Slavic Languages

Departmental Office: 708 Hamilton; 212-854-3941
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/slavic/

Director of Undergraduate Studies:
Prof. Irina Reyfman, 712 Hamilton Hall; 212-854-3941; ir2@columbia.edu

Russian Language Program Director:
Prof. Alla Smyslova, 708 Hamilton; 212-854-8155; as2157@columbia.edu

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is devoted to the study of the cultures, literatures, and languages of Russia and other Slavic peoples and lands. We approach our study and teaching of these cultures with an eye to their specificity and attention to their interaction with other cultures, in history and in the contemporary global context. We focus not only on the rich literary tradition, but also on the film, theater, politics, art, music, media, religious thought, critical theory, and intellectual history of Russians and other Slavs. Our approach is interdisciplinary.

Students who take our courses have different interests. Many of our courses are taught in English with readings in English and have no prerequisites. As a consequence, our majors and concentrators are joined by students from other literature departments, by students of history and political science who have a particular interest in the Slavic region, and by others who are drawn to the subject matter for a variety of intellectual and practical reasons.

We provide instruction in Russian at all levels (beginning through very advanced), with a special course for heritage speakers. To improve the proficiency of Russian learners and speakers, we offer a number of literature and culture courses in which texts are read in the original and discussion is conducted in Russian. We offer three levels of other Slavic languages: Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, and Ukrainian (with additional courses in culture in English). All language courses in the Slavic Department develop the four basic language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural understanding.

Our department prides itself on the intellectual vitality of its program and on the sense of community among students and faculty. As they explore Russian and Slavic languages, literatures, and cultures, students develop not only their specific knowledge and cultural understanding, but also the capacity for critical thought, skills in analyzing literary and other texts, and the ability to express their ideas orally and in writing. Our graduates have used their knowledge and skills in different ways: graduate school, Fulbright and other fellowships, journalism, publishing, law school, NGO work, public health, government work, and politics. Our faculty is proud of its students and graduates.

Majors and Concentrations

Guided by the director of undergraduate studies and other faculty members, students majoring in Slavic create a program that suits their intellectual interests and academic goals. They choose from three tracks: Russian Language and Culture (for those with a strong interest in mastering the language), Russian Literature and Culture (for those who want to focus on literary and cultural studies), and Slavic Studies (a flexible regional studies major for those interested in one or more Slavic cultures). In each major, students may count related courses in other departments among their electives.

In addition to its majors, the department offers five concentrations. Three are analogous to the major tracks (Russian Language and Culture, Russian Literature and Culture, and Slavic Studies). There is also a concentration in Russian Literature that does not require language study and another concentration in Slavic Cultures that allows students to focus on a Slavic language and culture other than Russian.

Motivated seniors are encouraged but not required to write a senior thesis. Those who write a thesis enroll in the Senior Seminar in the fall term and work individually with a thesis adviser. Students have written on a wide range of topics in literature, culture, media, and politics.

Slavic Culture at Columbia Outside of the Classroom

All interested students are welcome to take part in departmental activities, such as conversation hours, Slavic student organizations, the department's various film series (Russian, East Central European, Central Asian, and Ukrainian), and the country's first undergraduate journal of Eastern European and Eurasian Culture, The Birch. The Slavic Department has close ties to the Harriman Institute and the East Central European Center, which sponsor lectures, symposia, performances, and conferences.

Study and Research Abroad

The department encourages its students to enrich their cultural knowledge and develop their language skills by spending a semester or summer studying in Russia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, or the countries of the former Yugoslavia. The department helps students find the program that suits their needs and interests. Undergraduates may apply to the Harriman Institute for modest scholarships for research during winter/spring breaks or the summer.

Professors

  • Valentina Izmirlieva (Chair)
    Liza Knapp
  • Cathy Popkin
  • Irina Reyfman
  • Alan Timberlake 
     

Assistant Professors   

Adam Leeds
Jessica Merrill

Visiting Assistant Professors

  • Bradley Gorski (Barnard)

Senior Lecturers

  • Alla Smyslova

Lecturers

  • Aleksandar Boskovic
  • Christopher Caes
  • Christopher Harwood
  • Nataliya Kun
    Yuri Shevchuk

On Leave

  • Liza Knapp (Fall 2017)
  • Prof. Leeds (Fall 2017, Spring 2018)
     
  •  

Guidelines for all Slavic Majors and Concentrators

Senior Thesis

A senior thesis is not required for any Slavic major. Students who wish to undertake a thesis project should confer with the director of undergraduate studies during the registration period in April of their junior year and register to take RUSS UN3595 Senior Seminar in the fall term of their senior year. Students can opt to expand the thesis into a two-semester project register for RUSS UN3998 Supervised Individual Research, with their thesis adviser, in the spring term of their senior year. Senior Seminar may satisfy one elective requirement; the optional second semester of thesis work adds one course to the 15 required for the major.

Grading

Courses in which a grade of D has been received do not count toward major or concentration requirements.


Major in Russian Language and Culture

This major is intended for students who aim to attain maximal proficiency in the Russian language. Intensive language training is complemented by an array of elective courses in Russian culture that allow students to achieve critical understanding of contemporary Russian society and of Russian-speaking communities around the world. Since this major emphasizes language acquisition, it is not appropriate for native Russian speakers.

The program of study consists of 15 courses, distributed as follows:

Eight semesters of coursework in Russian language (from first- through fourth-year Russian) or the equivalent
Select two of the following surveys; at least one of these should be a Russian literature survey (RUSS UN3220 or RUSS UN3221):
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]
RUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of Old Rus'
SLCL UN3001Slavic Cultures
RUSS GU4006Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, and Literature
CLRS GU4022Russia and Asia: Orientalism, Eurasianism, Internationalism
RUSS GU4107Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium
Five additional courses in Russian culture, history, literature, art, film, music, or in linguistics, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. At least one of the selected courses should be taught in Russian

Major in Russian Literature and Culture

The goal of this major is to make students conversant with a variety of Russian literary, historical and theoretical texts in the original, and to facilitate a critical understanding of Russian literature, culture, and society. It is addressed to students who would like to complement serious literary studies with intensive language training, and is especially suitable for those who intend to pursue an academic career in the Slavic field.

The program of study consists of 15 courses, distributed as follows:

Six semesters of coursework in Russian language (from first- through third-year Russian) or the equivalent.
Select three of the following surveys; two of which must be in Russian literature (RUSS UN3220 and RUSS UN3221)
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]
RUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of Old Rus'
SLCL UN3001Slavic Cultures
RUSS GU4006Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, and Literature
CLRS GU4022Russia and Asia: Orientalism, Eurasianism, Internationalism
RUSS GU4107Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium
Six additional courses in Russian literature, culture, history, film, art, music, or in advanced Russian language, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. At least one course should be taught in Russian

Students considering graduate study in Russian literature are strongly advised to complete four years of language training.


Major in Slavic Studies

This flexible major provides opportunities for interdisciplinary studies within the Slavic field. Students are encouraged to choose one target language (Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, Russian, or Ukrainian), though there are possibilities for studying a second Slavic language as well. Generally, the major has one disciplinary focus in history, political science, economics, religion, anthropology, sociology, art, film, or music. In addition, this program allows students to focus on a particular Slavic (non-Russian) literature and culture or to do comparative studies of several Slavic literatures, including Russian. Students should plan their program with the director of undergraduate studies as early as possible, since course availability varies from year to year.

The program of study consists of 15 courses, distributed as follows:

Six semesters of coursework in one Slavic language (from first- through third-year Russian, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, or Ukrainian) or the equivalent.
Two relevant courses in Russian, East/Central European or Eurasian history.
Two relevant literature or culture courses in Slavic, preferably related to the target language.
Five additional courses with Slavic content in history, political science, economics, literature, religion, anthropology, sociology, art, film, or music, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. Two of these electives may be language courses for students who opt to include a second Slavic language in their program.

Altogether students should complete four courses in a single discipline, including, if appropriate, the required history or literature/culture courses.


Concentration in Russian Language and Culture

This program is intended for students who aim to attain proficiency in the Russian language. Intensive language training is complemented by an array of elective courses in Russian culture that allow students to achieve critical understanding of contemporary Russian society and of Russian-speaking communities around the world. Since this concentration emphasizes language acquisition, it is not appropriate for native Russian speakers.

The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:

Six semesters of coursework in Russian language (from first- through third-year Russian) or the equivalent.
Select one of the following surveys:
SLCL UN3001Slavic Cultures
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]
RUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of Old Rus'
CLRS GU4022Russia and Asia: Orientalism, Eurasianism, Internationalism
Three additional courses in Russian culture, history, literature, art, film, music, or in linguistics, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies; at least one of the selected courses should be taught in Russian.
RUSS GU4107Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium

Concentration in Slavic (Non-Russian) Language and Culture

This program is intended for students who aim to attain proficiency in a Slavic language other than Russian. Intensive language training is complemented by an array of elective courses in Slavic cultures that allow students to achieve critical understanding of the communities that are shaped by the Slavic language of their choice. Since this concentration emphasizes language acquisition, it is not appropriate for native speakers of the target language.

The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:

Six semesters of coursework in one Slavic language (from first- through third-year Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, or Ukrainian) or the equivalent.
Four additional courses in Slavic literature, culture or history, or in linguistics, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies; at least two should be directly related to the target language of study.

Concentration in Russian Literature and Culture

The goal of this concentration is to make students conversant with a variety of Russian literary texts and cultural artifacts that facilitate a critical understanding of Russian culture. It is addressed to students who would like to combine language training with study of the Russian literary tradition.

The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:

Four semesters of coursework in Russian language (first- and second-year Russian) or the equivalent.
Select two of the following surveys; one of which must be a literature survey (RUSS UN3220 or RUSS UN3221)
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]
RUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of Old Rus'
RUSS GU4006Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, and Literature
SLCL UN3001Slavic Cultures
CLRS GU4022Russia and Asia: Orientalism, Eurasianism, Internationalism
RUSS GU4107Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium
Four additional courses in Russian literature, culture, and history, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.

Concentration in Slavic Studies

This flexible concentration provides opportunities for interdisciplinary studies within the Slavic field. Students are encouraged to choose one target language (Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, Russian, or Ukrainian), and one disciplinary focus in history, political science, economics, religion, anthropology, sociology, art, film, or music. In addition, this program allows students to focus on a particular Slavic (non-Russian) literature and culture, or to do comparative studies of several Slavic literatures, including Russian.

The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:

Four semesters of coursework in one Slavic language (first- and second-year Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, Russian, or Ukrainian) or the equivalent.
One relevant courses in Russian, East/Central European or Eurasian history.
One relevant literature or culture course in Slavic, preferably related to the target language.
Four additional courses with Slavic content in history, political science, economics, literature, religion, anthropology, sociology, art, film, or music, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies

Altogether students should complete three courses in a single discipline, including, if appropriate, the required history or literature/culture courses.


Concentration in Russian Literature

This concentration is addressed to serious literature students who would like to pursue Russian literature but have no training in Russian. It allows students to explore the Russian literary tradition, while perfecting their critical skills and their techniques of close reading in a variety of challenging courses in translation.

The program of study consists of 8 courses, with no language requirements, distributed as follows:

Select two of the following Russian literature surveys (in translation):
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]
Six additional courses, focused primarily on Russian literature, culture, and history, though courses in other Slavic literatures are also acceptable if approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

Relevant literature courses from other departments may count toward the concentration only if approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Language and Literature

BCRS UN1101 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: BCRS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1101 001/61317 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Milica Ilicic 4 2/12

BCRS UN1102 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2017: BCRS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1102 001/28675 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
352c International Affairs Bldg
Aleksandar Boskovic 4 8/12

BCRS UN2101 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students.

Fall 2017: BCRS UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 2101 001/22615 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 5/12

BCRS UN2102 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students. This course number has been changed to BCRS 2102

Spring 2017: BCRS UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 2102 001/86347 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
352b International Affairs Bldg
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 5/12

BCRS W4002 (Dis)integration in Frames: Race, Ethnicity and gender Issues in Yugoslav and Post Yugoslav Cinemas. 3 points.

This course investigates the complex relationship between aesthetics and ideology in Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav cinema. Specifically, it examines the variety of ways in which race, ethnicity, gender inequality, and national identity are approached, constructed, promoted, or contested and critically dissected in film texts from the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) and its successor states (Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia, FYR Macedonia). The course has four thematic units and is organized chronologically.

BCRS GU4331 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Fall 2017: BCRS GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4331 001/75054 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 3/12

BCRS GU4332 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Spring 2017: BCRS GU4332
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4332 001/11029 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
718 Hamilton Hall
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 1/12

Comparative Literature - Czech

CLCZ W4020 Czech Culture Before Czechoslovakia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: sophomore standing or the instructor's permission.

An interpretive cultural history of the Czechs from earliest times to the founding of the first Czechoslovak republic in 1918. Emphasis on the origins, decline, and resurgence of Czech national identity as reflected in the visual arts, architecture, music, historiography, and especially the literature of the Czechs.

CLCZ GU4030 Postwar Czech Literature [in English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of postwar Czech fiction and drama. Knowledge of Czech not necessary. Parallel reading lists available in translation and in the original.

Fall 2017: CLCZ GU4030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCZ 4030 001/15375 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 3/18

CLCZ W4035 The Writers of Prague. 3 points.

A survey of the Czech, German, and German-Jewish literary cultures of Prague from 1910 to 1920. Special attention to Hašek, ÄŒapek, Kafka, Werfel, and Rilke. Parallel reading lists available in English and in the original.

CLCZ GU4038 Prague Spring of '68 in Film and Literature [In English]. 3 points.

The course explores the unique period in Czech film and literature during the 1960s that emerged as a reaction to the imposed socialist realism. The new generation of writers (Kundera, Skvorecky, Havel, Hrabal) in turn had an influence on young emerging film makers, all of whom were part of the Czech new wave.

Spring 2017: CLCZ GU4038
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCZ 4038 001/12870 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 7/25

Comparative Literature - Polish

CLPL V3235 Imagining the Self. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the literary construction of the self by comparing autobiographical and fictional texts from antiquity to the present. Focus on how the narrating self is masked, illusory, ventriloquized, or otherwise problematic. Works include Homer, Vergil, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Dostoevsky, Nabokov, and theoretical texts.

CLPL W4020 North America in the Mirror of Polish Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: A knowledge of Polish is not required and all lectures are available in English.
Considers the reflections of American culture in Polish literature. All aspects of American life viewed through the lenses of the Polish writers, bringing into focus their perceptions of a different political, hitorical, and aesthetic experience

CLPL W4040 Mickiewicz. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The Polish literary scene that in this particular period stretched from Moscow, Petersburg, and Odessa, to Vilna, Paris, Rome. The concept of exile, so central to Polish literature of the 19th-century and world literature of the 20th will be introduced and discussed. The course will offer the opportunity to see the new Romantic trend initially evolving from classicism, which it vigorously opposed and conquered. We will examine how the particular literary form - sonnet, ballad, epic poem and the romantic drama developed on the turf of the Polish language. Also we will see how such significant themes as madness, Romantic suicide, Romantic irony, and elements of Islam and Judaism manifested themselves in the masterpieces of Polish poetry. The perception of Polish Romanticism in other, especially Slavic, literatures will be discussed and a comparative approach encouraged.Most of the texts to be discussed were translated into the major European languages. Mickiewicz was enthusiastically translated into Russian by the major Russian poets of all times; students of Russian may read his works in its entirety in that language. The class will engage in a thorough analysis of the indicated texts; the students' contribution to the course based on general knowledge of the period, of genres, and/or other related phenomena is expected.

CLPL G4042 Bestsellers of Polish Literature. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A study of the 20th-century Polish novel during its most invigorated, innovative inter-war period. A close study of the major works of Kuncewiczowa, Choromanski, Wittlin, Unilowski, Kurek, Iwaszkiewicz, Gombrowicz, and Schulz. The development of the Polish novel will be examined against the background of new trends in European literature, with emphasis on the usage of various narrative devices. Reading knowledge of Polish desirable but not required. Parallel reading lists are available in the original and in translation.

CLPL W4120 The Polish Short Story in a Comparitive Context. 3 points.

CLPL W4300 Unbound and Post Dependent: The Polish Novel After 1989. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar is designed to offer an overview of Post-1989 Polish prose. The literary output of what is now called post-dependent literature demonstrates how political transformations influenced social and intellectual movements and transformed the narrative genre itself. The aesthetic and formal developments in Polish prose will be explored as a manifestation of a complex phenomenon bringing the reassessment of national myths, and cultural aspirations. Works by Dorota Maslowska, Andrzej Stasiuk, Pawel Huelle, Olga Tokarczuk, Magdalena Tulli and others will be read and discussed. Knowledge of Polish not required.

Comparative Literature - Slavic

CLSL GU4003 Central European Drama in the Twentieth Century. 3 points.

Focus will be on the often deceptive modernity of modern Central and East European theater and its reflection of the forces that shaped modern European society. It will be argued that the abstract, experimental drama of the twentieth-century avant-garde tradition seems less vital at the century's end than the mixed forms of Central and East European dramatists.

Spring 2017: CLSL GU4003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLSL 4003 001/22296 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Ivan Sanders 3 4/8

CLSL W4004 Introduction to Twentieth-Century Central European Fiction. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to works of literature that offer a unique perspective on the tempestuous twentieth century, if only because these works for the most part were written in "minor" languages (Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Serbian), in countries long considered part of the European backwaters, whose people were not makers but victims of history. Yet the authors of many of these works are today ranked among the masters of modern literature. Often hailing from highly stratisfied , conservative societies, many Eastern and Central European writers became daring literary innovators and experimenters. To the present day, writers from this "other" Europe try to escape history, official cultures, politics, and end up redefining them for their readers. We will be dealing with a disparate body of literature, varied both in form and content. But we will try to pinpoint subtle similarities, in tone and sensibility, and focus, too, on the more apparent preoccupation with certain themes that may be called characteristically Central European.

CLSL G4008 Slavic Avant-Garde Surfaces. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This lecture course will provide a punctual survey of the major trends and figures in the interwar visual culture and avant-garde poetry of the Soviet Russia and East Central Europe (Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Yugoslavia), including the opulent field of their intersection. Topics include various interfaces of visual culture and graphic arts, such as public spaces, walls, propaganda trains, windows, postcards, posters, books, and screens. The course will address the innovative use of typography and photography, typophoto and photomontage, as well as the short written and hybrid genres such as manifesto, cinepoetry, photo essay, and photo frescoes. We will discuss poets and artists such as Mayakovsky, Lissitsky, Rodchenko, Klutsis, Vertov, Teige, Nezval, Sutnar, Štirsky, Szczuka, Stern, Themersons, Kassák, Kertész, Moholy-Nagy, Goll, Micić, Vučo, Matić. Each session will include a lecture followed by discussion.

CLSL GU4075 Soviet and Post-Soviet, Colonial and Post Colonial Film. 3 points.

The course will discuss how filmmaking has been used as an instrument of power and imperial domination in the Soviet Union as well as on post-Soviet space since 1991. A body of selected films by Soviet and post-Soviet directors which exemplify the function of filmmaking as a tool of appropriation of the colonized, their cultural and political subordination by the Soviet center will be examined in terms of postcolonial theories. The course will focus both on Russian cinema and often overlooked work of Ukrainian, Georgian, Belarusian, Armenian, etc. national film schools and how they participated in the communist project of fostering a «new historic community of the Soviet people» as well as resisted it by generating, in hidden and, since 1991, overt and increasingly assertive ways their own counter-narratives. Close attention will be paid to the new Russian film as it re-invents itself within the post-Soviet imperial momentum projected on the former Soviet colonies.

Spring 2017: CLSL GU4075
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLSL 4075 001/79782 T 6:10pm - 10:00pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 5/18
Fall 2017: CLSL GU4075
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLSL 4075 001/61953 T 6:10pm - 10:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 9/18

CLSL W4995 Central European Jewish Literature: Assimilation and Its Discontents. 3 points.

Examines prose and poetry by writers generally less accessible to the American student written in the major Central European languages: German, Hungarian, Czech, and Polish. The problematics of assimilation, the search for identity, political commitment and disillusionment are major themes, along with the defining experience of the century: the Holocaust; but because these writers are often more removed from their Jewishness, their perspective on these events and issues may be different. The influence of Franz Kafka on Central European writers, the post-Communist Jewish revival, defining the Jewish voice in an otherwise disparate body of works.

CLSL G6200 Mulsim and Christian in Balkan Narratives. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

  This course explores the tangled relations of Muslims and Christians in the Balkans through the stories they tell of each other and the foreign narratives about themselves that they import, absorb, and resist. The course defines “narrative” broadly and probes creative storytelling across media and genres, asking methodological questions about narration and narrative inquiry and developing students’ skills for reading both narrative texts and the complex social contexts that produce and sustain them. Its introductory part, “Cities of the Book: Geographies of Conflict and Coexistence,” will familiarize students with the region through case studies of three cities that have served as symbols of Balkan conflict and convivencia: Sarajevo, Thessaloniki, and Istanbul. The second part, “(Broken) Mirrors and Bridges (to Nowhere),” focuses on four novels by highly visible fiction writers from the region (Pamuk, Pavić, Andrić, and Kadare). In the third part, “My Neighbor, My Enemy,” students—drawing from a range of heterogeneous narratives—are invited to consider whether Muslim-Christian violence is indeed inevitable, how interreligious hatred can be countered, and what effective strategies exist for cultivating “neighborliness” in multi-religious societies. No knowledge of Balkan languages required.

Comparative Literature - Russian

CLRS UN3307 (Russian) Literary Playgrounds: Adventures in Textual Paichnidology. 3 points.

There's a lot to be said for the virtues of play!  This course proceeds from the notion that while we may be accustomed to considering it as little more than frivolous activity, play is a serious business with great potential for enriching our social, creative, and scholarly lives.  Over the course of the semester we will read a number of theorists and authors who suggest that play has profound aesthetic, ethical, and epistemological dimensions while we blur the lines between literature and philosophy, science and the arts, the serious and the absurd.....

Spring 2017: CLRS UN3307
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 3307 001/80796 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Benjamin Lussier 3 6/20

CLRS UN3308 RUSSIAN LITERATURE: A TRAVEL GUIDE. 3 points.

This course is designed as a journey through twentieth century Russian literature outside the borders of Russia/the USSR itself. Starting in London, the students will travel south through Western European cities and later on to North America. The students will spend between one and three weeks in each location and learn about the history of Russian exiles, émigrés and travelers in that particular city or country. Each week will be focused on a particular period or theme in this Russian literature from abroad. Through novels, short stories, letters, websites, films and images, the students will explore each place in the minds of Russian writers and artists. The course will furthermore emphasize the relationship between city and text. Students will be encouraged to draw maps, describe architecture and analyze urban phenomena such as the museum as they are represented by the materials we study in class. 

CLRS V3224 Nabokov. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the writing (including major novels, short stories, essays and memoirs) of the Russian-American author Vladimir Nabokov. Special attention to literary politics and gamesmanship and the author's unique place within both the Russian and Anglo-American literary traditions. Knowledge of Russian not required.

CLRS V3501 How to Tell a War Story: Narratives About War from Leo Tolstoy to the Present. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

We will read a range of works about war, from Tolstoy’s war stories to contemporary American war fiction, reporting, memoirs, and essays.  Each author attempts to capture and convey the truth about war, subject matter that challenges language, narrative, memory, and understanding.  What means do the authors use to tell their war stories?  What truths do they reveal about war, death, love, responsibility, and the human condition?  Authors include: Leo Tolstoy, William Russell, Ambrose Pierce, Stephen Crane, Henri Barbusse, Isaac Babel, Erich Maria Remarque, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Philip Caputo, Tim O’Brien, Kevin Powers, Siobhan Fallon, Phil Klay, and others.  (All readings in English.)

CLRS W4011 Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel [in English]. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky (Netochka Nezvanova; The Idiot; "A Gentle Creature") and Tolstoy (Childhood, Boyhood, Youth; "Family Happiness"; Anna Karenina; "The Kreutzer Sonata") in conjunction with related English novels (Bronte's Jane Eyre, Eliot's Middlemarch, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway). No knowledge of Russian is required.

CLRS W4016 Petersburg Texts. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will explore the concept of the Petersburg Text, its origins, development, and continuations. We will read classic, nineteenth-centurt Petersburg texts by Pushin ("The Bronze Horseman," "The Queen of Spades"), Gogol (the Petersburg tales), and Dostoevsky ("White Nights," The Double, Crime and Punishment) Leskov's parody of the tradition ("Apparation at the Engineer's Castle"), Bely's Petersburg, Daniil Kharms' 'old women" stories, Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, and some contemporary Petersburg noir stories. No knowledge of Russian required.

CLRS W4017 Chekhov [English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A close reading of Chekhov's best work in the genres on which he left an indelible mark (the short story and the drama) on the subjects that left an indelible imprint on him (medical science, the human body, identity, topography, the nature of news, the problem of knowledge, the access to pain, the necessity of dying, the structure of time, the self and the world, the part and the whole) via the modes of inquiry (diagnosis and deposition, expedition and exegesis, library and laboratory, microscopy and materialism, intimacy and invasion) and forms of documentation (the itinerary, the map, the calendar, the photograph, the icon, the Gospel, the Koan, the lie, the love letter, the case history, the obituary, the pseudonym, the script) that marked his era (and ours). No knowledge of Russian required.

CLRS GU4022 Russia and Asia: Orientalism, Eurasianism, Internationalism. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores the formation of Russian national and imperial identity through ideologies of geography, focusing on a series of historical engagements with the concept of "Asia." How has the Mongol conquest shaped a sense of Russian identity as something destinct from Europe? How has Russian culture participated in Orientalist portrayals of conquered Asian lands, while simultaneously being Orientalized by Europe and, indeed, Orientalizing itself? How do concepts of Eurasianism and socialist internationalism, both arising in the ealry 20th century, seek to redraw the geography of Russia's relations with East and West? We will explore these questions through a range of materials, including: literary texts by Russian and non-Russian writers (Pushkin, Lermontov, Tolstoy, Solovyov, Bely, Blok, Pilnyak, Khlebnikov, Planotov, Xiao Hong, Kurban Said, Aitimatov, Iskander, Bordsky); films (Eisenstein, Tarkovsky, Kalatozov, Paradjanov, Mikhalkov); music and dance (the Ballets Russes); visual art (Vereshchagin, Roerich); and theoretical and secondary readings by Chaadaev, Said, Bassin, Trubetskoy, Leontievm, Lenin, and others.

CLRS GU4038 Dostoevsky in the 1870s: Demons, Diary of a Writer, Adolescent, and Dickens.. 3 points.

A study of Dostoevsky and Dickens as two writers whose engagement in the here and now was vital to their work and to their practice of the novel.  Readings from Dostoevsky cluster in the 1870s and include two novels, Demons (1872) and The Adolescent (1876), and selections from his Diary of a Writer.  Readings from Dickens span his career and include, in addition to David Copperfield (1850), sketches and later essays.

CLRS W4190 Race, Ethnicity, and Narrative, in the Russian/Soviet Empire. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the literary construction of ethnic and cultural identity in texts drawn from the literatures of ethnic minorities and non-Slavic nationalities that coexist within the Russian and Soviet imperial space, with attention to the historical and political context in which literary discourses surrounding racial, ethnic, and cultural particularity develop. Organized around three major regions -- the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Russian Far East --readings include canonical "classics" by Aitmatov, Iskander, and Rytkheu as well as less-known texts, both "official" and censored. 

Czech Language and Literature

CZCH UN1101 Elementary Czech I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: CZCH UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1101 001/70275 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 2/12

CZCH UN1102 Elementary Czech II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2017: CZCH UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1102 001/60303 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 1/20

CZCH UN2101 Intermediate Czech I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

Fall 2017: CZCH UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 2101 001/12417 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 1/12

CZCH W2102 Intermediate Czech II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

CZCH GU4333 Readings in Czech Literature, I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Fall 2017: CZCH GU4333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4333 001/10823 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 3 0/12

CZCH GU4334 Readings in Czech Literature, II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Spring 2017: CZCH GU4334
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4334 001/67008 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 0/10

History - Slavic

HSSL W3224 Cities and Civilizations: an Introduction To Eurasian Studies. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to the study of the region formerly occupied by the Russian and Soviet Empires focusing on cities as the space of self-definition, encounter, and tension among constituent peoples. Focus on incorporating and placing in dialogue diverse disciplinary approaches to the study of the city through reading and analysis of historical, literary, and theoretical texts as well as film, music, painting, and architecture. Group(s): B

HSSL W3860 Post-Socialist Cities of Eurasia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Beginning with the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, the reorganization of urban life was a central goal of Marxist-Leninist state socialism. Despite its claim to be making a radical break with the past, however, this new vision of the city was realized in practice through interaction with earlier urban forms, and the legacy of socialist urbanity continues to be felt in the physical spaces and daily lives of current post-Soviet and post-communist metropolises. This course examines the "socialist city" from its origins in the early USSR, through its transformations across time and space in Eastern Europe and East Asia, down to the present day. Our definition of "Eurasia" therefore extends beyond the former Soviet space to include cities in socialist and post-socialist societies such as China, East Germany, Poland, Mongolia, and North Korea. The course will also venture as far afield as Havana, Brasilia, Mexico City, and New York, considering the socialist city as an experiment in urban living carried out in various times and places well outside the former socialist "bloc." These cities will be studied through a variety of sources across several disciplines, including history, literature, film, art and architecture, anthropology and geography. The spring course continues with the Global Scholars Program Summer Workshop 2014, "Contemporary Cities of Eurasia: Berlin, Moscow, Ulan Bator, Beijing." Students are expected to enroll in both courses.

HSSL W4860 Post-Socialist Cities of Eurasia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Beginning with the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, the reorganization of urban life was a central goal of Marxist-Leninist state socialism. Despite its claim to be making a radical break with the past, however, this new vision of the city was realized in practice through interaction with earlier urban forms, and the legacy of socialist urbanity continues to be felt in the physical spaces and daily lives of current post-Soviet and post-communist metropolises. This course examines the "socialist city" from its origins in the early USSR, through its transformations across time and space in Eastern Europe and East Asia, down to the present day. Our definition of "Eurasia" therefore extends beyond the former Soviet space to include cities in socialist and post-socialist societies such as China, East Germany, Poland, Mongolia, and North Korea. The course will also venture as far afield as Havana, Brasilia, Mexico City, and New York, considering the socialist city as an experiment in urban living carried out in various times and places well outside the former socialist "bloc." These cities will be studied through a variety of sources across several disciplines, including history, literature, film, art and architecture, anthropology and geography. The spring course continues with the Global Scholars Program Summer Workshop 2014, "Contemporary Cities of Eurasia: Berlin, Moscow, Ulan Bator, Beijing." Students are expected to enroll in both courses.

Polish Language and Literature

POLI UN1101 Elementary Polish I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: POLI UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1101 001/23502 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 6/12

POLI UN1102 Elementary Polish II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2017: POLI UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1102 001/24236 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
255 International Affairs Bldg
Christopher Caes 4 8/15

POLI UN2101 Intermediate Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

Fall 2017: POLI UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 2101 001/62997 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 5/12

POLI W2102 Intermediate Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

POLI GU4101 Advanced Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Fall 2017: POLI GU4101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4101 001/10750 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
716a Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 1/12

POLI GU4102 Advanced Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Spring 2017: POLI GU4102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4102 001/65624 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
716a Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 4/18

POLI W4050 Contemporary Polish Poetry. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: A knowledge of Polish is not required.

POLI W3997 Supervised Individual Research. 2-4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the department's permission.

Romanian Language and Literature

Russian Language

RUSS UN1101 First-year Russian I. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1101 001/17926 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Ben Hooyman 5 6/12
RUSS 1101 002/18272 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 5 3/12
RUSS 1101 003/24192 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
William Hanlon 5 12/12
RUSS 1101 004/29872 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Michael Gluck 5 9/12

RUSS UN1102 First-year Russian II. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1102 001/75241 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Erica Drennan 5 11/12
RUSS 1102 002/63835 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 5 9/12
RUSS 1102 004/28894 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Vera Senina 5 6/12
RUSS 1102 005/29945 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Michael Gluck 5 3/12

RUSS UN2101 Second-Year Russian I . 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review."Off-sequence" 

Fall 2017: RUSS UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2101 001/26331 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
707 Hamilton Hall
Serhii Tereshchenko 5 10/12
RUSS 2101 002/36129 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Alexey Pekov 5 9/12
RUSS 2101 003/27222 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Erica Drennan 5 12/12

RUSS UN2102 Second-year Russian II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2101 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2102 001/05672 M T W Th 11:45am - 12:50pm
207 Milbank Hall
Illya Kun 5 18/18
RUSS 2102 002/87397 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
402 Hamilton Hall
Serhii Tereshchenko 5 7/12
RUSS 2102 003/92298 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Jamie Bennett 5 6/12

RUSS UN3101 Third-year Russian I. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2102 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3101 001/10726 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 4 11/12
RUSS 3101 002/17331 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
707 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 4 11/12

RUSS UN3102 Third-Year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2102 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission.

Enrollment limited. Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN3102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3102 001/60636 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 4 8/12
RUSS 3102 002/73456 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
707 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 4 8/12

RUSS W4333 Fourth-year Russian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Systematic study of problems in Russian syntax; written exercises, translations into Russian, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GU4334 Fourth-year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Discussion of different styles and levels of language, including word usage and idiomatic expression; written exercises, analysis of texts, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4351 Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today. 3 points.

Prerequisites: eight semesters of college Russian and the instructor’s permission.

The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding. Conducted in Russian.

RUSS W4433 Specific Problems in Mastering Russian. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: four years of college Russian and the instructor’s permission.

The Russian verb (basic stem system, aspect, locomotion); prefixes; temporal, spatial, and causal relationships; word order; word formation.

RUSS W4432 Contrastive Phonetics and Grammar of Russian and English. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: RUSS W4334 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission.

Comparative phonetic, intonational, and morphological structures of Russian and English, with special attention to typical problems for American speakers of Russian.

RUSS W4434 Practical Stylistics [in Russian]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: RUSS W4334 or the equivalent or the instructor's permission.

Focuses on theoretical matters of style and the stylistic conventions of Russian expository prose, for advanced students of Russian who wish to improve their writing skills.

Russian Literature (In English)

RUSS UN3221 Literature & Revolution [In English]. 3 points.

Survey of Russian literature from symbolism to the culture of high Stalinism and post-Socialist realism of the 1960-70s, including major works by Andrei Bely, Blok, Olesha, Babel, Bulgakov, Platonov, Zoshchenko, Kharms, Kataev, Pasternak, Venedikt Erofeev. Knowledge of Russian not required.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN3221
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3221 001/07073 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
302 Milbank Hall
Edward Tyerman 3 16

RUSS UN3222 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky [In English]. 3 points.

Two epic novels, Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, will be read along with selected shorter works. Other works by Tolstoy include his early Sebastopol Sketches, which changed the way war is represented in literature; Confession, which describes his spiritual crisis; the late stories "Kreutzer Sonata" and "Hadji Murad"; and essays on capital punishment and a visit to a slaughterhouse. Other works by Dostoevsky include his fictionalized account of life in Siberian prison camp, The House of the Dead; Notes from the Underground, his philosophical novella on free will, determinism, and love; "A Gentle Creature," a short story on the same themes; and selected essays from Diary of a Writer. The focus will be on close reading of the texts. Our aim will be to develop strategies  for appreciating the structure and form, the powerful ideas, the engaging storylines, and the human interest in the writings of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. No knowledge of Russian is required.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN3222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3222 001/11037 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
703 Hamilton Hall
Liza Knapp 3 31/86

RUSS UN3223 Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of Old Rus'. 3 points.

Winston Churchill famously defined Russia as "a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma." This course aims at demystifying Russia by focusing on the core of its "otherness" in the eyes of the West: its religious culture. We will explore an array of texts, practices and pragmatic sites of Russian religious life across such traditional divides as medieval and modern, popular and elite, orthodox and heretical. Icons, liturgical rituals, illuminated manuscripts, magic amulets, religious sects, feasting and fasting, traveling practices from pilgrimages to tourism, politcial myths and literary mystification, decadent projects of life-creation, and fervent anticipation of the End are all part of the tour that is as illuminating as it is fun. No knowledge of Russian required.

RUSS V3305 The Poetics of Censorship After the Thaw. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will explore Russian culture after Stalin and after Khrushchev's Thaw, focusing on the evolution of censorship and the ways in which writers responded to different types of censorship over time. While the course will deall mainly with literature and writers, it will also touch on film, television, art, and music, including popular culture. Students will analyze the categories of "official" and "dissident" culture, moving beyond a black and white understanding of censorship, conformity, and dissidence in the Soviet Union and contemporary Russia. Readings will include works that were published or shown though official channels as well as those written "for the drawer" or for small circle of friends, or published in samizdat or abroad. Artistic texts will be supplemented with secondary readings that will provide historical context and theoretical grounding, with sampling of different approaches (literary, historical, anthropological. All readings will be in English; no knowledge of Russian is required.

RUSS GU4006 Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, and Literature. 3 points.

This course examines the interaction of religious thought, praxis, and literature in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. As the Russian Empire sought to define it place in the world, many Russian writers and thinkers turned to religious experience as a source of meaning. A varied body of work emerged as they responded to the tradition of Russian Orthodoxy. The goals of this course are to acquaint students with key texts of Russian religious thought and to give students the knowledge and tools required for critical inquiry into the religious dimension of Russian literature and culture.

RUSS GU4013 Late Tolstoy (Beyond Anna Karenina): Thinker, Writer, Activist, Pacifist, Humanitarian, and Mortal. 4 points.

The focus of the course is Tolstoy's work in the last 35 years of his life. On finishing War and Peace and Anna Karenina, Tolstoy swore off the kind of literature and decided to devote himself to what he believed would be more meaningful work. This work included confessions, letters, tracts, critiques, proclamations, invectives, exposes, meditations, and gospel, and as more fiction, some of which is overly didactic and some which is, like his earlier fiction, more covertly so. 

RUSS G4104 Behind the Nylon Curtain: Space Race, Architecture and Cinematography During the Cold War. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar explores space race, architecture and cinematography of the Cold War in a bi-polarized world with special emphasis on cultural memories, curatorial practices, and object-based learning. Being extracted from literature and journalism, tested on the territory of mass media and popular culture, Cold War phenomenon operates with the illusional nature of canonic cultural codes, empowering visional metaphors with the military instrumental and vocabulary of forms. Operating with the concept of synthetic, anti-biological and quasi-transparent Nylon Curtain versus the solidity of the iron barrio might allow us to look at the Cold War phenomenon even more critically and to contextualize it within the broader fabric of contemporary arts and its transcultural agenda.

RUSS W4108 The Great Experiment: Russian Media in the Long 20th Century. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will examine key events of Russian cultural history from the 1870s until today from the point of view of the concept of medium. it will begin with some theoretical definitions and proceed with a closer look at optical, audio and print media and their role in promoting mass culture, avant-garde experiments of the 1920s and 1930s, Soviet propaganda and dissident practices, and post-Soviet uses artistic and political uses of new media. Works by Mayakovsky, II'f and Petrov, Erenburg, Shklovsky. Critical readings by Marshall McLuhan, Lev Manovich, Katherine Hayles, and Boris Groys.

RUSS GU4109 Russia's Self Image in Music. 3 points.

A snapshot of Russian cultural history, from the age of Romanticism and realism to early twentieth-century modernism, to the Soviet time, made through the lens of most notable musical events of that epoch. The course follows highlights of the history of Russian music, from Glinka and the popular "romance" of Pushkin's time to Schnittke and Gubaidullina. Knowledge of Russian not required. 

RUSS W4451 The Cultural Cold War. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine major developments in Soviet society after WWII through the prism of the Cold War. Organized thematically and chronologically, it will focus selectively on specific episodes of Soviet-American relations by drawing on a variety of media. Students will read, discuss and evaluate a broad range of primary and secondary sources and think critically about historical writing, the relationship bewtween art and politics, mass culture and propaganda, spy novels, memoirs and travelogues. Films by Sergi Eisenstein, Andrei Tarkovsky, Stanley Kubrick, and John Frankenheimer. Prose and poetry by Andrei Voznesensky, Viktor Pelevin, Svetlana Alexievich, Vasily Aksyonov, Viktor Nekrasov and others.

RUSS W4452 Russian Modernism Through the Lens of Music. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A historical survey of trends of Russian musical modernism in the context of Russian cultural history of the first half of the twentieth century. Works by Chaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Scriabin, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Mosolov, Shostakovich and Schnittke will be considered alongside notable events of contemporary literature, visual art, and aethetic theory. Knowledge of Russian not required.

RUSS W4676 Russian Art between East and West: The Search for National Identity. 3 points.

Open to undergraduate and graduate students.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Aims to be more than a basic survey that starts with icons and ends with the early modernists. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, it aims to highlight how the various cultural transmissions interacted to produce, by the 1910s, an original national art that made an innovative contribution to world art. It discusses the development of art not only in terms of formal, aesthetic analysis, but also in the matrix of changing society, patronage system, economic life and quest for national identity. Several guest speakers will discuss the East-West problematic in their related fields-for example, in literature and ballet. Some familiarity with Russian history and literature will be helpful, but not essential. Assigned readings in English.

RUSS GU4910 Literary Translation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: four years of college Russian or the equivalent.

Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4910 001/27735 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Ronald Meyer 4 6/12

Russian Literature

RUSS UN3333 Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Poor Liza, Poor Olga, Poor Me. 3 points.

For non-native speakers of Russian.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission.

The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students’ linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. In 2007-2008: A close study in the original of the “fallen woman” plot in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3333 001/24208 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
411 Hamilton Hall
Irina Reyfman 3 8/18

RUSS V3339 Masterpieces of Russian Literature: 19th Century. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Native or near-native knowledge of Russian and permission of the instructor.

A close study, in the original, of representative works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Goncharov, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Leskov, and Chekhov.

RUSS V3340 Masterpieces of Russian Literature: 20th Century. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Native or near-native knowledge of Russian and permission of the instructor.

A close study, in the original, of representative works by Bunin, Tsvetaeva, Mayakovsky, Babel, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Mandelstam, Anna Akhmatova, Solzhenitsyn, Brodsky, and Pelevin.

RUSS V3997 Supervised Individual Research. 2-4 points.

Prerequisites: Open to senior majors, and permission of the instructor.

Supervised research culminating in a critical paper.

RUSS W4014 Introduction to Russian Poetry and Poetics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to Russian poetry, through the study of selected texts of major poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, primarily: Pushkin, Lermontov, Pavlova, Tiutchev, Blok, Mandel'shtam, Akhmatova, Mayakovsky, Prigov and Brodsky. Classes devoted to the output of a single poet will be interspersed with classes that draw together the poems of different poets in order to show the reflexivity of the Russian poetic canon. These classes will be organized according either to types of poems or to shared themes. The course will teach the basics of verisification, poetic languages (sounds, tropes), and poetic forms. Classes in English; poetry read in Russian.

RUSS W4200 Russian Theatre--Hands On. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and permission of the instructor.
The study and staging in the original of a Russian play. Detailed textual analysis, including character development, dramatic style, and language usage. Oral presentations and recitations with focus on pronunciation and intonation

RUSS W4331 Chteniia po russkoi literaturu: Turgenev. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course is devoted to reading shorter prose works by Ivan Turgenev. The reading list includes stories from his collection Sketches of a Hunter as well as such masterpieces as The Diary of a Superfluous Man, First Love, and Asia. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4332 Chteniia po russkoi literaturu: Gogol. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course is devoted to reading shorter works by Nikolai Gogol, The syllabus includes selections from his collection Sketches of a Hunter as well as such masterpieces as the Diary of a Superfluous Man, First Love, and Asia. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4339 Chteniia po russkoi literature: Pushkin. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

A survey of Alexander Pushkin's poetry and prose in the original. Emphasis on the emergence of a new figure of the Poet in Russin in the 1820-1830s. Linguistic analysis of the poetic texts (vocabulary, metrics, versification) will be combined with the study of Russian History and Culture as reflected in Pushkin's writings.

RUSS W4346 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Russian Folklore and the Folkloric Tradition. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint structure with traditional folk beliefs that are part of Russian life today. Readings will include descriptions of character ritual folk beliefs as well as narratives about personal experiences concerning superstition, sorcery and the supernatural. Also included will be folktales that most Russians know and contemporary Russian folk narratives.

RUSS W4347 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Contemporary Social Sciences. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: five semesters of college level Russian, or four semesters of college level Russian and participation in a study abroad program in a Russian speaking country, and the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to meet the needs of advanced undergraduate and graduate students across several fields--the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, fine arts, business, law and others-- who wish to focus on acquisition of high proficiency reading skills that will allow them to conduct research using written Russian-language academic sources.

RUSS W4348 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through the Media. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian or the equivalent.

This course is designed to meet the needs of advanced students of Russian across several fields - the humanities, social sciences, law, arts, and others - who want to further develop their speech, comprehension, reading, and writing and be introduced to the contemporary Russian media. This addition to our series of courses in Advanced Russian through cultural content provides training for research and professional work in Russian.

RUSS W4349 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through Song. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian or the equivalent.

This is a content-based language course that is designed to develop students' ability to understand fluent Russian speech and express their opinions on various social and cultural topics in both oral and written form.

RUSS W4354 Chteniia po Russkoi Literature: A Hero of Our Time and Other Superfluous People. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on the study and analysis of Mikhail Lermontov's, "A Her of Our Time" - one of the most influential Russian novels of the 19th century - in its broader social, artistic, and intellectual context. Students will trace the development of the so-called "superfluous man," a strikingly ubiquitous character type whose recurrent appearance throughout the broader history of Russian literature makes him one of the most recognizable national characters.

RUSS G4034 Literature, Politics, and Tradition after Socialist Realism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The major writers and trends in Russian literature from the death of Stalin to the present. Emphasis on the rethinking of the role of literature in society and on formal experimentation engendered by relaxation of political controls over literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required.

RUSS G4110 Russian Formalism & Structuralism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Evaluation of the contributions of Russian Formalism and Structuralism to modern critcal thought. Tracing of the characteristic features of both movements in comparison with kindred critcal developments in the West.

Slavic Culture

HNGR GU4028 Modern Hungarian Prose in Translation: Exposing Naked Reality. 3 points.

This course introduces students to representative examples of an essentially robust, reality-bound, socially aware literature. In modern Hungarian prose fiction, the tradition of nineteenth-century "anecdotal realism" remained strong and was further enlivened by various forms of naturalism. Even turn-of-the century and early twentieth-century modernist fiction is characterized by strong narrative focus, psychological realism, and an emphasis on social conditions and local color. During the tumultuous decades of the century, social, political, national issues preoccupied even aesthetics-conscious experimenters and ivory-tower dwellers. Among the topics discussed will be "populist" and "urban" literature in the interwar years, post-1945 reality in fiction, literary memoirs and reportage, as well as late-century minimalist and postmodern trends.

Fall 2017: HNGR GU4028
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 4028 001/19782 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Ivan Sanders 3 3/12

HNGR W4050 The Hungarian New Wave: Cinema in Kadarist Hungary [In English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Hungarian cinema, like film-making in Czechoslovakia, underwent a renaissance in the 1960's, but the Hungarian new wave continued to flourish in the 70's and film remained one of the most important art forms well into the 80's. This course examines the cultural, social and political context of representative Hungarian films of the Kadarist period, with special emphasis on the work of such internationally known filmmakers as Miklos Jancso, Karoly Makk, Marta Meszaros, and Istvan Szabo. In addition to a close analysis of individual films, discussion topics will include the "newness"of the new wave in both form and content (innovations in film language, cinematic impressionism, allegorical-parabolic forms, auteurism, etc.), the influence of Italian, French, German and American cinema, the relationship between film and literature, the role of film in the cultures of Communist Eastern Europe, the state of contemporary Hungarian cinema. The viewing of the films will be augmented by readings on Hungarian cinema, as well as of relevant Hungarian literary works.

Slavic Literatures

SLLT GU4000 EURASIAN EXILES & LIT IN N.Y.. 3 points.

Eurasian Exiles and Literature in New York examines Eurasian exile literature in the United States and especially New York over the course of four emigration waves: so called Second Wave writers who fled the Russian Revolution (Vladimir Nabokov), the Third Wave exiles, who came after World War II (Joseph Brodsky and Sergei Dovlatov), the exile literature of the last Soviet generation who came as refugees in the late 1970s and early 1980s (Gary Shteyngart, Irina Reyn), and the perestroika and post-Soviet diaspora, who came to New York after 1991. All four waves drew upon a rich Russian cultural heritage and influences that they encountered abroad to create innovative work: new topoi and urban fiction as well as unique images of New York. All four have complicated and fascinating engagements with American society and the cultures of New York City, and also with the Russian and Eurasian émigré communities, vibrant worlds unto themselves. The initial waves drew mainly on East European themes and were still attached to Russia while the latter were increasingly concerned with non-Russian nationalities like Bukharan Jews, Georgians, and Tajiks. The course looks closely and critically at the meanings of “exile” and “Eurasia,” as well as the poetics of exilic and urban writing; it asks whether we can still speak of exiles and exile fiction in the postSoviet age of globalization, social media, and unprecedented migration.

SLLT W4015 Ideology, History, Identity: South Slavic Writers from Modernism to Postmodernism and Beyond. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the issue of Yugoslav identity through the representative texts of major Serbian writers, such as Milos Crnjanski, Ivo Andric, Danilo Kis, Milorad Pavic, and Borislav Pekic.

Ukrainian Language and Literature 

UKRN UN1101 Elementary Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1101 001/13786 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/12

UKRN UN1102 Elementary Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Spring 2017: UKRN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1102 001/12392 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
351a International Affairs Bldg
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/15

UKRN UN2101 Intermediate Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 2101 001/67418 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/12

UKRN UN2102 Intermediate Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Spring 2017: UKRN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 2102 001/96946 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
351a International Affairs Bldg
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/20

UKRN UN4001 Advanced Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN W2102 or the equivalent.

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN4001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 4001 001/73424 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/12

UKRN GU4002 Advanced Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN2102 or the equivalent.

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Spring 2017: UKRN GU4002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 4002 001/21528 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/20

UKRN W4021 Introduction to Ukrainian Literature and Culture: Beginnings Through the 19th Century. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Some familiarity with at least one Slavic language.

UKRN W4033 Early Modernism in Ukrainian Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course focuses on the rise of modernism in Ukrainian literature in the late 19th century and early 20th century, a period marked by a vigorous, often biting polemic between the populist Ukrainian literary establishment and young Ukrainian writers who were inspired by their European counterparts. Students will read prose, poetry, and drama written by Ivan Franko, the writers of the Moloda Musa, Olha Kobylianska, Lesia Ukrainka, and Volodymyr Vynnychenko among others. The course will trace the introduction of urban motifs and settings, as well as decadence, into Ukrainian literature and analyze the conflict that ensued among Ukrainian intellectuals as they forged the identity of the Ukrainian people. The course will be supplemented by audio and visual materials reflecting this period in Ukrainian culture. Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read Ukrainian.

UKRN W4040 Twentieth Century Ukrainian Prose. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: A reading knowledge of Ukrainian or fluency in another Slavic language.