theory and real-world challenges of leveraging data analysis, including using big data sets for problem-solving and innovation. It will explore typical data related scenarios in development and social impact projects: stakeholder engagement, defining and quantifying impact, community based data collection, data discovery & analysis, engaging stakeholders with data and implementing data-driven social innovation. Real-world clients and datasets from the UN, Ushahidi and the City of New York are an integral part of the course as way for students to experience realistic challenges.

INAF U6512 Data Driven Approaches for Campaigns and Advocacy. 3 Points.

Category: IMAC, USP, USP:Urban

Prerequisites: Basic statistics and facility with spreadsheets

This class will focus on the proper understanding and use of a wide range of tools and techniques involving data, analytics, and experimentation by campaigns. We will study evolutions and revolutions in data driven advocacy and campaigns, starting with polling and continuing through micro-targeting, random controlled experiments, and the application of insights from behavioral science. Our primary focus will be on developments in US political and advocacy campaigns, but we will also examine the uses of these tools in development and other areas. The course is designed to provide an informative but critical overview of an area in which it is often difficult to separate hype from expertise. The purpose of the course is to prepare students to understand the strengths and limitations of Big Data and analytics, and to provide concrete and practical knowledge of some of the key tools in use in campaigns and advocacy. Students will be expected to examine the use of data in practical case studies and distinguish between proper and improper uses. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 12946 Mark Steitz M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6515 Technology and the Future of Governance and Public Policy. 1.5 Point.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, Management, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 23 - Mar. 6

The purpose of the course is to help future policy makers, computer scientists, technologists and entrepreneurs think about how to benefit the public sector in an era in which burgeoning access to digital technology holds great potential to change governance and policy-making. Students will receive a general introduction to how decisions get made, including how policy is developed and implemented in the public sector, and opportunities to apply new technology to this process.  Students will leave as more effective problem solvers. Students will learn multiple modes of problem solving that use technology (online platforms etc.) as well as new models for problem solving (design thinking, rapid prototyping, Lean, Open Space, etc.) to develop a "faux" product to be created in order to meet the goals of finding new ways to address public policy challenges. Projects might vary from eTown Hall forums to maximize participation in democratic governance to leveraging innovation to address one of the 21st century’s most wicked public policy problems.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 11096 Hollie Gilman, Ari Wallach M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6602 Economic Development for International Affairs. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Core, USP, USP:Urban

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the economics of international development. The key objective is to give students a framework to think about the processes that drive economic development, as well as policies that might promote it.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 63046 Miguel Urquiola T 9:00am - 10:50am
410 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 002 66696 Miguel Urquiola T 11:00am - 12:50pm
410 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 68247 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
410 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R02 71046 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
410 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6653 Higher Education, Policy and Development in Asia. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Social, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban

The course has been designed to enable students to understand and discuss major evolutions and trends in Higher Education policies across several Asian countries. Through an interdisciplinary and comparative approach the semester will be dedicated to the investigation of the origin, design, implementation, and effects of different policy responses to development problems and challenges. In particular the course will examine how the Higher Education choices reflect development goals of states and nations. Combining lectures with the intervention of outside speakers (expert analysts, journalists, diplomats, public figures), current education policy problems and debates will be related to political, economic, social and historical context, with particular concern for issues such as skilled migrations, human resources development, R&D, modernity, democracy. The course will focus on the major cases of China, India, Singapore, Japan and Korea, but students will be encouraged to bring a comparative perspective with other regions of the world.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 77046 Alessia Lefebure Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6898 Program Evaluation and Design. 3 Points.

Category: Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Political, EPD:Social, EPD:Sustainable

In this course, students will: (1) become familiar with the concepts, methods, and applications of evaluation research; (2) learn how to assess the context for evaluation; (3) learn how to read evaluation research critically; and (4) be able to propose an appropriate evaluation plan.  The course will center on a Group Project where teams of students (no more than 5 students) will work together to develop an evaluation plan for a program. In the process, students will learn to assess evaluation needs, how to map a program theory, link outcomes to metrics, and plan to ‘conduct' an evaluation. At the end of the course, students will be required to present their group evaluation plan in class and to submit an individual final paper, based on your group's proposal for the program evaluation plan.

INAF U8145 Advanced Economic Development for International Affairs. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Core, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, USP, USP:Urban
Pre-req: SIPA U6400

This is an advanced course in development economics, designed for second-year SIPA students. The course will cover both seminar papers and recent research on development microeconomics. The goal is to introduce students to the literature and familiarize them with the main research methods and questions in the field. After an introduction on the big macro questions and motivating facts, including some quantitative tools and a discussion on poverty traps, the course will focus on key topics in the microeconomics of development. We will discuss the different hypotheses that can explain low investment levels in human capital (nutrition, health, education, entrepreneurship programs) and on agricultural inputs. Then, we will focus on the most recent developments related to microfinance (credits, savings and insurance). The course will also include papers at the intersection between behavioral economics and development, with focus on self-control problems. Coursework includes empirical exercises, requiring some programming in Stata. Material discussed during class presumes knowledge of calculus and quantitative methods.

INAF U8201 Innovations in K-12 Education. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Sept. 6 - Oct. 18

In this course, we will examine - through readings, class discussion and guest speakers - the role of the "public" in public education, offering a broad perspective of where public education lies in the consciousness of the American body politic and how politics, the media, the non-profit sector, foundations, parents, the unions and the business world perceive and impact public education. Following an examination of the historical development of public engagement and how it has transformed over time, we will discuss what civic involvement looks like today. Who are the participants and what are their roles? And, does civic involvement actually have an impact on school leadership and on students? We will attempt to answer the question: How can the broad civic community most effectively participate in the public school system in a manner that makes a difference on school improvement?  Students will also explore their own experiences as members of the public --- incorporating all international students and their experiences --- for insight in answering these questions. Issues will be tackled while ever-mindful of the major contextual variables and outside players and their impact on the relationship between civic support and public education (Country by Country: Race, Class, Ethnicity, Media, Courts, Federal government, Non-Educator Superintendents).

INAF U8778 Distributed Energy Economics, Technology, and Policy. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-DP, EE, EE: GEMP, EE: ERM, EE: EPM, USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the growing role of distributed energy resources in the global energy mix, with a focus on economic and technology fundamentals of key technologies, the changing business model of regulated electric and gas utilities, and new and emerging approaches to enabling innovation at the "Grid Edge." The course will also focus on changing relationship between distributed technology providers, consumers, and the grid, and the role of platform networks and new approaches to market design and resource valuation, and specifically how they relate to policy goals such as lower customer bills, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, or reliability/resilience. Finally, the course will review and develop business cases for products or concepts in "real world" policy landscapes, including urban energy environments.

INAF U8161 Economics, Law and Public Policy. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, APEA, USP, USP:Urban

As Adam Smith noted long ago, economic development cannot occur in the absence of a stable legal system. The purpose of this course is two-fold. First, the course reviews some of the modern developments in economics that are relevant for the study of institutions. Second, it uses these tools to explore the structure of the law, and its impact upon economic performance. The goal is to provide a foundation for the understanding of legal institutions that goes beyond national boundaries, and can help better understand the challenges that rapid economic growth and globalization pose for policy makers.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 63444 W. Bentley MacLeod Th 9:00am - 10:50am
801 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U4260 Critical Issues in Urban Public Policy. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is designed to prepare future policymakers to critically analyze and evaluate key urban policy issues in New York. It is unique in offering exposure to both practical leadership experience and urban affairs scholarship that will equip students to meet the challenges that face urban areas. Students will read academic articles and chapters from books dealing with urban politics and policy, and will hear from an exciting array of guest lecturers from the governmental, not-for-profit, and private sectors. Drawing from my experiences as former Mayor of New York City, I will lay out the basic elements of urban government and policymaking, emphasizing the most important demographic, economic, and political trends facing urban areas.

PUAF U4400 Campaign Management in the United States. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management

Together we are going to learn how to plan, manage, and execute the major elements of a modern American campaign using skills that can be applied to all levels of the electoral process. Although this is a course focusing on practical competence, empirical political theory and relevant political science will be applied to our work. Guest lecturers, simulations, and additional materials such as videos and handouts will augment the course. When we are done, you will know what you need to do, and where you need to turn, in order to effectively organize an election campaign. The curriculum is ambitious, specialized, and task-specific. This is not a course in political science, but rather a hands-on, intensive training seminar in campaign skills. By May, you will be able to write a campaign plan, structure a fundraising effort, hire and work with consultants, plan a media campaign (both paid and unpaid), research and target a district, structure individual voter contact, use polling data, understand the utility of focus groups, write press releases, conduct advance work on behalf of your candidate, manage crises, hire and fire your staff, and tell your candidate when he or she is wrong. My aim is to make you competent and eminently employable in the modern era of advanced campaign technology. For the purposes of this class, you will design a campaign plan for the 2005 NYC Mayoral race. To make this more interesting (and realistic), you will be provided with information and situations throughout the semester that will require you to plan, anticipate, and adapt your campaign plan to the changing realities inherent to every campaign.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 62192 Karine Jean-Pierre Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
407 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6028 Public-Private Partnerships to Foster Effective, Sustainable and Scalable Nonprofits. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Sept. 6 - Oct. 18; Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 17 - Feb. 28

This course is designed for students interested in establishing, working in or leading non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or creating social value through partnerships between NGOs, business and government. The course will deepen students' understanding of: (1) the nonprofit sector in general, and (2) partnerships between nonprofits, business and government. Students will learn through cases involving a variety of NGOs, businesses, and governments. The cases include a range of industries (e.g. housing, sports, transportation and drugs); NGOs (e.g. Habitat for Humanity International, the Red Cross and Homeless World Cup); companies (e.g. Nike and GlaxoSmithKline); and countries (e.g. France, Brazil, Mexico and the US).

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 19256 Lynn Thoman T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6033 Decision Models & Management. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, Management

This course provides an introduction to computer-based models for decision-making. The emphasis is on models that are widely used in diverse industries and functional areas, including finance, accounting, operations, and marketing. Applications will include advertising planning, revenue management, asset-liability management, environmental policy modeling, portfolio optimization, and corporate risk management, among others. The aim of the course is to help students become intelligent consumers of these methods. To this end, the course will cover the basic elements of modeling -- how to formulate a model and how to use and interpret the information a model produces. The course will attempt to instill a critical viewpoint towards decision models, recognizing that they are powerful but limited tools.The applicability and usage of computer-based models have increased dramatically in recent years, due to the extraordinary improvements in computer, information and communication technologies, including not just hardware but also model-solution techniques and user interfaces. Thirty years ago working with a model meant using an expensive mainframe computer, learning a complex programming language, and struggling to compile data by hand; the entire process was clearly marked "experts only." The rise of personal computers, friendly interfaces (such as spreadsheets), and large databases has made modeling far more accessible to managers. Information has come to be recognized as a critical resource, and models play a key role in deploying this resource, in organizing and structuring information so that it can be used productively.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 65946 Lucius Riccio Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 12298 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6123 Immigration Politics and Policy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course emphasizes theories of migration, migration and development, transnational Citizenship, European responses to immigration, U. S. responses to immigration, immigrant Incorporation, refugee policy.

PUAF U6132 Politics and Policies of Community Planning and Participation. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management

This course will examine the intersections of policy, planning and participation at the community and local level in the United States. The belief in widespread community participation and active civic engagement is basic to the effective operation of the American political democracy.   In the planning profession, neighborhood planning has often been viewed as an essential mechanism for citizen involvement, for balanced physical development and beyond to the resolution of economic, political, social and environmental issues. In many ways, neighborhood planning is more important than ever, whether it focuses on urban design and livability or on the local effects of climate change and disaster prevention and sustainability.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 83097 Ethel Sheffer W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6190 Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-DP, EE, EE: ERM

The guiding questions behind the course are: How can extractive industry investments be leveraged for sustainable and equitable development, particularly in low-income resource-rich countries? What is the international, national and regional regulatory framework under which such investments are made? Who are the stakeholders, and what are their respective interests, roles, responsibilities and opportunities? How can the challenges of poverty alleviation, environmental sustainability and governance be addressed in an integrated, multi-stakeholder framework for extractive industry investments that promotes sustainable development, respects the profitability of private-sector investments, and builds the mutual trust needed for long-term investments? The course covers the inter-related challenges of governance (fair and efficient negotiations, contracts, policy and planning framework, sound resource management, effective institutions), infrastructure (concession arrangements for shared platforms, corridor development), economic diversification (industrial policy, training, local procurement), environmental management (climate change resilience and adaptation, avoidance and management of catastrophic environmental events), and economic development (budgetary processes and tools, community engagement, integrated approaches to poverty alleviation at the local and national levels). Students who are interested in registering for this course should e-mail the instructor for permission.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 69271 Lisa Sachs W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
407 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6217 Operations Management. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management

This course provides a foundation for understanding the operations of an organization. The objective is to provide the basic skills necessary to critically analyze an organization's operating performance and practices. Such knowledge is important for careers in a variety of areas, including general management and consulting. Unlike other courses which tend to treat operations as a "black box", this course will be concerned with 'opening up the inner workings of an organization's operations to see how they work or don't work, learning the fundamental laws of behavior of producing a product or services, and lastly to learn how to design operations that perform at maximum levels. Its focus will be on the technical and mathematical analysis of operations rather than a human factors approach, although there are obvious connections between the two that will be explored. Concern is given to understanding which elements of an organization's operations enable it to produce quality outputs at a reasonable cost. The course will accomplish this by grouping the material under two major headings. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding the "physics" of how material, paper work, and information flow through an organization to produce a product or service and how its design encourages or impedes good performance. The second half will focus on excellence in operations, learning techniques and approaches that increase overall performance in production, quality, variety, or speed of service.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 94254 Lucius Riccio W 11:00am - 12:50pm
411 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6234 Planning and Implementing Urban Public Policy. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

PUAF U6237 Implementing Better Health: Systems-Based Problem Solving. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-DP, USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course, we will examine real time political efforts to improve national health at different scales in Nigeria (national), India (state-based), and the United States (district level). Given the complexity of this challenge, a practitioner's eye is required to guide the mechanics of a scalable and sustainable health system. We will focus on the alignment of governance, community participation, and information feedback required to successfully meet this high level goal. Each of these initiatives are being technically advised by an interdisciplinary team of Earth Institute advisors. Using case-based methodology to explore implementation challenges, we focus on the intersection of community need, technical feasibility and political will in building health systems. We will highlight the cumulative nature of content and situational analyses to examine three recurring course themes: (1) the components of a dynamic health system in the context of integrated community development, (2) the importance of regional and local context in planning for scalability and sustainability, and (3) bridging the gap between policy and implementation. This will be a hands-on, practical look at the implementation mechanics required to connect community level management to national policy. The major course output will be a guided, semester long exercise in writing a strategic development plan from a practitioners perspective to guide political decision making. The focus on health systems is a concrete means to understand the more general skills involved in this process, which include political, financial, technical and organizational analysis. Non-MPA-DP students who are interested in registering for this course should e-mail the instructor for permission.

PUAF U6239 Comparative Urban Policy: Global Developing Cities. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban

Studying developing cities, such as Johannesburg, Sao Paulo, and Shanghai, has never been more important. Over half of the world's population is now urban. As cities continue to expand, metropolitan areas around the globe face a growing number of challenges, including: sprawl, poor sanitation, poverty, pollution, corruption, and crime. This course in comparative urban policy will help you develop a keener understanding of these challenges. Our focus will be on how academics and analysts study and debate global developing cities. We will explore questions, such as: What accounts for the global pace of migration from rural to urban places in our time? What are the major challenges facing developing cities? What strategies do individuals, neighborhoods, and economic interest groups have available to influence, and to optimize their experiences in developing cities? How well are developing cities' urban governance and planning geared to resolve controversies and, where appropriate, implement effective remedies? What can we learn from innovative change initiatives?

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 21397 Yumiko Shimabukuro W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
409 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6245 Housing Policy and the City. 3 Points.

Category: USP:Urban

This class is designed to introduce students to housing policy and how it shapes cities and neighborhoods - and in turn how housing policy is shaped by a place's culture, values, economy, and its politics. It will examine the tools, strategies, laws, codes and programs employed to influence the housing marketplace in urban environments. Students will learn how housing policies can create problems and distortions in cities, as well as how they can work to resolve them. In particular, the class will focus on housing policy as a driver of solutions following economic problems (market failures and excesses), conflict (including war), and natural disasters (Katrina and Superstorm Sandy). Students will be introduced to methods to identify housing issues, determine which housing policy tools are most effective, what constraints must be considered, and how to minimize the impact of unintended consequences. The class will also explore the nexus of housing policy, community identity, and the private marketplace. The overall objective of the course is to illustrate to students the vital link between policy and practice, the need for ongoing evaluation of goals and outcomes, and the importance of sound research and observation when working within the field of housing in cities.  

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 26196 Jerilyn Perine, Sarah Watson W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6427 Technology, Innovation and Economic Development in Cities. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

For the first time in history, the majority of the world’s people live in cities—a figure that will climb to 75 percent of the global population by 2050. At the same time, technology is rapidly changing the way cities are run and how local governments interact with their constituents and deliver services. This course will examine how technology is informing the economic development strategies of some key global cities and positioning them for future growth. New York City, and the rapid growth in technology as well as media & entertainment that it has experienced over the last decade, will serve as a case study.  As well, we will workshop ideas for other cities based on key learnings from New York City. The course will ask students to think creatively and put forth ideas driven by technology designed to enable local governments to attract and retain jobs, provide efficiencies in government and market and communicate a City’s strengths in new ways.

PUAF U6850 Local & Global Corruption: Maneuvering Toward Good Governance. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What is corruption? Is corruption a necessary evil? Is corruption sand or grease on the wheels of a country’s economy? Why is corruption so pervasive around the world? My course engages these and other questions relating to the topics of good governance and corruption. We explore core theories about corruption and learn about corruption’s damaging influence on local and national governments. We also examine some of the most promising strategies available for promoting integrity in public administration. My goal with this course is twofold. First, I hope to encourage you to reflect on corruption as a practice that reduces government legitimacy, affects the quality of public service delivery, and biases policy and its application in favor of special interests. Second, I will endeavor to leave you with a grounded appreciation of local and national regimes’ potential for advancement. Good governance is possible.

PUAF U8203 Project Management. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, Management

While it is generally thought of to be related to construction, the truth is that Project Management can be applied to any field. It is defined as the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to a broad range of activities in order to meet the requirements of the particular project. A project is an endeavor undertaken to achieve a particular aim. Project management knowledge and practices are best described in terms of their component processes. These processes are: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling and Closing. Knowledge Areas include Scope Management, Time Management, Cost Management, Quality Management, Risk Management, and Change Management. We will discuss all of these elements in the course.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 76946 Thomas Quaranta M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
410 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U8206 Advocacy and the Legislative Process. 1.5 Point.

Category: USP, USP:Urban
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Sept. 8 - Oct. 20

Notwithstanding the admonition to avoid viewing the making of sausages and legislation, it is highly probable that SIPA graduates will find their careers inextricably linked with government, politics and/or law. It is also highly probable that SIPA graduates will directly or indirectly engage in advocacy designed to either pass or defeat legislation. The dreaded "L" word: Lobbying. Accordingly, it is important to have an understanding of how these disciplines intersect, the process of lawmaking, the role of advocacy and the tools needed to navigate successful outcomes. Unfortunately, the abbreviated nature of the course does not allow for a real time laboratory experience. In the alternative, we will use simulation exercises as learning tools for projects designed to replicate strategic plans for passing legislation. Upon completion of the course, students should expect to gain (1) a thorough, behind the curtain understanding of both the legislative process and the political process as it relates to governing, (2) working knowledge of strategies involved in successfully passing or defeating legislation, and (3) negotiating and strategic planning skills related to advocacy, particularly within the context of nonprofit organizations.

PUAF U8207 Creating and Managing Effective Nonprofits. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is designed for students interested in leading nonprofits, managing them under government contract, or supporting them through corporate philanthropy departments. The goal is to provide concepts and practical tools to manage or assess, launch or re-design nonprofits/NGOs.

PUAF U8232 Seminar in Urban Politics and Policy. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban

All public policy occurs within a political context. The purpose of this seminar is to examine the politics of America's large cities. While we rely on case material from American cities the theoretical and applied problems we consider are relevant to understanding public policy in any global city. Cities are not legal entities defined in the American Constitution. Yet, historically they have developed a politics and policymaking process that at once seems archetypically American and strangely foreign We will consider whether America's traditional institutions of representation "work" for urban America; how the city functions within our federal system; and whether neighborhood democracy is a meaningful construct. We will also consider the impact of politics on urban policymaking. Can cities solve the myriad problems of their populations under existing institutional arrangements? Are cities really rebounding economically or does a crisis remain in communities beyond the resurgence in many downtown business districts? Do the economic and social factors which impact urban politics and policy delimit the city's capacity to find and implement solutions to their problems? Finally, can urban politics be structured to make cities places where working and middle class people choose to live and work and businesses choose to locate; the ultimate test of their viability in the twenty first century.

PUAF U8238 Practical Problems in Urban Politics. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is now PUAF U6246

PUAF U8243 The Politics and Policies of Public Pension Funds. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, USP:Urban
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 19 - Mar. 2

This course is designed for students interested in the financial and budget issues confronting state and local government officials.  Across the country pension funds are underfunded and require substantial financial contributions from hard-pressed state and local governments. The course will address the financial and political challenges faced by public pension funds today. It will cover the financial concepts that underlie pension fund investment strategies and the politics surrounding pension funds. The primary focus will be the New York State and New York City pension funds but other major funds, such as CalPERS, CalSTRS, Chicago and Detroit will also be discussed.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 83197 Josephine Miller Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
402 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U8244 Municipal Finance in the U.S.. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP, Management

This course examines key municipal finance and fiscal policy issues for government, focusing on New York City as a real-life case study.  Students will dive deeply into several aspects of municipal finance, including bread and butter topics of accounting, auditing, capital funding, and investment management.  We will also analyze current issues of economic development policy, labor relations, and pension and healthcare cost impact.  The class will be joined by guest speakers among the ranks of elected officials, top city appointees, labor leaders, and private sector professionals who will share firsthand their experience and perspectives.  The coursework will entail analysis of current news, participation in public meetings, and formulation and presentation of policy initiatives in view of projected billion-dollar budget deficits.

PUAF U8250 Governing the Twenty First Century City. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban

This course will examine the linkages between urban governance structures and an economically successful democratic city. We will consider the particular policy challenges that confront both developed and developing cities in the 21st century.  It will be important to understand the institutional political causes of urban economic decline, the unique fiscal and legal constraints on city governments as well as the opportunities that only cities offer for democratic participation and sustainable economic growth.  The course will draw on case material from primarily American cities and from other developing and developed cities around the globe.  It is important to keep in mind that creative policy solutions to the problems of urban economic sustainability may be found in small towns, in rural areas, in private businesses or in other global cities.  The utility of "importing" ideas and programs rests on a practical understanding of politics in that city or community and an effective implementation strategy.  Our objective in this course is not simply to understand the challenges to governing the 21st century city but also the policies that promote effective urban governance and economic sustainability.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 92397 Ester Fuchs W 11:00am - 12:50pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U8355 Politics of Race, Crime and Criminal Justice. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course investigates the intersection between race (as political/social/economic identity and/or category) and the politics of crime and the criminal justice system. We investigate the origins of the politics of law and order from the mid-twentieth century to today, against a broader backdrop of partisan competition, urban de-industrialization, and socio-cultural tensions.  Particular attention is paid to the role of politicians and political institutions such as the Congress, the Judiciary and federal, state and local bureaucracies such as local police in conceptualizing the need for a "war on crime;" and developing the political and institutional mechanisms for carrying out this war.

PUAF U8260 Generating Financial Support to Grow Social Enterprises. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Sept. 7 - Oct. 19

This workshop is designed for students interested in securing financial support for public/private partnerships, traditional or innovative philanthropies, well established cultural or educational institutions. It will focus on a variety of fundraising strategies such as direct solicitation via print mail, online appeals and digital approaches such as crowd funding as well as more traditional methods like writing grants to secure foundation funding and identifying and cultivating high net worth potential donors. There will be sessions dealing with creating donor data bases, segmenting appeals, deciding on when or whether to hold special events, and assessing corporate and government entities as potential philanthropic partners. At the conclusion, each student will have an opportunity to present a philanthropic proposal before a panel of outside judges.

SIPA U6003 Analysis of Public Sector Organizations. 3 Points. Course Video

Category: MIA, MPA, MIA/MPA Core: Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, Management

This course develops a framework for understanding organizational performance, with a focus on public sector managerial settings. Topics covered include decision-making, the design of tasks and careers, the evolution of modern bureaucracies, public versus private ownership, and agency reform. The analytical approaches include game theory, behavioral economics, and the theory of incentives and contracts. Some examples will be drawn from American political institutions, but the goal is for students to acquire analytical skills that will be broadly applicable. While the course would be appropriate for all MIA and MPA students, it will likely be of particular interest to students with academic backgrounds in political science or economics.

SIPA U6005 Effective Management in the Public Service. 3 Points. Course Video

Category: MIA, MPA, MIA/MPA Core: Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social

This course serves as an introduction to management in government and in the non-profit and private organizations that contract with and/or partner with government to provide public services.  Lectures, cases, discussions and group projects focus on an array of management tools that help managers implement public policy and deliver critical services.  While many examples come from the instructor’s experience in New York City and US state and federal agencies, numerous comparative cases and projects from Asia, Latin America and Europe are used to discover best practices, common challenges and the impact of culture on organization behavior. The course will be valuable to those expecting a career in large, complex organizations, either as a manager or a policy advisor. A laboratory section focuses on assigned readings and case studies, provides more opportunities for student discussions and brings in prominent guest speakers from all three sectors.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 99691 William Eimicke M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 16097 M 8:10pm - 9:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg

SIPA U6310 Nonprofit Financial Management. 3 Points.

Category: MIA, MPA, MIA/MPA Core: Financial Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social

There are more than one million nonprofit organizations in the United States and hundreds of thousands more internationally and the number is growing.  The nonprofit sector includes an enormous diversity of organizations, ranging from complex health care systems, to education and arts institutions, to small community-based human service organizations.  This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of how to conduct the financial management of a nonprofit entity. Through the use of readings, case studies, a class project and lecture, we will study financial statements, financial analysis, and accounting for non-profit organizations and international NGOs.  We will examine how the principles of financial management assist the nonprofit and NGO manager in making operating, budgeting, capital, and long-term financial planning decisions.  We will also explore contemporary ethical, accountability, and mission issues facing national and international organizations.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 29693 Sarah Holloway W 11:00am - 12:50pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 19695 W Th 1:00pm - 2:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg

SIPA U6320 Budgeting and Financial Management for Government. 3 Points.

Category: MIA, MPA, MIA/MPA Core: Financial Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social

Public sector budgeting in the US (and arguably at a global level) has become an increasingly contentious issue since the 2008 crisis and subsequent recession. This course will introduce students to the field of budgeting and fiscal management in the public sector. We will look at the special challenges of developing a budget within a political environment and the techniques used for management control. Additional topics may include taxes and other revenues, expenditure control, debt management, audits and productivity enhancement. Lectures will also discuss current events related to public sector budgeting on the local and state level. The course seeks to provide students with practical knowledge on budgetary decision-making. Drawing from both theory and case studies, students will acquire practical skills to help them design, implement and assess public sector budgets. The practical nature of the subject requires active participation from students, meaning they will engage in hands-on assignments such as periodical debates, case analyses and a budget cycle simulation. By the end of the semester, students are expected to a) conduct in-depth budgetary analyses, and b) formulate policy recommendations.  

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 61996 John Liu M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
410 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 66296 F 9:00am - 10:50am
405 International Affairs Bldg