Earth and Environmental Sciences

Departmental Offices:
556-7 Schermerhorn; 212-854-4525
106 Geoscience, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8550
http://eesc.columbia.edu

Directors of Undergraduate Studies:
Prof. Sidney Hemming, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8417; 557 Schermerhorn Extension; sidney@ldeo.columbia.edu
Prof. Hugh Ducklow, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8167; 557 Schermerhorn Extension; hducklow@ldeo.columbia.edu

Senior Administrative Manager: Carol Mountain, 557 Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-9705; 107 Geoscience, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8551; carolm@ldeo.columbia.edu

Business Manager: Sally Odland, 108 Geoscience, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8633; odland@ldeo.columbia.edu

The undergraduate major in Earth and environmental sciences provides an understanding of the natural functioning of our planet and considers the consequences of human interactions with it. Our program for majors aims to convey an understanding of how the complex Earth system works at a level that encourages students to think creatively about the Earth system processes and how to address multidisciplinary environmental problems. The breadth of material covered provides an excellent background for those planning to enter the professions of law, business, diplomacy, public policy, teaching, journalism, etc. At the same time, the program provides sufficient depth so that our graduates are prepared for graduate school in one of the Earth sciences. The program can be adjusted to accommodate students with particular career goals in mind.

The department’s close affiliations with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), the Earth Institute at Columbia (EI), and several departments within the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences afford opportunities for student participation in a wide variety of current research programs. Summer employment, research, and additional educational opportunities are available at Lamont and GISS. The department encourages majors to become involved in a research project by their junior year.

All majors and concentrators, when planning their programs of study, should regularly consult the directors of undergraduate studies and make themselves aware of the requirements for their particular program.

Programs of Study

Environmental Science Major

The environmental science major curriculum provides an introduction to a variety of fields of study relevant to the environment. Environmental science majors are required to take three semesters of introductory courses and to develop a grounding in basic physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics. Here, students may select courses depending on their interest. With this introduction to the Earth’s environment and equipped with a knowledge of the basic sciences, students are prepared to choose a set of upper-level courses in consultation with an undergraduate adviser. All environmental science majors are required to complete a research project, providing a practical application of mastered course work. This research culminates in a senior thesis. The research and the thesis are usually done at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory with guidance from a faculty member or a research scientist. However, other options are also possible.

Environmental science majors have an option to complete the special concentration in environmental biology for environmental science majors.

Earth Science Major

The major in Earth science follows a similar rationale but is designed to allow students to pursue particular fields of the Earth sciences in greater depth. Compared with the environmental science major, one fewer introductory course is required, while one additional advanced course should be part of the plan of study. The Earth science major also offers the possibility of in-depth field experience through a six- to eight-week geology summer field course, arrangements for which are made through another university. The research and senior thesis capstone requirements are the same as for the environmental science major. The geology summer field course may be used as an alternative means of fulfilling the capstone requirement in the Earth science major.

Concentrations

The program for concentrators serves students who want more exposure to Earth and environmental science than is provided by introductory-level courses. The program aims to provide concentrators with experience in data analysis and a thorough introduction to the Earth's systems.

The concentrations in environmental science and in Earth science are designed to give students an understanding of how the Earth works and an introduction to the methods used to investigate Earth processes, including their capabilities and limitations. Concentrators often join the social professions (e.g., business, law, medicine, etc.) and take with them a strong scientific background. They take the same introductory courses as the majors, but fewer basic science and upper-level courses are required.

In addition to the environmental science and Earth science concentrations, the department sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental biology major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental biology major in order to receive credit for the special concentration. There is also a special concentration in environmental biology for environmental science majors sponsored by the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology.

Departmental Honors

The Department of Earth and Environmental Science awards departmental honors to the major or majors in Earth science or environmental science judged to have the best overall academic record. The award is accorded to no more than 10% of the graduating class, or one student in the case of a class smaller than 10. A grade point average of at least 3.6 in the major and a senior thesis or equivalent research of high quality are required. Students who wish to be considered should contact the director of undergraduate studies early in their senior year.

Professors

  • Wallace S. Broecker
  • Mark A. Cane
  • Nicholas Christie-Blick
  • Joel E. Cohen
  • Peter B. de Menocal
  • Hugh Ducklow
  • Peter Eisenberger
  • Göran Ekström
  • Steven L. Goldstein
  • Arnold L. Gordon
  • Kevin L. Griffin
  • Sidney R. Hemming (Vice Chair)
  • Peter B. Kelemen (Chair)
  • Jerry F. McManus
  • William H. Menke
  • John C. Mutter
  • Paul E. Olsen
  • Stephanie L. Pfirman (Barnard)
  • Terry A. Plank
  • Lorenzo M. Polvani
  • G. Michael Purdy
  • Peter Schlosser
  • Christopher H. Scholz
  • Adam H. Sobel
  • Sean C. Solomon
  • Marc W. Spiegelman
  • Martin Stute (Barnard)
  • David Walker

Associate Professors

  • Sonya Dyhrman
  • Arlene M. Fiore
  • Bärbel Hönisch
  • Meredith Nettles
  • Maria Tolstoy

Assistant Professors

  • Ryan Abernathey
  • Jonathan Kingslake

Adjunct Professors

  • Robert F. Anderson
  • W. Roger Buck IV
  • Denton Ebel
  • John J. Flynn
  • James Gaherty
  • Lisa M. Goddard
  • Arthur Lerner-Lam
  • Alberto Malinverno
  • Douglas G. Martinson
  • Ronald L. Miller
  • Mark A. Norell
  • Dorothy M. Peteet
  • Maureen Raymo
  • Andrew Robertson
  • Joerg M. Schaefer
  • Christopher Small
  • Taro Takahashi
  • Minfang Ting
  • Felix Waldhauser
  • Spahr C. Webb
  • Gisela Winckler

Adjunct Associate Professors

  • Natalie Boelman
  • Alessandra Giannini
  • Andrew Juhl
  • Andrew Robertson

Lecturers

Pietro Ceccato

Associates

  • Anthony Barnston

Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators

Advising

All majors and concentrators, when planning their programs of study, should regularly consult the directors of undergraduate studies, who can be contacted through the department office on the fifth floor of Schermerhorn. The requirements are different for each major and concentration and must be met in conjunction with the general requirements for the bachelor's degree. Declaration of the major must be approved by the department and filed in the departmental office.

Substitutions and Exceptions

  1. Higher-level courses may be used to satisfy supporting mathematics and science requirements for students with Advanced Placement preparation with the permission of the major adviser.
  2. In addition to the courses listed for the depth, and breadth and related courses requirements, several graduate-level courses offered in the department as well as several advanced courses offered at Barnard may be substituted with the permission of the major adviser.
  3. 1000-level courses in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department can not be used toward meeting the requirements of any of the majors, concentrations, or special concentrations.
  4. The following courses are not suitable for undergraduates and can not be used toward meeting any of the requirements for the majors, concentrations, or special concentrations:
    EESC W4001Advanced General Geology
    EESC W4400Dynamics of Climate Variability and Climate Change
    EESC W4401Quantitative Models of Climate-Sensitive Natural and Human Systems
    EESC W4404Regional Climate and Climate Impacts
    EESC W4930Earth's Oceans and Atmosphere

Grading

A grade of C- or better must be obtained for a course to count toward the majors, concentrations, or special concentrations. The grade of P is not acceptable, but a course taken Pass/D/Fail may be counted if and only if the P is uncovered by the Registrar's deadline.


Major in Earth Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The major in Earth science requires a minimum of 45.5 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC W2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC W2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
or EESC W2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Students who wish to take both EESC W2100 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System and EESC W2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System can include one of these under breadth and related fields below.

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

MATH V1101Calculus I
or MATH V1102 Calculus II
Select one of the following three-course sequences:
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
   and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
   and General Physics I
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
   and General Physics I
   and General Physics II

Capstone Experience

Select one of the following:
Senior Research Seminar
   and Environmental Science Senior Seminar
Senior Research Seminar
   and Environmental Science Senior Seminar
A six to eight week summer geology field course

Breadth and Related Fields Requirement

A minimum of 6 points (two courses) chosen with the major adviser are required.

Breadth and related field courses are science courses relevant for an Earth science major that do not require an Earth science background. Several such courses are offered at the 2000-, 3000- and 4000-level in the department and at Barnard. Examples include:

Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System
Field Geology
Environmental Data Analysis
Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
Earth/Human Interactions
Alternative energy resources

Also included among breadth and related fields courses are science, mathematics, statistics, and engineering courses offered by other departments that count toward fulfilling degree requirements in those departments.

Depth Requirement

A minimum of 12 points (four courses) chosen with the major adviser to provide depth in the field of Earth science.

These courses build on the foundation and supporting courses listed above and provide a coherent focus in some area of Earth science. Students should include at least one of the following in their course of study:

EESC W3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC W3201 Solid Earth Dynamics

Areas of focus include one of the courses listed above and three or more additional courses. Students are not required to specialize in a focus area, but examples are given below for those who choose to do so.

Geological Science
EESC W4076Geologic Mapping
EESC W4090Introduction to Geochronology and Thermochronology
EESC W4113Introduction to Mineralogy
EESC W4223Sedimentary Geology
EESC W4230Crustal Deformation
EESC W4480Paleobiology and Earth System History
EESC W4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EESC W4887Isotope Geology I
EESC W4947Plate Tectonics
It is strongly recommended that students focusing in geological science take the summer geology field course as their capstone experience.
Geochemistry
EESC W3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC BC3016Environmental Measurements
EESC BC3200Ecotoxicology
EESC W4090Introduction to Geochronology and Thermochronology
EESC W4113Introduction to Mineralogy
EESC W4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EESC W4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC W4887Isotope Geology I
EESC W4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
It is recommended that students focusing in geochemistry take CHEM C1403-CHEM C1404 General Chemistry I and II, and PHYS V1201 General Physics I as their supporting science sequence.
Atmosphere and Ocean Science
EESC W4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC W4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC W4925Principles of Physical Oceanography
EESC W4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
EESC W4920Paleoceanography
EESC W4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
It is recommended that students focusing on atmosphere and ocean science also take a course in fluid dynamics and a course in differential equations.
Solid Earth Geophysics
EESC W4230Crustal Deformation
EESC W4300The Earth's Deep Interior
EESC W4947Plate Tectonics
EESC W4949Introduction to Seismology
It is recommended that students focusing in solid Earth geophysics take PHYS V1201-PHYS V1202 General Physics I and II, and CHEM C1403 General Chemistry I as their supporting science sequence and also take MATH V1201 Calculus II.
Climate
EESC W3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC BC3025Hydrology
EESC W4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC W4330Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate
EESC W4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC W4920Paleoceanography
EESC W4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC W4925Principles of Physical Oceanography
EESC W4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
Paleontology
EESC W4223Sedimentary Geology
EESC W4480Paleobiology and Earth System History
EESC W4550Plant Ecophysiology
EESC W4920Paleoceanography
EESC W4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC W4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
It is recommended that students focusing in paleontology take EESC V2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System, as one of their foundation courses.

Major in Environmental Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The major in environmental science requires a minimum of 47 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC W2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC W2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC W2300Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

MATH V1101Calculus I
or MATH V1102 Calculus II
Select one of the following three-course sequences:
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
   and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
   and General Physics I
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
   and General Physics I
   and General Physics II
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
   and Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
   and General Physics I

Capstone Experience

EESC BC3800Senior Research Seminar
or EESC BC3801 Senior Research Seminar
EESC W3901Environmental Science Senior Seminar

Breadth and Related Fields Requirement

A minimum of 6 points (two courses) chosen with the major adviser are required.

Breadth and related field courses are science courses relevant for an environmental science major that do not require an environmental science background. Several such courses are offered at the 2000-, 3000- and 4000-level in the department and at Barnard. Examples include:

EESC W3010Field Geology
EESC BC3017Environmental Data Analysis
EESC W4050Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
EESC W4600Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
EESC W4917Earth/Human Interactions

Also included among breadth and related fields courses are science, mathematics, statistics, and engineering courses offered by other departments that count toward fulfilling degree requirements in those departments.

Depth Requirement

A minimum of 9 points (three courses) chosen with the major adviser to provide depth in the field of environmental science.

These courses build on the foundation and supporting courses listed above and provide a coherent focus in some area of environmental science. Students should include at least one of the following in their course of study:

EESC W3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC W3201 Solid Earth Dynamics

Areas of focus include one of the courses listed above and two or more additional courses. Students are not required to specialize in a focus area, but examples are given below for those who choose to do so.

Environmental Geology
EESC W4076Geologic Mapping
EESC W4480Paleobiology and Earth System History
EAEE E3221Environmental geophysics
It is recommended that students focusing in environmental geology also take EESC W4050 Remote Sensing.
Environmental Geochemistry
EESC W3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC W4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC W4887Isotope Geology I
EESC W4888Isoptope Geology II
EESC W4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC W4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
Hydrology
EESC W4076Geologic Mapping
EESC W4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC W4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC BC3025Hydrology
EAEE E3221Environmental geophysics
Climate Change
EESC W3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC W4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC W4330Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate
EESC W4480Paleobiology and Earth System History
EESC W4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC W4920Paleoceanography
It is recommended that students focusing in environmental geology also take EESC W4050 Remote Sensing.
Energy and Resources
EESC W4076Geologic Mapping
EESC W4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EAEE E2002Alternative energy resources

Concentration in Earth Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The concentration in Earth science requires a minimum of 25 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC W2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC W2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
or EESC W2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

Two science or mathematics courses (6-7 points) selected from among those listed for the Earth science major above.

Depth and Breadth and Related Fields Requirements

A minimum of 10 points (typically three courses) is required as follows:

EESC W3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC W3201 Solid Earth Dynamics
One additional course chosen from those listed under Depth Requirement for the earth science major above.
The third course selected from those listed under either Depth Requirement or Breadth and Related Fields Requirement for the earth science major above.

Concentration in Environmental Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The concentration in environmental science requires a minimum of 25.5 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC W2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC W2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC W2300Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

Two science or mathematics courses (6-7 points) selected from among those listed for the environmental science major above.

Depth and Breadth and Related Fields Requirements

A minimum of 6 points (two courses) is required as follows:

EESC W3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC W3201 Solid Earth Dynamics
One additional course selected from those listed under either Depth Requirement or Breadth and Related Fields Requirement for the environmental science major above.

Special Concentration in Environmental Science for Majors in Environmental Biology

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental biology major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental biology major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

The special concentration in environmental science requires a minimum of 31.5 points, distributed as follows:

Introductory Environmental Science (13.5 points)

EESC W2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC W2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC W2300Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Introductory Science (6 points)

Two courses in chemistry, physics, mathematics, or environmental biology from the supporting mathematics and science list for the environmental science major above.

Advanced Environmental Science (12 points)

Four courses at the 3000-level or above chosen from those recommended for the environmental science major above.

Advanced courses used to fulfill requirements in the environmental biology major cannot count toward requirements for the special concentration.


Special Concentration in Environmental Biology for Majors in Environmental Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental science major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental science major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

The special concentration in environmental biology requires a minimum of 39 points, distributed as follows:

Introductory Environmental Biology and Environmental Science (17 points)

EEEB W2001Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
EEEB W2002Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere (equivalent to EESC V2300)
EESC W2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC W2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System

Introductory Science (13 points)

Select one of the following chemistry sequences:
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
   and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
Intensive General Chemistry (Lecture)
   and Intensive General Chemistry Laboratory
One term of statistics such as the following:
STAT W1101Introduction to Statistics
STAT W1201Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
Statistics and Research Design
Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
EEEB W3087Conservation Biology

Advanced Environmental Biology (9 points)

Three additional advanced EEEB courses (3000-level and above), each chosen from a different curricular area (evolution/genetics, ecology/behavior/conservation, anatomy/physiology/diversity, biology laboratory courses).

Advanced courses used to fulfill requirements in the environmental science major cannot count toward requirements for the special concentration.

Sustainable Development

Students interested in sustainable development should refer to the Sustainable Development section in this Bulletin.

Students interested in sustainable development should refer to the Sustainable Development section in this Bulletin.

Fall 2016

EESC W1011 Earth: Origin, Evolution, Processes, Future. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required

What is the nature of our planet and how did it form?  This class explores Earth's internal structure, its dynamical character expressed in plate tectnics and earthquakes, and its climate system. It also explores what Earth's future  may hold. Lecture and lab. Students who wish to take only the lectures should register for W1411.

Spring 2016: EESC W1011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1011 001/23898 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Sedelia Rodriguez 4 9
EESC 1011 001/23898 Th 1:10pm - 4:00pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Sedelia Rodriguez 4 9

EESC W1411 Earth: Origin, Evolution, Processes, Future: Lectures. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
The lectures of EESC W1011.

What is the nature of our planet and how did it form? This class explores Earth's internal structure, its dynamical character expressed in plate tectonics and earthquakes, and its climate system. It also explores what Earth's future may hold.

Spring 2016: EESC W1411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1411 001/96446 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Sedelia Rodriguez 3 38

EESC W1030 Oceanography. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment limited to 160.

Explore the geology of the sea floor, understand what drives ocean currents and how ocean ecosystems operate. Case studies and discussions centered on ocean-related issues facing society.

Fall 2016: EESC W1030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1030 001/68999 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
501 Northwest Corner
Baerbel Hoenisch 3 62

EESC W1201 Environmental Risks and Disasters. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Discussion Section Required
Priority given to first-years and sophomores.

Prerequisites: high school science and math.

An introduction to risks and hazards in the environment. Different types of hazards are analyzed and compared: natural disasters, such as tornados, earthquakes, and meteorite impacts; acute and chronic health effects caused by exposure to radiation and toxic substances such as radon, asbestos, and arsenic; long-term societal effects due to environmental change, such as sea level rise and global warming. Emphasizes the basic physical principles controlling the hazardous phenomena and develops simple quantitative methods for making scientifically reasoned assessments of the threats (to health and wealth) posed by various events, processes, and exposures. Discusses methods of risk mitigation and sociological, psychological, and economic aspects of risk control and management.

Fall 2016: EESC W1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1201 001/11049 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Goran Ekstrom 3 13

EESC W1600 Earth Resources and Sustainable Development. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: none; high school chemistry recommended.

Survey of the origin and extent of mineral resources, fossil fuels, and industrial materials, that are non renewable, finite resources, and the environmental consequences of their extraction and use, using the textbook Earth Resources and the Environment, by James Craig, David Vaughan and Brian Skinner. This course will provide an overview, but will include focus on topics of current societal relevance, including estimated reserves and extraction costs for fossil fuels, geological storage of CO2, sources and disposal methods for nuclear energy fuels, sources and future for luxury goods such as gold and diamonds, and special, rare materials used in consumer electronics (e.g., “Coltan”, mostly from Congo) and in newly emerging technologies such as superconducting magnets and rechargeable batteries (e.g., heavy rare earth elements, mostly from China). Guest lectures from economists, commodity traders and resource geologists will provide “real world” input.  Discussion Session Required.

Fall 2016: EESC W1600
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1600 001/21456 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Peter Kelemen 3 80/120

EESC W4600 Earth Resources and Sustainable Development. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: none; high school chemistry recommended.

Survey of the origin and extent of mineral resources, fossil fuels, and industrial materials, that are non renewable, finite resources, and the environmental consequences of their extraction and use, using the textbook Earth Resources and the Environment, by James Craig, David Vaughan and Brian Skinner. This course will provide an overview, but will include focus on topics of current societal relevance, including estimated reserves and extraction costs for fossil fuels, geological storage of CO2, sources and disposal methods for nuclear energy fuels, sources and future for luxury goods such as gold and diamonds, and special, rare materials used in consumer electronics (e.g., “Coltan”, mostly from Congo) and in newly emerging technologies such as superconducting magnets and rechargeable batteries (e.g., heavy rare earth elements, mostly from China). Guest lectures from economists, commodity traders and resource geologists will provide “real world” input.

Fall 2016: EESC W4600
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4600 001/61887 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Peter Kelemen 3 20/100

EESC W2100 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be reinstated.

Prerequisites: high school algebra. Recommended preparation: high school chemistry and physics; and one semester of college science.

  Origin and development of the atmosphere and oceans, formation of winds, storms and ocean currents, reasons for changes through geologic time. Recent influence of human activity: the ozone hole, global warming, water pollution. Laboratory exploration of topics through demonstrations, experimentation, computer data analysis, and modeling. Students majoring in Earth and Environmental Sciences should plan to take EESC W2100 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with Senior Seminar.

Spring 2016: EESC W2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/18944 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 39
EESC 2100 001/18944 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 39
Fall 2016: EESC W2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/64783 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
517 Hamilton Hall
Jerry McManus, Adam Sobel 4.5 53
EESC 2100 001/64783 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Jerry McManus, Adam Sobel 4.5 53

EESC W2200 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be necessary.

Prerequisites: high school algebra and chemistry. Recommended preparation: high school physics.

Exploration of how the solid Earth works, today and in the past, focusing on Earth in the Solar system, continents and oceans, the Earth's history, mountain systems on land and sea, minerals and rocks, weathering and erosion, hydrological cycle and rivers, geochronology, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, fossil fuels. Laboratory exploration of topics through examination of rock samples, experimentation, computer data analysis, field exercises, and modeling. Columbia and Barnard majors should plan to take W2200 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with the Senior Seminar.

Spring 2016: EESC W2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/11774 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
William Menke, Einat Lev 4.5 21
EESC 2200 001/11774 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
William Menke, Einat Lev 4.5 21
Fall 2016: EESC W2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/73741 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Maria Tolstoy, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 24
EESC 2200 001/73741 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Maria Tolstoy, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 24

EESC W2330 Science for Sustainable Development. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Provides an introduction to natural science approaches essential to understanding central issues of sustainable development. Topics may include: climate, ecology/agriculture/biodiversity, energy, natural disasters, population dynamics, public health and water resources. Treatment includes background, methods and applications from selected settings throughout the world. Taught by specialists in a number of fields.

Fall 2016: EESC W2330
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2330 001/13282 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
John Mutter, Ruth DeFries 3 68

EESC W3000 Tutorial Study in Earth and Environmental Sciences. 1-3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: declared major in Earth and environmental sciences and the department's permission.

Students with particular interest in one of the many components of the Earth and environmental sciences should approach a director of undergraduate studies during the registration period so that tutorial-level exposure to the subject can be arranged. Each point requires two hours each week of readings, discussion, and research work under the close supervision of a member of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, American Museum of Natural History, or Goddard Institute for Space Studies. In consultation with the supervisor, the student selects a topic for intensive study and the time and place of the tutorial discussion sessions. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 points, with a maximum of 6 points with each staff member.

EESC W3010 Field Geology. 2 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Discussion Section Required
Fee: to be determined.

This course may be repeated for up to 9 points of credit if taken in different areas. Field study in various geologic settings. Plans for the courses are announced at the beginning of each term. Class size will depend on available space. Priority is given to majors in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia College and School of General Studies. Barnard Environmental Science majors may enroll with the permission of the Barnard Environmental Science department chair. All others require the instructor's permission.

Fall 2016: EESC W3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3010 001/23188 F 10:00am - 11:30am
Room TBA
Nicholas Christie-Blick 2 2

EESC W3101 Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: any 1000-level or 2000-level EESC course; MATH V1101 Calculus I and CHEM W1403 General Chemistry I or their equivalents.

The origin, evolution, and future of our planet, based on the book How to Build a Habitable Planet by Wallace S. Broecker. This course will focus on the geochemical processes that built Earth from solar material, led to its differentiation into continents and ocean, and have maintained its surface at a comfortable temperature. Students will participate in a hands-on geochemistry project at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Fall 2016: EESC W3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3101 001/11177 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Terry Plank 3 21

EESC BC3800 Senior Research Seminar. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to senior majors (juniors with the instructor's permission). Provides credit for the senior thesis. The Senior Research Seminar can be taken Spring/Fall or Fall/Spring sequence.

Guided, independent, in-depth research culminating in the senior thesis in the spring. Includes discussion about scientific presentations and posters, data analysis, library research methods and scientific writing. Students review work in progress and share results through oral reports. Weekly seminar to review work in progress and share results through oral and written reports. Prerequisite to EESC W3901.

Fall 2016: EESC BC3800
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3800 001/05632 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Stephanie Pfirman 3 38

EESC W4001 Advanced General Geology. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required

Prerequisites: one term of college-level calculus, physics, and chemistry.

A concentrated introduction to the solid Earth, its interior and near-surface geology. Intended for students with good backgrounds in the physical sciences but none in geology. Laboratory and field trips.

Fall 2016: EESC W4001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4001 001/77198 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Christopher Scholz 4 4
EESC 4001 001/77198 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Christopher Scholz 4 4

EESC W4008 Introduction to Atmospheric Science. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: advanced calculus and general physics, or the instructor's permission.

Basic physical processes controlling atmospheric structure: thermodynamics; radiation physics and radiative transfer; principles of atmospheric dynamics; cloud processes; applications to Earth's atmospheric general circulation, climatic variations, and the atmospheres of the other planets. 

Fall 2016: EESC W4008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4008 001/11642 Th 8:40am - 11:25am
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Lorenzo Polvani 3 12/32

EESC W4050 Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required
Enrollment limited to 24. Priority given to graduate students in the natural sciences and engineering.

Prerequisites: Course Cap 20 students. Priority given to graduate students in the natural sciences and engineering. Advanced level undergraduates may be admitted with the instructor's permission. Calculus I and Physics I & II are required for undergraduates who wish to take this course.

General introduction to fundamentals of remote sensing; electromagnetic radiation, sensors, interpretation, quantitative image analysis and modeling. Example applications in the Earth and environmental sciences are explored through the analysis of remote sensing imagery in a state-or-the-art visualization laboratory.

Fall 2016: EESC W4050
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4050 001/10006 Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Christopher Small 3 16/20
EESC 4050 001/10006 F 9:00am - 10:45am
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Christopher Small 3 16/20

EESC W4085 Geodynamics. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: calculus, differential equations, introductory physics.

An introduction to how the Earth and planets work. The focus is on physical processes that control plate tectonics and the evolution of planetary interiors and surfaces; analytical descriptions of these processes; weekly physical model demonstrations.

Fall 2016: EESC W4085
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4085 001/68058 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
W Buck 3 4

EESC W4330 Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

An overview of the archives in which evidence of terrestrial paleoclimate is preserved, the approaches to developing and applying proxies of climate from these archives, approaches for constraining the time represented by the information, and interpretations that have been developed from such archives. Important archives to be included are ice cores, caves, wetlands, lakes, trees, and moraines. The time interval covered will be mostly the last few tens of thousand years, and chronometers based on radiocarbon, U-series and surface exposure dating will be presented. The course will consist of a formal lecture on one day and a recitation on the second day which will emphasize examples and problem solving.

Fall 2016: EESC W4330
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4330 001/10399 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Wallace Broecker, Jorg Schaefer 3 9/50

EESC W4400 Dynamics of Climate Variability and Climate Change. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Required course for students in the Climate and Society MA program.

Prerequisites: undergraduate course in climate or physics; undergraduate calculus.

An overview of how the climate system works on large scales of space and time, with particular attention to the science and methods underlying forecasts of climate variability and climate change. This course serves as the basic physical science course for the M.A. Program in Climate and Society.

Fall 2016: EESC W4400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4400 001/73704 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Alessandra Giannini, Lisa Goddard 3 0/52

EESC W4401 Quantitative Models of Climate-Sensitive Natural and Human Systems. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required
Required course for students in the Climate and Society MA program.

Prerequisites: undergraduate-level coursework in introductory statistics or data analysis; knowledge of calculus.

An overview of how climate-societal and intra-societal relationships can be evaluated and quantified using relevant data sets, statistical tools, and dynamical models. Concepts and methods in quantitative modeling, data organization, and statistical analysis, with applications to climate and climate impacts. Students will also do some simple model experiments and evaluate the results.

Fall 2016: EESC W4401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4401 001/19755 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Tony Barnston 4 0/52
EESC 4401 001/19755 M 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Tony Barnston 4 0/52

EESC W4403 Managing and adapting to climate change. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Course is required for the MA in Climate and Society program. Open to a maximum of 8 additional graduate students, admitted by application to and with the instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: EESC W4400; previous social science course or experience in policy and administration.

This integrating seminar on science and policy-making deals with climate and environment-development issues, and helps investigate ideas and methods for analyzing problems to reduce societal vulnerability and build resilience to climate variability and climate change. In order to integrate learning, the course is structured around modules that bridge several "divides": the social and natural sciences, temporal scales of variability and change impacting various sectors, the developing and industrialized regions, across local, national and international spatial levels, as well as socio-political, economic and ecological dimensions of development. The lectures and discussions move back and forth between theory and practice, required for the effective management of risks from a changing climate. The seminar modules will be led by outstanding researchers and professionals, with deep experience in the praxis of climate risk management and will include the economics & politics of sustainable development and climate risks; climate phenomena, societal responses and impacts; poverty, agriculture and food security; managing climate risks for health; managing competing claims over water; urban disaster risk management; climate risks & decision-making under uncertainty; media and climate. Practicum sessions, in addition, are designed to help integrate learning.

Fall 2016: EESC W4403
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4403 001/61467 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Ben Orlove 3 0

EESC W4887 Isotope Geology I. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: basic background in chemistry and physics.

Introduction to nuclear and radiochemistry, origin of the chemical elements, principles of radiometric dating, processes responsible for the chemical makeup of the solar system and the Earth.

Fall 2016: EESC W4887
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4887 001/23166 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Goldstein 3 8

EESC W4917 Earth/Human Interactions. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment limited to 20. Priority given to senior natural and social science majors, then graduate students.

Based upon the most current understanding of our planet our interactions, and how we make decisions,  a new knowledge-based "green" framework is developed for our relationship to our planet and to each other as well as its general implications for human stewardship of our planet. This new knowledge-based  framework is explored using case studies, class participation, and  term papers on  specific current scientific and policy issues like global warming that impact the sustainability and resilience of our planet.

Fall 2016: EESC W4917
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4917 001/64689 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Peter Eisenberger 3 7

EESC W4925 Principles of Physical Oceanography. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a solid background in mathematics, physics, and chemistry.

Physical properties of seawater, water masses and their distribution, sea-air interaction influence on the ocean structure, basic ocean circulation pattern, relation of diffusion and advection with respect to distribution of ocean properties, ocean tides and waves, turbulence, and introduction to ocean dynamics.

Fall 2016: EESC W4925
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4925 001/67592 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Arnold Gordon, Andreas Thurnherr 3 5

EESC W4949 Introduction to Seismology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: advanced calculus and general physics, or the instructor's permission.

Methods and underpinnings of seismology including seismogram analysis, elastic wave propogation theory, earthquake source characterization, instrumentation, inversion of seismic data to infer Earth structure.

Fall 2016: EESC W4949
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4949 001/61232 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Felix Waldhauser 3 7

EESC G6001 Earth Science Colloquium. 1 point.

Current topics in the Earth sciences.

Spring 2016: EESC G6001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 6001 001/29382 F 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Room TBA
Carol Mountain 1 50

EESC G6400 (Section 1) Communicating Earth and Environmental Science. 3 points.

Prerequisites: At least three graduate level courses in discipline or permission of the instructor.

Communicating science well in the context of the earth and environmental sciences is critical. This science communication course will transect specific earth and environmental science disciplines to provide a foundational understanding of what it means to communicate science and how to do so effectively. Within this overarching theme of science communication, students will gain a comprehensive and holistic understanding of how to communicate earth and environmental science across a variety of formats and to a diversity of audiences. Practical outcomes include but are not limited to students learning 1) how to rationalize a research topic, 2) write a hypothesis driven proposal, 3) evaluate proposals, 4) produce clear and compelling graphics, 5) adopt the latest pedagogical approaches, and 6) present science findings to a diversity of audiences.

Fall 2016: EESC G6400 (Section 1)
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 6400 001/14267 M W 9:30am - 11:00am
Room TBA
Sonya Dyhrman 3 4/10

EESC W4113 Introduction to Mineralogy. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required
Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: introductory geology or the equivalent, elementary college physics and chemistry, or the instructor's permission.

Elementary crystallography and crystal structures, optical properties of minerals, mineral associations, and economic minerals. Laboratory: identification of minerals in hand specimens and use of the petrographic microscope. 

Fall 2016: EESC W4113
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4113 001/73397 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Cornelia Class 4 1
EESC 4113 001/73397 Th 4:10pm - 7:00pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Cornelia Class 4 1

EESC G6700 (Section 1) Magmatism and Volcanism. 3 points.

Prerequisites: One year each of Chemistry, Physics, Calculus and Earth Sciences

  Overview This course explores the origin of magmas and their subsequent movements; their ascent, stalling and eruption; their transport of heat and mass through the earth; their formation of crust and creation of volcanoes. The course will explore magmatism itself - its chemical and physical underpinnings – and also develop magmatic tools used to understand other earth processes. Topics will be focused around Grand Questions. Example questions include: What do magmas tell us about the thermal structure of the earth? Why do magmas store and stall where they do? What drives the largest eruptions on Earth? Does continental extension drive melting or melting drive extension? Questions will evolve to reflect the state of the field and student interest. The course is designed to serve as an accessible breadth course for Earth Science graduate students in any discipline.

Fall 2016: EESC G6700 (Section 1)
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 6700 001/68696 W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Terry Plank 3 2/20

EESC G6823 Microbial Oceanography. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: EESC W4923 or EESC W4926 (or equivalent) or the instructors' permission. Upper level undergraduates may take the course with the instructors' permission.

In depth exploration of the identity, diversity, distributions, activity and roles of ocean microbes, the predominant organisms in the largest ecosystems on earth.  Emphasis is on the contemporary ocean in the Anthropocene, but roles of microbes both past and future will be considered.

Fall 2016: EESC G6823
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 6823 001/14005 M W 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Room TBA
Hugh Ducklow, Sonya Dyhrman 3 1

EESC G6908 Quantitative Methods of Data Analysis. 4 points.

Prerequisites: calculus. Recommended preparation: linear algebra, statistics, or the instructor's permission.

Introduction to the fundamentals of data analysis. Topics: review of relevant statistics and linear algebra; methods of interpolation (different interpolants, advantages/disadvantages); methods of least squares (linear, weighted, constrained, error analysis); linear and nonlinear correlation; spectral analysis (Fourier analysis, convolution, deconvolution, distribution theory, Fourier theorems, smoothing, error analysis, power and phase spectral estimation, different approaches); filtering time series; forecast models (AR, MA, ARMA, ARIMA), empirical orthogonal functions (EOF), and related techniques.

Fall 2016: EESC G6908
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 6908 001/64371 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
William Menke 4 9

EESC G8010 Field Geology. 1 point.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

May be repeated for up to 9 points of credit, if taken in different areas. Estimated expenses: depends on locality visited. Field study in various geologic settings. Plans for the course are announced at the beginning of each term.

Fall 2016: EESC G8010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 8010 001/93496 F 10:00am - 11:30am
Room TBA
Nicholas Christie-Blick 1 3/9

EESC G9001 Research In Earth and Environmental Sciences. 1-6 points.

Prerequisites: the permission of the instructor in charge of the student's field of research.

Individual research in the student's field of specialization. The research may lead to a doctoral dissertation or to contributions for publications.

EESC G9600 Seminar in Paleoceanography. 2 points.

Noegene Puzzles - The subject will be the MIS5e interglacial (Eemian), with specific emphasis on North Atlantic records of ocean circulation, climatology, sea level, super-storms, and tsunamis. The seminar will take flight with a controversial paper published last summer by Dr. James Hansen (attached below) which proposes that changes occurring now in Antarctica could rapidly lead to changes in sea ice, thermohaline circulation, and ultimately, rapid sea level rise and superstorms in the North Atlantic.  The paper is a combo of both modeling results and an investigation of the MIS5e geologic record.  We envision spending a few classes on the paper (it is very long) as well as the community discussion surrounding it, and then delve into the specific controversies surrounding the interpretation of the MIS5e records (super-storms?  tsunamis?  normal climatology?  etc.), focusing on key papers cited by the Hansen et al.   We will also read papers which challenge those interpretations of the geologic record.

Spring 2016: EESC G9600
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 9600 001/76285 M 10:00am - 11:30am
Room TBA
Maureen Raymo, William D'Andrea 2 7

EESC G9945 Seismology Seminar. 1-3 points.

May be repeated for up to 10 points of credit.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Critical study of current problems in the field of seismology, including such topics as near and deep earthquakes, seismicity, instrument design, and monitoring underground nuclear explosions.

Spring 2016: EESC G9945
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 9945 001/64729 W 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Spahr Webb, Meredith Nettles, James Gaherty 1-3 11
Fall 2016: EESC G9945
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 9945 001/63213 W 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Goran Ekstrom, Meredith Nettles 1-3 5

Of Related Interest

Environmental Science (Barnard)
EESC BC1001Environmental Science I
EESC BC1011Environmental Science Science I Lab
EESC BC3014Field Methods in Environmental Science
EESC BC3016Environmental Measurements
EESC BC3017Environmental Data Analysis
EESC BC3025Hydrology
EESC BC3033Waste Management
EESC BC3050Big Data with Python: Python for Environmental Analysis and Visualisation
EESC BC3200Ecotoxicology
EESC BC3300Workshop in Sustainable Development
Physics
PHYS W3018Weapons of Mass Destruction

Spring 2017

EESC W1003 Climate and Society: Case Studies. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Explores a series of environmental hazards (ozone depeletion, El Nino, global warming) as examples of risk management. For each module, students will learn the scientific principles underlying each hazard and then will examine how social and economic policies were developed amd implemented to mitigate the perceived risk.

EESC W1010 Geological Excursion To Death Valley, CA. 2 points.

Discussion Section Required
Enrollment limited to 20.

The trip is restricted to first-years and sophomores from Columbia College/General Studies, Barnard College, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Early application is advised, and no later than November 7. A spring-break excursion focused on the geology of Death Valley and adjacent areas of the eastern California desert. Discussion sessions ahead of the trip provide necessary background. Details at: http://eesc.columbia.edu/courses/v1010/.

Spring 2016: EESC W1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1010 001/66896 F 7:00pm - 9:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Nicholas Christie-Blick 2 20

EESC W1001 Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures and Lab. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: basic high school science and math.

Lab is a hands-on introduction to geochronology, paleontology, and historical geology with field trips. (See W1401 for lectures only.) Dinosaurs: a spectacular example of a common, highly successful form of life, dominant for 135 million years. Where did they come from? Why were they so successful? Why did they die out? A basic introduction to interface between geology and biology.

EESC W1401 Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: basic high school science and math.

Dinosaurs: a spectacular example of a common, highly successful form of life, dominant for 135 million years. Where did they come from? Why were they so successful? Why did they die out? A basic introduction to the interface between geology and biology.

EESC W2100 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be reinstated.

Prerequisites: high school algebra. Recommended preparation: high school chemistry and physics; and one semester of college science.

  Origin and development of the atmosphere and oceans, formation of winds, storms and ocean currents, reasons for changes through geologic time. Recent influence of human activity: the ozone hole, global warming, water pollution. Laboratory exploration of topics through demonstrations, experimentation, computer data analysis, and modeling. Students majoring in Earth and Environmental Sciences should plan to take EESC W2100 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with Senior Seminar.

Spring 2016: EESC W2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/18944 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 39
EESC 2100 001/18944 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 39
Fall 2016: EESC W2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/64783 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
517 Hamilton Hall
Jerry McManus, Adam Sobel 4.5 53
EESC 2100 001/64783 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Jerry McManus, Adam Sobel 4.5 53

EESC W3010 Field Geology. 2 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Discussion Section Required
Fee: to be determined.

This course may be repeated for up to 9 points of credit if taken in different areas. Field study in various geologic settings. Plans for the courses are announced at the beginning of each term. Class size will depend on available space. Priority is given to majors in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia College and School of General Studies. Barnard Environmental Science majors may enroll with the permission of the Barnard Environmental Science department chair. All others require the instructor's permission.

Fall 2016: EESC W3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3010 001/23188 F 10:00am - 11:30am
Room TBA
Nicholas Christie-Blick 2 2

EESC W2200 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be necessary.

Prerequisites: high school algebra and chemistry. Recommended preparation: high school physics.

Exploration of how the solid Earth works, today and in the past, focusing on Earth in the Solar system, continents and oceans, the Earth's history, mountain systems on land and sea, minerals and rocks, weathering and erosion, hydrological cycle and rivers, geochronology, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, fossil fuels. Laboratory exploration of topics through examination of rock samples, experimentation, computer data analysis, field exercises, and modeling. Columbia and Barnard majors should plan to take W2200 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with the Senior Seminar.

Spring 2016: EESC W2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/11774 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
William Menke, Einat Lev 4.5 21
EESC 2200 001/11774 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
William Menke, Einat Lev 4.5 21
Fall 2016: EESC W2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/73741 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Maria Tolstoy, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 24
EESC 2200 001/73741 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Maria Tolstoy, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 24

EESC W2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be reinstated.

Prerequisites: high school algebra. Recommended preparation: high school chemistry and physics.

Role of life in biogeochemical cycles, relationship of biodiversity and evolution to the physical Earth, vulnerability of ecosystems to environmental change; causes and effects of extinctions through geologic time (dinosaurs and mammoths) and today. Exploration of topics through laboratories, demonstrations, computer data analysis and modeling. REQUIRED LAB: EESC W2310. Students should see the Directory of Classes for lab sessions being offered and select one.

Spring 2016: EESC W2300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2300 001/12632 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Paul Olsen, Natalie Boelman 4.5 39

EESC W2310 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System Required Lab: Sections 001, 002, 003, 004,005. 0 points.

Lab Required

This three hour lab is required of all students who enroll in EESC W2300. There are currently five lab sections.

Spring 2016: EESC W2310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2310 001/63930 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Olsen, Natalie Boelman 0 20/24
EESC 2310 002/13255 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Olsen, Natalie Boelman 0 11/24
EESC 2310 003/16173 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Olsen, Natalie Boelman 0 7/24
EESC 2310 004/20221 Th 4:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Olsen, Natalie Boelman 0 18/24
EESC 2310 005/72107 Th 4:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Olsen, Natalie Boelman 0 4/24

EESC W3000 Tutorial Study in Earth and Environmental Sciences. 1-3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: declared major in Earth and environmental sciences and the department's permission.

Students with particular interest in one of the many components of the Earth and environmental sciences should approach a director of undergraduate studies during the registration period so that tutorial-level exposure to the subject can be arranged. Each point requires two hours each week of readings, discussion, and research work under the close supervision of a member of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, American Museum of Natural History, or Goddard Institute for Space Studies. In consultation with the supervisor, the student selects a topic for intensive study and the time and place of the tutorial discussion sessions. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 points, with a maximum of 6 points with each staff member.

EESC W3201 Solid Earth Dynamics. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: any 1000-level or 2000-level EESC course; MATH V1101 Calculus I and PHYS W1201 General Physics I or their equivalents. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS W1201 is acceptable with the instructor's permission.

Properties and processes affecting the evolution and behavior of the solid Earth. This course will focus on the geophysical processes that build mountains and ocean basins, drive plate tectonics, and otherwise lead to a dynamic planet. Topics include heat flow and mantle circulation, earthquakes and seismic waves, gravity, Earth's magnetic field, and flow of glaciers and ice sheets.

Spring 2016: EESC W3201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3201 001/27595 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Meredith Nettles 3 20

EESC W3901 Environmental Science Senior Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: EESC BC3800 or EESC BC3801 and a good grounding in basic sciences.

Guided, independent, in-depth research culminating in the senior thesis in the spring. Includes discussion about scientific presentations and posters, data analysis, library research methods and scientific writing. Students review work in progress and share results through oral reports. Weekly seminar to review work in progress and share results through oral and written reports.

Spring 2016: EESC W3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3901 001/00997 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Martin Stute 3 22

EESC W4210 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. 3 points.

Required course for M.A./Ph.D. candidates focusing in physical oceanography and atmospheric sciences. Elective for undergraduate majors in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

Prerequisites: APMA E3101, APMA E3201 or equivalents and APPH E4200 or equivalent or the instructor's permission.

Fundamental concepts in the dynamics of rotating stratified flows. Geostrophic and hydrostatic balances, potential vorticity, f and beta plane approximations, gravity and Rossby waves, geostrophic adjustment and quasigeostrophy, baroclinic and barotropic instabilities.

Spring 2016: EESC W4210
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4210 001/70007 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Ryan Abernathey 3 5

EESC W4230 Crustal Deformation. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: introductory geology and one year of calculus. Recommended preparation: higher levels of mathematics.

Introduction to the deformation processes in the Earth's crust. Fundamental theories of stress and strain; rock behavior in both brittle and ductile fields; earthquake processes; ductile deformation; large-scale crustal contractional and extensional events.

Spring 2016: EESC W4230
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4230 001/66585 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Christopher Scholz, Benjamin Holtzman 3 6

EESC W4404 Regional Climate and Climate Impacts. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Course is required for the MA in Climate and Society program. Open to a maximum of 8 additional graduate students, admitted by application to and with the instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: EESC W4400 and EESC W4401.

The dynamics of environment and society interact with climate and can be modified through use of modern climate information. To arrive at the best use of climate information, there is a need to see climate in a balanced way, among the myriad of factors at play. Equally, there is a need to appreciate the range of climate information available and to grasp its underlying basis and the reasons for varying levels of certainty. Many decisions in society are at more local scales, and regional climate information considered at appropriate scales and in appropriate forms (e.g., transformed into vegetation stress) is key. Students will build a sufficient understanding of the science behind the information, and analyze examples of how the information can and is being used. This course will prepare the ground for a holistic understanding needed for wise use of climate information.

Spring 2016: EESC W4404
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4404 001/22599 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Andrew Robertson, Pietro Ceccato 3 47

EESC W4630 Air-sea interaction. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years. Enrollment limited to 20. Priority based on seniority (graduate students, graduating seniors, etc.).

Prerequisites: solid background in mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Some background in fluid mechanics (as in EESC W4925/APPH E4200) or the instructor's permission.

An overview of oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers including fluxes of momentum, heat, mass, (eg., moisture salt) and gases between the ocean and atmosphere; vertical distribution of energy sources and sinks at the interface including the importance of surface currents; forced upper ocean dynamics, the role of surface waves on the air-sea exchange processes and ocean mixed layer processes.

EESC W4888 Isoptope Geology II. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: introductory chemistry and earth science coursework.

This class will be an introduction to the field of stable isotope geochemistry and its application to environmental processes and problems. The utility of stable isotopes as tacers of environmental processes will be examined with respect to the disciplines of paleoclimatology, paleoceanography, hydrology and hydrogeology. We will focus on the light elements and stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen in water, carbonates and organic compounds and why they fractionate in the environment.  Radiocarbon as a tracer and dating tool will alos be presented. The theoretical background for isotope fractionation will be discussed in class. The mechanics of how mass spectrometers analyze different isotope ratios will be explored during experiments in the laboratory at Lamont-Doherty. Additional key parts of the class will be a review of paper and student-lead reviews of published papers on relevant topics and a reveiw paper.

EESC W4937 Cenozoic Paleoceanography. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years. Enrollment limited to 20 students EESC (DEES) graduate students have priority..

Prerequisites: college-level geology helpful but not required.

Introduces the physical, chemical and biological processes that govern how and where ocean sediments accumulate. Major topics addressed are: modes of biogenic, terrigenous and authigenic sedimentation, depositional environments, pore fluids and sediment geochemistry, diagenesis, as well as biostratigraphy and sediment stratigraphic principles and methods. Second half of the semester focuses on major events in Cenozoic paleoceanogrpahy and paleoclimatology including orbital control of climate, long-term carbon cycle, extreme climate regimes, causes of ice ages in Earth's history, human evolution, El Niño evolution, and long-term sea level history.

EESC W4924 Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: Physics W1201, Chemistry W1403, Calculus III, or equivalent or the instructor's permission. EESC W2100 preferred.

Physical and chemical processes determining atmospheric composition and the implications for climate and regional air pollution. Atmospheric evolution and human influence; basics of greenhouse effect, photolysis, reaction kinetics; atmospheric transport of trace species; stratospheric ozone chemistry; tropospheric hydrocarbon chemistry; oxidizing power, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, carbon, mercury cycles; chemistry-climate-biosphere interactions; aerosols, smog, acid rain.

Spring 2016: EESC W4924
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4924 001/14510 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Arlene Fiore 3 16

EESC W4926 Principles of Chemical Oceanography. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission for students without one year of chemistry. Course open to undergraduates with one year of chemistry. Recommended preparation: a solid background in mathematics, physics, and chemistry.

Factors controlling the concentration and distribution of dissolved chemical species within the sea. Application of tracer and natural radioisotope methods to large-scale mixing of the ocean, the geological record preserved in marine sediments, the role of ocean processes in the global carbon cycle, and biogeochemical processes influencing the distribution and fate of elements in the ocean.

EESC W4930 Earth's Oceans and Atmosphere. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a good background in the physical sciences.

Physical properties of water and air. Overview of the stratification and circulation of Earth's ocean and atmosphere and their governing processes; ocean-atmosphere interaction; resultant climate system; natural and anthropogenic forced climate change.

Spring 2016: EESC W4930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4930 001/69898 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Arnold Gordon 3 8

EESC G6001 Earth Science Colloquium. 1 point.

Current topics in the Earth sciences.

Spring 2016: EESC G6001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 6001 001/29382 F 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Room TBA
Carol Mountain 1 50

EESC G6003 Masters Research. 4 points.

Individual research in the student's field of specialization at the masters level.  DEES PhD students register for this in the semester in which thay take their Masters Exam.

EESC G6920 Dynamics of Climate. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: EESC W4008, and advanced calculus, or the instructor's permission.

The current climate and its variations over Earth history are interpreted as consequences of fundamental physical processes, including radiative transfer, the atmosphere and ocean circulation, and the carbon cycle. Perturbations to climate, resulting from changing atmospheric composition or insolation, are examined using a combination of simple interpretative models and full Earth System Models.

EESC G6922 Atmospheric Radiation. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: Advanced calculus and general physics or the instructor's permission.

This course provides a basic but solid quantitative introduction to scattering of light. Properties such as spectra, angular distribution, and polarization of light in the atmosphere are of interest to remote sensing communities and to climate modeling communities. Hence, these properties of light play a central role in this course: What parameters can we use to describe them? How do they change when light is scattered, absorbed or emitted by clouds, aerosols, and gasses? How can we relate these changes to the physical parameters of clouds, aerosols, and gasses? How do such changes affect the light measured by satellites? Examples of past, current and future satellite measurements are briefly discussed.

EESC G6928 Tropical Meteorology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: EESC W4008,EESC W4210/APPH4210 and EESC G6927, or some prior exposure to linear equatorial wave theory.

An introduction to the physics governing the large-scale behavior of the tropical atmosphere. Topics covered include the Hadley and Walker circulations, monsoons, atmospheric equatorial waves, the Madden-Julian oscillation, tropical cyclones, and El Nino. Principles of atmospheric dynamics and thermodynamics will be introduced as needed.

EESC G6930 Ocean Dynamics. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: calculus, differential equations, vector algebra, fluid mechanics.

Hydrodynamical equations, vorticity dynamics, ocean circulation theories.

EESC G6949 Advanced Seismology. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: a solid background in geophysics, and a knowledge of complex variables.

Seismic waves in layered media, matrix methods, free vibrations of the Earth, dislocation theory, source mechanics.

EESC G8010 Field Geology. 1 point.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

May be repeated for up to 9 points of credit, if taken in different areas. Estimated expenses: depends on locality visited. Field study in various geologic settings. Plans for the course are announced at the beginning of each term.

Fall 2016: EESC G8010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 8010 001/93496 F 10:00am - 11:30am
Room TBA
Nicholas Christie-Blick 1 3/9

EESC G8884 Advanced Geochemistry. 3 points.

Usually given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Advanced topics in radiogenic isotope and trace-element geochemistry. Origin and composition of the Earth, evolution of the continents and mantle, and applications to igneous and surficial processes.

Spring 2016: EESC G8884
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 8884 001/60983 W 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Albrecht Hofmann 3 2

EESC G9001 Research In Earth and Environmental Sciences. 1-6 points.

Prerequisites: the permission of the instructor in charge of the student's field of research.

Individual research in the student's field of specialization. The research may lead to a doctoral dissertation or to contributions for publications.

EESC G9802 Seminar In Geochemistry. 1-3 points.

May be repeated for up to 6 points of credit.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Discussion of current developments in rock and water geochemistry.

Spring 2016: EESC G9802
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 9802 001/75857 F 10:00am - 11:30am
Room TBA
Albrecht Hofmann 1-3 6

EESC G9945 Seismology Seminar. 1-3 points.

May be repeated for up to 10 points of credit.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Critical study of current problems in the field of seismology, including such topics as near and deep earthquakes, seismicity, instrument design, and monitoring underground nuclear explosions.

Spring 2016: EESC G9945
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 9945 001/64729 W 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Spahr Webb, Meredith Nettles, James Gaherty 1-3 11
Fall 2016: EESC G9945
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 9945 001/63213 W 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Goran Ekstrom, Meredith Nettles 1-3 5

EESC G9947 Marine Geophysics Seminar. 1-3 points.

May be repeated for up to 6 points of credit.

Prerequisites: Undergraduates must obtain the instructor's permission.

The focus of each seminar is on a specific research direction that has proven critical to advancing our understanding of global geodynamic phenomena. Students and members of the teaching and reserach faculty engage in analysis of such topics as mid-oceran ridge processes, subduction zone processes, formation of marine sediments and marine geophysical imaging techniques. Much of this analysis is based on critique of the current literature, but students are also required to present their ongoing research.

Generally Alternate Year Courses

EESC W1001Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures and Lab
EESC W1201Environmental Risks and Disasters
EESC W1401Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures
EESC W3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC W4009Chemical Geology
EESC W4020Humans and the Carbon Cycle
EESC W4085Geodynamics
EESC W4090Introduction to Geochronology and Thermochronology
EESC W4113Introduction to Mineralogy
EESC W4223Sedimentary Geology
EESC W4300The Earth's Deep Interior
EESC W4330Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate
EESC W4480Paleobiology and Earth System History
EESC W4550Plant Ecophysiology
EESC W4630Air-sea interaction
EESC W4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EESC W4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC W4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC W4920Paleoceanography
EESC W4923Biological Oceanography
EESC W4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
EESC W4929Mixing and Dispersion in the Ocean
EESC W4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
EESC W4947Plate Tectonics
EESC W4949Introduction to Seismology