International Security Policy (ISP)

International Security Policy Curriculum

The International Security Policy concentration is designed for students interested in international conflict and conflict management, defense policy, military strategy, arms control, intelligence, peacekeeping, coercion, negotiation, and alternatives to the use of force as an instrument of policy. It provides a conceptual foundation for understanding conflict and the political, economic, and military components of policies and capabilities for coping with the possibility of war, as well as expertise for analyzing specific functional and regional security issues.

View or print the ISP Audit Form

Richard Betts, Leo A. Shifrin Professor of War and Peace Studies; Arnold A. Saltzman Professor of War and Peace Studies; Professor of International and Public Affairs; Director of the International Security Policy Concentration


Severine Autesserre, Associate Professor of Political Science

Matthew ConnellyProfessor of History; Director

John GentryAdjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Stuart Gottlieb, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Scott Harold, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jason Healey, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

John Hirsch, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Colin Jackson, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Stuart Johnson, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Sarah Kovner, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Austin Long, Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

William H. Luers, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Annemarie McAvoy, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Dipali Mukhopadhyay, Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Richard Nephew, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

David Rothkopf, Visiting Professor of International and Public Affairs

Stephen Sestanovich, Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor for the Practice of International Diplomacy

Mitchell Silber, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Naomi Weinberger, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

The International Security Policy Concentration (ISP) requires 15 points, consisting of 5 three-point courses: 1 core course; 1 from General Problems in International Security and Conflict Management; 1 Use of Force; 2 electives (preferably including a course on security issues in a particular country or region)

1. Core Course

Points
INAF U6871War, Peace Strategy3

2. General Problems in International Security and Conflict Management

Select at least one of the following:

Points
INAF U4545Contemporary Diplomacy3
INAF U6383Dynamics of Cyber Power and Conflict3
INAF U6389State Formation, Violence, and Intervention in the Modern World3
INAF U6416Third World Security Issues3
INAF U6440Peace Operations in Fragile States3
INAF U8132Intelligence Special Operations3
INAF U8142Intelligence Foreign Policy3
INAF U8818Topics in International Ethics3
Political Science
POLS GR6801Theories of International Relations4
POLS G8844Nationalism4
POLS G8863Conflict and Cooperation in World Politics4
POLS GR8866International Signaling and Communication4
Law School
LAW L9377Enforcing International Law2

3. Use of Force

Select at least one of the following:

Points
INAF U6228Cybersecurity3
INAF U6285Methods for Defense Analysis and Assessment3
INAF U6345Analytic Techniques for Military Policy3
INAF U6384Cyberwar3
INAF U6387Terrorism Counterterrorism3
INAF U6388Modern Urban Terrorism3
INAF U6393Evolving Military Strategy Post-9/113
INAF U6398Unconventional Warriors3
INAF U6399Weapons of Mass Destruction3
INAF U6789Special Operations, Counterterrorism, and Counterinsurgency3
INAF U6799Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict3
INAF U6805Limited War Low Intensity Conflict3
INAF U6880Planning U.S. Military Forces3
INAF U8879Technology and National Security3

4 and 5. Electives

Select two courses from those below or any of those above in General Problems or Use of Force:

Points
HIST G8235Expressions of Identities and Change in Muslim Eurasia4
HIST GR87014
HIST G8712The U.S., the Middle East, and the Cold War4
INAF U6161African Institutions in a Changing Regional Global Security Environment3
INAF U6209E-Government Digital Diplomacy3
INAF U6221Navigating by Starlight - the Challenges of Conflict Resolution3
INAF U6346US Role in World Affairs I3
INAF U6347US Role In World Affairs II3
INAF U6379Privacy, Secrecy, and Surveillance: History and the Future3
INAF U6382Technology, National Security the Citizen3
INAF U6386Policy Dilemmas in Cybersecurity3
INAF U6388Modern Urban Terrorism3
INAF U6391Conflict Resolution3
INAF U6396Mediation of Armed Conflict: Dilemmas, Strategies and Methods3
INAF U6430East Asian Security3
INAF U6445Talking with the Enemy3
INAF U6470The Logic of the Weak State3
INAF U6485Law Politics of Conflict Management and Intervention3
INAF U6553Advancing Human Protection3
INAF U6556United Nations: Challenges and Alternatives3
INAF U6564Applied Peacebuilding: Fieldwork3
INAF U6680Geopolitics of Oil Natural Gas 23
INAF U6727Deconstructing Afghanistan3
INAF U6784The Practice of Economic Sanctions1.5
INAF U6794Ideas and American Foreign Policy3
INAF U6796War and Captivity3
INAF U6798Central Issues in American Foreign Policy3
INAF U6802International Law3
INAF U6848Threat Financing and Anti-Money Laundering1.5
INAF U6869The Evolution of Civil War Mediation Strategy3
INAF U6940Analytic Thinking, Writing and Briefing3
INAF U8136US Foreign Policy-Persian Gulf3
INAF U8415US-Latin American Relations: WWII to Present3
INAF U8488Contemporary Russian Security Policy3
INAF U8507The Security Council and Peacekeeping in Africa in the 21st Century3
INAF U8508Inside the Security Council: Inequality at Work3
INAF U8559Building Peace After Conflict1.5
INAF U8564Culture and Foreign Policy: China, India3
INAF U8565European Security3
INAF U8566China's Security and the Peoples' Liberation Army3
INAF U8876Nuclear Proliferation Concepts for Non-Scientists1
INAF U8867International Enforcement and the UN Security Council3
INAF U8869Civil Wars and Peace Settlements3
INAF U8885Conflict Assessment3
INAF U8909Environment, Conflict Resolution Strategies3
LAW L6410Constitution and Foreign Affairs3
LAW L6458National Security Law3
LAW L6549Terror and Consent
LAW L8079Latin American Law3
LAW L8870Geopolitics of Law and Conflict on the Korean Peninsula
LAW L9001United Nations Peacekeeping2
ORLJ Y6040Fundamentals of Cooperation, Conflict resolution and Mediation in Different Institutional Contexts
POLS GU4405Insurgencies and Conflicts in Southeast Asia4
POLS GU4845National Security Strategies of the Middle East: A Comparative Perspective4
POLS GU4871Chinese Foreign Policy4
POLS G8205History of East-West Relations in Post-WWII Europe
POLS GR8807Armed Groups and Political Violence4
POLS G8811Civil Wars4
POLS G8823Debates in International Peace Interventions: Constructivists, critical theorists, pols-structuralists, feminists, and their critics4
POLS G8833Law of War3
POLS G8843International Law and International Relations4
POLS G8844Nationalism4
POLS G8853Normative and Empirical Perspectives on International Law3
POLS G8865United States Foreign Policy4
POLS GR8870US Relations with East Asia4
POLS G8876US-Japan Relations from WWII to Present3
PUAF U6801Negotiation Conflict Resolution3
REGN U6658United States - Southeast Asia Relations3
REGN U6660Security and International Politics of the Persian Gulf3
REGN U6725Modern Afghanistan: History, Culture, Politics3
REGN U6719Middle East Conflicts and Global Security3
REGN U8588Modern Iran: From Monarchy to Islamic Republic3
REGN U8750Political Transitions in the Former Soviet Union3
INAF U6551Why We Fail: Lessons in Conflict Resolution and Atrocity Prevention3
REGN U8757Ukrainian Foreign Policy3
2

Students graduating in 2016 may count U6680 "Geopolitics of Oil and Gas" for the “General Problems” distribution requirement.  Students graduating at a later date may count U6680 as an elective only.

All students are encouraged to discuss their proposed schedule with their advisor.

Year 1
FallPointsSpringPoints
Core: Conceptual Foundations (MIA) Politics of Policy Making (MPA)13SIPA U4201 or U640113
SIPA U40400.5SIPA U65003
SIPA U4200 or U640013ISP Concentration Course #1 (Group A or B)3
INAF U68713Specialization Course 1 3
Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3Core: Management Course or Financial Management Course3
 12.5 15
Year 2
FallPointsSpringPoints
Elective 3Core: Capstone Workshop 3
ISP Elective 1 3ISP Elective 23
Specialization Course 2 3Specialization Course 3 3
Elective 3Internship Registration (optional) 1.5, 3
ISP Concentration Course #2 (Group A or B)3Elective3
 15 13.5-15
Total Points: 56-57.5
1

 Courses must be taken in the semester listed.

2

 Satisfies MIA interstate Relations requirement.

Group A: General Problems in International Security and Conflict Management
Group B: Use of Force

Year 1

Foreign Language - For MIA students and EPD concentrators who need to take language courses to fulfill the
degree/concentration requirement, your schedule may need to be adjusted accordingly.

ISP Courses

INAF U4545 Contemporary Diplomacy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, ISP, ICR, Regional, IO

This course examines the process of diplomacy; the patterns, purposes, and people that shape the contemporary interactions of states. In the first, entitled "Making War and Peace"- we look at a series of the most important episodes in twentieth-century diplomacy. In the second section under the heading "Professional Norms and Pathologies"-we consider some of the problems faced by diplomats in any period. The concluding section of the course called "The Newest 'New Diplomacy'"- takes up distinctive aspects of diplomacy in the current period: how the United States and other governments have dealt with the proliferation of multilateral organizations (and of weapons of mass destruction), with ethnic warfare and genocide, with the pressures and opportunities of globalization, and with the war on terrorism that began after September 11, 2001.

INAF U6161 African Institutions in a Changing Regional & Global Security Environment. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional, EPD, EPD:Political
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will analyze the current political context - the opportunities as well as the constraints - facing the African Union and the Regional Economic Communities (RECs). We will examine key challenges facing African institutions and leaders including developing the tools for good governance, dealing with the illegal exploitation of natural resources, conflict resolution, protection of human rights, and strengthening humanitarian response (e.g. protection of women and children in conflict zones). African states have the potential to benefit from globalization but are also challenged by both old and new global trading patterns from which in many areas they are still marginalized. Recognizing and overcoming these constraints represents a major challenge for Africa's leaders and civil society representatives as well as their external partners - the United Nations, the European Union, and major bilateral donors.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 68150 John Hirsch Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
402b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6166 African Institutions. 1.5 Point.

The course seeks to give you the perspective and analytical capability to deal with in-depth consideration of the complex challenges facing Africa's regional and sub-regional institutions. In particular, the course aims to enable you: a) to acquire knowledge and understanding of the recent history and contemporary developments of selected African organizations; and b) to examine the context and consequences of current and emerging global political and economic challenges for African institutions. The course will seek to challenge you to approach these issues through the prism of African and international decision-makers, and to be able to offer them policy relevant recommendations.

INAF U6221 Navigating by Starlight - the Challenges of Conflict Resolution. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, ICR, EPD, EPD:Political
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What brings adversaries to the negotiating table?  Who can actually end a conflict? How important are mediation tactics to resolving a conflict? Has international advocacy changed the way conflict resolution is approached? This course will develop students understanding of key aspects of international conflict resolution by examining these and other fundamental questions, through discussion of different case studies. Conflicts in Algeria, Angola, Bosnia, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sudan will be among those discussed. Students will draw generic lessons or observations from each case while also developing an appreciation for the unique nature of different conflicts.  Supplementary case studies will also be integrated through lecture and targeted readings. Priority for this course will be given to second-year students.

INAF U6228 Cybersecurity. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Cybersecurity explores the evolution of cyberspace and the impact which these new technologies have had on national security as well as the commercial environment and individuals. Assignments are designed demonstrate how the world of cyberspace evolved, and the range of military, intelligence, commercial, social and legal issues that have emerged. Of particular importance here is the balance between security and privacy in the evolving legal regime as well as issues related to government surveillance programs. The course should be most directly relevant to those who intend to pursue careers in the national security, homeland security, or intelligence areas, as well as those students seeking a deeper understanding of how cyberspace has influenced the modern world.

INAF U6285 Methods for Defense Analysis and Assessment. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

This course is intended to provide students with the tools and knowledge required to assess modern military forces. It covers strategic nuclear forces, as well as conventional air, sea, and land forces. It addresses the technical capabilities of modern military forces, the command, control, communication (C3) and logistics infrastructure that support them, and some of the organizational/political factors that can affect force employment. It will also provide an overview of some defense analysis applications of commercial software such as Google Earth.

INAF U6345 Analytic Techniques for Military Policy. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, APEA
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course is designed to teach you the skills you will need to handle the responsibilities of an entry-level defense analyst in the government or in an outside think tank. The course should give you the underlying intellectual foundations needed to learn more rapidly from your experience once you enter the field, and thus to graduate more quickly to positions of greater responsibility and influence within the field. The course is designed to equip you to be a force for positive change in the profession to position you to make a difference not just on the substance of the decisions you analyze, but on the way the community does its analyses.

INAF U6346 US Role in World Affairs I. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP

Prerequisites: Restricted to International Fellows

This course will explore the international role of the United States by examining its evolution over time the interests and concepts that underlie it, the domestic debates that have shaped it, the historical turning points that periodically re-shaped it, and some of its most notable successes and failures

INAF U6347 US Role In World Affairs II. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP
Instructor Permission Required

This course will explore the international role of the United States by examining its evolution over time the interests and concepts that underlie it, the domestic debates that have shaped it, the historical turning points that periodically re-shaped it, and some of its most notable successes and failures.  Only students who are currently registered in INAF U6346 will be allowed to register for INAF U6347, unless otherwise indicated by the professor.

INAF U6384 Cyberwar. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Cyberwar and cyberstrategy roam the borderlands between hype and reality. What was once a pre-occupation of specialists is now thought to be central to domestic security, international relations, and economic development. Yet, cyberspace is poorly understood as a venue of conflict. The potential for cyberwar does not reside in physical laws but in errors and choices people make in building systems (and writing software for such systems). Tradeoffs that system owners and Internet corporations make among security, convenience, and cost may have non-trivial effects on U.S. national security. The purpose of this course is to help students think creatively about the uses and abuses of cyberwar and cyberspace policy.

INAF U6391 Conflict Resolution. 3 Points.

Category: ICR

This course introduces the study and practice of conflict resolution, offering students a broad conceptual framework for more specific strands of study offered by CICR.  It also aims to show how ideas about conflict resolution can cast light on individual conflicts and peace initiatives.  The majority of classes focus on thematic issues and debates, but these are interspersed with classes concentrating on individual conflict situations, to allow students to link theory and practice. Students will be tested on both their grasp of the main themes of the course and their application to specific situations.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 72348 Richard Gowan T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
410 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6794 Ideas and American Foreign Policy. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The aim of this course is not to consider policy as such but to examine the ideas underpinning US foreign policy and informing the foreign policy debate.  Some (affirming) ideas inspire or explain or justify actually existing policy.  Other (dissenting) ideas call into question or challenge government actions and priorities while advancing alternatives. The course posits that ideas (although not ideas alone) define the framework within which policymakers operate.  Therefore, understanding the trajectory of those ideas as they have evolved facilitates our understanding of the environment in which policymakers make decisions along with constraints within which they operate. The course takes a chronological approach.  It begins with the founding of Anglo-America and concludes with the period since 9/11.

INAF U6387 Terrorism & Counterterrorism. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

This course examines the origins and evolution of modern terrorism, challenges posed by terrorist groups to states and to the international system, and strategies employed to confront and combat terrorism. We assess a wide variety of terrorist organizations, and explore the psychological, socioeconomic, political, and religious causes of terrorist violence past and present. We also analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various counterterrorism strategies, from the point of view of efficacy as well as ethics, and look into ways in which the new threat of global terrorism might impact the healthy functioning of democratic states. The course is divided into two parts. Part I focuses on the terrorist threat, including the nature, roots, objectives, tactics, and organization of terrorism and terrorist groups. Part II addresses the issue of counterterrorism, including recent American efforts to combat terrorism, the strengths and weaknesses of counterterrorist tools and instruments, the issue of civil liberties and democratic values in confronting terrorism, and international strategies and tactics.

INAF U6388 Modern Urban Terrorism. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, USP, USP:Urban

This course will focus on contemporary urban Islamist terrorism, as it is most relevant to New York City. The first part of this course will be more theoretical starting with a historical perspective, methodology on how to approach to problem, the importance of ideology and the evolution of this wave of terrorism, including the role of the Internet. In the second half of the course, several case studies relevant to New York City will be analyzed. Finally, the course will end with a discussion of disengagement from terrorism

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 68547 Mitchell Silber M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6389 State Formation, Violence, and Intervention in the Modern World. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, EPD, EPD:Political

With a case study on Afghanistan, this seminar in international security policy will introduce students to several generations of literature on state formation and its relationship to violence and foreign intervention. We will explore the resilience and limitations of various theoretical approaches as they relate to a number of empirical cases. Students will become familiarized with a number of important arguments that have been advanced to explain state formation in its more recent incarnations in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, and post-Communist Europe.

INAF U6393 Evolving Military Strategy Post-9/11. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

The World at Night: America's Evolving Military Strategy in an Asymmetrical Age. Drawing from the NASA composite photograph depicting where the world is, and is not, brightly lit at night, the seminar will explore how dynamic demographies, economies, technologies, ideologies, and requirements for natural resources are shaping a minor revolution in military thinking. Students will consider global trends and linkages to better understand the renewed importance of contextual understanding of regional populations, geography, religion and history as they relate directly to accomplishing military objectives in support of national policy.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 75899 Eric Olson M 9:00am - 10:50am
1302 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6398 Unconventional Warriors. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

In this course in international security policy, students will take a closer look at a host of non-state armed actors whose origins can be traced back to pre-statal politics and international relations but whose presence can be felt very tangibly in 21st century geopolitics. Violence has always been a principal currency of sociopolitical interaction. We tend to associate unconventional forms of war-making with the post-September 11th era of geopolitics; in fact, a number of unconventional warriors have wielded violence before and, then, alongside states for centuries. A great deal of today's attention, both scholarly and policy-oriented, tends to focus in particular on terrorists and insurgents; but a host of other non-state armed actors (from bandits, mercenaries, and mafia to druglords, warlords, and militias) also operate as what Vadim Volkov called ?entrepreneurs? in the field of violence. Their methods, motivations, and interests have evolved over time. Many of the factors that led to their emergence historically have ceased to exist, but these actors have adapted and transformed in ways that keep them relevant to this day.

INAF U6399 Weapons of Mass Destruction. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the strategic, military, and political implications of weapons of mass destruction, understood here to be nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, with a particular focus on nuclear weapons in light of their more significant role in international politics. The course will seek to give students a grounding in the history and concepts of these weapons and then address key issues relating to WMD in the contemporary context.

INAF U6416 Third World Security Issues. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines in depth how third world countries plan for their defense. It focusses on the security dilemmas facing Third World states and is designed to help students evaluate national security issues from the perspective of non-Western defense planners. During the term we will analyze the politico-military strategies of non-Western countries and the domestic, regional, and international factors that affect them.

INAF U6430 East Asian Security. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, MIA Core: Interstate Relations

This course explores the principal hard power security issues facing East Asia: the rise of China; the US relationship with its allies and security partners in the region; Japan’s security strategy; the political-military disputes centered on the East and South China seas, the Korean peninsula, and the Taiwan Strait; and military strategies in the region.  Through a set of readings and discussions, students will come to a deeper understanding of the major issues in the region’s security; how the histories and domestic politics of China, Japan, the two Koreas and Taiwan shape and impact on the region’s security; and how some of the major scholars and practitioners who have thought about the region have viewed its security problems.

INAF U6440 Peace Operations in Fragile States. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, EPD, EPD:Political
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will focus on peace operations and the stabilization of fragile states. It will assess the various tools used by the International community and the evolution in their use: the deployment of military forces, transitional authorities, multidimensional operations, security sector reform, rule of law and transitional justice, support to political processes. It will conclude with an examination of the evolving broader political context and the growing challenge it poses to effective stabilization strategies: an increasingly divided international community, limited consent of host countries, obstacles to effective reform of the United Nations. The course will be entirely based on case studies drawn from operations of the last 20 years.  Assignments and classroom discussion are designed to prepare students for professional work in developing or implementing stabilization strategies in fragile states.

INAF U6470 The Logic of the Weak State. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, EPD, EPD:Political
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course in international security policy (and economic and political development), students will investigate the notion that weak states operate by way of a number of different, discernible logics that enable their survival and advancement. Although we tend to think of them as fragile or failing, there is substantial evidence to suggest that many so-called weak states are, in fact, both functional and resilient. The absence of Weberian governance does not imply the absence of any governance at all. We will begin the course by considering different theories, concepts, and indicators related to "stateness" and, then, dive deep into a number of case studies. These case studies are not organized by geographic location or historical period but rather along different possible logics of statehood. We will consider the "contested" state, the "bigman" state, the "fragmented" state, the "enclave" state, and the "non-state" state and, along the way, will likely arrive at a number of alternate categories as well. In so doing, we will cover a wide range of cases across time and space. Case study experts will join us for select sessions where possible.

INAF U6485 Law & Politics of Conflict Management and Intervention. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP, ICR
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course in international security policy (this course can also count towards the ICR specialization), students will be asked to consider the ways in which politics and law inform, undermine, and bypass one another in the realm of conflict management and military intervention. We will draw from a rich set of cases across time and space (Afghanistan, Algeria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, post-war Germany, Iran, Iraq, Israel-Palestine, Libya, Pakistan, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Uganda, and the former Yugoslavia) to examine the notion of ?threats to peace and security? as it has evolved. When do states feel comfortable using force and how do they justify themselves? How do the logics of foreign policy and international security run up against legal doctrine, and what do these interactions mean for the waging of modern war? What do empirical studies of one intervention after the next tell us about the degree to which the ends justify the means?

INAF U6556 United Nations: Challenges and Alternatives. 3 Points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Does the United Nations matter? The course will offer a broad assessment and analysis of the place, performance and potential of the United Nations within the nation-state system. It will assess the world body based on a range of distinct expectations through the prism of global threats, global norms and global responsibilities. Increasingly the world is confronted with phenomena - related to both security and development - which require global responses; the question this course seeks to answer is to what extent can we rely on the UN to act as a global instrument for constructive change? The United Nations does not exist in isolation. It is shaped by the broad political context in which it operates. The course will first examine the changing nature of world politics and the new challenges it poses to the world organization in the 21st century, both the end of the Cold War and the impact of 9/11 having profoundly shaped the framework within which policy and action must take place. In particular the course will examine the emergence of new threats (the unprecedented role of non-state actors, the emergence of a single hyper-power and the reformulation of state sovereignty) which go beyond borders and the reach of individual states - no matter how powerful they may be - and which require a global response. Will the United Nations be up to the challenge? And, we must also ask, who exactly is the United Nations?

INAF U6564 Applied Peacebuilding: Fieldwork. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, ISP, ICR

This course exposes students to conceptual and practical skills needed to develop a "reflective practice" orientation to applied professional work in international peace building and conflict resolution.  The class focuses on skills for designing, implementing, and evaluating conflict resolution interventions.  During the semester, students co-design projects, creating specific objectives and activities in collaboration with a Project Supervisor in a pre-selected field-based partner institution.  Students are encouraged to work in teams of 2-3 in the course.  Students implement the project during the summer, taking into consideration changes on the ground, through internships under the guidance of their field-based Project Supervisors.  Students return in the fall to deliver a report of their activities in the field reflecting on their experiences and presenting their findings to the SIPA community.  The course supports students in developing critical practical skills and experiences in managing a conflict resolution project while exploring the professional field of applied conflict resolution. This course requires instructor permission in order to register. Please add yourself to the waitlist in SSOL and submit the proper documents in order to be considered.

INAF U6680 Geopolitics of Oil & Natural Gas. 3 Points.

Category: EE, EE: GEMP

The course will examine in detail the geopolitics that support U.S. energy security and the geopolitics that may challenge it. The class will focus on U.S. energy relations with Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq, as well as with Venezuela, Brazil Russia and Nigeria. We will explore the possibility of a Canada-U.S.-Mexico united energy market and the likely geopolitical effects of a united Northern American energy system. China, and India as major growing consumer markets will also be a point of discussion. We will also look at the various factors that have made the shale oil and gas revolution so successful, the forces that continue to drive the revolution forward despite falling prices The class will discuss the geopolitical effects the U.S. shale revolution has had on the world.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 84283 Natasha Udensiva T 11:00am - 12:50pm
324 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6727 Deconstructing Afghanistan. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, ICR
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

  The past decade in Afghanistan provides a real-life encyclopedia on virtually every element of post-conflict peacebuilding and statebuilding. The objective of this course is to use the experience of Afghanistan's post-conflict transition as a means of studying transitions in general, and to use the specific episodes of Afghanistan's experience to compare with other transitions.

INAF U6798 Central Issues in American Foreign Policy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP

This course examines the sources, substance, and enduring themes of American foreign policy.  Part I reviews the rise of American power in world affairs from the 18th Century through the end of the Cold War.  Part II provides an overview of the process and politics of American foreign policy making.  Part III applies the theory and history of Part I, and the process of Part II, to examine a number of contemporary U.S. foreign policy issues and debates, including America's two wars with Iraq; America's responses to the threat of global terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; and what role the U.S. should play in the world economy, global and regional institutions, and the developing world. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 11747 Stuart Gottlieb T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
407 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6799 Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is intended to provide an understanding of two of the major components of warfare and international security since World War II. The first is special operations, defined broadly as military operations whose high risk and potential high pay-off require forces with extraordinary capabilities. The second is low-intensity conflict, defined broadly as conflict conducted by or against organizations other than conventional or nuclear forces. This includes terrorism and counterterrorism, insurgency and counterinsurgency, support to law enforcement against criminal organizations, and certain types of paramilitary operations. The two are grouped together in this course both because of their inherent relationship and because the U.S. government organizes itself in this way, having an Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (ASD SO/LIC). The focus of the course is largely but not exclusively on U.S. special operations and low-intensity conflict. There are three principal reasons for this. First, the U.S. special operations community is larger than many countries' entire military establishment and as of 2009 it is roughly one third the size of the entire British Army. This quantity thus has a quality all its own. Second, the United States has since World War II been heavily involved in low-intensity conflict around the globe and this involvement has only intensified since 2001. Third, the instructor's personal experience and knowledge of the subject are, for idiosyncratic reasons, mostly with U.S. special operations and low-intensity conflict. That said, both Russian/Soviet and British special operations and low intensity conflict are discussed in the course, and students are further encouraged to examine non-U.S. cases in course work if they are so inclined. The basic outline of the course is that the first half will provide students with a general understanding of both special operations and low-intensity conflict. The second half will then apply that understanding to six case studies.

INAF U6805 Limited War & Low Intensity Conflict. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is about two oxymora. To those caught in the crossfire, war is not limited and conflict is not low intensity. However, states must make policies and part of making policy is defining terms, establishing categories, and setting parameters. Scholars who study war in its many forms do the same. In general, limited wars are those somehow limited in scope, aims, and/or means. Low intensity conflict is often the term applied to those actions of violence beyond diplomacy that fall short of total war.

INAF U6848 Threat Financing and Anti-Money Laundering. 1.5 Point.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, ISP, MIA/MPA: Short Course
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 18 - Mar. 1

This class provides a comprehensive look at the efforts to prevent and detect money laundering and terrorist financing in a post 9/11 world. Developments in the United States, as well as internationally, are discussed.  The evolution of the area is examined, including a review of the relevant statutes and regulations such as the Patriot Act, the Bank Secrecy Act and the Material Support statute.  Analysis is done of the Suspicious Activity Reporting that is required to be done by all financial institutions, including banks, securities firms and money services businesses.  Cases and actions brought relating to money laundering issues are discussed, including detailed review of the requirements for an Anti-Money Laundering compliance program.  There is also analysis of threat financing, from the viewpoint of the requirements placed upon financial institutions, charities and companies, along with a review of cases involving terror financing.  In addition, the course addresses the role of lawmakers, lawyers, companies, financial institutions and law enforcement in the process of trying to stop money laundering and terrorist financing.

INAF U6869 The Evolution of Civil War Mediation Strategy. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, ICR, ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is a journey through the evolution of civil war mediation strategy from the ancient world to the present day. This course is designed to provide students with a comparative historical and thematic understanding of civil war peacemaking strategy and the major dilemmas faced by civil war mediators. In this course, students will be introduced to an alternative framework for analyzing civil war peacemaking than is typically applied in the academic and policy-making literature in this field: strategic study. To study strategy is to study the history of ideas on how to pursue success, the origins of these ideas, how they have evolved and why, and what this teaches us about how to improve future strategy. While this approach is common in studies of war and statecraft, it is rare in the study of international peacemaking in civil wars. Studying the evolution of international mediation in civil wars in this way provides an innovative but essential perspective on the struggle to develop international order and on contemporary debates on international security and global governance.

INAF U6871 War, Peace & Strategy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP, ICR

Survey of the causes of war and peace, functions of military strategy, interaction of political ends and military means. Emphasis on 20th-century conflicts; nuclear deterrence; economic, technological, and moral aspects of strategy; crisis management; and institutional norms and mechanisms for promoting stability.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 25781 Richard Betts M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6880 Planning U.S. Military Forces. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

This course is a seminar in analytic approaches used in formulating national security strategy and in defense planning.  The objective is to acquaint students with methods used by national security decision makers to evaluate options and formulate defense policy and plans.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 21548 Stuart Johnson Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
409 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6940 Analytic Thinking, Writing and Briefing. 3 Points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How did intelligence analysts get Saddam’s WMD programs so wrong? How did Kodak, a century old, top 10 US company and leader in digital research die in the digital age? Why do doctors take so long to correctly diagnose an illness?  The short answer?  Flawed analytic thinking.   This course focuses on the core skills critical to any job in government, the private sector or academe:   analytic thinking, writing, and briefing.   Class readings, in-class simulation exercises and homework assignments are designed to enhance students’ analytic skills in all three areas.  The analytic thinking component will examine case studies in intelligence, business, media and medicine to better understand the factors behind flawed thinking—as well as the analytic tools and techniques designed to improve analytic thinking and reduce surprise.  The writing and briefing segments will focus on conveying concise, well-sourced analysis in short memo formats and in briefings.

INAF U8132 Intelligence & Special Operations. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

This course is intended to provide an understanding of the major components of intelligence operations. These include human intelligence collection, signals intelligence collection, counterintelligence and interrogation, overhead reconnaissance, paramilitary operations, covert action, and intelligence analysis. The focus of the course is largely but not exclusively on U.S. intelligence. There are three principal reasons for this. First, the U.S. intelligence community is vast, employing about 200,000 people at a cost of more than $70 billion annually in 2009 according to statements by the U.S. Director of National Intelligence. This quantity thus has a quality all its own. Second, the instructor's personal experience and knowledge of the subject, for idiosyncratic reasons, mostly involve the United States. Third, more information is publicly available about the U.S. intelligence community than any other. However, some non-U.S. intelligence collection and analysis are discussed in the course and students are encouraged to examine non-U.S. cases in the course paper if they are so inclined.  

INAF U8136 US Foreign Policy-Persian Gulf. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional, EPD, EPD:Political

This course will focus on the process by which U.S. foreign policy is formulated and executed, using the Persian Gulf region as case material. Readings and lectures will examine the relationship between U.S. government agencies (White House, State, Defense, CIA, Congress, etc.) and instrumentalities (declaratory policy, diplomacy, military presence, arms transfers, covert action, etc.) in the pursuit of national goals. Special attention will be devoted to the analysis of U.S. regional policy and international relations from the Iranian revolution through the two gulf wars to the present.

INAF U8142 Intelligence & Foreign Policy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP, Regional
ISP Students Receive Priority

The major national security controversies during the last decade have all concerned intelligence. Critics blamed U.S. intelligence agencies for failing to prevent the 9/11 attacks, and then for missing the mark on Iraqi capabilities before the war. In response, Congress ordered a sweeping reorganization of the intelligence community, and scholars began to revisit basic questions: What is the relationship between intelligence and national security? How does it influence foreign policy and strategic decisions? Why does it succeed or fail? This seminar provides an overview of the theory and practice of U.S. intelligence. It details the sources and methods used by collectors, the nature of intelligence analysis, and the relationship between intelligence agencies and policymakers. It also contains a short history of the U.S. intelligence community and evaluates the ongoing efforts to reform it. Finally, it discusses the uneasy role of secret intelligence in a modern democracy.

INAF U8415 US-Latin American Relations: WWII to Present. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, ISP, Regional

The course seeks to analyze the dynamics and issues that describe relations between the United States and Latin America since the end of World War II. A complete picture of the current state of affairs in the hemisphere and the reasons that led to it require an analysis in three different - but related - dimensions. To cover the first one, the course analyzes historical benchmarks that contextualize particular overt American interventions in the region, dissecting their causes, operation and consequences. In a second dimension, the course looks at topics that have permeated the relationship between the United States and Latin America over this period. Because of their typically cross-national nature, they illustrate a different set of dynamics and concerns that have fueled tensions in the relationship. A third and final dimension concerns recent developments in Latin America that affect and have been affected by American foreign policy. Their novelty suggests that these issues will remain relevant at least in the immediate future.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 62397 John Coatsworth M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
802 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8488 Contemporary Russian Security Policy. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Two decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia remains a major world actor. It retains the world's largest arsenal of nuclear weapons, sits atop large reserves of oil and natural gas, and enjoys veto power in the UN Security Council-which in turn allows it to exert influence on such controversial issues as the Syrian civil war or the Iranian and North Korean nuclear programs. This course revolves around a single guiding question: Which factors in Russia's security calculus are most influential in Moscow's policies on the range of key international issues?

INAF U8559 Building Peace After Conflict. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, Management
Fall 2017 Course Dates: Oct. 23 - Dec. 11

This short course traces the outlines of the international community's steep learning curve in addressing the challenges of post-conflict peace building. It will examine some of the early UN and World Bank experiments in restoring nation states, follow the institutional changes meant to build capacity in the field of post-conflict recovery, look at the methodological and funding tools developed to strengthen field operations, and review some case studies illustrating the impact of this evolution. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 97598 Judy Cheng-Hopkins M 11:00am - 12:50pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8564 Culture and Foreign Policy: China, India. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

It is well understood that there are tectonic shifts underway in the development of a new world order. For the first time in more than two centuries, non-western players such as China and India are beginning to take center stage in a nascent multi-polar world. In what ways do these millennial civilizations develop a different policy trajectory from the historical Euro-American axis? What role, if any, does culture-history, memory, traditional belief systems, identity, arts, and perceptions-play in the foreign policy decision making of these two countries? How important are such considerations in managing relations with China and India? How do China and India as rising powers use the cultural medium in projecting their image abroad and how do they differ from other countries?

INAF U8565 European Security. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP, IO

This course surveys historical and current case studies in the context of theoretical debates about the sources of security and insecurity and war and peace. The aim is to establish a foundation for analyzing the prospects for a secure order in Europe in the first part of the 21st century. The emphasis is on problems concerning strategic calculations, military strategy and war as well as political processes and institutional dynamics. Separate sections in the second half of the term are devoted to selected current policy challenges, such as transatlantic rifts, identity issues and ethnonational conflict, transitions in Central Europe and the former Soviet Union, NATO and EU enlargements, and European foreign and defense initiatives.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 68598 Cynthia Roberts M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8566 China's Security and the Peoples' Liberation Army. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the history, missions, strategy, organization, doctrine, and capabilities of China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) and how the PLA contributes to China's national security. Additionally, the course explores the domestic, regional, and global influences on the PLA, and how China's military modernization program is assessed by other states.

INAF U8818 Topics in International Ethics. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, HRHP, ISP, EPD, EPD:Political

The seminar begins with an examination of how moral philosophers have considered the problem of the ethics of policy choice. In the next part of the seminar we explore human rights and the role of ethics in international politics. We then focus on problems in contemporary international ethics, wars, massacres and terrorism; international intervention; and global economic justice. We conclude with a discussion of the debate between the proponents of cosmopolitan justice, on the one hand, and the defenders of national self-determination, on the other, over the conditions of world order.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 17797 Michael Doyle T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8879 Technology and National Security. 3 Points.

Category: ISP
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Technology and National Security explores the evolution of modern military and related intelligence technologies as well as their application to the current national security environment. Technologies of various kinds have been important to defense, intelligence, and diplomacythroughout history. They have shaped the way nations have approached foreign policy and military operations, and currently the U.S. continues to develop technologies that will enable it to deal with a range of new and emerging threats.

LAW L9001 United Nations Peacekeeping. 2 points.

SIPA: Intl Org, SIPA: Electives

This is a Law School course. For more detailed course information, please go to the Law School Curriculum Guide at: http://www.law.columbia.edu/courses/search

REGN U6660 Security and International Politics of the Persian Gulf. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional

The course will be divided into two sections. The first will focus on the international dimensions of security, and will situate the Gulf in the Middle East and the world. It will review the consequences of the three major wars fought there over the past three decades before addressing both hard and soft security issues (the latter including climate issues and food security), border disputes, the nuclear issue, and the role both Iran and the U.S. play in the Gulf. Part II will focus on domestic sources of instability, including national identity and the ruling bargain, the rise of the post-rentier state, sectarian conflict, the problem of migrant workers (who currently make up a majority of the population in the GCC states), and the repercussions of the Arab Spring, which has led to an ominous retreat from earlier signs of liberalization.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 92195 Lawrence Potter W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
208 Knox Hall

REGN U6719 Middle East Conflicts and Global Security. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional

This course analyzes the impact of domestic and regional conflicts in the Middle East on global security. Case studies include: Palestine/Israel, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Iran and Saudi Arabia. Key concepts include: security sector reform, regime change, conflict management, arms races, nuclear proliferation, counterterrorism and energy security.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 75510 Naomi Weinberger M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
407 International Affairs Bldg

REGN U8588 Modern Iran: From Monarchy to Islamic Republic. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional, EPD, EPD:Political

An introduction to the culture, politics and international relations of Iran which will explore the country's transition from the 19th to the 21st century. Topics include continuity and change in traditional social structure, the conflict between clergy and state and the modernization of Iran under the Pahlavi shahs (1925-79). The role of women will be explored. The roots of the Iranian revolution will be examined, and an assessment made of the present Islamic Republic. The role of Iran in international affairs, including the course of U.S.-Iranian relations, will also be considered. Sources will be multidisciplinary and include historical works, literature and films.

INAF U6383 Dynamics of Cyber Power and Conflict. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, TMAC

This class examines the dynamics of cyber conflict. We will focus less on the technology of cyberspace than the national security threats, challenges, and policy responses including lessons from history and other kinds of conflict. After taking this course, you will understand about the Internet and Internet-based attacks; how cyber conflicts unfold at the tactical and strategic levels; how cyber conflicts and cyber power are different or similar to conflict and power in other domains; the evolution of US cyber policies and organizations; as well as legal issues and the policies and organizations of other nations. The centerpiece of the course is an exercise to reinforce the fundamentals of national security response to a major cyber incident. Accordingly, you will demonstrate the ability to formulate policy recommendations in the face of the uncertainties of an unfolding cyber conflict.  

REGN U6658 United States - Southeast Asia Relations. 3 Points.

Category: Regional

This course examines the interaction between the United States and Southeast Asia in the contemporary history of international relations. When one thinks about the relationship between great powers and small states, the dependence of the latter on the former is generally assumed despite their displaying a symbiotic nature in many respects. Despite the fact that Southeast Asia is distant from the US and comprised of small and medium size states, it holds an important role in US security and foreign policy since the end of the World War II. This interdependence can be seen through many regional developments such as anti-communist policy, the Vietnam War, US policy towards the rise of China, as well as other policies on transnational issues including responses to terrorism, narcotics trafficking, piracy, etc. These interactions suggest that the two parties have engaged closely throughout contemporary history. Yet, there are challenges for US policymakers to address due to the region's complexities and dynamics. This course will offer a perspective on current and future prospects of US-Southeast Asia relations. It will address these issues not only through a politico-strategic point of view but will also incorporate the influence of historical and normative understanding of this relationship.

INAF U8508 Inside the Security Council: Inequality at Work. 3 Points.

Category: IO, ISP, ICR

This course will examine the inner workings of the UN Security Council and how they have evolved over the years in order to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of power relationships within the international community, of the ways large and small countries seek to advance or defend their interests, and of how the working methods of the Council have been adjusted to better meet new challenges, such as human security, non-proliferation, and counter terrorism. Inequality-among its members, between them and the other 178 Member States, and between the Council and other international bodies--has been a defining characteristic of the composition, procedures, and rules of the world's premier security institution from the outset. Through case studies and conversations with practitioners, including the representatives of large, emerging, and smaller powers, the class will assess what kinds of reforms might be needed in how the Council goes about the critical business of maintaining international peace and security. The course aims to provide an informed and nuanced understanding of the politics and procedures of the Council for those in civil society, governments, international secretariats, and research institutions who seek to assess, influence, or work with the Council.

INAF U8508 Inside the Security Council: Inequality at Work. 3 Points.

Category: IO, ISP, ICR

This course will examine the inner workings of the UN Security Council and how they have evolved over the years in order to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of power relationships within the international community, of the ways large and small countries seek to advance or defend their interests, and of how the working methods of the Council have been adjusted to better meet new challenges, such as human security, non-proliferation, and counter terrorism. Inequality-among its members, between them and the other 178 Member States, and between the Council and other international bodies--has been a defining characteristic of the composition, procedures, and rules of the world's premier security institution from the outset. Through case studies and conversations with practitioners, including the representatives of large, emerging, and smaller powers, the class will assess what kinds of reforms might be needed in how the Council goes about the critical business of maintaining international peace and security. The course aims to provide an informed and nuanced understanding of the politics and procedures of the Council for those in civil society, governments, international secretariats, and research institutions who seek to assess, influence, or work with the Council.

INAF U6796 War and Captivity. 3 Points.

Category: ISP

As long as societies have gone to war, commanders have had to consider how they will treat captives. It can be a factor at every stage of a struggle, from negotiations to avert war, tactics and strategy for winning, and post-conflict resolution. And long after the end of fighting, the experience of captivity can continue to shape how people recall and commemorate their history. This course examines how generations of lawmakers, diplomats, military commanders and activists have dealt with the problem of captivity. It will also explore the experience of the captives themselves, as well as their guards, including those guards who themselves were made prisoner after being accused of war crimes. Students will become familiar not just with different kinds of modern conflict, but also the different disciplinary methods for studying it, from sociology and political science to philosophy and international law.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 12531 Sarah Kovner T 11:00am - 12:50pm
501a International Affairs Bldg