Regional Specializations

Regional specialization offers students courses on Africa, East Asia, East Central Europe, Europe, Latin America, Middle East, Russia and the Former Soviet States, South Asia, or the United States.

View or print the Regional Audit Form

Africa

For the regional specialization in African Studies, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). One 3-credit course on INAF U6163 African Development Strategies: Policies, Institutions and Governance or a comparable course approved by the Institute of African Studies (IAS) and two 3-credit courses from the Social Sciences, Humanities or Public Health that are approved by IAS.

Click here for the IAS course listing

Contact

Mamadou Diouf
Director, Institute of African Studies
310 Knox Hall
md2573@columbia.edu
212-854-4083

Jinny Prais
Advisor to the Certificate in African Studies
Assistant Director, Institute of African Studies
Room 201 Knox Hall
201 Knox Hall
jkp2123@columbia.edu
212-854-3528

East Asia

For the regional specialization in East Asian Studies, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). Courses must be drawn from at least two different social science disciplines and cover at least two different East Asian countries. A list of approved courses can be obtained from the Weatherhead East Asian Institute (WEAI).

Click here for the WEAI course listing

Contact

Eugenia Lean
Director, Weatherhead East Asian Institute
Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures
Room 925 IAB
eyl2006@columbia.edu
212-854-1742

Waichi Ho
Executive Director
Room 914B IAB
wh2118@columbia.edu 
212-854-6902

East Central Europe

For the regional specialization in East Central Europe, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). Courses must be drawn from at least two different disciplines. A list of approved courses is available through the East Central European Center; courses not listed must be approved by the Director or Assistant Director.

Click here for the East Central European Center course listing

Contact

Alan Timberlake
Director, East Central European Center
Room 1228 IAB
at2205@columbia.edu
212-854-8488

Rebecca Dalton
Program Manager, Harriman Institute 
Room 1211 IAB
rld2130@columbia.edu
212-854-6239

Europe

For the regional specialization in Europe, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). Courses must be drawn from at least two different disciplines. A list of approved courses is available through the European Institute; courses not listed must be approved by the Associate Director or Program Manager.

Click here for the European Institute course listing

Contact

Adam Tooze 
Director, European Institute
421 Fayerweather Hall
adam.tooze@columbia.edu
212-854-2434

Francois Carrel-Billard 
Associate Director, European Institute
Room 1204 IAB
francois.carrel@columbia.edu
212-854-4727

Latin America

For the regional specialization in Latin American Studies, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). Courses must be drawn from any area studies discipline of 4000 level or above, with exception of History which can be a 3000-level. For more information and a list of approved courses, visit the Institute of  Latin America Studies (ILAS); courses not listed must be approved by the ILAS Student Affairs Coordinator.

Click here for the ILAS course listing

Contact

Gustavo S. Azenha
Director of Graduate Studies, MARSLAC
Associate Director, Center for Brazilian Studies
Room 834 IAB
ga2161@columbia.edu
212-854-9793

Eliza Kwon
Student Affairs Coordinator
Room 827 IAB
ek2159@columbia.edu
212-854-5468

Middle East

For the regional specialization in Middle East, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). Courses must be drawn from at least two different disciplines. A list of approved courses is available on the Middle East Institute website; courses not on the list must be approved by the Associate Director of the Middle East Institute.

Click here for the Middle East Institute course listing

Contact

Brinkley Messick
Director, Middle East Institute
Room 756 Schermerhorn
bmm23@columbia.edu
212-854-1932

Astrid Benedek
Associate Director, Middle East Institute
Room 304 Knox Hall
amb49@columbia.edu
212-854-2201

Russia and the Former Soviet States

For the regional specialization in Russia and the Former Soviet States, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). Courses must be drawn from at least two different disciplines. A list of approved courses is available through the Harriman Institute; courses not listed must be approved by the Director of the Harriman Institute.

Click here for the Harriman course listing

Contact

Alexander Cooley
Director, Harriman Institute
Room 1214 IAB
ACOOLEY@barnard.edu
212-854-6213

Rebecca Dalton
Program Manager, Harriman Institute 
Room 1211 IAB
rld2130@columbia.edu
212-854-6239

South Asia

For the regional specialization in South Asia Studies (SAI), students must take a total of three courses (9 points). Courses must be drawn from at least two different disciplines. For more information and a list of approved courses, visit the South Asia Institute. Courses not on the list must be approved by the Director or Assistant Director.

Click here for the SAI course listing

Contact

Partha Chatterjee
Director, South Asia Institute
452 Schermerhorn Ext.
pc281@columbia.edu

William Carrick
Assistant Director and Outreach Coordinator, South Asia Institute
Room 219 Knox Hall
wac2112@columbia.edu
212-854-4565

United States

For the specialization in United States, students must take a total of three courses (9 points). For a list of approved courses, please see the link below. Courses not found on the list must be approved by Professor Ester Fuchs, Director of the United States Studies Specialization.

Click here for the United States specialization course listing

Contact

Ester Fuchs
Specialization Director
Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science
Room 1428 IAB
ef25@columbia.edu
212-854-3866

Kevin Gully
Specialization Coordinator
Room 1430A IAB
kg2515@columbia.edu
212-851-0624
 

Sara Guerschanik Calvo, Lecturer in Discipline of International and Public Affairs

John Coatsworth, Provost, Columbia University

Angel Collado-SchwarzAdjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Veshaka DesaiAdjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

David Dinkins, Professor of Professional Practice in the Faculty of International and Public Affairs

Tanya Domi, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Dmitry DubrovskyAdjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jendayi Frazer, Visiting Professor of International and Public Affairs

Ester Fuchs, Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science; Director of the Urban and Social Policy Concentration; Director of the United States Specialization

John Hirsch, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Kristy Kelly, Adjunct Assistant Professor in International and Public Affairs

Valerii Kuchynskyi, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Edward LemonLecturer of International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Ronaldo Lemos, Edward Larocque Tinker Visiting Professor

Sidney Nakahodo, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Gray Newman, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Stephen NoerperAdjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Akbar Noman, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Seamus O'Cleireacain, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

José Antonio Ocampo, Professor of Professional Practice in International and Public Affairs

Robert Oxnam, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Lawrence Potter, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jinny Prais, Adjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jenik Radon, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Christopher Sabatini, Lecturer in Discipline of International and Public Affairs

Ronald SchrammVisiting Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Gary Sick, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Simon Toner, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Natasha Udensiva, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Pierre Vimont, Visiting Professor of International and Public Affairs 

Akbar Zaidi, Professor of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies and of International and Public Affairs

Regional Courses

INAF U4409 Political, Social & Economic Development in Brazil. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Economic, Regional
Course meets all semester

This course is a practicum, which has been designed to enable you to discuss major problems of contemporary Brazil with important political figures, business representatives, activists and analysts. Normally the guest speaker will make an opening statement of approximately 40 minutes and the rest of the time will be devoted to a discussion. Guest speakers may recommend one or two articles or documents they have written, or that they think are particularly relevant, for the policy issues they will discuss.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 14530 Sidney Nakahodo W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
802 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U4410 Political, Social & Economic Development in Brazil II. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Economic, Regional

This course is set-up in a form of a practicum where major activists concerned with Brazilian political, social and economic development will be asked to address a policy problem and discuss their proposals for effective changes. Other speakers will analyze the government's policies but will also discuss major new reports or studies, and bring to our attention key issues that are not yet on the policy agenda.

INAF U4545 Contemporary Diplomacy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, ISP, ICR, Regional, IO

This course examines the process of diplomacy; the patterns, purposes, and people that shape the contemporary interactions of states. In the first, entitled "Making War and Peace"- we look at a series of the most important episodes in twentieth-century diplomacy. In the second section under the heading "Professional Norms and Pathologies"-we consider some of the problems faced by diplomats in any period. The concluding section of the course called "The Newest 'New Diplomacy'"- takes up distinctive aspects of diplomacy in the current period: how the United States and other governments have dealt with the proliferation of multilateral organizations (and of weapons of mass destruction), with ethnic warfare and genocide, with the pressures and opportunities of globalization, and with the war on terrorism that began after September 11, 2001.

INAF U4890 Topics in Contempoary Turkey. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, Regional

This course proposes to examine in depth some of the major debates and issues faced by the citizens of the Turkish Republic at the present time. In doing so this course will briefly examine the origins of the modern Turkish State with a focus on how the founding realities and myths have aided or hindered contemporary Turkish society. This course will give particular emphasis to the interplay of domestic and international agendas in the larger framework of the current Turkish debates on such topics as accession negotiations to join the European Union, the PKK, civil society and the rights of women and ethnic minorities.

INAF U6021 European Banking Post Crisis. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track

This course examines the root causes, implications,  regulatory reforms and prognosis for European Union and non EU countries financial sectors following the financial and currency crisis in 2010 which initially implicated Greece, but  evolved into a larger European banking and market crisis. The course will focus on three main areas: EU and Eurozone political and economic environment; policies and politics: regulatory reforms; country specific analysis of major and minor institutions.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 11785 Irene Finel-Honigman Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6048 Oil and Gas Scenarios and Risk Analysis. 3 Points.

Category: EE, EE: GEMP, EE: ERM
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: INAF U6072 or INAF U6680 or SUMA K4155

This course provides an interdisciplinary perspective on global oil and gas activity by examining how international oil companies assess and manage risk, and how they deal with an uncertain (i.e., unpredictable) future. An innovative approach to dealing with uncertainty, the scenario methodology, is used to construct a range of plausible future outcomes resulting from the interaction of market, sovereign, and other variables. The first section of the course covers the theoretical aspects of corporate organization, risk, uncertainty, and geopolitical analysis. The second section covers the governmental aspects of oil and gas activity and how operating "regimes" are developed and maintained. The final section looks at several specific investment projects.

INAF U6085 The Economic Development of Latin America. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, Regional, Management

This course aims at familiarizing students with contemporary debates on Latin American economic development and its social effects. The focus of the course is comparative in perspective. Most of the readings deal, therefore, with Latin America as a region, not with individual countries. After a first lecture, which overviews long-term historical trends and debates on institutional development, it looks at market reforms as a whole. It then focuses on specific contemporary issues: macroeconomic management, trade policies, production sector trends and policies, income distribution and social policy.

INAF U6161 African Institutions in a Changing Regional & Global Security Environment. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional, EPD, EPD:Political
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will analyze the current political context - the opportunities as well as the constraints - facing the African Union and the Regional Economic Communities (RECs). We will examine key challenges facing African institutions and leaders including developing the tools for good governance, dealing with the illegal exploitation of natural resources, conflict resolution, protection of human rights, and strengthening humanitarian response (e.g. protection of women and children in conflict zones). African states have the potential to benefit from globalization but are also challenged by both old and new global trading patterns from which in many areas they are still marginalized. Recognizing and overcoming these constraints represents a major challenge for Africa's leaders and civil society representatives as well as their external partners - the United Nations, the European Union, and major bilateral donors.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 68150 John Hirsch Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
402b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6163 African Development Strategies: Policies, Institutions and Governance. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, Regional

This course focuses on economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa from a political economy perspective. It is divided into three sections. The first section examines the broad economic trends, policies and strategies of the past 50 years. The Washington Consensus and the "lost decades" are examined in some detail. The focus of this part is on economic growth and structural change, notably the controversies around economic policies and institutions. In the second section the course turns to socioeconomic dimensions and aspects of development including poverty, inequality, employment, health, education, and gender. The final section concludes with an examination of the implications of climate change, debates around foreign aid and an overview of what we have learned. Some readings are to be finalized.

INAF U6166 African Institutions. 1.5 Point.

The course seeks to give you the perspective and analytical capability to deal with in-depth consideration of the complex challenges facing Africa's regional and sub-regional institutions. In particular, the course aims to enable you: a) to acquire knowledge and understanding of the recent history and contemporary developments of selected African organizations; and b) to examine the context and consequences of current and emerging global political and economic challenges for African institutions. The course will seek to challenge you to approach these issues through the prism of African and international decision-makers, and to be able to offer them policy relevant recommendations.

INAF U6236 History of American Ecology & Environmentalism. 3 Points.

Category: EE, EE: EPM, Regional

We will explore various conceptions of nature and ecology in changing ideas of conservation, preservation, the Dust Bowl, the atomic age, growing environmentalism, and the current focus on biodiversity as one route to a sustainable society. We will look at how scientific information has been constructed and used in environmental debates over pollution and overpopulation and will question the utility of distinguishing between "first nature" (untouched by humans) and "second nature" (nature modified by humans). Along the way, we will address connections between environmentalism and nationalism, the relationship between environmental change and social inequality, the rise of modern environmental politics, and different visions for the future of nature.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 87030 Sara Tjossem T 9:00am - 10:50am
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6497 Humanitarian Crisis in the Eastern DRC. 1 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, HRHP, Regional
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Feb. 24 & 25

Over the past decades, perhaps no area of the world has seen such violent transformations and complex conflicts as Africa's Great Lakes Region. This 1-credit course focuses on the conflicts and humanitarian assistance in two Eastern Congolese provinces, Kivu Sud and Kivu Nord. Extrapolations based on IRC studies estimate an excess mortality in Eastern DR Congo of over 4 million people out of a total population of about 20 million over the last twenty years. The neighboring countries of DR Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, and Uganda all play a role in this conflict. Moreover, they have also endured their own forms of traumatic upheaval and are still searching for a form of stability. This course asks why these conflicts endured for so long? What are the root causes? What happens when a state bureaucracy breaks down? What happens to the health care and educational systems? Can solutions be found? What is the role of the humanitarian organizations vis-à-vis the local population, civil society, and the local administration?

INAF U6575 The New (and Old) Foreign Policy Challenges in the Americas in the XXI Century. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, Regional

This course will be taught as a seminar to collectively explore changes in inter-state relations in Latin America and the foreign policy implications of those changes, for the U.S., for larger powers such as Brazil and multilaterally.

INAF U6636 Banking in Brazil, a Comparative Examination. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP: International Finance Track, Regional, EPD, EPD:Economic

This course provides students the tools to analyze the workings and efficacy of emerging economies' financial systems as a pillar for sustained economic development. We begin by studying the basic characteristics of six banking systems (Brazil, Mexico, India, China, Indonesia and Turkey) and then proceed to examine the efficacy of a chosen one (Brazil) vis-à-vis the others. Key aspects examined include the roles of public sector and foreign banks, bank credit availability and systemic resilience, and depth of domestic fixed income and equity markets.

REGN U6639 Gender and Development in Southeast Asia. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, EPD:Social, Regional

This course is designed to introduce students to issues of gender and development in Southeast Asia in comparative context. Development debates are currently in flux with important implications for the practice and analysis of gender and development.  Some argue for market-driven, neo-liberal solutions to gender equality, while others believe that equitable gender relations will only come when women (and men) are empowered to understand their predicaments and work together to find local solutions to improve their lives. Empowerment and human rights approaches are popular among development practitioners, particularly those concerned with gender equity. This course uses the context of development in Southeast Asia to critically engage with issues important to development planners, national leaders and women’s groups throughout Southeast Asia.   

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 73502 Kristy Kelly Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
402b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6643 The Political Economy of South Asia. 3 Points.

Category: Regional, EPD, EPD:Economic

This is an advanced undergraduate/graduate seminar course over fifteen weeks, designed to introduce upper level students to the study of South Asia as a region as a whole, as well as to countries which constitute it. We will examine the political economy of different countries, as well as the nature of their state, how society has evolved over the last six decades, and how the economy behaves and develops in a globalised world. The focus will be on trying to understand key themes which affect each of the main countries which constitute South Asia - themes such as politics and democracy, economic development, the state and society, and so on - as well as how the region has been affected as a whole.

INAF U6672 Political Economy of Pakistan: State, Society, and Economy. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar course will try and provide a broad historical review of the nature of changes which have taken place in Pakistan and have affected many of the impressions which are now part of conventional wisdom about Pakistan. The emphasis of the course will be on social and structural change and transformation, of society, the state and the economy. The early half of the course will familiarise students through some chronology of Pakistan, looking at events and processes in different eras, in a political economy framework, followed by a deeper analysis of key themes over time.

INAF U6775 Indian Economy in Transition. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, Regional

This course will be devoted to an analytic study of the transformation. The bulk of the course will be devoted to understanding the reforms that are under way or must be undertaken to accelerate growth and poverty reduction. On the macroeconomic front, we will discuss the issues related to fiscal deficit, public debt and the likelihood of a macroeconomic crisis. Special attention will be paid to the external sector reforms including trade liberalization, foreign investment liberalization, capital account convertibility, preferential trade arrangements and multilateral trade negotiations. Among domestic reforms, we will discuss the reform of the tax system, subsidies, agriculture, product and factor markets, infrastructure and social sectors. Cautionary Note: This is a new course whose content will evolve as the semester progresses. Therefore, the description should be viewed as tentative.

INAF U8136 US Foreign Policy-Persian Gulf. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional, EPD, EPD:Political

This course will focus on the process by which U.S. foreign policy is formulated and executed, using the Persian Gulf region as case material. Readings and lectures will examine the relationship between U.S. government agencies (White House, State, Defense, CIA, Congress, etc.) and instrumentalities (declaratory policy, diplomacy, military presence, arms transfers, covert action, etc.) in the pursuit of national goals. Special attention will be devoted to the analysis of U.S. regional policy and international relations from the Iranian revolution through the two gulf wars to the present.

INAF U8142 Intelligence & Foreign Policy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, ISP, Regional
ISP Students Receive Priority

The major national security controversies during the last decade have all concerned intelligence. Critics blamed U.S. intelligence agencies for failing to prevent the 9/11 attacks, and then for missing the mark on Iraqi capabilities before the war. In response, Congress ordered a sweeping reorganization of the intelligence community, and scholars began to revisit basic questions: What is the relationship between intelligence and national security? How does it influence foreign policy and strategic decisions? Why does it succeed or fail? This seminar provides an overview of the theory and practice of U.S. intelligence. It details the sources and methods used by collectors, the nature of intelligence analysis, and the relationship between intelligence agencies and policymakers. It also contains a short history of the U.S. intelligence community and evaluates the ongoing efforts to reform it. Finally, it discusses the uneasy role of secret intelligence in a modern democracy.

INAF U8246 Comparative Development: East Asia and Its Lessons. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, Regional

This course will first, examine the nature, ingredients and gradations of the extraordinary success of several East Asian economies. The lessons of their experience have been the subject of an extensive literature. The course will introduce students to the main controversies. The second part will illuminate the debate by contrasting the experience and policies of East Asia with stylized trends and overviews of developments in each of the regions of Latin America, South Asia (Indian subcontinent), Sub-Saharan Africa and the transition economies of Europe and Central Asia. These comparisons will be informed by the question of what the lessons of East Asian success are for these other regions.

INAF U8415 US-Latin American Relations: WWII to Present. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, ISP, Regional

The course seeks to analyze the dynamics and issues that describe relations between the United States and Latin America since the end of World War II. A complete picture of the current state of affairs in the hemisphere and the reasons that led to it require an analysis in three different - but related - dimensions. To cover the first one, the course analyzes historical benchmarks that contextualize particular overt American interventions in the region, dissecting their causes, operation and consequences. In a second dimension, the course looks at topics that have permeated the relationship between the United States and Latin America over this period. Because of their typically cross-national nature, they illustrate a different set of dynamics and concerns that have fueled tensions in the relationship. A third and final dimension concerns recent developments in Latin America that affect and have been affected by American foreign policy. Their novelty suggests that these issues will remain relevant at least in the immediate future.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 62397 John Coatsworth M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
802 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8421 The Latin American Left Today, In and Out of Power. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar will focus on the so-called “pink tide” that has swept Latin America since 1999, bringing left-of-center movements to power nearly everywhere in the region. Initially we will devote three sessions to the historical origins of this trend; then four sessions to the abstract, policy debates in question; subsequently, three sessions to case studies, grouped together by common features; finally,  two sessions to summing up and placing Latin America and its left in the international arena.

INAF U8488 Contemporary Russian Security Policy. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Two decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia remains a major world actor. It retains the world's largest arsenal of nuclear weapons, sits atop large reserves of oil and natural gas, and enjoys veto power in the UN Security Council-which in turn allows it to exert influence on such controversial issues as the Syrian civil war or the Iranian and North Korean nuclear programs. This course revolves around a single guiding question: Which factors in Russia's security calculus are most influential in Moscow's policies on the range of key international issues?

INAF U8507 The Security Council and Peacekeeping in Africa in the 21st Century. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, Regional

This course, which will be taught by a practitioner, will focus on United Nations peacekeeping operations as one of the main conflict management tools of the Security Council (SC) in Africa. Through an extensive series of case studies (Somalia, Rwanda, South Sudan, Libya, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, the Central African Republic and Cote d'Ivoire), It will closely examine the tool of peace keeping, the context in which it operates, the evolution of its doctrine, the lessons learned, and the challenges ahead. Drawing on the recent report of the High-level Independent Panel on peace operations (HIPPO), and the cases studies above, it will elaborate on the many issues in peacekeeping today,in particular the limits of the use of force, the protection of civilians, the nexus peacekeeping/peacebuilding, and the increased partnership with regional and subregional organizations.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 88598 Elisabeth Lindenmayer W 11:00am - 12:50pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8619 China and the Global Economy. 0 Points.

Category: EPD, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP: International Finance Track, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Through this seminar students will develop an integrated perspective on the Chinese economy and the policy environment and choices that are under consideration by and available to policy makers and business executives. The global implications of the changing nature and structure of the Chinese economy will be examined. Both macro and micro dimensions will be considered. Instructor permission is required to register for this course. Please go to: http://sipa.columbia.edu/academics/sipa_registration/instructions.html for instructions.

INAF U8675 Emerging Capital Markets: Theory & Practice. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Economic, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP: International Finance Track
Pre-req: SIPA U6401; IFEP students receive registration priority

Prerequisites: SIPA U6401, PEPM U6105 or EMPA U8216

The goal of this course is to teach students about the historical relationships between financial risk, capital structure and legal and policy issues in emerging markets. Our strategy will be to develop a model of how and why international capital flows to emerging market countries and to use the model to examine various topics in the history of international financing from the 1820's to the present. Students will identify patterns in investor and borrower behavior, evaluate sovereign capital structures, and analyze sovereign defaults, including the debt negotiation process during the various debt crises of the past 175 years. We will focus primarily on Latin America, emerging Asia, and Russia, although the lessons will be generalized to cover all emerging market countries.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 73501 Bruce Wolfson, Jorge Mariscal T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
407 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8910 Food, Farming & Famine: Struggles for Sustainability. 3 Points.

Category: EE, EE: EPM, Regional

U.S. agricultural practice has been presented as a paradigm for the rest of the world to emulate, yet is a result of over a century of unique development. Contemporary agriculture has its historical roots in the widely varied farming practices, social and political organizations, and attitudes toward the land of generations of farmers and visionaries. We will explore major forces shaping the practice of U.S. agriculture, particularly geographical and social perspectives and the development and adoption of agricultural science and technology. We will consider how technological changes and political developments (government policies, rationing, subsidies) shape visions of and transmission of agriculture and the agrarian ideal.

PUAF U8470 Work/Family Policy in Advanced Industrial Countries. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Social, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course has three objectives. The first is to acquaint students with existing policies in the US and Western Europe aimed at increasing women's workforce participation and men's participation in family work. The second is to give students an improved understanding of the creation of public policy and ability to assess possibilities for future change. The third is to encourage students to think about the consequences - both intended and unintended -- of public policies. Students whose geographical interests lie outside of the scope of the course will have the opportunity to apply the concepts introduced in the course to their country or region of choice in the research paper. Additionally, they are warmly encouraged to expand the scope of the seminar discussion by introducing examples from outside the readings.

REGN U6149 Energy, Corporate Responsibility & Human Rights. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Social, EPD:Sustainable, EE, EE: ERM, HRHP, Regional, ICR

This class examines how to reconcile the differing/conflicting interests/goals of energy, and mining, companies and the public interest (e.g. governments); how to negotiate PPP agreements; understand the function/impact of laws and international trade agreements; and determine how CSR, especially environment and anti-corruption, and human rights apply. Case studies of multi-billion international energy pipeline projects, including TAP in Albania and Greece, TAPI in Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India, BTC in Georgian and the Caucasus and , for comparative purposes, the controversial Keystone in US and Canada, will be the prism/focus for analysis. The class is dynamic and cross-disciplinary.

REGN U6300 The Economics of European Integration. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP, Regional

A policy-oriented but theory-based course on the current state of economic integration in the European Union.  Topics include: Brexit scenarios, design failures of the Eurozone and steps to a Banking Union; monetary policy of the ECB; Greek and other peripheral bailouts; macroeconomic performance, unemployment and EU labor markets; cohesion and the refugee crisis; fiscal policies and fiscal rules; tax and competition policy for high tech firms in a digital economy; EU trade policy and the future of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

REGN U6525 Media in Contemporary Ukraine. 3 Points.

Category: Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Ukraine is a young post-soviet democracy that has been transforming over the past two decades. This course is devoted to the issues of media development and media practice in contemporary Ukraine and has three main goals. First, it heightens students` awareness of the state of journalism in post-soviet Ukraine (after 1991) and history of media changes in light of broader political, economic, social and cultural transformations. Further, it introduces the evolution of Ukrainian media landscape, explains the structure of media ownership, its connection with political and business elites and examines recent changes in journalism culture and practice. Finally, it helps students develop a deeper understanding of the path of media development and democratization and invites them to discuss the ethical and professional challenges Ukrainian media organizations, individual journalists and civic activists face today and analyze specific media practices in the country.

REGN U6530 Post-Soviet Russia: Business Practices and Legal Developments. 3 Points.

Category: Regional

This course will look at the development of a modern market economic system in Russia from perestroika through the collapse of the USSR, the creation of the Russian Federation, the privatization process and the Putin era. The focus will be on the creation of new commercial and business practices and the restructuring of the legal system. We will look closely at the key players in these processes and analyze successes and failures. Guest speakers who were themselves involved in this history will add on-the-ground insights into our examination of the changes.

REGN U6535 The Geopolitics of Russian Oil and Gas. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EE, EE: GEMP, EE: ERM, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Will Russian oil and gas exports survive the political turmoil between Russia and the West? The Ukraine crisis has left Russia in political isolation from the West. However, because Russian energy is deeply integrated into the global energy system, there is a tacit understanding by both parties that, at least for now, Russian oil and gas exports will continue to flow. Thus, in the short term, it will be business as usual. However, two sanction points will make the status quo difficult to sustain: Russia will lose access to technology and unrestricted access to capital. What should Russia do? What alternatives does the EU have to Russian gas? Will it be willing to substitute Russian gas?

REGN U6545 Human Rights in the Western Balkans. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, HRHP, Regional
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Oct. 18 - Dec. 6

This Human Rights practicum course focuses on the Western Balkans of the Former Yugoslavia in a contemporary context.  The course focuses on war crimes and their respective consequences that have occurred during the most recent Balkan Wars 1991-1999 in the Former Yugoslav states and will include a detailed review and examination of human rights policies and practices carried out by international, regional and national bodies, laws, organizations, frameworks of transitional justice and evaluative tools employed in an effort to stabilize a post-war, post-Communist, post-conflict scenario.  The course will present and examine in detail policies and practices deployed by international and national state structures to address the legacies of war crimes and the emergence of new human rights issues that are currently present in the Former Yugoslav space. The course will require students to prepare a 10-page paper on a human rights issue in the region, analyze the issues, review implementation to date and recommend policy initiatives that will address the problem (75 percent of the grade).  Students are expected read weekly assignments and regularly participate and attend the class, which will constitute  25 percent of their final grade. Failure to attend class without a justifiable explanation will be penalized by a reduction of one grade letter.

REGN U6634 Power, Democracy and Legitimacy in Southeast Asia. 0 Points.

Category: Regional

This course will examine state formation in Southeast Asia, state violence, and the always difficult question of legitimacy. How has power been thought of, challenged, and contested in the region?

REGN U6646 Islam, Democracy and Secularism in Southeast Asia. 3 Points.

Category: Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is designed to introduce students to new and emergent literature in the field of Southeast Asian Islam and to familiarize them with ongoing debates on the concepts of religion, democracy and secularism. Bridging academic and media material, this course brings together the main actors and structures in the current transformation of the relationship between religion and politics in peninsular Southeast Asia. How is Islam organized structurally across the different political systems in Southeast Asia? We assess recent shifts and transformations of religious and political authority and trace the question as to whether Indonesia is becoming more liberal or more Islamic and whether this dichotomy is actually adequate. Crucial elements of this course are debates that mirror key actors and structures of the religio-political landscape. The course thus also introduces students to the main actors and channels of power in contemporary Southeast Asia, in particular Indonesia and Malaysia.

REGN U6647 International Relations of Northeast Asia. 3 Points.

Category: Regional

This graduate seminar examines the international relations of Northeast Asia, one of the most significant and dynamic regions in global politics in the twenty-first century. The course discusses the politics, foreign policies, and interrelations of China, Japan, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, and Russia with the United States. The principal focus is on US relations with these Northeast Asian nations, as well as their bilateral and multilateral relations. The course examines the rise of nationalism in Northeast Asia, a key and growing driver for regional hostilities, and issues of history and popular memory, the source of recent ferment in relations. Participants examine the political, economic and social developments in the region and challenges that hinder increased regional integration. The class weighs the evolution of the American alliance system following World War II, Japan’s post-war transformation, South Korea’s emergence from the 1970s, North Korea’s developmental challenges and pursuit of nuclear weapons, and China’s rise as a regional and global power. The course posits nineteenth and twentieth century experiences that influence the bent of Northeast Asian foreign policies today. Participants arrive at a firm read of the politics and strategic priorities of Northeast Asia nations today and leaning forward.

REGN U6649 Nation, State, Ethnicity and Transnational Communities in insular Southeast Asia. 3 Points.

Category: Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to concepts of the nation, the state, ethnicity, and transnational communities with examples from Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore, as well as the Southern Philippines and Southern Thailand. Drawing on theoretical approaches as well as ethnographic work, this interdisciplinary course familiarizes students with concepts of nation, state, loyalties and communities. In the first part of the course we look at concepts of nationalism, the state, and ethnicity. In the second part, we examine the national narratives and prevalent identities in five sessions each dedicated to one of the above-mentioned countries. In the third part of the course, we turn our view to transnational movements and organizations such as the Tablighi Jama'at and various Islamic women's rights groups to understand how communities transcend national boundaries.

REGN U6660 Security and International Politics of the Persian Gulf. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional

The course will be divided into two sections. The first will focus on the international dimensions of security, and will situate the Gulf in the Middle East and the world. It will review the consequences of the three major wars fought there over the past three decades before addressing both hard and soft security issues (the latter including climate issues and food security), border disputes, the nuclear issue, and the role both Iran and the U.S. play in the Gulf. Part II will focus on domestic sources of instability, including national identity and the ruling bargain, the rise of the post-rentier state, sectarian conflict, the problem of migrant workers (who currently make up a majority of the population in the GCC states), and the repercussions of the Arab Spring, which has led to an ominous retreat from earlier signs of liberalization.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 92195 Lawrence Potter W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
208 Knox Hall

REGN U6719 Middle East Conflicts and Global Security. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional

This course analyzes the impact of domestic and regional conflicts in the Middle East on global security. Case studies include: Palestine/Israel, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Iran and Saudi Arabia. Key concepts include: security sector reform, regime change, conflict management, arms races, nuclear proliferation, counterterrorism and energy security.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 75510 Naomi Weinberger M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
407 International Affairs Bldg

REGN U6725 Modern Afghanistan: History, Culture, Politics. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will be a weekly seminar, limited to 20 students. It will be a historically-oriented introduction to culture, politics and international relations of Afghanistan; themes to be addressed include state-society relations, ethnic and tribal diversity, modernization and development, nationalism and political identity, the position of women and religion and the state, as well as Afghan relations with outside world. Sources include materials from many disciplines including history, anthropology, political science, literature and film.

REGN U8090 The Transatlantic Economy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, APEA, IO, Regional

A course on contemporary transatlantic economic relations with particular emphasis on the US-EU dimension. Topics include: the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP); implications of the UK referendum on Brexit; contrasting monetary and fiscal responses to the 2008 crisis; dollar-euro diplomacy and the international roles of the dollar and euro; European competition and MNC taxation policies toward high tech companies such as the so-called “Frightful Five” firms Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google (Alphabet), and Microsoft; secular stagnation and disparate U.S.-EU long term growth prospects; relative macroeconomic performance and why most of Europe can’t get its unemployment levels down to U.S. levels; the economic dimension to transatlantic security arrangements

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 68299 Seamus O'Cleireacain Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
402 International Affairs Bldg

REGN U8480 Politics and Society in Post-Revolutionary East Central Europe. 3 Points.

Category: Regional

The purpose of this colloquium is to examine contemporary political, social, and intellectual issues in the countries of East Central Europe.

REGN U8588 Modern Iran: From Monarchy to Islamic Republic. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional, EPD, EPD:Political

An introduction to the culture, politics and international relations of Iran which will explore the country's transition from the 19th to the 21st century. Topics include continuity and change in traditional social structure, the conflict between clergy and state and the modernization of Iran under the Pahlavi shahs (1925-79). The role of women will be explored. The roots of the Iranian revolution will be examined, and an assessment made of the present Islamic Republic. The role of Iran in international affairs, including the course of U.S.-Iranian relations, will also be considered. Sources will be multidisciplinary and include historical works, literature and films.

REGN U8600 China's New Marketplace. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP, Regional

This seminar is for students anticipating China-focused careers, shaping and responding to economic development. It is relevant both to those interested in international business and those interested in economic policy. This is an application class for 20 students, including those pursuing non-SIPA degrees. Second year students who have completed the first year economic sequence are encouraged to apply, as the course will require a strong conversance in topical economics (not econometrics). Instructor permission required for registration. Please join the waitlist is SSOL and follow instructions on the waitlist to be considered.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 72849 Daniel Rosen, Arthur Kroeber T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
402b International Affairs Bldg

REGN U8730 Reforming Legal Systems after Communism in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. 3 Points.

Category: Regional

This course analyzes legal reforms in Eastern Europe, and in countries of the former Soviet Union which are members of the Council of Europe, from legal, political and sociological perspectives. It considers similar problems that these societies faced at the end of communist regimes and examines their uneven success in introducing the rule of law. The course starts with working definitions of the "rule of law." It then focuses on developments in three areas of public law - constitutional, criminal, civil rights and liberties. Did countries in transition amend existing constitutions or create a completely new legal order? How distinct are new constitutions in Eastern Europe and Eurasia from West European counterparts or constitutional models elsewhere? Can nascent legal systems judge the communist past without violating basic principles of the rule of law? Choices made at the start of legal reforms continue to shape these countries' internal political dynamics and their relations with the international community. Assessing successes and failures of legal reforms, the course examines their driving forces - such as aspirations to join European institutions, internal political pressures, importation of western legal models, and demands for legal reform by civil society. It asks whether authoritarian and nationalist backlash against democratic legal system reflects uncertainties of transition or reactionary counter-reform. The study of formal legal institutions such as independent judiciaries and the legal profession is combined with discussion of less tangible concerns such as legal cultures. Formal training in law is not required - rather, the course helps non-lawyers to acquire skills necessary to read and interpret legislation and the case law of domestic and international tribunals.  

REGN U8740 Religions and States: European Political and Legal Perspectives. 3 Points.

Category: Regional

The seminar explores concepts of religious liberty in nations within the Council of Europe's legal jurisdiction. These include not only Western Europe, but also Eastern Europe, Turkey, and nations formerly in the Soviet Union -- prevailingly Christian, Muslim, pluralist and secular countries. Their legal systems and cultures respond differently to such questions as: Should the state favor some religions over others, and sponsor religions as sources of national identity? On what terms are minority religions tolerated? Can secular law prosecute offenses against religion? Ought public expression offensive to religions be limited? Can courts regulate religious "extremism"? Ought the public domain be devoid of religious symbolism? Direct application of American constitutional assumptions about church-state relations is seriously misleading in the pan-European space. The seminar equips non-lawyers to draw actively on legal materials in understanding policies on religion among heterogeneous nations of Europe.

REGN U8745 Politics in Russia. 0 Points.

Category: Regional

This course has several goals. First, it invites students to think deeply about why and how the Soviet Union-a superpower for 75 years-disintegrated suddenly and for the most part, peacefully. Then, the bulk of the course focuses on state-building in the Russian Federation. Russia's effort to construct new political institutions, a functioning economy, and a healthy society represents one of the greatest political dramas of our time. Beginning with Yeltsin's presidency in 1991 and continuing through the present era of Putin and Medvedev, we consider political phenomena such as economic reform, nationalism, separatism, federalism, war, legal reform, civil society and NGOs, and democratization. The third part of the course addresses Russia's relations with other states. Like its predecessor states the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, Russia is concerned with what kind of state it is (or should be) and where it stands in the international order. We will study how Russian leaders and intellectuals make sense of Russia's identity, as well as Russia's policies toward the US, Europe, its "near abroad," and China. On a practical level, this course will sharpen students' ability to assimilate facts and think analytically. Course assignments will also strengthen students' research and writing skills.

REGN U8750 Political Transitions in the Former Soviet Union. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, Regional
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In the almost twenty years since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the fifteen countries which once made up of the Soviet Union have followed different paths of political development. Some have become reasonably well functioning democracies; a few have solidified into authoritarian systems, while many remain somewhere in between. This course will seek to explore the political systems and structures in the former Soviet Union as well as how these systems evolved. We will pay particular attention to themes and trends that are visible throughout the region, or parts of the region as well as to how political institutions function throughout the region.

REGN U8753 International News Reporting in Russia & its Neighbors. 3 Points.

Category: IMAC, Regional

This course is a guide to the work of foreign correspondents. It is aimed not only at students who seek a career in journalism, but at those who seek to understand how foreign correspondents work, how to work with them and how to get the most out of their coverage. Lectures and discussions present the principles, ethics, tradecraft, technology and dangers of international news reporting, with an emphasis on past and present coverage of the area once controlled or influenced by the Soviet Union. However, lectures and guest speakers will provide current perspectives on coverage all parts of the world.

REGN U8755 Ukraine: Power Politics & Diplomacy. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, Regional

Ukraine is at war, the country is in turmoil. What is to be done by the Government to rebuff foreign aggression, eradicate corruption, improve economic situation  and implement reforms?  What are the chances of the new opposition to succeed? Will the Minsk accords be implemented?  These and other issues, including behind-the-scene politics, power struggle and diplomatic activities, are dealt with in the newly revised course delivered by a career diplomat. The course is aimed at both graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

REGN U8757 Ukrainian Foreign Policy. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, ISP, Regional

The newly revised 3 point seminar-like course deals with the performance of independent Ukraine on international arena, its relationship with major powers: Russia, Europe and the US and the trajectory of its foreign policy. Having illegally annexed Crimea and conducting a proxy war in Eastern Ukraine, Russia has challenged the basic principles of international law, numerous bilateral agreements and threatening global peace and security. What is to be done to rebuff the aggressor? Can diplomacy still play a role? These and other issues are dealt with in this course. Special emphasis is made on the assessment of current conflict with Moscow and on the new trends in foreign policy doctrine. The issues of national security and current political situation are dealt with extensively. The course delivers first-hand insights by a career diplomat, who has been actively involved in the implementation of Ukrainian foreign policy for over three decades. The format of the course will encourage active dialogue and analytical reflection on the part of the students. The course is aimed at attracting both graduate and advanced undergraduate students.  

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2017 001 83048 Valerii Kuchynskyi T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg

REGN U6310 Diplomacy in Practice: the EU & the World . 1.5 Point.

Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 19 - Mar. 2

The course will introduce students to the practice of modern diplomacy through case studies of global or regional crises and the EU’s response to them. Students will learn how foreign policy is devised and implemented from the perspective of a professional diplomat. The course will start with an introduction of the EU institutions involved in foreign affairs. Each class will then focus on a specific case study: the EU’s strategic partnerships, the migration crisis, the conflict in Ukraine, the Iran nuclear agreement, the Middle East, and Brexit. In each case, students will explore the interplay between the various instruments of foreign policy, including crisis management, trade, financial aid, humanitarian assistance, and public diplomacy.