East Asian Languages and Cultures

Departmental Office: 407 Kent; 212-854-5027
ealac.columbia.edu/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. John Phan, 500A Kent; (212) 854-5744; jp3720@columbia.edu

The program in East Asian studies offers a wide range of courses in a variety of disciplines, as well as training in the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Tibetan languages. The program is designed to provide a coherent curriculum for undergraduates wishing to major in East Asian studies, with disciplinary specialization in anthropology, art history, economics, history, literature, philosophy, political science, sociology, or religion. The department also offers a series of introductory and thematic courses especially designed for students seeking to acquire some knowledge of East Asia as part of their broader undergraduate experience.

Admission to Language Courses

All students wishing to enter the language program at another point besides the first term of the first level must pass a language placement test before registering. The language placement exams are held during the change of program period, the week before classes begin.

Students who have been absent from the campus for one term or more must take a placement test before enrolling in a language course beyond the first term of the first level.

Students who wish to place out of the Columbia College Foreign Language Requirement for a language taught in the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures must consult with the director of the relevant language program. The names of the directors, and additional information about East Asian language programs, can be accessed via the department website at ealac.columbia.edu.

Language Laboratory

An additional hour of study in the language laboratory is required in first-year Japanese (JPNS UN101 and JPNS UN1102). 

JPNS UN1101
 - JPNS UN1102
First-Year Japanese I
and First-Year Japanese II

Students taking these courses must attend all assigned language laboratory sessions. Grades for written and oral work in the language laboratory and for additional work in oral drill sessions count as 10% of the final grade in the course. Assignments of laboratory hours are made during the first session of the regular classes.

Course Numbering

The following are general guidelines to the numbering of department courses open to undergraduates. Students with questions about the nature of a course should consult with the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies.

  • 1000-level: Introductory-level undergraduate courses and first-year language courses
  • 2000-level: Intermediate-level undergraduate courses and second-year language courses
  • 3000-level: Advanced-level undergraduate courses and third-year language courses
  • 4000-level: Advanced courses geared toward undergraduate students available to graduate students or geared toward both undergraduate and graduate students, fourth-year and above language courses

Study Abroad

East Asian Studies majors or concentrators who plan to spend their junior spring abroad must contact the director of undergraduate studies for information about course selection in the sophomore year. 

The Kyoto Center for Japanese Studies

The Kyoto Center offers Columbia students the opportunity to study in Japan in a program combining intensive instruction in the Japanese language with courses taught in English on a wide range of topics in Japanese studies. Students should have at least the equivalent of two years of Japanese by the time of their departure. The program is most appropriate for the junior year, although other arrangements are considered.

East Asian Studies majors or concentrators who opt to spend their junior spring at the Kyoto Center must take the required disciplinary and senior thesis-related courses in the spring of their sophomore year (contact the director of undergraduate studies for details). For further information about the Kyoto Center, please consult Robin Leephaibul: rl2705@columbia.edu.

Grading

Courses in which the grade of D or P has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements.

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors are conferred only on East Asian Studies majors who have earned a grade point average of at least 3.6 for courses in the major, have pursued a rigorous and ambitious program of study, and have submitted senior theses of superior quality, clearly demonstrating originality and excellent scholarship. Qualified seniors are nominated by their thesis advisers. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year. Concentrators are not eligible for departmental honors.

Professors

  • Paul Anderer
  • Bernard Faure
  • Carol Gluck (History)
  • Robert Hymes
  • Theodore Hughes
  • Dorothy Ko (Barnard History)
    Eugenia Lean
  • Feng Li
    Lening Liu
  • Lydia Liu
  • D. Max Moerman (Barnard)
  • Wei Shang (Vice Chair)
  • Haruo Shirane (Chair)
  • Tomi Suzuki
    Gray Tuttle
  • Madeleine Zelin

Associate Professors

  • Michael Como (Religion)
  • David Lurie
  • Lien-Hang Nguyen (History)
  • Gregory Pflugfelder

Assistant Professors

  • Nicholas Barlett (Barnard)
  • Jue Guo (Barnard)
  • Harrison Huang
  • Jungwon Kim
    Seong Uk Kim
  • Paul Kreitman
  • John Phan
  • Ying Qian
    Takuya Tsunoda
  • Zhaohua Yang (Religion)

Affiliated Faculty

Robert Harrist (Art History)
Matthew McKelway (Art History)
Jonathan Reynolds (Art History, Barnard)

Senior Lecturers

  • Shigeru Eguchi
  • Yuan-Yuan Meng
  • Fumiko Nazikian
  • Miharu Nittono
  • Zhongqi Shi
    Joowon Suh
  • Zhirong Wang
    Ling Yan

Lecturers

Yu-Shan Chen
Eunice Chung
Lingjun Hu
Tianqi Jiang
Ji-Young Jung
Ulug Kuzuoglu
Beom Lee
Huijuan Liu
Liping Liu
Kyoko Loetscher
Yuka Nakazato
Chung Nguyen
Keiko Okamoto
Jisuk Park
Shaoyan Qi
Junli Shen
Sunhee Song
Naofumi Tatsumi
Sonam Tsering
Feng Wang
Hailong Wang
Xiaodan Wang
Chen Wu
Jia Xu
Hyunkyu Yi

Adjunct Faculty

Seunghee Back
Pema Bhum
Patrick Booz
Yongjun Choi
Karl Debreczeny
Leta Hong Fincher
Hey-Ryoun Hong
Vinh Nguyen
Andrew Plaks
Morris Rossabi
Seunghyo Ryu
Gahye Song
Ximo (Molly Tong)
Konchog Tseten
Yan Wang
Eveline Washul
Charles Woolley
Yaxi Zheng

On Leave (Fall 2019)

Paul Anderer
Eunice Chung
Harrison Huang
Theodore Hughes
Robert Hymes
Jisuk Park
Paul Kreitman
D. Max Moerman

Major in East Asian Studies

The requirements for this program were modified in the Spring 2017 semester. Students who declared an EAS major before this semester have the option of following the old or the new requirements. If you have any questions, please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Prerequisite

Students must meet the following prerequisite prior to declaring the East Asian Studies major: two years of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan, or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). 

Language Requirement

Third-year Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan (completion of the UN3005-UN3006 level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean; TIBT UN3611-UN3612 level in Tibetan), or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination).  Students of Chinese may also complete UN3003-UN3004 to meet the third-year requirement.

One of the following sequences (in the target language):
CHNS UN3003
 - CHNS UN3004
Third-Year Chinese I (N)
and Third-Year Chinese II (N)
Or, for heritage students:
Third-Year Chinese I (W)
and Third-Year Chinese II (W)
JPNS UN3005
 - JPNS UN3006
Third-Year Japanese I
and Third-Year Japanese II
KORN UN3005
 - KORN UN3006
Third-Year Korean I
and Third-Year Korean II
TIBT UN3611
 - TIBT UN3612
Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I
and Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan II

Students who test out of three years or more of a language must take an additional year of that language or another East Asian language at Columbia in order to satisfy the language requirement.

Introductory Courses

Students are required to take:
AHUM UN1400Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia
Students must also select two of the following:
ASCE UN1359Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China
ASCE UN1361Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan
ASCE UN1363Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea
ASCE UN1365Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet
ASCE UN1367Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Vietnam

First-year students and sophomores, prior to declaring an East Asian studies major, are strongly urged to take one or more of the introductory courses.

Methodology Course

All majors must also take EAAS UN3990 Approaches to East Asian Studies which is offered every spring.

Elective Courses

For students must take four elective courses in East Asian studies, to be chosen in consultation with the DUS. Two of these courses must be EALAC or AMEC courses. Courses in a second East Asian language (one year minimum) or a classical East Asian language (one semester minimum) may be used to fulfill one elective course.

Senior Thesis Program

East Asian Studies majors who wish to write a senior thesis apply to the EALAC Senior Thesis Program at the end of their junior year. Students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.6 in courses taken in the major at the time of the application. Students interested in applying to the Senior Thesis Program should submit the EALAC Senior Thesis Program Application (see Undergraduate Planning Sheets and Forms) to the DUS by Friday, May 26, 2019. Decisions will be made by Friday, May 10.

All potential thesis writers are required to enroll in the Senior Thesis Research Workshop (EAAS UN3999) in the fall of the senior year. Students who perform satisfactorily in this workshop, successfully complete a thesis proposal, and find a faculty adviser will then write the Senior Thesis itself in the spring semester under the direction of the adviser and a graduate student tutor (EAAS UN3901).

The senior thesis typically consists of about 30-35 pages of text (double-spaced, normal typeface and margins) and 5-8 pages of references. Under no circumstances should a thesis exceed a total of 50 pages (including references), without the special permission of the faculty adviser.

Successful completion of the thesis by the April 1 deadline in the spring semester will be necessary but not sufficient for a student to receive departmental honors. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year; as such, not all thesis writers will receive honors.


Concentration in East Asian Studies

Prerequisite

Students must meet the following prerequisite prior to declaring the East Asian Studies concentration: two years of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan, or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). 

Language Requirement

Third-year Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan (completion of the UN3005-UN3006 level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean; TIBT UN3611-UN3612 level in Tibetan), or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination).  Students of Chinese may also complete UN3003-UN3004 to meet the third-year requirement.

One of the following sequences (in the target language):
CHNS UN3003
 - CHNS UN3004
Third-Year Chinese I (N)
and Third-Year Chinese II (N)
Or, for heritage students:
Third-Year Chinese I (W)
and Third-Year Chinese II (W)
JPNS UN3005
 - JPNS UN3006
Third-Year Japanese I
and Third-Year Japanese II
KORN UN3005
 - KORN UN3006
Third-Year Korean I
and Third-Year Korean II
TIBT UN3611
 - TIBT UN3612
Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I
and Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan II

Students who test out of a third-year level East Asian language must take either an additional year of the same language, one year of a classical East Asian language, one year of an additional East Asian language, or two electives.

Introductory Courses

AHUM UN1400Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia
Select one of the following:
ASCE UN1359Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China
ASCE UN1361Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan
ASCE UN1363Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea
ASCE UN1365Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet
ASCE UN1367Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Vietnam

Electives

Two courses in East Asian Studies at Columbia or Barnard at the 3000- or 4000-level, subject to approval by the DUS. Concentrators may count Classical Chinese, Classical Japanese, or Classical Tibetan as one of the electives for this requirement.

Concentrators are not eligible for the Senior Thesis Program or for departmental honors.

NOTE: Courses without scheduling information are not offered during this current semester.  Please also consult the Directory of Classes for course information before emailing the contact below.

For questions, please contact Youngmi Jin (yj2180@columbia.edu).

Content Courses

ASCE UN1359 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE UN1360

The evolution of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on characteristic institutions and traditions.

Spring 2019: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/68821 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Robert Hymes 4 54/90
Fall 2019: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/44383 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Ulug Kuzuoglu 4 82/90

ASCE UN1361 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371

A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century.

Spring 2019: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/16983 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Gregory Pflugfelder 4 70/90
Fall 2019: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/44438 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
David Lurie 4 74/90

ASCE UN1365 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course seeks to introduce the sweep of Tibetan civilization and its history from its earliest recorded origins to the present. The course examines what civilizational forces shaped Tibet, especially the contributions of Indian Buddhism, sciences and literature, but also Chinese statecraft and sciences. Alongside the chronological history of Tibet, we will explore aspects of social life and culture.

Fall 2019: ASCE UN1365
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1365 001/44512 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Patrick Booz 4 95/90

ASCE UN1367 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Vietnam. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Corequisites: ASCE UN1377

This course provides a survey of Vietnamese civilization from prehistoric origins to the French colonization in the 19th century, with special emphasis on the rise and development of independent kingship over the 2nd millennium CE.  We begin by exploring ethnolinguistic diversity of the Red River plain over the first millenium BCE, culminating in the material bronze culture known as the Dong Son.  We then turn towards the introduction of high sinitic culture, and the region's long membership within successive Chinese empires.  We pay special attention to the rise of an independent state out of the crumbling Tang Dynasty, and the specific nation-building effects of war with the Mongols and the Ming Dynasty, in the 14th and 15th centuries respectively.  Our class ends with the French colonization of the region, and the dramatic cultural and intellectual transformations that were triggered as a result.  Our course will interrogate Vietnamese culture as a protean object, one that is defined and redefined at virtually every level, throughout a history marked by foreign interest, influence, and invasion.

Fall 2019: ASCE UN1367
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1367 001/44384 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
5ab Kraft Center
John Phan 4 56/60

AHUM UN1400 Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Spring 2019: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/25108 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Paul Anderer 4 19/22
AHUM 1400 002/68388 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Michael Como 4 18/22
AHUM 1400 003/65702 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Itsuki Hayashi 4 27/22
AHUM 1400 004/29600 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Seong-Uk Kim 4 20/22
Fall 2019: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/44432 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
201a Philosophy Hall
Seong-Uk Kim 4 21/22
AHUM 1400 002/07112 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
119 Milstein Center
Jue Guo 4 14/22
AHUM 1400 003/44433 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
John Phan 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 004/10216 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Chi Zhang 4 22/20

EAAS UN3322 East Asian Cinema. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course introduces students to major works, genres and waves of East Asian cinema from the Silent era to the present, including films from Japan, Korea, Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. How has cinema participated in East Asian societies’ distinct and shared experiences of industrial modernity, imperialism and (post)colonialism? How has cinema engaged with questions of class, gender, ethnic and language politics? In what ways has cinema facilitated transnational circulations and mobilizations of peoples and ideas, and how has it interacted with other art forms, such as theatre, painting, photography and music? In this class, we answer these questions by studying cinemas across the region sideby- side, understanding cinema as deeply embedded in the region’s intertwining political, social and cultural histories and circulations of people and ideas. We cover a variety of genres such as melodrama, comedy, historical epic, sci-fi, martial arts and action, and prominent film auteurs such as Yasujirō Ozu, Akira Kurosawa, Yu Hyŏnmok, Chen Kaige, Hou Hsiao-hsien, and Ann Hui. As cinema is, among other things, a creative practice, in this course, students will be given opportunities to respond to films analytically and creatively, through writing as well as creative visual projects. As a global core course, this class does not assume prior knowledge of East Asian culture or of film studies.

Spring 2019: EAAS UN3322
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3322 001/12164 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
317 Hamilton Hall
Takuya Tsunoda 4 18/15
Fall 2019: EAAS UN3322
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3322 001/44532 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
903 School Of Social Work
Ying Qian 4 39/50

EAAS UN3343 Japanese Contemporary Cinema and Media Culture. 4 points.

In this course, we will look at the contemporary history and theory of cinema and media culture in Japan.  To be more specific, the course will closely examine 1) the various traits of postmodern Japanese cinemas in the 1980s and the 1990s after the phase of global cinematic modernism, 2) contemporary media phenomena such as media convergence and the media ecologies of anime, 3) media activism after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, and beyond.  We will proceed through careful analysis of films, anime, and digital media, while also addressing larger questions of historiography in general.  In other words, this course asks, what is it to study Japanese cinema and media (outside Japan)?  What would be a heuristic narrative mode to examine the (trans-)national history of Japanese cinema and media?  Such inquiries will be integrated into the ways we analyze and discuss the films and media works selected for our weekly screenings.


The readings will extend the realm of the course topics to include broader cultural criticism in an attempt to surface the interrelation of (audio-)visual media and culture in Japan.

Fall 2019: EAAS UN3343
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3343 001/44369 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
602 Northwest Corner
Takuya Tsunoda 4 29/30

EAAS UN3338 Cultural History of Japanese Monsters. 3 points.

Priority is given to EALAC and History majors, as well as to those who have done previous coursework on Japan.

From Godzilla to Pokemon (literally, "pocket monster") toys, Japanese monsters have become a staple commodity of late-capitalist global pop culture. This course seeks to place this phenomenon within a longer historical, as well as a broader cross-cultural, context. Through an examination of texts and images spanning over thirteen centuries of Japanese history, along with comparable productions from other cultures, students will gain an understanding not only of different conceptions and representations of monsters, ghosts, and other supernatural creatures in Japan, but also of the role of the "monstrous" in the cultural imagination more generally. The course draws on various media and genres of representation, ranging from written works, both literary and scholarly, to the visual arts, material culture, drama, and cinema. Readings average 100-150 pages per week. Several film and video screenings are scheduled in addition to the regular class meetings. Seating is limited, with final admission based on a written essay and other information to be submitted to the instructor before the beginning of the semester.

Fall 2019: EAAS UN3338
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3338 001/44511 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
101 Kent Hall
Gregory Pflugfelder 3 9/13

HSEA UN3871 Modern Japan: Images and Words. 3 points.

This course relies primarily on visual materials to familiarize students with the history of Japan from the beginning of the nineteenth century through the present. It follows a chronological order, introducing students to various realms of Japanese visual culture—from woodblock prints to film, anime, and manga—along with the historical contexts that they were shaped by, and in turn helped shape. Special attention will paid to the visual technologies of nation-building, war, and empire; to historical interactions between Japanese and Euro-American visual culture; to the operations of still versus moving images; and to the mass production of visual commodities for the global marketplace. Students who take the course will emerge not only with a better understanding of Japan’s modern historical experience, but also with a more discerning eye for the ways that images convey meaning and offer access to the past.

Spring 2019: HSEA UN3871
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 3871 001/68314 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Gregory Pflugfelder 3 11/18
Fall 2019: HSEA UN3871
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 3871 001/44516 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
633 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Gregory Pflugfelder 3 6/18

EAAS UN3990 Approaches to East Asian Studies. 4 points.

Enrollment is limited to EALAC and AMEC majors and concentrators only.

This course is intended to provide a focal point for undergraduate majors in East Asian Studies. It introduces students to the analysis of particular objects of East Asian historical, literary, and cultural studies from various disciplinary perspectives. The syllabus is composed of a series of modules, each centered around an object, accompanied by readings that introduce different ways of understanding its meaning.

Spring 2019: EAAS UN3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3990 001/23542 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Robert Hymes 4 25/25
Fall 2019: EAAS UN3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3990 001/44521 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
411 Kent Hall
Feng Li 4 22/25

EAAS UN3999 Research in East Asian Studies. 1 point.

Introduces students to research and writing techniques and requires the preparation of a senior thesis proposal. Required for majors and concentrators in the East Asian studies major in the spring term of the junior year.

Fall 2019: EAAS UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3999 001/44404 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
522d Kent Hall
Xiao Xiao, Yuqing Luo 1 11/25

EAAS GU4123 Japanese Documentary Films. 4 points.

This course investigates the theories and practices of documentary film in Japan. Spanning from the 1920s to the present, we will engage in rigorous examination of the transformations of cinematic forms and contents, and of the social, cultural, and political elements bound up with those transformations. We will also juxtapose aspects of Japanese documentary film with global movements, and wider theories of documentary and non-fiction.

HSEA GU4222 China's Global Histories: People, Space, and Power. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This seminar asks what Chinese history tells us about global history and vice versa. Taking a long-term and multiregional approach, it invites you to develop your own answers to this question from perspectives such as trade and economy, migration and immigration, empire and imperialism, war, religion, science, gender, ideology, and modern state- and nation-building, and contemporary international relations. We will not only challenge Eurocentric and Sinocentric methodologies, but push toward new conceptual vocabularies that aspire to the genuinely global.

EAAS GU4226 Gender, Class and Real Estate in Urbanizing China. 4 points.

This is a seminar for advanced undergraduates and master’s degree students, which explores the socioeconomic consequences of China’s development of a boom, urban residential real-estate market since the privatization of housing at the end of the 1990s. We will use the intersecting lenses of gender/sexuality, class and race/ethnicity to analyze the dramatic new inequalities created in arguably the largest and fastest accumulation of residential-real estate wealth in history. We will examine topics such as how skyrocketing home prices and state-led urbanization have created winners and losers based on gender, sexuality, class, race/ethnicity and location (hukou), as China strives to transform from a predominantly rural population to one that is 60 percent urban by 2020. We explore the vastly divergent effects of urban real-estate development on Chinese citizens, from the most marginaliz4d communities in remote regions of Tibet and Xinjiang to hyper-wealthy investors in Manhattan. Although this course has no formal prerequisites, it assumes some basic knowledge of Chinese history. If you have never taken a course on China before, please ask me for guidance on whether or not this class is suitable for you. The syllabus is preliminary and subject to change based on breaking news events and the needs of the class.

Fall 2019: EAAS GU4226
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4226 001/44524 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Leta Hong Fincher 4 15/25

EARL GU4324 Religion and Politics in Korea. 4 points.

This course explores diverse aspects of the interactions between religion and politics in modern, pre-modern, and contemporary Korea. It focuses on how Korean religions such as Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, and new religions have influenced and been influenced by politics, thereby leading to the mutual transformation of the two major social phenomena.

Fall 2019: EARL GU4324
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4324 001/44523 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Seong-Uk Kim 4 12/15

HSEA GU4814 Space and Place in Urbanizing Tibet: Indigenous Experiences in China. 4 points.

This course engages with approaches from anthropology, geography, and indigenous studies to analyze contemporary urban transitions on the Tibetan plateau.

HSEA GU4815 Faith and Empire: Art and Politics in Tibetan Buddhism. 4 points.

Religious claims to political power are a global phenomenon, and Tibetan Buddhism once offered a divine means to power and legitimacy to rule. This class will explore the intersection of politics, religion, and art in Tibetan Buddhism--the force of religion to claim political power. Images were one of the primary means of political propagation, integral to magical tantric rites, and embodiments of power.

HSEA GU4880 History of Modern China I. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

China’s transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

Fall 2019: HSEA GU4880
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4880 001/44472 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
413 Kent Hall
Madeleine Zelin 3 45/60

Chinese Language Courses

CHNS UN1011 Introductory Chinese B. 2.5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18.

Prerequisites: CHNS W1010y (offered in the Spring only) or the equivalent.

The program is designed to develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing colloquial Chinese. This course (Part II) is offered in the Fall only. The two parts (I and II) together cover the same materials as Chinese C1101/F1101 (Fall) and fulfill the requirement for admission to Chinese C1102/F1102 (Spring). Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS UN1011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1011 001/44393 M W 8:50am - 9:55am
255 International Affairs Bldg
Cheng Ji 2.5 6/12
CHNS 1011 002/44394 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Cheng Ji 2.5 7/12

CHNS UN1101 First-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

The course is designed to develop basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing modern colloquial Chinese. Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Students who can already speak Mandarin will not be accepted into this course. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1101 001/44459 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
306 Hamilton Hall
Huijuan Liu 5 11/12
CHNS 1101 002/44460 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
537 Grace Dodge Hall (Tc)
Chen Wu 5 12/12
CHNS 1101 003/44461 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
522a Kent Hall
Liping Liu 5 4/12
CHNS 1101 004/44462 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
522d Kent Hall
Lingjun Hu 5 12/12
CHNS 1101 005/44463 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Tianqi Jiang 5 11/12
CHNS 1101 006/44464 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Ling Yan 5 13/12
CHNS 1101 007/44465 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
423 Kent Hall
Ximo Tong 5 4/12

CHNS UN1111 First-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

The course is specially designed for students of Chinese heritage and advanced beginners with good speaking skills. It aims to develop the student's basic skills to read and write modern colloquial Chinese. Pinyin system is introduced; standard Chinese pronunciation, and traditional characters. Classes will be conducted mostly in Chinese. Open to students with Mandarin speaking ability in Chinese only. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS UN1111
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1111 001/44466 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
337 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Tianqi Jiang 5 16/12
CHNS 1111 002/44467 M T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Hailong Wang 5 16/18

CHNS UN2201 Second-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1101-1102 or CHNS F1101-1102, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Designed to further the student's four skills acquired in the elementary course, this program aims to develop higher level of proficiency through comprehensive oral and written exercises. Cultural aspects in everyday situations are introduced. Traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2201 001/44447 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
501 Milbank Hall
Feng Wang 5 10/12
CHNS 2201 002/44448 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Jia Xu 5 15/12
CHNS 2201 003/44449 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
424 Kent Hall
5 7/12
CHNS 2201 004/44450 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Junli Shen 5 12/12
CHNS 2201 005/44451 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Cheng Ji 5 12/12
CHNS 2201 006/44452 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Yaxi Zheng 5 6/12

CHNS UN2221 Second-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS UN1112 or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Continuation of CHNS UN1112, with a focus on reading comprehension and written Chinese. Traditional characters. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS UN2221
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2221 001/44513 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Junli Shen 5 11/12
CHNS 2221 002/44514 M W Th 12:10pm - 1:25pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Feng Wang 5 5/12

CHNS UN3003 Third-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1202 or F1202, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

This course fulfills the language requirement for east Asian studies majors. Prepares for more advanced study of Chinese through rigorous vocabulary expansion, more sophisticated language usage patterns, and introduction to basics of formal and literary styles. Materials are designed to advance the student's fluency for everyday communicative tasks as well as reading skills. Simplified characters are introduced. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS UN3003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3003 001/44395 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
313 Hamilton Hall
Zhirong Wang 5 5/12
CHNS 3003 002/44396 M W 10:10am - 11:15am
405 Kent Hall
Huijuan Liu 5 9/12
CHNS 3003 002/44396 T Th 10:10am - 11:15am
407 Mathematics Building
Huijuan Liu 5 9/12
CHNS 3003 003/44397 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
543 Grace Dodge Hall (Tc)
Lingjun Hu 5 9/12
CHNS 3003 004/44398 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Zhong Qi Shi 5 8/12
CHNS 3003 005/44399 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
326 International Affairs Bldg
Liping Liu 5 6/12

CHNS UN3005 Third-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1222 or F1222, or the equivalent.

Admission after Chinese placement exam and an oral proficiency interview with the instructor. Especially designed for students who possess good speaking ability and who wish to acquire practical writing skills as well as business-related vocabulary and speech patterns. Introduction to semiformal and formal Chinese used in everyday writing and social or business-related occasions. Simplified characters are introduced.

Fall 2019: CHNS UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3005 001/44453 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Hailong Wang 5 15/18

CHNS GU4012 Business Chinese. 5 points.

Prerequisites: two years of Chinese study at college level.

This course is designed for students who have studied Chinese for two years at college level and are interested in business studies concerning China. It offers systematic descriptions of Chinese language used in business discourse. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS GU4012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4012 001/44454 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
253 Engineering Terrace
Zhong Qi Shi 5 13/12

CHNS GU4014 Media Chinese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least 3 years of intensive Chinese language training at college level and the instructor's permission.

This advanced course is designed to specifically train students' listening and speaking skills in both formal and colloquial language through various Chinese media sources. Students view and discuss excerpts of Chinese TV news broadcasts, soap operas, and movie segments on a regular basis. Close reading of newspaper and internet articles and blogs supplements the training of verbal skills.

Fall 2019: CHNS GU4014
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4014 001/44389 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
6c Kraft Center
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 11/13
CHNS 4014 002/44390 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
6c Kraft Center
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 4/12

CHNS GU4015 Fourth-Year Chinese I (N). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4004 or the equivalent.

Implements a wide range of reading materials to enhance the student’s speaking and writing as well as reading skills. Supplemented by television broadcast news, also provides students with strategies to increase their comprehension of formal style of modern Chinese. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2019: CHNS GU4015
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4015 001/14059 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
6c Kraft Center
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 8/12
CHNS 4015 002/24071 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
6c Kraft Center
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 5/12
Fall 2019: CHNS GU4015
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4015 001/44411 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Jia Xu 4 9/12
CHNS 4015 002/44412 M W Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Ling Yan 4 6/12

CHNS GU4017 Readings In Modern Chinese I (W) (Level 4). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4006 or the equivalent.

This is a non-consecutive reading course designed for those whose proficiency is above 4th level. See Admission to Language Courses. Selections from contemporary Chinese authors in both traditional and simplified characters with attention to expository, journalistic, and literary styles.

Fall 2019: CHNS GU4017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4017 001/44391 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
537 Grace Dodge Hall (Tc)
Chen Wu 4 4/12

CHNS GU4018 Readings In Modern Chinese II (W) (Level 4). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4017 or the equivalent.

This is a non-consecutive reading course designed for those whose proficiency is above 4th level. See Admission to Language Courses. Selections from contemporary Chinese authors in both traditional and simplified characters with attention to expository, journalistic, and literary styles.

CHNS GU4019 History of Chinese Language. 3 points.

Introduces the evolution of Chinese language. It reveals the major changes in Chinese sound, writing and grammar systems, and social and linguistic factors which caused these changes. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Spring 2019: CHNS GU4019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4019 001/75150 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
423 Kent Hall
Zhirong Wang 3 10/15
Fall 2019: CHNS GU4019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4019 001/44401 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
522d Kent Hall
Zhirong Wang 3 8/12

CHNS GU4301 Introduction To Classical Chinese I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

Fall 2019: CHNS GU4301
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4301 001/44455 M W F 11:00am - 11:50am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Lening Liu 3 15/15

CHNS GU4507 Readings in Classical Chinese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W3302 or the equivalent.

Admission after placement exam. Focusing on Tang and Song prose and poetry, introduces a broad variety of genres through close readings of chosen texts as well as the specific methods, skills, and tools to approach them. Strong emphasis on the grammatical and stylistic analysis of representative works. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2019: CHNS GU4507
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4507 001/44380 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
411 Kent Hall
Wei Shang 4 18/20

CHNS GU4516 FIFTH YEAR CHINESE I. 4 points.

updating...

Fall 2019: CHNS GU4516
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4516 001/44392 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
326 International Affairs Bldg
Lening Liu 4 12/12

CHNS GU4904 Acquisition of Chinese as a Second Language. 4 points.

For more than forty years, second language acquisition (SLA) has been emerging as an independent field of inquiry with its own research agenda and theoretical paradigms. The study of SLA is inherently interdisciplinary, as it draws on scholarship from the fields of linguistics, psychology, education, and sociology. This course explores how Chinese is acquired by non-native speakers. Students will learn about general phenomena and patterns during the process of acquiring a new language. They will become familiar with important core concepts, theoretical frameworks, and research practices of the field of SLA, with Chinese as the linguistic focus.

Fall 2019: CHNS GU4904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4904 001/44456 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Shaoyan Qi 4 7/12

Japanese Language Courses

JPNS UN1002 Introductory Japanese B. 2.5 points.

Prerequisites: C+ or above in JPNS W1001 or pass the placement test.

The sequence begins in the spring term. JPNS W1001-W1002 is equivalent to JPNS C1101 or F1101 and fulfills the requirement for admission to JPNS C1102 or F1102. Aims at the acquisition of basic Japanese grammar and Japanese culture with an emphasis on accurate communication in speaking and writing. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Fall 2019: JPNS UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1002 001/44414 M W 5:40pm - 6:45pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Yuka Nakazato 2.5 10/15
JPNS 1002 002/44415 T Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
522d Kent Hall
Yuka Nakazato 2.5 9/15

JPNS UN1101 First-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Lab Required

Basic training in Japanese through speaking, listening, reading and writing in various cultural contexts. 

Fall 2019: JPNS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1101 001/44478 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
4a Kraft Center
Mayumi Nishida 5 15/15
JPNS 1101 002/44479 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
4c Kraft Center
Fumiko Nazikian 5 15/15
JPNS 1101 003/44480 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 14/15
JPNS 1101 004/44481 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Keiko Okamoto 5 19/15
JPNS 1101 005/44482 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522d Kent Hall
Yuka Nakazato 5 17/15
JPNS 1101 006/18078 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
522a Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 5 14/12

JPNS UN2201 Second-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Lab Required

Prerequisites: JPNS C1102 or the equivalent.

Further practice in the four language skills. Participation in a once a week conversation class is required.

Fall 2019: JPNS UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 2201 001/44373 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
4c Kraft Center
Fumiko Nazikian 5 12/15
JPNS 2201 002/44374 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
4a Kraft Center
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 7/15
JPNS 2201 004/44376 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 5 16/15

JPNS UN3005 Third-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS C1202 or the equivalent.

Readings in authentic/semi-authentic texts, videos, and class discussions.

Fall 2019: JPNS UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 3005 001/44416 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
423 Kent Hall
Keiko Okamoto 5 8/15
JPNS 3005 002/44417 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
423 Kent Hall
Kyoko Loetscher 5 10/15

JPNS UN3610 Tokyo Olympics Japanese - N2 Level Proficiency. . points.

Prerequisites: Completion of Second-Year Japanese or above.

This course is intended to prepare students for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) N2 level, which will be administered by the Japan Foundation on December 1, 2019. With nearly 890,000 people taking the JLPT in 2017 compared to 750,000 in 2016, this test has shown to be a reliable means by which to evaluate the Japanese proficiency of non-native speakers. Passing this test, therefore, provides students with more opportunities to work in Japan, to study at Japanese universities, or to receive scholarships to further their Japanese studies. The JLPT can also help earn students a position working for the Tokyo Olympics, which will take place in the summer of 2020.

JPNS GU4007 Introduction To Classical Japanese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS C1202 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Japanese grammar. Trains students to read Japanese historical and literary texts from the early period up to the 20th century.

Fall 2019: JPNS GU4007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4007 001/44427 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
304 Hamilton Hall
Charles Woolley 4 7/15

JPNS GU4012 Fourth Year Business Japanese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Third Year Level Japanese I and II, or equivalent.

This course is designed for intermediate students to acquire advanced Japanese proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, writing, and reading with the focus on using Japanese in business settings. The main objective of this course is to foster not only students' practical communication skills in business Japanese but also to develop their ability to carry out business activities in a global society (a society of multiple languages and cultures) by incorporating interdisciplinary subjects.

JPNS GU4017 Fourth-Year Japanese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4006 or the equivalent.

Sections 1 & 2: Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political, and journalistic texts, and class discussions about current issues and videos. Exercises in scanning, comprehension, and English translation. Section 3: Designed for advanced students interested in developing skills for reading and comprehending modern Japanese scholarship.

Fall 2019: JPNS GU4017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4017 001/44483 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
411 Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 4 13/12

JPNS GU4610 Tokyo Olympics Japanese - N1 Level Proficiency. . points.

Prerequisites: Completion of Third Year Japanese or above

This course is intended to prepare students for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) N1 level, which will be administered by the Japan Foundation on December 1, 2019. With nearly 890,000 people taking the JLPT in 2017 compared to 750,000 in 2016, this test has shown to be a reliable means by which to evaluate the Japanese proficiency of non-native speakers. Passing this test, therefore, provides students with more opportunities to work in Japan, to study at Japanese universities, or to receive scholarships to further their Japanese studies. The JLPT can also help earn students a position working for the Tokyo Olympics, which will take place in the summer of 2020.

Korean Language Courses

KORN UN1002 Introductory Korean B. 2.5 points.

This course provides basic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean. Elementary Korean A (1001y) is equivalent to the first half of Elementary Korean I. Elementary Korean B (1002x) is equivalent to the second half of Elementary Korean I.

Fall 2019: KORN UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1002 001/44377 M W 2:40pm - 3:45pm
501 International Affairs Bldg
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 12/14
KORN 1002 002/44378 T Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 8/14
KORN 1002 003/44517 M W 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522c Kent Hall
Ji-Young Jung 2.5 6/14

KORN UN1101 First-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Lab Required
Students who are unsure which section to register for should see the director of the Korean Language Program.

An introduction to written and spoken Korean. Textbook: Integrated Korean, Beginning I and II.

Fall 2019: KORN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1101 002/44421 T Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Hey-Ryoun Hong 5 13/14
KORN 1101 002/44421 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Hey-Ryoun Hong 5 13/14
KORN 1101 003/44422 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
411 Hamilton Hall
Ji-Young Jung 5 14/14
KORN 1101 004/44423 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Joowon Suh 5 10/14
KORN 1101 005/44518 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Gahye Song 5 11/14

KORN UN2201 Second-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1102 or the equivalent. Consultation with the instructors is required before registration for section assignment.

Further practice in reading, writing, listening comprehension, conversation, and grammar.

Fall 2019: KORN UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 2201 001/44429 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Seunghee Back 5 14/14
KORN 2201 002/44430 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
4a Kraft Center
Beom Lee 5 11/14
KORN 2201 003/44431 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
4a Kraft Center
Beom Lee 5 13/14
KORN 2201 004/44519 M W 4:10pm - 5:15pm
407 Hamilton Hall
YongJun Choi 5 4/14
KORN 2201 004/44519 T Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
411 Kent Hall
YongJun Choi 5 4/14

KORN UN3005 Third-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1202 or the equivalent and consultation with instructor. (See Entrance to Language Courses Beyond the Elementary Level in the main bulletin under Department of Instruction -- East Asian Languages and Cultures.)

Readings in modern Korean. Selections from modern Korean writings in literature, history, social sciences, culture, and videos and class discussions.

Fall 2019: KORN UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 3005 001/44424 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Hyunkyu Yi 5 12/14
KORN 3005 002/44425 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Ji-Young Jung 5 12/14

KORN GU4105 Fourth-Year Korean I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4006 or the equivalent.

Selections from advanced modern Korean writings in social sciences, literature, culture, history, journalistic texts, and intensive conversation exercises.

Fall 2019: KORN GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 4105 001/44379 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
602 Northwest Corner
Beom Lee 4 12/12

KORN GU4511 FIFTH YEAR KOREAN I. 4 points.

Please see department for details.

Fall 2019: KORN GU4511
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 4511 001/44487 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
402 Kent Hall
Joowon Suh 4 4/12

Tibetan Language Courses

TIBT UN1410 FIRST YEAR CLASSICAL TIBETAN I. 4 points.

First year Classical Tibetan

Fall 2019: TIBT UN1410
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 1410 001/44496 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
352b International Affairs Bldg
Kunchog Tseten 4 2/15

TIBT UN1600 First Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 5 points.

This is an introductory course and no previous knowledge is required. It focuses on developing basic abilities to speak as well as to read and write in modern Tibetan, Lhasa dialect. Students are also introduced to modern Tibetan studies through selected readings and guest lectures.

Fall 2019: TIBT UN1600
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 1600 001/44498 M T W Th 12:10pm - 1:00pm
352b International Affairs Bldg
Sonam Tsering 5 7/15

TIBT UN3611 Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the Second Year course. The course develops students’ reading comprehension skills through reading selected modern Tibetan literature. Tibetan is used as the medium of instruction and interaction to develop oral fluency and proficiency.

Fall 2019: TIBT UN3611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 3611 001/44501 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
351c International Affairs Bldg
Sonam Tsering 4 3/15

Vietnamese Language Courses

VIET UN1101 First Year Vietnamese I. 5 points.

This course introduces students to the linguistic and grammatical structures of Vietnamese, a major language of Southeast Asia.  Language skills include listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Students will also be introduced to some aspects of Vietnamese life and culture

Fall 2019: VIET UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIET 1101 001/44400 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Chung Nguyen 5 8/15

VIET UN2101 SECOND YEAR VIETNAMESE W I. 5 points.


Fee: Language Resource Center Fee - 15

Prerequisites: First Year Vietnamese (VIET UN1101 and VIET UN1102) or equivalent, or instructor's permission.

This course is designed for students who have some background in Vietnamese language, and further develops students' familiarity with the linguistic and grammatical structures of Vietnamese.  Students' reading, listening, speaking and writing skills will be emphasized through dialogues, reading passages, authentic materials, listening comprehension exercises, and media clips.  Students will also further study life and culture in Vietnam.

Fall 2019: VIET UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIET 2101 001/44428 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Chung Nguyen 5 4/15

VIET UN3101 Third Year Vietnamese I. 5 points.


Fee: Language Resource Center Fee - 15.00

Prerequisites: VIET UN1101 and VIET UN1102 and VIET UN2101 and VIET UN2102 and This course is designed for students who have already completed First and Second Year Vietnamese (VIET 1101, VIET 1102, VIET 2101, and VIET 2102) or who possess the equivalent background of intermediate Vietnamese. Students with equivalent background should contact instructor for permission to enroll.

This course is designed for students who have completed four semesters of Vietnamese language or have the equivalent background of intermediate Vietnamese language experience. The course is aimed at enhancing students' competence in reading and listening comprehension as well as the ability to present or show their knowledge of the language and various aspects of Vietnamese with the use of more advanced Vietnamese language skills.

Cross-listed Courses

RELI UN2308Buddhism: East Asian
HIST UN2580THE HISTORY OF UNITED STATES RELATIONS WITH EAST ASIA
CPLS GU4111World Philology
RELI GU4617Image Theories in Chinese Religions