Film and Media Studies

Departmental Office: 513 Dodge; 212-854-2815
http://arts.columbia.edu/film

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Robert King, 509C Dodge Hall; 212-854-2815; rk2704@columbia.edu. Office hours: Wednesdays, 2–5 p.m.

The major in film studies is scholarly, international in scope, and writing-intensive. Students choose to major in film if they want to learn more about the art form, from technology to cultural significance; want to work in the film industry; or are interested in a major that combines arts and humanities.

Students usually declare the major toward the end of the second year by meeting with the departmental adviser; together, they create a program of twelve required courses within the major, often supplemented by courses outside the department. In the lecture classes and seminars, there tends to be a mixed population of undergraduate majors and graduate film students.

Students have the opportunity to gain additional experience by taking advantage of internship opportunities with film companies, working on graduate student films, and participating in the Columbia Undergraduate Film Productions (CUFP), an active, student-run organization that provides film-making experience to Columbia undergraduate producers and directors. In addition to careers in screenwriting, directing, and producing, alumni have gone on to work in film distribution, publicity, archives, and festivals, and to attend graduate school to become teachers and scholars.

The trajectory of the major is from introductory-level courses (three are required), to intermediate and advanced-level courses (two are required, plus seven electives). While film studies majors take workshops in screenwriting and film-making, the course of study is rooted in film history, theory, and culture.

The prerequisite for all classes is Introduction to Film and Media Studies (FILM UN1000)  offered each term at Columbia as well as at Barnard, and open to first-year students. Subsequently, majors take a combination of history survey courses; workshops ("Labs"); and advanced classes in theory, genre study, national cinemas, auteur study, and screenwriting.

The educational goal is to provide film majors with a solid grounding in the history and theory of film; its relation to other forms of art; and its synthesis of visual storytelling, technology, economics, and sociopolitical context, as well as the means to begin writing a script and making a short film.

Students who wish to graduate with honors must take the Senior Seminar in Film Studies (FILM UN3900), writing a thesis that reflects mastery of cinematic criticism. The essay is submitted after the winter break. Students decide upon the topic with the professor and develop the essay during the fall semester.

Since film courses tend to be popular, it is imperative that students attend the first class. Registration priority is usually given to film majors and seniors.

Departmental Honors

In order to qualify for departmental honors, students must take FILM UN3900 Senior Seminar in Film Studies, have a GPA of at least 3.75 in the major and distinction in their overall achievements in film study. The department submits recommendations to the undergraduate honors committees for confirmation. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Faculty

  • Nico Baumbach
  • Loren-Paul Caplin
  • Jane Gaines
  • Annette Insdorf
  • Caryn James
  • Christina Kallas
  • Nelson Kim
  • Robert King
  • Sandra Luckow
  • Richard Peña
  • James Schamus
  • Edward Turk

Major in Film Studies

The major in film studies requires a minimum of 36 points distributed as follows:

Introductory Courses
FILM UN1000Introduction to Film and Media Studies
FILM GU4000Film and Media Theory
History Courses
Select two of the following courses, one of which must either be FILM UN2010 or FILM UN2020:
FILM UN2010Cinema History 1: Beginning-1930
FILM UN2020Cinema History 2: 1930-60
FILM UN2030Cinema History 3: 1960-90
FILM UN2040Cinema History 4: after 1990
Laboratories
Select one of the following courses:
FILM UN2410Laboratory in Writing Film Criticism
FILM UN2510Laboratory in Fiction Filmmaking
FILM UN2420Laboratory in Screenwriting
FILM UN2520Laboratory In Nonfiction Filmmaking
Electives
Select seven of the following electives, one of which must be an international course:
FILM UN1010Genre Study
FILM UN2310The Documentary Tradition
FILM UN2190Topics in American Cinema: The Western
FILM UN3020Interdisciplinary Studies
FILM UN3900Senior Seminar in Film Studies
FILM UN3910Senior Seminar in Filmmaking
FILM UN3920Senior Seminar in Screenwriting
FILM UN3925Narrative Strategies in Screenwriting
FILM UN3930Seminar in International Film
FILM UN3950Seminar in Media: Seriality
FILM UN2400Script Analysis
FILM Q3010Auteur Study
FILM UN2290Topics in World Cinema: Arab and Africa
FILM G4310Experimental Film and Media
FILM G4320New Directions in Film and Philosophy
FILM GU4910Seeing Narrative

FILM UN1000 Introduction to Film and Media Studies. 3 points.

Lecture and discussion. Priority given to declared film majors. Fee: $75.

Prerequisites: Discussion section FILM UN1001 is a required corequisite

This course serves as an introduction to the study of film and related visual media, examining fundamental issues of aesthetics (mise-en-scene, editing, sound), history (interaction of industrial, economic, and technological factors), theory (spectatorship, realism, and indexicality), and criticism (auteurist, feminist, and genre-based approaches). The course also investigates how digital media change has been productive of new frameworks for moving image culture in the present. FILM UN1001 is required discussion section for this course.

Spring 2017: FILM UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 1000 001/28969 Th 2:00pm - 5:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Jane Gaines 3 55/75
Fall 2017: FILM UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 1000 001/63009 T 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Robert King 3 61/75
FILM 1000 001/63009 Th 1:10pm - 3:55pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Robert King 3 61/75

FILM UN1010 Genre Study. 3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 75

Prerequisites: This lecture course will have 3 discussion sections, capped at 20, listed as UN 1011 Genre Study - Disc. There will also be a film screening, scheduled immediately after one of the lecture sessions.
This course examines how globalization and the global success of American blockbuster films have affected Hollywood film production, stardom, distribution, and exhibition. The course will analyze blockbuster aesthetics, including aspects of special effects, 3-D, sound, narration, genre, and editing. We will also study the effects of new digital technologies on Hollywood and the cross-pollination among Hollywood, art house, and other national cinemas. Finally, we will examine the effects of 9/11, the “war on terrorism,” climate change and other global concerns on marketing, aesthetics and other aspects of this cinema

FILM UN2020 Cinema History 2: 1930-60. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Priority given to film majors. Fee: $75.

This course examines major developments and debates in the history of cinema between 1930 and 1960, from the consolidation of the classic Hollywood studio system in the early sound era to the articulation of emergent “new waves” and new critical discourses in the late 1950s. Our approach will be interdisciplinary in scope, albeit with an emphasis on social and cultural history – concerned not only with how movies have developed as a form of art and medium of entertainment, but also with cinema’s changing function as a social institution. FILM W2021

Fall 2017: FILM UN2020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2020 001/76097 M 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Richard Pena 3 49/55
FILM 2020 001/76097 W 4:10pm - 6:55pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Richard Pena 3 49/55

FILM UN2030 Cinema History 3: 1960-90. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Priority given to film majors and seniors. Fee: $75.

By closely watching representative classics from countries including Italy, Poland, Russia and Argentina, we will study the distinctive trends and masters of this vibrant era. Special attention will be paid to the French New Wave (60s); the New German Cinema (70s); the reformulation of Hollywood studio filmmaking in the 70s (Altman, Cassavetes, Coppola), and the rise of the independent American cinema (80s). FILM W2031

Fall 2017: FILM UN2030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2030 001/77747 Th 2:00pm - 5:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Annette Insdorf 3 35/65

FILM UN2190 Topics in American Cinema: The Western. 3 points.

FILM W2191

Spring 2017: FILM UN2190
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2190 001/63203 M 10:00am - 1:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Robert King 3 58/65
Fall 2017: FILM UN2190
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2190 001/81697 M 10:00am - 1:50pm
511 Dodge Building
James Schamus 3 27/65

FILM UN2410 Laboratory in Writing Film Criticism. 3 points.

Priority is given to film majors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Non-majors must also submit a writing sample, approximately 3 pages long, to cj2374@columbia.edu.

This course will focus on writing fresh, original, lively criticism, and on creating strong arguments for your ideas. We will screen films from classics to some currently in theaters. We will read, analyze and evaluate critical responses to them considering some crucial questions: How do you approach a new film? How do you approach one that has been written about for decades? Students will write short reviews and longer essays, including first-day reviews of new films and a final paper taking a longer look at a director’s career. Screenings in and outside class will be followed by discussion of critical approaches to the films, and by in-class writing exercises. This course assumes there is no right or wrong in criticism, no single best approach, just stronger or weaker arguments.

Fall 2017: FILM UN2410
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2410 001/86096 M 2:00pm - 5:00pm
403 Dodge Building
Caryn James 3 8/0

FILM UN2420 Laboratory in Screenwriting. 3 points.

Open to film majors only.

Exercises in the writing of film scripts.

Spring 2017: FILM UN2420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2420 001/21370 Th 2:00pm - 5:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Shakti Bhagchandani 3 12/12
FILM 2420 002/18206 Th 10:00am - 1:00pm
403 Dodge Building
Melissa Hernandez 3 12/12
Fall 2017: FILM UN2420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2420 001/87296 Th 10:00am - 1:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Thomas Locke 3 12/12
FILM 2420 002/87597 F 10:00am - 1:00pm
403 Dodge Building
Alies Sluiter 3 12/12

FILM UN2510 Laboratory in Fiction Filmmaking. 3 points.

Open to film majors only. Fee: $75.

Exercises in the use of video for fiction shorts.

Spring 2017: FILM UN2510
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2510 001/26424 M 2:00pm - 5:00pm
508 Dodge Building
Andrew Lee 3 10/12
Fall 2017: FILM UN2510
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2510 001/88296 T 10:00am - 1:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Leticia Akel 3 12/12

FILM UN2520 Laboratory In Nonfiction Filmmaking. 3 points.

Open to film majors only. Fee: $75.

Exercises in the use of video for documentary shorts.

FILM UN3910 Senior Seminar in Filmmaking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: FILM UN2420 or FILM UN2510

An advanced directing workshop for senior film majors who have already completed FILM UN2420 or FILM UN2510.

Fall 2017: FILM UN3910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3910 001/16647  
Sandra Luckow 3 5/12

FILM UN3920 Senior Seminar in Screenwriting. 3 points.

A seminar for senior film majors. Students will complete a step outline and minimum of 30 pages of their project, including revisions. Through reading/viewing and analyzing selected scripts/films, as well as lectures, exercises and weekly critiques, students will expand their understanding of dramatic writing and narrative-making for film and TV, including adaptations. They will learn appropriate structure for each specific screen-writing form, and endeavor to apply their understanding of drama, character, theme, and structure to their chosen narrative project.

Fall 2017: FILM UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3920 001/17297 W 10:00am - 1:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Loren-Paul Caplin 3 12/12

FILM UN3930 Seminar in International Film. 3 points.

Spring 2017: FILM UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3930 001/18420 T 2:00pm - 5:45pm
512 Dodge Building
Edward Turk 3 12/15
Fall 2017: FILM UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3930 001/21596 W 2:00pm - 5:30pm
507 Dodge Building
Edward Turk 3 15/20

FILM UN1000 Introduction to Film and Media Studies. 3 points.

Lecture and discussion. Priority given to declared film majors. Fee: $75.

Prerequisites: Discussion section FILM UN1001 is a required corequisite

This course serves as an introduction to the study of film and related visual media, examining fundamental issues of aesthetics (mise-en-scene, editing, sound), history (interaction of industrial, economic, and technological factors), theory (spectatorship, realism, and indexicality), and criticism (auteurist, feminist, and genre-based approaches). The course also investigates how digital media change has been productive of new frameworks for moving image culture in the present. FILM UN1001 is required discussion section for this course.

Spring 2017: FILM UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 1000 001/28969 Th 2:00pm - 5:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Jane Gaines 3 55/75
Fall 2017: FILM UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 1000 001/63009 T 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Robert King 3 61/75
FILM 1000 001/63009 Th 1:10pm - 3:55pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Robert King 3 61/75

FILM UN2010 Cinema History 1: Beginning-1930. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

This course rethinks the “birth of cinema” from the vantage of “when old media was new.” Following standard approaches, it moves from actualities to fiction, from the “cinema of attractions” to narrative, from the cinématographe to cinema, from cottage industry to studio system. Units in silent film music, early genres, film piracy and copyright, word and moving image, and restoration—the film archivist’s dilemma in the digital era. FILM W2011

Spring 2017: FILM UN2010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2010 001/74744 Th 10:00am - 1:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Vito Adriaensens 3 11/65

FILM UN2020 Cinema History 2: 1930-60. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Priority given to film majors. Fee: $75.

This course examines major developments and debates in the history of cinema between 1930 and 1960, from the consolidation of the classic Hollywood studio system in the early sound era to the articulation of emergent “new waves” and new critical discourses in the late 1950s. Our approach will be interdisciplinary in scope, albeit with an emphasis on social and cultural history – concerned not only with how movies have developed as a form of art and medium of entertainment, but also with cinema’s changing function as a social institution. FILM W2021

Fall 2017: FILM UN2020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2020 001/76097 M 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Richard Pena 3 49/55
FILM 2020 001/76097 W 4:10pm - 6:55pm
Kob Lenfest Center For The Arts
Richard Pena 3 49/55

FILM UN2030 Cinema History 3: 1960-90. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Priority given to film majors and seniors. Fee: $75.

By closely watching representative classics from countries including Italy, Poland, Russia and Argentina, we will study the distinctive trends and masters of this vibrant era. Special attention will be paid to the French New Wave (60s); the New German Cinema (70s); the reformulation of Hollywood studio filmmaking in the 70s (Altman, Cassavetes, Coppola), and the rise of the independent American cinema (80s). FILM W2031

Fall 2017: FILM UN2030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2030 001/77747 Th 2:00pm - 5:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Annette Insdorf 3 35/65

FILM UN2040 Cinema History 4: after 1990. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

This course brings our survey of the development of the art, technology, and industry of motion images up to the present. During this era, most people no longer watched movies (perhaps the most neutral term) in theaters, and digital technology came to dominate every aspect of production, distribution, and exhibition. Highlighted filmmakers include Michael Haneke, Lars von Trier, Wong Kar-wei, and Steve McQueen. Topics range from contemporary horror to animation. Requirements: short (2-3 pages) papers on each film shown for the class and a final, take-home exam. FILM W2041

Spring 2017: FILM UN2040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2040 001/29644 T 10:00am - 1:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Richard Pena 3 33/55

FILM UN2190 Topics in American Cinema: The Western. 3 points.

FILM W2191

Spring 2017: FILM UN2190
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2190 001/63203 M 10:00am - 1:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Robert King 3 58/65
Fall 2017: FILM UN2190
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2190 001/81697 M 10:00am - 1:50pm
511 Dodge Building
James Schamus 3 27/65

FILM UN2290 Topics in World Cinema: Arab and Africa. 3 points.

FILM W2291

Spring 2017: FILM UN2290
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2290 001/14776 W 10:00am - 1:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Richard Pena 3 15/50

FILM UN2310 The Documentary Tradition. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Film screening, lecture, and discussion. Fee: $75.

Documentary film from the late 1890s to the mid-1980s. Attention focuses on the documentary as a means of either supporting or attacking the status quo, on the relationship between the creators and consumers, on claims to truth and objectivity, and on how new technology influences the oldest form of filmmaking. FILM W2311

Spring 2017: FILM UN2310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2310 001/15164 M 2:00pm - 5:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Nico Baumbach 3 37/65

FILM W2400 Script Analysis. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Lecture and discussion. Fee: $50.

The dramatic and cinematic principles of screen storytelling, including dramaturgy, character and plot development, use of camera, staging, casting, sound, editing, and music. Diverse narrative techniques, story patterns, dramatic structures, and artistic and genre forms are discussed, and students do screenwriting exercises. FILM W2401

FILM UN2410 Laboratory in Writing Film Criticism. 3 points.

Priority is given to film majors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Non-majors must also submit a writing sample, approximately 3 pages long, to cj2374@columbia.edu.

This course will focus on writing fresh, original, lively criticism, and on creating strong arguments for your ideas. We will screen films from classics to some currently in theaters. We will read, analyze and evaluate critical responses to them considering some crucial questions: How do you approach a new film? How do you approach one that has been written about for decades? Students will write short reviews and longer essays, including first-day reviews of new films and a final paper taking a longer look at a director’s career. Screenings in and outside class will be followed by discussion of critical approaches to the films, and by in-class writing exercises. This course assumes there is no right or wrong in criticism, no single best approach, just stronger or weaker arguments.

Fall 2017: FILM UN2410
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2410 001/86096 M 2:00pm - 5:00pm
403 Dodge Building
Caryn James 3 8/0

FILM UN2420 Laboratory in Screenwriting. 3 points.

Open to film majors only.

Exercises in the writing of film scripts.

Spring 2017: FILM UN2420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2420 001/21370 Th 2:00pm - 5:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Shakti Bhagchandani 3 12/12
FILM 2420 002/18206 Th 10:00am - 1:00pm
403 Dodge Building
Melissa Hernandez 3 12/12
Fall 2017: FILM UN2420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2420 001/87296 Th 10:00am - 1:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Thomas Locke 3 12/12
FILM 2420 002/87597 F 10:00am - 1:00pm
403 Dodge Building
Alies Sluiter 3 12/12

FILM UN2510 Laboratory in Fiction Filmmaking. 3 points.

Open to film majors only. Fee: $75.

Exercises in the use of video for fiction shorts.

Spring 2017: FILM UN2510
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2510 001/26424 M 2:00pm - 5:00pm
508 Dodge Building
Andrew Lee 3 10/12
Fall 2017: FILM UN2510
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2510 001/88296 T 10:00am - 1:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Leticia Akel 3 12/12

FILM W2520 Laboratory In Nonfiction Filmmaking. 3 points.

Open to film majors only. Fee: $75.

Exercises in the use of video for documentary shorts.

FILM UN3020 Interdisciplinary Studies. 3 points.

Fee: $75.

We will explore how films from a variety of countries--notably Germany, Poland, France, Italy and the U.S.--have attempted to grapple with the legacy of the Shoah. Through close reading of such motion pictures as THE SHOP ON MAIN STREET, THE PAWNBROKER, SEVEN BEAUTIES, PARTISANS OF VILNA, KORCZAK and GENGHIS COHN, we will discuss the possibilities and limitations of Holocaust representation onscreen.

Spring 2017: FILM UN3020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3020 001/75855 T 2:00pm - 5:45pm
511 Dodge Building
Annette Insdorf 3 14/20

FILM UN3910 Senior Seminar in Filmmaking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: FILM UN2420 or FILM UN2510

An advanced directing workshop for senior film majors who have already completed FILM UN2420 or FILM UN2510.

Fall 2017: FILM UN3910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3910 001/16647  
Sandra Luckow 3 5/12

FILM UN3920 Senior Seminar in Screenwriting. 3 points.

A seminar for senior film majors. Students will complete a step outline and minimum of 30 pages of their project, including revisions. Through reading/viewing and analyzing selected scripts/films, as well as lectures, exercises and weekly critiques, students will expand their understanding of dramatic writing and narrative-making for film and TV, including adaptations. They will learn appropriate structure for each specific screen-writing form, and endeavor to apply their understanding of drama, character, theme, and structure to their chosen narrative project.

Fall 2017: FILM UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3920 001/17297 W 10:00am - 1:00pm
512 Dodge Building
Loren-Paul Caplin 3 12/12

FILM UN3925 Narrative Strategies in Screenwriting. 3 points.

Prerequisites: FILM W2420.

This workshop is primarily a continuation of Senior Seminar in Screenwriting. Students will either continue developing the scripts they began in Senior Seminar in Screenwriting, or create new ones including a step outline and a minimum of 30 pages. Emphasis will be placed on character work, structure, theme, and employing dramatic devices. Weekly outlining and script writing, concurrent with script/story presentation and class critiques, will ensure that each student will be guided toward the completion of his or her narrative script project.

Spring 2017: FILM UN3925
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3925 001/70208 W 6:00pm - 9:00pm
513f Dodge Building
Loren-Paul Caplin 3 11/12

FILM UN3930 Seminar in International Film. 3 points.

Spring 2017: FILM UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3930 001/18420 T 2:00pm - 5:45pm
512 Dodge Building
Edward Turk 3 12/15
Fall 2017: FILM UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3930 001/21596 W 2:00pm - 5:30pm
507 Dodge Building
Edward Turk 3 15/20

FILM UN3950 Seminar in Media: Seriality. 3 points.

From streaming to binge-viewing, Serial to Breaking Bad, seriality is a preeminent framework for the orchestration of contemporary media production and consumption. This course explores histories and theories of seriality as a recurrent trope of media cultures over the last century and more. To this end, the course adopts a comparative media perspective, exploring seriality in its varied textual manifestations across diverse media forms (the penny press, early cinema, television, podcasts, and social media). It also focuses on the range of functions that seriality has performed, as, e.g., a mode for the systematization of mass cultural reproduction, as a framework for the integration of fan networks and media systems, even as a vehicle for the creation of national and political communities.

Fall 2017: FILM UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3950 001/22596 W 10:00am - 1:45pm
507 Dodge Building
Robert King 3 15/15