Sustainable Development

Departmental Office: The Earth Institute, Office of Academic and Research Programs, Hogan, B-Level; http://sdev.ei.columbia.edu

Co-Directors of Undergraduate Studies:
Ruth DeFries, 212-851-1647; rd2402@columbia.edu
Kevin Griffin, 845-365-8371; griff@ldeo.columbia.edu
Jason Smerdon, 845-365-8493; jsmerdon@ldeo.columbia.edu

Program Administrators:
Natalie Unwin-Kuruneri, 212-854-8536; natalie@ei.columbia.edu
Jessica Sotomayor, 212-851-9350; jsotomayor@ei.columbia.edu

Sustainable development is founded on the premise that human well-being should advance without irreparable harm to ecosystems and the vital services they provide, without depleting essential resources, and without posing risks to future generations. The term "sustainable" refers to managing the world's economy in a manner consistent with the continued healthy functioning of Earth's ecosystems, oceans, atmosphere and climate. In this context, "development" refers to continued social, political, and economic progress aimed at improving the well-being of the global community, especially for the poorest people.

Academic Programs

The Earth Institute—in collaboration with Columbia College, the School of General Studies, the School of International and Public Affairs, and the Departments of Earth and Environmental Science; Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology; and Earth and Environmental Engineering—offers a major and a special concentration in sustainable development.

These programs are designed to: engage students in this emergent interdisciplinary discussion, provide knowledge of the theory and practice of sustainable development, stimulate a critical examination of historical and conceptual antecedents, provide experience in the complex challenges of sustainable development through direct engagement, and help them imagine alternative futures for our rapidly changing world. With help from the Earth Institute faculty, courses are specifically created to address the very real and complex issues of development as they relate to the interactions of the natural and social systems.

The major focuses heavily on the sciences and provides students with a working knowledge of issues on a range of interacting subject areas. After declaring the major, students are assigned an academic adviser from within the Earth Institute, who advises on class selection and career development. Students benefit from a support system of faculty, advisers, and program managers, and have access to the multitude of resources for internships, study abroad programs, and career development.

The special concentration is intentionally more flexible, but its structure allows students to benefit from the cross-disciplinary courses and to build the expertise to allow them to address the fundamental issue of how to move towards a trajectory of sustainability.

The sustainable development program is structured to ensure that students graduate with the skills and knowledge to enable them to advance professionally in the public, private, governmental, and nonprofit sectors, and to pursue advanced degrees. Those interested in sustainable development are encouraged to participate in lectures, conferences, and other programs sponsored by the Earth Institute.

Grading

A letter grade of C- or better is needed in all program-related courses in order to satisfy the program requirements.

Committee for Sustainable Development

  • Steven Cohen (The Earth Institute and School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Peter Coleman (Psychology and Teachers College)
  • Patricia Culligan (Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics)
  • Ruth DeFries (Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology) (Co-Chair)
  • Peter deMenocal (Earth and Environmental Sciences)
  • Joseph Graziano (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • Kevin Griffin (Earth and Environmental Sciences) (Co-Chair)
  • Upmanu Lall (Earth and Environmental Engineering)
  • Edward Lloyd (Law School)
  • Alberto Medina (Latin American and Iberian Cultures)
  • Michele Moody-Adams (Philosophy)
  • Shahid Naeem (Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology)
  • Stephanie Pfirman (Environmental Science, Barnard)
  • Robert Pollack (Biological Sciences)
  • Victoria Rosner (General Studies)
  • Wolfram Schlenker (Economics)
  • Elliott Sclar (Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation)
  • Sam Sia (Biomedical Engineering)
  • Sara Tjossem (School of International and Public Affairs)
  • Kathryn Yatrakis (Columbia College)

Major in Sustainable Development

The sustainable development foundation courses should be taken first and students should then work with the program adviser on further course selection and sequencing.

The major in sustainable development requires a minimum of 15 courses and a practicum as follows:

Sustainable Development Foundation
SDEV W1900Introduction to Sustainable Development Seminar
SDEV W2300Challenges of Sustainable Development
EESC W2330Science for Sustainable Development
Basic Disciplinary Foundation
Select one of the following science sequences:
General Physics II
   and General Physics II
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
   and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
   and Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere
A better planet by design
   and Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate
   and Earth's Environmental Systems: Solid Earth
Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate
   and Earth's Environmental Systems: Life Systems
Select two of the following social science courses:
The Social World
The Interpretation of Culture
Principles of Economics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Introduction to International Politics
Introduction to Environmental Law
Human Populations and Sustainable Development
Select one of the following quantitative foundations courses:
STAT W1211
Linear Algebra
STAT W2024
STAT W2025
STAT W2026
Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Environmental Data Analysis
STAT W3026
Applied Statistical Methods
Undergraduate Research
STAT W4105
STAT W4107
Linear Regression Models
STAT W4606
Analysis and Solutions to Complex Problems
Select two of the following courses:
Agricultural and Urban Land Use: Human-Environment Interactions
Responding to Climate Change
Fundamentals of Global Health
Global Food Systems
Engineering for developing communities
Ecological and Social Systems for Sustainable Development
Climate Change and Law
Disasters and Development
Energy Law
Urbanization and Sustainable Development
Cities in Developing Countries: Problems and Prospects
Management and development of water systems
Closing the carbon cycle
Introduction to Environmental Planning
Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
The Summer Ecosystems Experience for Undergraduates (SEE-U) *
Skills/Actions
Select two of the following courses:
Economic and Financial Methods for Sustainable Development
Methods for Social Research
GIS for Sustainable Development
Spatial Analysis and Modeling for Sustainable Development
Complexity Science
Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
Sustainability Management
Environmental data analysis and modeling
The Summer Ecosystems Experience for Undergraduates (SEE-U) *
Electives
Select one of the following courses:
Practicum in Innovation Sustainability Leadership
Oil, Rights and Development
Earth Institute Practicum
Select two of the following:
Additional courses from analysis and solutions to complex problem
Additional courses from skills/actions
Upper division courses from the list approved by program adviser
Environmental Science Senior Seminar
   and Senior Research Seminar
Capstone Workshop
SDEV W3280Workshop in Sustainable Development
or SDEV W3550 Bangladesh: Life on a Tectonically Active Delta
*

The Summer Ecosystem Experiences for Undergraduates (SEE-U): Please note that students in the major or the special concentration who take SEE-U as a 6-point course can use 3 points towards the Complex Problems requirement and 3 points towards the Skills/Action requirement. If SEE-U is taken for 3 points, it can only count as one Complex Problems class.


Special Concentration in Sustainable Development

In addition to the requirements of the special concentration, students must complete a major or a full concentration.

In addition to the requirements of the special concentration, students must complete a major.

The sustainable development foundation courses should be taken first and students should then work with the program adviser on further course selection and sequencing.

The special concentration in sustainable development requires a minimum of 9 courses and a practicum as follows:

Sustainable Development Foundation
SDEV W1900Introduction to Sustainable Development Seminar
SDEV W2300Challenges of Sustainable Development
EESC W2330Science for Sustainable Development
Natural Science Systems
Select one of the following courses:
Biodiversity
Climate and Society: Case Studies
Earth: Origin, Evolution, Processes, Future
Environmental Risks and Disasters
General Physics I
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere
A better planet by design
Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
Human Science Systems
Select one of the following courses:
The Social World
The Interpretation of Culture
Principles of Economics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Introduction to International Politics
Introduction to Environmental Law
Human Populations and Sustainable Development
Analysis and Solutions to Complex Problems
Select two of the following courses:
Agricultural and Urban Land Use: Human-Environment Interactions
Responding to Climate Change
Fundamentals of Global Health
Global Food Systems
Engineering for developing communities
Ecological and Social Systems for Sustainable Development
Climate Change and Law
Disasters and Development
Energy Law
Urbanization and Sustainable Development
Cities in Developing Countries: Problems and Prospects
Management and development of water systems
Closing the carbon cycle
Introduction to Environmental Planning
Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
The Summer Ecosystem Experiences for Undergraduates (SEE-U) *
Skills/Actions
Select one of the following courses:
Economic and Financial Methods for Sustainable Development
Science, technology and society
Methods for Social Research
GIS for Sustainable Development
Spatial Analysis and Modeling for Sustainable Development
Complexity Science
Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
Sustainability Management
Environmental data analysis and modeling
The Summer Ecosystem Experiences for Undergraduates (SEE-U) *
Practicum
Select one of the following courses:
Practicum in Innovation Sustainability Leadership
Oil, Rights and Development
Earth Institute Practicum
Capstone Workshop
SDEV W3280Workshop in Sustainable Development
or SDEV W3550 Bangladesh: Life on a Tectonically Active Delta
*

The Summer Ecosystem Experiences for Undergraduates (SEE-U): Please note that students in the major or the special concentration who take SEE-U as a 6-point course can use 3 points towards the Complex Problems requirement and 3 points towards the Skills/Action requirement. If SEE-U is taken for 3 points, it can only count as one Complex Problems class.

SDEV W1900 Introduction to Sustainable Development Seminar. 1 Point.

Open to prospective sustainable development majors and concentrators only.

The course is designed to be a free flowing discussion of the principals of sustainable development and the scope of this emerging discipline. This course will also serve to introduce the students to the requirements of the undergraduate program in sustainable development and the content of the required courses in both the special concentration and the major. The focus will be on the breadth of subject matter, the multidisciplinary nature of the scholarship and familiarity with the other key courses in the program. Offered in the Fall and Spring.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 18646 Jason Smerdon M 11:40am - 12:55pm
963 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Fall 2016 001 70489 Jason Smerdon M 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA

SDEV W2000 Introduction to Environmental Law. 3 Points.

The course provides an overview of environmental law for students without a legal background. It examines U.S. statutes and regulations regarding air, water, hazardous and toxic materials, land use, climate change, endangered species, and the like, as well as international environmental issues. After completing the course students should be equipped to understand how the environmental laws operate, the role of the courts, international treaties and government agencies in implementing environmental protection, and techniques used in addressing these issues.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 28697 Philip Weinberg M W 10:10am - 11:25am
103 Knox Hall

SDEV W2300 Challenges of Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of sustainable development, drawing on the most recent developments in social and physical sciences. The course describes the interactions between physical ecology and economic development, and it stresses the ways in which they impact each other. Ecological constraints (climate, disease ecology, physical resources such as soils and energy sources, topography and transport conditions) significantly shape the patterns of economic development, demography, and wealth and poverty. At the same time, anthropogenic activities (farming, resource depletion, demographic stresses, and energy use) change the physical environment. The course offers a rigorous treatment of the field and aims to provide students with an understanding of economic development and its relation to nature's processes. Offered in the Spring.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 88946 Kathryn Vasilaky, Joel Cohen, Jason Chun Yu Wong M W 8:40am - 9:55am
209 Havemeyer Hall

SDEV W2320 Economic and Financial Methods for Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Prerequisites: Principles of Economics and one semester of calculus.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the skills and methods necessary to understand and evaluate the economic and financial aspects of sustainable development. Throughout the course, students will compare competing objectives and policies through the prism of economic & financial reasoning. Environmental economics and finance are broad areas covering all the multi-faceted and complex interactions between the economic system and the natural environment. Financial markets are the primary source of signals used to direct economic activity in a capitalist global economy. Economic activity is the primary determinant of the quality and sustainability of the natural environment. Students interested in sustainable development who are unfamiliar with economics and who do not develop a facility with economic and financial concepts are severely handicapped in their efforts to increase the level of environmental responsibility embedded in economic activity. This course is intended to provide students with a flying introduction to key analytical concepts required to understand topics in environmental economics and finance and to introduce them to selected topics within the field. The first part of the course (the Analytical Toolbox) is designed to provide a set of portable skills for two sets of students: a) those who will work in fields specifically devoted to sustainable development who, as part of their work, will need to engage with sources of economic & financial information and with discourses where sustainable development is not a focus; and b) students who may end up following careers in organizations where sustainability is not the primary objective. The topics and readings in the second part of the course were chosen to facilitate a critical engagement with the broad intellectual framework underlying sustainable development from the perspective of economics and finance. The topics are intended to create a community of intellectual discourse on sustainable development that will spill over beyond the classroom to the conversations of students and alumni that will far outlive graduation. Offered in the Fall.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2016 001 16037 Satyajit Bose T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA

SDEV W3200 Global Food Systems. 3 Points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Concerns about food shortages, land use, climate change and biodiversity have created an urgent need for interdisciplinary researchers, practitioners and policy-makers focused on agriculture. Developing sound solutions that improve agricultural production systems in a sustainable way demands in-depth knowledge of key disciplines underpinning tropical agricultural production systems as well as a good understanding of the broader biophysical, economic and socio-cultural context. Focusing on agricultural science, including biophysical and socioeconomic factors, farming systems, technology, crop and soil management, and current policy issues in agriculture and food production, with a focus on the tropics and subtropics, this course will give key insights into how to improve environmental quality, nutrition and farmers' incomes through sustainable agricultural practices in developing countries.

SDEV W3280 Workshop in Sustainable Development. 4 Points.

Open to sustainable development seniors only.

The upper level undergraduate Sustainable Development Workshop will be modeled on client based graduate-level workshops, but with more time devoted to methods of applied policy analysis and issues in Sustainable Development.  The heart of the course is the group project on an issue of sustainable development with a faculty advisor providing guidance and ultimately grading student performance. Students would receive instruction on methodology, group work, communication and the context of policy analysis. Much of the reading in the course would be project-specific and identified by the student research teams. Offered in Fall and Spring. For registration issues contact Jessica Sotomayor (jsotomayor@ei.columbia.edu).

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 22097 Stuart Gaffin T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Spring 2016 002 26798 Radley Horton M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
252 Engineering Terrace
Fall 2016 001 27661 Stuart Gaffin T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Fall 2016 002 16732 Radley Horton M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA

SDEV W3310 Ethics of Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Aiming to improve human conditions within many diverse environments, sustainable development seeks to create, increase and perpetuate benefit and to cease, rectify and reverse harm. Sustainable development is consequently inextricable from the fabric of ethics, woven with determinations of benefit and harm to the existence and well-being of both humans and nonhumans. Underlying such determinations are those of self- and other-regarding motivation and behavior; and underlying these are still others, of sensitivity and rationality in decision-making, whether individual, social or public. Sustainable development is interlaced with and contingent upon all these determinations, at once prescriptive and judgmental, which can be called the ethics of sustainable development. This course is divided into four main sections, of which two are intended to show the ethical fallacies of unsustainable development, and two, the ethical pathways of sustainable development. The first section focuses upon ethically problematic basic assumptions, including human (species) hegemony, happy (hedonic) materialism, and selective (data) denial. The second focuses upon ethically problematic ensuing rationalizations, including those pertaining to damages, victims, consequences and situations of climatic, chemical, biological and ecological harm. The third section responds to these rationalizations with ethically vital considerations of earth justice, environmental justice, culturally-based ethics, and sector-based ethics (water, food, place and climate ethics). Finally, the fourth section responds to the initial, longstanding problematic assumptions with a newly emergent ethical paradigm, comprising biotic wholeness, environmental integrity and the deliberative zero-goal. Tying all sections together is the central theme: to be sustainable, development must be ethical. Reflecting the collaborative quality of the field of sustainable development, the course extends to readings whose authors have all pursued their work at intersections of science and ethics, environment and ethics, policy and ethics, business and ethics, and sustainable development and ethics.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 67198 Adela Gondek T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg

SDEV W3330 Ecological and Social Systems for Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Prerequisites: SDEV W2300 Challenges of Sustainable Development; EESC W2330 Science for Sustainable Development.

The course provides an overview of the complex relationships between ecological and social systems. The course focuses on basic principles in understanding these relationships. After the students are introduced to these basic concepts, the course will focus on three current topics central to Sustainable Development for in-depth study. The emphasis is on the multiple perspectives - environmental, social and economic - required to understand and develop solutions to problems in sustainable development. The three topics are: conservation of biodiversity, payments for ecosystem services, and the ecology of food production. We expect these topics to vary from year to year to keep pace with current topics. The following areas will be covered.: -What is an ecosystem? How are social and ecological systems linked through the flow of energy and materials? -What are the characteristics of coupled human-natural systems? How do these systems function? -What are the current topics in sustainable development that require understanding of social and ecological systems? -For each topic (protection of biodiversity, ecosystem services, ecology of food production), what are the environmental, economic, and social perspectives important for sustainable solutions? How can critical thinking be applied to balance these perspectives to derive sustainable solution? -Data analysis and approaches to analyze ecosystems and options for sustainable development. Offered in the Fall.

SDEV W3355 Climate Change and Law. 3 Points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad introduction to the field of climate law in the United States and at the international level. The course begins with an overview of the causes and effects of global climate change and the methods available to control and adapt to it. We then examine the negotiation, implementation and current status of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Copenhagen Accord. The focus then turns to the past and proposed actions of the U.S. Congress, the executive branch and the courts, as well as regional, state and municipal efforts. The Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act and the Endangered Species Act will receive special attention. We evaluate the various legal tools that are available to address climate change, including cap-and-trade schemes; carbon taxation; command-and-control regulation; litigation; securities disclosures; and voluntary action. The roles of energy efficiency, renewable energy sources, carbon capture and sequestration, and forestry and agriculture each receive close attention. Implications for international human rights, international trade, environmental justice, and international and intergenerational equity are discussed. The course concludes with examination of the special challenges posed by China; proposals for adaptation and geoengineering; and business opportunities and the role of lawyers. Offered in the Spring.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 10996 Michael Gerrard T Th 9:10am - 10:30am
102a Jerome L Greene Hall

SDEV W3360 Disasters and Development. 3 Points.

Prerequisites: EESC 2330; SDEV W2300.

Human welfare status is very unevenly distributed throughout the globe – some of us live very comfortable lives, others remain in desperate poverty showing little progress away from their condition. Between are countries that are rapidly developing and converging toward the welfare of the richest. At all levels of economic development human activities place significant pressure on the environment and threatens all of Earth’s vital functions and support systems for human life. This challenge requires timely responses based on solid understanding of the human/environment interface, technological and economic approaches to mitigate adverse effects on the environment, and routes to understanding the complex dynamics of the coupled human/natural systems that can chart a pathway to improvement in the lives of the poorest and continued well-being for those who have achieved prosperity without forcing natural systems into decline or massive fluctuation. This course offers undergraduate students, for the first time, a comprehensive course on the link between natural disaster events and human development at all levels of welfare. It explores the role that natural disasters might have and have had in modulating development prospects. Any student seriously interested in sustainable development, especially in light of climate change, must study the nature of extreme events - their causes, global distribution and likelihood of future change. This course will cover not only the nature of extreme events, including earthquakes, hurricanes, floods and droughts but also their transformation into disaster through social processes. It will ultimately help students to understand the link between such extreme events, the economic/social shock they represent and development outcomes. The course will combine careful analysis of the natural and social systems dynamics that give rise to disasters and examine through group learning case studies from the many disasters that have occurred in the first decade of the 21st century. Offered in the Spring (odd years only).

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 22192 John Mutter T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
304 Hamilton Hall

SDEV W3366 Energy Law. 3 Points.

This course concerns the regulation of energy, energy resources, and energy facilities. Among the topics will be the regulation of rates and services; the roles of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the state public utility commissions; and the interaction with environmental law. Attention will be devoted to energy resources (such as oil, natural gas and coal) and to generating, transmission and distribution facilities. The current and future roles of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and nuclear energy will receive special attention, as will the regulation and deregulation of electricity.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2016 001 66872 Michael Gerrard T 4:20pm - 6:10pm
Room TBA

SDEV W3390 GIS for Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Priority given to sustainable development senior and juniors.

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of theoretical concepts underlying GIS systems and to give students a strong set of practical skills to use GIS for sustainable development research. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are a system of computer software, data and analysis methods used to create, store, manage, digital information that allow us to create maps and dynamic models to analyze the physical and social processes of the world. Through a mixture of lectures, readings, focused discussions, and hands-on exercises, students will acquire an understanding of the variety and structure of spatial data and databases, gain knowledge of the principles behind raster and vector based spatial analysis, and learn basic cartographic principles for producing maps that effectively communicate a message. Student will also learn to use newly emerging web based mapping tools such as Google Earth, Google Maps and similar tools to develop on-line interactive maps and graphics. The use of other geospatial technologies such as the Global Positioning System will also be explored in this class. Case studies examined in class will draw examples from a wide ranges of GIS applications developed to assist in the development, implementation and evaluation of sustainable development projects and programs. On completion of the course, students will: 1. use a variety of GIS software programs to create maps and reports; 2. develop a sound knowledge of methods to search, obtain, and evaluate a wide variety of spatial data resources; 3. develop skills needed to determine best practices for managing spatial data resources; 4. use GIS to analyze the economic, social and environmental processes underlying the concept of building a sustainable world; 5. Gain an understanding of the limits of these technologies and make assessments of uncertainty associated with spatial data and spatial analysis models. Offered in the fall and spring.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 61280 Dara Mendeloff M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
252 Engineering Terrace
Spring 2016 001 61280 Dara Mendeloff W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
252 Engineering Terrace
Fall 2016 001 18103 Kytt MacManus M 1:10pm - 2:25pm
252 Engineering Terrace
Fall 2016 001 18103 Kytt MacManus W 1:10pm - 3:30pm
252 Engineering Terrace

SDEV W3400 Human Populations and Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Population processes and their outcomes in terms of population size and distribution have a fundamental role in sustainable development and also broad policy implications. This course will introduce students to the scientific study of human populations as a contribution toward understanding social structure, relations, and dynamics, as well as society-nature interactions. The aim is to offer a basic introduction to the main theories, concepts, measures, and uses of demography. The course will cover the issues of population size, distribution and composition, and consumption, at different scales from global to regional to local, as well as the implications for population-environment relationships. It will also address the fundamental demographic processes of mortality, fertility and migration, including their trends and transitions, We will consider these topics in the context of economic development, sustainability and cultural change. The course will also include an overview of basic demographic techniques and tools used for identifying, managing, analyzing and interpreting population data, and an introduction to population projections. Lab sessions will supplement readings and lectures by enabling students to explore data sources, calculate rates, and graphically represent demographic data. Offered in the Fall (even years).

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2016 001 81762 Susana Adamo T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA

SDEV W3410 Urbanization and Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

The first decade of the 21st century marked the first time in human history when more of world’s population  lived in urban as distinct from rural places. It is impossible to achieve sustainable development in a physical, social or economic manner absent an understanding of the powerful and interdependent relationship between these concepts of sustainability and urbanization. This course explores this vital nexus. Students will gain a more detailed understanding of the ways in which urban life provides opportunities and challenges for addressing climate change, access to water and energy efficiency, among other topics. The intention is to provide students majoring in Sustainable Development with an historic and contemporary understanding of the connections between the process of urbanization that now dominates the world and the range of ways in which that process, directly and indirectly, shapes the challenge of sustainable development. Offered in the Fall (even years).

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Fall 2016 001 78499 Elliott Sclar W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA

SDEV W3450 Spatial Analysis and Modeling for Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Priority given to sustainable development senior and juniors.

This is an intermediate course in spatial modeling developed specifically for students in the undergraduate Sustainable Development program. This course will provide a foundation for understanding a variety of issues related to spatial analysis and modeling.  Students will explore the concepts, tools, and techniques of GIS modeling and review and critique modeling applications used for environmental planning and policy development. The course will also offer students the opportunity to design, build and evaluate their own spatial analysis models. The course will cover both vector and raster based methods of analysis with a strong focus on raster-based modeling.  We will draw examples from a wide range of applications in such areas as modeling Land Use and Land Cover for biodiversity and conservation, hydrological modeling, and site suitability modeling. The course will consist of lectures, reading assignments, lab assignments, and a final project. Offered in the fall and spring. Students must register for required lab: SDEV W3452.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2016 001 81531 Tricia Chai-Onn, Gregory Yetman T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
252 Engineering Terrace

SDEV W3550 Bangladesh: Life on a Tectonically Active Delta. 3 Points.

Open to sustainable development seniors only.

This course will explore the interaction of riverine processes, water and hydrology, sedimentary processes, tectonics, land subsidence and sea level rise, environmental issues, cultural setting, and sustainable development in the world's largest delta. The course will explore both the hazards and resources for life in this dynamic environment through lectures, a field trip to Bangladesh during Spring Break and guest lecturers in earth and social sciences. Offered in Spring.

SDEV W3998 Sustainable Development Independent Study. 1-3 Points.

Sustainable development majors and special concentrators must register for this independent study to use internship hours for the practicum credit. Students must consult with their program adviser and department before registering. Offered fall, spring and summer.

SDEV W4015 Complexity Science. 3 Points.

The Complexity Course is a survey of techniques, applications, and implications of complexity science and complex systems. This course aims to be both an introduction for students from other fields, and a forum for continued discussion within the complexity community. Topics include systems dynamics, chaos, scaling, fattailed distributions, fractals, information theory, emergence, criticality, agentbased models, graph theory, and social networks.

Of Related Interest

Anthropology
ANTH V3924Anthropology and Disaster
Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
CIEE E3250Hydrosystems engineering
CIEE E4163Sustainable Water Treatment and Reuse
Earth and Environmental Engineering (SEAS)
EAEE E3103Energy, minerals and materials systems
EAEE E4001Industrial ecology of earth resources
EAEE E4009Geographic information systems (GIS) for resource, environmental and infrastructure management
EAEE E4160Solid and hazardous waste management
EAEE E4350Planning and management of urban hydrologic systems
ECIA W4100Management and development of water systems
Earth and Environmental Sciences
EESC W4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC W4400Dynamics of Climate Variability and Climate Change
EESC W4917Earth/Human Interactions
Economics
ECON W2257Global Economy
ECON W3211Intermediate Microeconomics
ECON G4301Economic Growth and Development
ECON W4321Economic Development
ECON W4370Political Economy
ECON W4500International Trade
ECON G4527Economic Organization and Development of China
ECON W4625Economics of the Environment
Economics (Barnard)
ECON BC3029Development Economics
Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology
EEEB W3087Conservation Biology
EEEB W4122Fundamentals of Ecology and Evolution
EEEB W4321Human Nature: DNA, Race & Identity
EEEB W4700Race: The Tangled History of a Biological Concept
History
HIST W4400Americans and the Natural World, 1800 to the Present
Sociology
SOCI V2230Food and the Social Order
SOCI W3290Environmental Sociology
SOCI W3960Law, Science, and Society
Urban Studies
URBS V3200Spatial Analysis: GIS Methods and Urban Case Studies
URBS V3550Community Building and Economic Development
URBS V3565Cities in Developing Countries: Problems and Prospects