Philosophy

Departmental Office: 708 Philosophy; 212-854-3196
www.philosophy.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: David Albert, 717 Philosophy; 212-854-4884; da5@columbia.edu

Economics-Philosophy Adviser: Philip Kitcher, 717 Philosophy; 212-854-4884; psk16@columbia.edu

Students interested in philosophy may pursue a major either in philosophy or in economics-philosophy. Because philosophy treats issues fundamental to both the sciences and the humanities, students are also welcome to combine their philosophy major with work in other fields. Before declaring a major in philosophy or economics-philosophy, and before deciding to combine philosophy with another discipline, students should meet with the director of undergraduate studies to formulate the program best for them.

Philosophy majors are given a foundation in logic and philosophical methodology, and are asked to confront fundamental questions in the main areas of philosophy: epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy, philosophy of mind and language, and history of philosophy. The department requires that all majors take at least one seminar (PHIL UN3912), designed to allow students to focus on particular philosophical issues or texts in greater depth. Outstanding seniors may also pursue their own philosophical project in a senior thesis.

Over and above the courses required of all majors, there is room for considerable flexibility. Through an appropriate choice of electives from among the department’s offerings (and from related courses in other departments), there are special opportunities for focusing more intensively on one or two subfields of philosophy, e.g., logic and the philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of science, ethics and political philosophy, or the history of philosophy. Students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies on how best to pursue such programs.

Study Abroad: Reid Hall, Paris

For information on the Columbia in Paris Program at Reid Hall, including summer courses, consult the Columbia University in Paris Bulletin (available in 606 Kent and online at the Office of Global Programs website), call 212-854-2559, or send an email to reidhall@columbia.edu. For information on applicability of Reid Hall courses to the major or concentration, consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Grading

Courses in which a grade of D has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements.

Senior Thesis

Undergraduates majoring in Philosophy or Economics-Philosophy may propose to write a senior thesis. Students who wish to write a thesis should approach a faculty member at the end of their junior or beginning of their senior year, and begin working on the proposal early in the fall semester of their senior year.  Proposals are due in early December, and will be reviewed by a committee which will include the Director of Undergraduate Studies; students will be notified of the committee’s decision within two weeks.  Students whose proposals are approved should register for their faculty advisor’s section of Supervised Independent Research for the spring term of the senior year. Theses are due in early April. 

Students who have a grade point average of 3.6 or above in the major and who complete a thesis will be placed into consideration for departmental honors, though any senior may complete a thesis regardless of their grade point average (upon approval of the proposal).

See the full policy and procedure concerning senior theses on the departmental webpage:

http://philosophy.columbia.edu/content/senior-thesis-philosophy

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors are highly competitive.  Normally no more than 10% of the majors graduating in the department each year will receive departmental honors.  

In order to qualify for departmental honors in philosophy, a student must have a grade point average of at least 3.6 in the major.  
For students with a GPA of 3.6 or above, there are two possible routes to consideration:

  1. A student may complete a senior thesis; those students who complete senior theses will automatically be considered for honors without having to be nominated.
  2. A student may be nominated by a faculty member early in the spring semester of the senior year; nominated students will be invited to submit a writing sample at least 15 pages in length.  A nominated student who is also writing a thesis may submit their thesis as the writing sample, or may choose to submit a different work.

Both the senior theses and writing samples are due in early April.  The departmental honors committee will then review the submitted material and the academic records of the writers, and will report to the full faculty.  

The full faculty will then decide which students to recommend for departmental honors to the Columbia College and General Studies administrations.  

Professors

  • David Albert
  • Akeel Bilgrami
  • Taylor Carman (Barnard)
  • Haim Gaifman
  • Lydia Goehr
  • Robert Gooding-Williams
  • Axel Honneth
  • Jenann Ismael
  • Patricia Kitcher
  • Philip Kitcher
  • Wolfgang Mann 
  • Christia Mercer
  • Michele Moody-Adams
  • Fred Neuhouser (Barnard)
  • Christopher Peacocke 
  • Carol Rovane
  • Achille Varzi
  • Katja Vogt

Associate Professors

  • Jessica Collins

Assistant Professors

  • Justin Clarke-Doane
  • Melissa Fusco
  • Dhananjay Jagannathan
  • Tamar Lando
  • Karen Lewis (Barnard)
  • John Morrison (Barnard)
  • Una Stojnić
  • Kathryn Tabb

Affiliated Faculty

  • Souleymane Bachir Diagne (French and Romance Philology)
  • Jon Elster (Political Science)
  • Kent Greenawalt (University Professor)
  • Wayne Proudfoot (Religion)
  • Joseph Raz (Law School)
  • Gayatri Spivak (University Professor)

Major in Philosophy

Students considering a major in philosophy are strongly encouraged to meet with the director of undergraduate studies early in their sophomore year. All majors must consult with the director of undergraduate studies each term before registering for classes in order to plan and update their individual programs of study.

Students planning to major in philosophy are advised to begin with PHIL UN1010 Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought. Beginning students are especially encouraged to take 2000-level courses, both in the history of philosophy and in systematic philosophy. These courses are typically less specialized and less narrowly focused than higher-numbered ones. More advanced students are encouraged to take 3000-level courses. The department requires that all majors take at least one seminar, PHIL UN3912.

No more than one course at the 1000-level can be counted toward the major. In order to enroll in one of the 4000-level courses, students must have taken at least four courses in Philosophy.

The major requires a minimum of 30 points in philosophy chosen from courses prefixed with UN or GU:

PHIL UN2101The History of Philosophy I: Presocratics to Augustine
PHIL UN2201History of Philosophy II: Aquinas to Kant
PHIL UN3411Symbolic Logic
At least one course in either metaphysics or epistemology e.g., PHIL W3960, or a related course to be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
Select at least one course in either ethics or social and political philosophy from the following:
Contemporary Moral Problems
Ethics
Political Philosophy
A related course to be chosen in consultation with the director of undergradute studies.
PHIL UN3912Seminar

Concentration in Philosophy

Philosophy, as an academic discipline, has significant points of contact with a wide range of other subjects—in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. A concentration in philosophy thus can be an attractive option for many students. Those considering becoming concentrators are strongly encouraged to meet with the director of undergraduate studies early in their sophomore year, in order to discuss their specific interests and to plan their programs of study. All concentrators should consult with the director of undergraduate studies each term before registering for courses.

The concentration requires a minimum of 24 points in philosophy, chosen from courses prefixed with UN or GU. There are no specific courses required for the concentration.

Students may choose courses prefixed with GR only with the instructor’s permission. 

PHIL UN3912 is open to junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four courses in philosophy.


Major in Economics-Philosophy

Please read Guidelines for all Economics Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors in the Economics section of this Bulletin.

Economics-Philosophy is an interdisciplinary major that, while introducing students to the basic methodologies of economics and philosophy, stresses areas of particular concern to both. These include subjects such as rationality and decision making, justice and efficiency, freedom and collective choice, and the logic of empirical theories and their testing. Many of the issues are dealt with historically, and classic texts of Plato, Kant, Mill, Marx, and Smith are reviewed.

Two advisers are assigned for the interdepartmental major, one in the Department of Economics and one in the Department of Philosophy. Please note that the Economics adviser can only advise on the Economics requirements and the Philosophy adviser can only advise on the Philosophy requirements.

The Economics-Philosophy major requires a total minimum of 54 points: 25 points in Economics, 16 points in Philosophy, 6 points in Mathematics, 3 points in Statistics, and 4 points in the interdisciplinary seminar as follows:

Economics Core Courses
ECON UN1105Principles of Economics
ECON UN3211Intermediate Microeconomics
ECON UN3213Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON UN3412Introduction To Econometrics
Mathematics Sequence
Select a mathematics sequence
Statistics
Select a statistics course
Economics Electives
Three electives are required; refer to the Economics section of this bulletin.
Philosophy Courses
PHIL UN1010Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought
PHIL UN3411Symbolic Logic
PHIL UN3701Ethics (a social or political philosophy course may be substituted, please consult the Philosophy DUS)
PHIL UN3551Philosophy of Science
or PHIL UN3960 Epistemology
PHIL GU4561Probability and Decision Theory
Seminar
ECPH GU4950Economics and Philosophy Seminar (or another seminar in philosophy or economics approved by advisers in both department)

Students who declared before Spring 2014:

The requirements for this program were modified in 2014. Students who declared this program before Spring 2014 should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their options for major requirements.

Fall 2018

PHIL UN1010 Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought. 3 points.

Critical introduction to philosophical problems, ideas and methods.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/15723 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3 54/80
Fall 2018: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/25824 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3 45/80

PHIL UN2003 Philosophy of Art. 3 points.

This is an introductory course in the Philosophy of Art. We will consider questions including (but not limited to) the following: What is art? Should we try to define art? What is taste? What are the conditions for aesthetic judgement? What is an aesthetic experience? We shall also consider the topics of "public art", "fakes and forgeries,"art and technology" and the philosophical implications of speaking of an "artworld.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN2003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2003 001/64572 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
517 Hamilton Hall
Lydia Goehr 3 80/80

PHIL UN2100 Philosophy of Education. 3 points.

Drawing on classical and contemporary sources, this course will introduce students to a variety of texts that address the philosophical consideration of education, including its role in the development of the individual and the development of a democratic society. Readings from Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, and others.

PHIL UN2101 The History of Philosophy I: Presocratics to Augustine. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL V2111 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Exposition and analysis of the positions of the major philosophers from the pre-Socratics through Augustine.  This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2101 001/71623 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
517 Hamilton Hall
Dhananjay Jagannathan 4 49/80

PHIL UN3252 Philosophy of Language and Mind. 3 points.

This course will provide an introduction to meaning, reference, understanding, and content in language, thought, and perception.  A central concern will be the question of the relation of meaning to truth-conditions, and what is involved in language and thought successfully latching on to reality.  If you have not already taken an elementary course in first order logic, you will need to catch up in that area to understand some crucial parts of the course.  All the same, the primary concerns of the course will be philosophical, rather than technical.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN3252
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3252 001/74094 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Peacocke 3 37/80

PHIL UN3264 19th Century Philosophy: Hegel. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PHIL UN2201 or PHIL UN3251

Examines major themes of Hegel's philosophy, with emphasis on social and political thought. Topics include Hegel's critique of Kant, the possibility of metaphysics, the master-slave dialectic, and the role of freedom in a rational society. Readings from Kant’s Third Critique help explain how Hegel's project develops out of Kant's transcendental idealism. Some knowledge of Kant's moral theory and his Critique of Pure Reason is presupposed. Prerequisite: at least one of PHIL UN2201, PHIL UN2301, or PHIL UN3251.

PHIL UN3411 Symbolic Logic. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHILV3413 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Advanced introduction to classical sentential and predicate logic. No previous acquaintance with logic is required; nonetheless a willingness to master technicalities and to work at a certain level of abstraction is desirable. This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/29919 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Achille Varzi 4 58/60
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/67835 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Tamar Lando 4 80/80

PHIL UN3551 Philosophy of Science. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 40.

Prerequisites: one philosophy course or the instructor's permission.

Philosophical problems within science and about the nature of scientific knowledge in the 17th-20th centuries. Sample problems: causation and scientific explanation; induction and real kinds; verification and falsification; models, analogies and simulations; the historical origins of the modern sciences; scientific revolutions; reductionism and supervenience; differences between physics, biology and the social sciences; the nature of life; cultural evolution; human nature; philosophical issues in cosmology.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN3551
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3551 001/67102 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
David Albert 3 29/80

PHIL UN3601 Metaphysics. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL V3611 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Systematic treatment of some major topics in metaphysics (e.g. modality, causation, identity through time, particulars and universals). Readings from contemporary authors.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN3601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3601 001/74671 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Achille Varzi 4 72/100

PHIL UN3701 Ethics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.
Corequisites: PHIL V3711 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

This course is mainly an introduction to three influential approaches to normative ethics: utilitarianism, deontological views, and virtue ethics. We also consider the ethics of care, and selected topics in meta-ethics.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/12000 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Michele Moody-Adams 4 62/80
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/72729 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Katja Vogt 4 61/80

PHIL UN3751 Political Philosophy. 3 points.

Six major concepts of political philosophy including authority, rights, equality, justice, liberty and democracy are examined in three different ways. First the conceptual issues are analyzed through contemporary essays on these topics by authors like Peters, Hart, Williams, Berlin, Rawls and Schumpeter. Second the classical sources on these topics are discussed through readings from Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Marx, Plato, Mill and Rousseau. Third some attention is paid to relevant contexts of application of these concepts in political society, including such political movements as anarchism, international human rights, conservative, liberal, and Marxist economic policies as well as competing models of democracy.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN3751
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3751 001/09606 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Naomi Dershowitz 3 2/40

PHIL UN3752 Philosophy of Law. 3 points.

This course explores philosophical reflection on the relationship between law, society and morality. We discuss the nature of law, the nature of legal reasoning, the relationship between law and social policy, and central concepts in civil and criminal law. Readings are drawn from such sources as the natural law tradition, legal positivism, legal realism, and Critical Legal Theory. Readings will be supplemented by analysis of classic cases.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN3752
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3752 001/71033 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Michele Moody-Adams 3 80/80

PHIL UN3840 The Nature and Significance of Animal Minds. 3 points.

Humans have a complicated relationship with other animals. We love them, befriend them and save them. We hunt, farm and eat them. We experiment on and observe them to discover more about them and to discover more about ourselves. For many of us, our pets are amongst the most familiar inhabitants of our world. Yet when we try to imagine what is going on in a dog or cat's mind--let alone that of a crow, octopus or bee--many of us are either stumped about how to go about this, or (the science strongly suggests) getting things radically wrong. Is our thought about and behavior towards animals ethically permissible, or even consistent, Can we reshape our habits of thought about animals to allow for a more rational, richer relationship with the other inhabitants of our planet? In this course, students will reflect on two closely intertwined questions: an ethical question, what sort of relationship ought we to have with animals?; and a metaphysical question, what is the nature of animal minds? Readings will primarily be be from philosophy and ethics and the cognitive sciences, with additional readings from literature and biology.  There are no prerequisites for this class--it will be helpful but certainly not necessary to have taken previous classes in philosophy(especially ethics and philosophy of mind) or in cognitive science.

Fall 2018: PHIL UN3840
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3840 001/78441 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Simon Brown 3 15/15

PHIL UN3912 Seminar. 3 points.

Required of senior majors, but also open to junior majors, and junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four philosophy courses. This exploration will typically involve writing a substantial research paper. Capped at 20 students with preference to philosophy majors.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 004/72834 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Kathryn Tabb 3 17/20
PHIL 3912 005/19112 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Carol Rovane 3 3/20
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 005/62980 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 18/20
PHIL 3912 010/92202 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Akeel Bilgrami 3 6/20
PHIL 3912 014/71781 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 20/20

PHIL UN3997 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/20951  
David Albert 3 0
PHIL 3997 002/22794  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0
PHIL 3997 003/01465  
Taylor Carman 3 1
PHIL 3997 004/75588  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0
PHIL 3997 005/16828  
John Collins 3 0
PHIL 3997 006/61957  
Melissa Fusco 3 0
PHIL 3997 007/15547  
Haim Gaifman 3 0
PHIL 3997 008/76984  
Lydia Goehr 3 1
PHIL 3997 009/68791  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0
PHIL 3997 010/27262  
Axel Honneth 3 1
PHIL 3997 011/60172  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 2
PHIL 3997 012/19314  
Patricia Kitcher 3 1
PHIL 3997 013/18851  
Philip Kitcher 3 2
PHIL 3997 014/02668  
Karen Lewis 3 0
PHIL 3997 016/72676  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0
PHIL 3997 017/25149  
Christia Mercer 3 3
PHIL 3997 018/08563  
John Morrison 3 0
PHIL 3997 019/09374  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 2
PHIL 3997 020/04286  
Elliot Paul 3 0
PHIL 3997 022/71067  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0
PHIL 3997 023/64468  
Carol Rovane 3 1
PHIL 3997 024/66364  
Una Stojnic 3 0
PHIL 3997 025/19285  
Kathryn Tabb 3 0
PHIL 3997 026/29634  
Achille Varzi 3 1
PHIL 3997 027/18505  
Katja Vogt 3 0
PHIL 3997 028/20952  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/64115  
David Albert 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 002/12282  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 003/63248  
Taylor Carman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 004/17731  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 005/21818  
John Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 006/70977  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 007/64842  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 008/18295  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 009/18228  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 010/17171  
Axel Honneth 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 011/64231  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 012/23645  
Patricia Kitcher 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 013/15337  
Philip Kitcher 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 014/63289  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 015/14847  
Karen Lewis 3 1
PHIL 3997 016/23815  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 017/25722  
Christia Mercer 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 018/70899  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 019/20996  
John Morrison 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 020/68788  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 021/60736  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 022/75782  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 023/74501  
Una Stojnic 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 024/18698  
Kathryn Tabb 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 025/27791  
Achille Varzi 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 026/72786  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5

PHIL GU4100 Paradoxes. 3 points.

Various paradoxes, from many areas, including mathematics, physics, epistemology, decision theory and ethics, will be analyzed. The goal is to find what such paradoxes imply about our ways of thinking, and what lessons can be derived. Students will have a choice to focus in their papers on areas they are interested in.

Fall 2018: PHIL GU4100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4100 001/61420 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Haim Gaifman 3 8/80

PHIL GU4424 Modal Logic. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Fall 2018: PHIL GU4424
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4424 001/60727 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Tamar Lando 3 15/40

PHIL GU4561 Probability and Decision Theory. 3 points.

Examines interpretations and applications of the calculus of probability including applications as a measure of degree of belief, degree of confirmation, relative frequency, a theoretical property of systems, and other notions of objective probability or chance. Attention to epistimological questions such as Hume's problem of induction, Goodman's problem of projectibility, and the paradox of confirmation.

Fall 2018: PHIL GU4561
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4561 001/22937 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Haim Gaifman 3 17/40

Spring 2018

PHIL UN1010 Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought. 3 points.

Critical introduction to philosophical problems, ideas and methods.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/15723 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3 54/80
Fall 2018: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/25824 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3 45/80

PHIL UN1401 Introduction to Logic. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA).

Explicit criteria for recognizing valid and fallacious arguments, together with various methods for schematizing discourse for the purpose of logical analysis. Illustrative material taken from science and everyday life.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1401 001/01435 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
304 Barnard Hall
John Morrison 3 61/80

PHIL UN2108 Philosophy and History. 3 points.

An introduction to historical (from 1800) and contemporary themes in the philosophy of history. Themes include Historicism, Historicity, Universality and Particularity; the debate over Positivism; the historical nature of concepts and meaning; time and tense: Past, Present Future; the Temporality of experience; the nature of Tradition and Practice; Epistemic, Revolutionary, and Paradigmatic change; Memory and the writing of one’s history (Autobiography).  

Spring 2018: PHIL UN2108
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2108 001/23147 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
303 Hamilton Hall
Lydia Goehr 3 25/40

PHIL UN2201 History of Philosophy II: Aquinas to Kant. 4 points.

Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL V2211 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

PHIL V2101 is not a prerequisite for this course. Exposition and analysis of the metaphysics, epistemology, and natural philosophy of the major philosophers from Aquinas through Kant. Authors include Aquinas, Galileo, Gassendi, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.  This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2201 001/04794 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Ll103 Diana Center
John Morrison 4 47/80

PHIL UN2702 Contemporary Moral Problems. 3 points.

Questions about how people should act have historically been central to philosophy.  This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some important moral problems that arise in the twenty-first century.  The aim is not only to offer ideas for thinking through the issues covered, but also to provide tools for general moral reflection.  Topics covered will include: the legitimacy of asking migrants to abandon their traditional practices, responsibilities to distant people and to future generations, abortion and genetic testing of the unborn, the proper treatment of animals, and the permissibility of war and terrorism.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN2702
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2702 001/23245 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Philip Kitcher 3 66/80

PHIL UN3251 Kant. 3 points.

Explores the connections between theoretical and practical reason in Kant's thinking with special attention to the Critique of Pure Reason and the project of "transcendental" philosophy.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3251
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3251 001/68956 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Patricia Kitcher 3 28/80

PHIL UN3351 Phenomenology and Existentialism. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Two prior philosophy courses. Enrollment limited to 30.

Survey of selected works of Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. Topics include intentionality, consciousness and self-consciousness, phenomenological and hermeneutical method, the question of being, authenticity and inauthenticiy, bad faith, death, and the role of the body in perception.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3351
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3351 001/04739 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
202 Milbank Hall
Taylor Carman 3 33/60

PHIL UN3411 Symbolic Logic. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHILV3413 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Advanced introduction to classical sentential and predicate logic. No previous acquaintance with logic is required; nonetheless a willingness to master technicalities and to work at a certain level of abstraction is desirable. This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/29919 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Achille Varzi 4 58/60
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/67835 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Tamar Lando 4 80/80

PHIL UN3685 Philosophy of Language. 3 points.

This course is a survey of analytic philosophy of language.  It addresses central issues about the nature of meaning, including: sense and reference, speech acts, pragmatics, and the relationship between meaning and use, meaning and context, and meaning and truth.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3685
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3685 001/74467 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
530 Altschul Hall
Karen Lewis 3 14/40

PHIL UN3701 Ethics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.
Corequisites: PHIL V3711 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

This course is mainly an introduction to three influential approaches to normative ethics: utilitarianism, deontological views, and virtue ethics. We also consider the ethics of care, and selected topics in meta-ethics.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/12000 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Michele Moody-Adams 4 62/80
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/72729 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Katja Vogt 4 61/80

PHIL UN3857 The Public and the Private. 3 points.

In an era in which government surveillance, hacking, and social media regularly challenge the line between our public and private lives, exploring the nature of the public/private dichotomy is a pressing task.  In this course we will explore how philosophers in the Western tradition have understood the contrast between the public and the private beginning with the ancient ideal of the polis as the site of genuine human flourishing and freedom, we will go on to explore the way in which modern thinkers have problematized this ideal in the context of capitalism, mass culture, and modern pluralistic societies.  By engaging with thinkers such as Aristotle, Arendt, Dewey, Rawls, and Habermas, we will ask questions such as: what kind of freedom do we enjoy when we are in public with other people, and what kind of freedom do we enjoy in private? Are both equally valuable? What is the relationship between public opinion and a healthy democracy? How does capitalism and the mass medial affect the public sphere? What are the dangers of an impoverished public sphere? Is the very distinction between the public and the private gendered in pernicious ways?

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3857
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3857 001/87247 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Laura Martin 3 9/15

PHIL UN3912 Seminar. 3 points.

Required of senior majors, but also open to junior majors, and junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four philosophy courses. This exploration will typically involve writing a substantial research paper. Capped at 20 students with preference to philosophy majors.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 004/72834 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Kathryn Tabb 3 17/20
PHIL 3912 005/19112 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Carol Rovane 3 3/20
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 005/62980 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 18/20
PHIL 3912 010/92202 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Akeel Bilgrami 3 6/20
PHIL 3912 014/71781 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 20/20

PHIL UN3960 Epistemology. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL W3963 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

What can we know? What is knowledge? What are the different kinds of knowledge? We will read classic and contemporary texts for insight into these questions.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3960 001/22037 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
5ab Kraft Center
John Collins 4 40/80

PHIL UN3997 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/20951  
David Albert 3 0
PHIL 3997 002/22794  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0
PHIL 3997 003/01465  
Taylor Carman 3 1
PHIL 3997 004/75588  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0
PHIL 3997 005/16828  
John Collins 3 0
PHIL 3997 006/61957  
Melissa Fusco 3 0
PHIL 3997 007/15547  
Haim Gaifman 3 0
PHIL 3997 008/76984  
Lydia Goehr 3 1
PHIL 3997 009/68791  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0
PHIL 3997 010/27262  
Axel Honneth 3 1
PHIL 3997 011/60172  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 2
PHIL 3997 012/19314  
Patricia Kitcher 3 1
PHIL 3997 013/18851  
Philip Kitcher 3 2
PHIL 3997 014/02668  
Karen Lewis 3 0
PHIL 3997 016/72676  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0
PHIL 3997 017/25149  
Christia Mercer 3 3
PHIL 3997 018/08563  
John Morrison 3 0
PHIL 3997 019/09374  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 2
PHIL 3997 020/04286  
Elliot Paul 3 0
PHIL 3997 022/71067  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0
PHIL 3997 023/64468  
Carol Rovane 3 1
PHIL 3997 024/66364  
Una Stojnic 3 0
PHIL 3997 025/19285  
Kathryn Tabb 3 0
PHIL 3997 026/29634  
Achille Varzi 3 1
PHIL 3997 027/18505  
Katja Vogt 3 0
PHIL 3997 028/20952  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0
Fall 2018: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/64115  
David Albert 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 002/12282  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 003/63248  
Taylor Carman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 004/17731  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 005/21818  
John Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 006/70977  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 007/64842  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 008/18295  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 009/18228  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 010/17171  
Axel Honneth 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 011/64231  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 012/23645  
Patricia Kitcher 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 013/15337  
Philip Kitcher 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 014/63289  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 015/14847  
Karen Lewis 3 1
PHIL 3997 016/23815  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 017/25722  
Christia Mercer 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 018/70899  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 019/20996  
John Morrison 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 020/68788  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 021/60736  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 022/75782  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 023/74501  
Una Stojnic 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 024/18698  
Kathryn Tabb 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 025/27791  
Achille Varzi 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 026/72786  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5

PHIL UN3998 Supervised Individual Research. 3 points.

Spring 2018: PHIL UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3998 001/14915  
David Albert 3 0
PHIL 3998 002/72613  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 1
PHIL 3998 003/95600  
Taylor Carman 3 0
PHIL 3998 004/62867  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0
PHIL 3998 005/63084  
John Collins 3 0
PHIL 3998 006/19714  
Melissa Fusco 3 0
PHIL 3998 007/67211  
Haim Gaifman 3 0
PHIL 3998 008/64587  
Lydia Goehr 3 0
PHIL 3998 009/21512  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0
PHIL 3998 010/68446  
Axel Honneth 3 0
PHIL 3998 011/71086  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0
PHIL 3998 012/77439  
Patricia Kitcher 3 1
PHIL 3998 013/74709  
Philip Kitcher 3 0
PHIL 3998 014/05620  
Karen Lewis 3 0
PHIL 3998 016/25013  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0
PHIL 3998 017/10129  
Christia Mercer 3 0
PHIL 3998 018/04538  
John Morrison 3 0
PHIL 3998 019/01144  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 1
PHIL 3998 020/04557  
Elliot Paul 3 0
PHIL 3998 021/29496  
Elliot Paul 3 0
PHIL 3998 022/63790  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0
PHIL 3998 023/28651  
Carol Rovane 3 0
PHIL 3998 024/69136  
Una Stojnic 3 0
PHIL 3998 025/12760  
Kathryn Tabb 3 0
PHIL 3998 026/27790  
Achille Varzi 3 0
PHIL 3998 027/74376  
Katja Vogt 3 1
PHIL 3998 028/77996  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 2

PHIL GU4137 Non-Classical Logics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: one term of formal logic (V3411/G4415, Introduction to Symbolic / Formal Logic, or G4801, Mathematical Logic I)

An overview of the main extensions and alternatives to classical logic, including: many-valued logics, fuzzy logics, partial logics, free logics, inclusive logics, paraconsistent logics, modal logics, intuitionism. Prerequisite: One term of formal logic (V3411/G4415, Introduction to Symbolic/ Formal Logic, or G4801, Mathematical Logic I).

Spring 2018: PHIL GU4137
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4137 001/62995 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Achille Varzi 3 26/40

PHIL GU4431 INTRODUCTION TO SET THEOR. 3 points.

Basic set-theoretic operations and constructions. The axiom of choice. Infinitary arithmetic, ordinal and cardinal. Russell’s paradox, Cantor’s paradoxes, and other set-theoretic paradoxes. The continuum hypothesis. Axiomatic set theory. Other topics as time permits.

PHIL GU4491 William James's Principles of Psychology. 3 points.

The primary goal of this course is to give sufficiently advanced students an opportunity to read through, in its entirety, one of the most influential works in the history of psychology. Although James conceived his two-volume work as an exhaustive scientific account of the mind, its approach is vastly different from contemporary psychology--which, since his time, has generated many subfields and methodologies, and benefitted from advances in related fields, such as computer science, linguistics, evolutionary biology, and neuroscience, to name just a few. Apart from subsequent developments within the mind sciences, another major difference between James's pioneering work and current scientific work is that it is explicitly governed by some concerns that currently belong more to philosophy than to science. These include James's focus on the phenomenological dimensions of mind that are open to direct introspection, which are no longer regarded as reliable indicators of mental reality, and his interest in the ethical significance of his findings. Being a pragmatist, he could not help but regard a correct account of the mind as providing a basis for improvement of human life, and right action.

Spring 2018: PHIL GU4491
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4491 001/68985 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Carol Rovane 3 13/40

PHIL GU4900 Topics in Early Modern Philosophy. 3 points.

Open to undergraduates with previous work in the history of philosophy and to graduate students. Focuses either on an important topic in the history of early modern philosophy (e.g., skepticism, causation, mind, body) or on the philosophy of a major figure in the period (e.g., Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Gassendi, Conway). 

Spring 2018: PHIL GU4900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4900 001/25746 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Christia Mercer 3 12/40