East Asian Languages and Cultures

Departmental Office: 407 Kent; 212-854-5027
ealac.columbia.edu/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Paul Anderer, 414 Kent; 212-854-1525; pja1@columbia.edu

The program in East Asian studies offers a wide range of courses in a variety of disciplines, as well as training in the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Tibetan languages. The program is designed to provide a coherent curriculum for undergraduates wishing to major in East Asian studies, with disciplinary specialization in anthropology, art history, economics, history, literature, philosophy, political science, sociology, or religion. The department also offers a series of introductory and thematic courses especially designed for students seeking to acquire some knowledge of East Asia as part of their broader undergraduate experience.

Admission to Language Courses

All students wishing to enter the language program at another point besides the first term of the first level must pass a language placement test before registering. The language placement exams are held during the change of program period, the week before classes begin.

Students who have been absent from the campus for one term or more must take a placement test before enrolling in a language course beyond the first term of the first level.

Students who wish to place out of the Columbia College Foreign Language Requirement for a language taught in the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures must consult with the director of the relevant language program. The names of the directors, and additional information about East Asian language programs, can be accessed via the department website at ealac.columbia.edu.

Language Laboratory

An additional hour of study in the language laboratory is required in first-year, second-year, and third-year Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. These courses include the following:

CHNS UN1101First-Year Chinese I (N)
CHNS UN1111
 - CHNS UN1112
First-Year Chinese I (W)
and First-Year Chinese II (W)
CHNS C1201
 - CHNS C1202
Second-Year Chinese I (N)
and Second-Year Chinese II (N)
CHNS C1221
 - CHNS C1222
Second-Year Chinese I (W)
and Second-Year Chinese II (W)
CHNS W4003
 - CHNS W4004
Third-Year Chinese I (N)
and Third-Year Chinese II (N)
JPNS UN1101
 - JPNS UN1102
First-Year Japanese I
and First-Year Japanese II
JPNS C1201
 - JPNS C1202
Second-Year Japanese I
and Second-Year Japanese II
JPNS W4005
 - JPNS W4006
Third-Year Japanese I
and Third-Year Japanese II
KORN UN1101
 - KORN UN1102
First-Year Korean I
and First-Year Korean II
KORN W1201
 - KORN W1202
Second-Year Korean I
and Second-Year Korean II
KORN W4005
 - KORN W4006
Third-Year Korean I
and Third-Year Korean II

Students who plan to take any of the courses listed above must attend all assigned language laboratory sessions. Grades for written and oral work in the language laboratory and for additional work in oral drill sessions count as 25% of the final grade in the course. Assignments of laboratory hours are made during the first session of the regular classes.

Course Numbering

The following are general guidelines to the numbering of department courses open to undergraduates, although not all courses conform to them. Students with questions about the nature of a course should consult with the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies.

  • 1000-level: First- and second-year language courses
  • 2000-level: Broad introductory undergraduate courses
  • 3000-level: Intermediate and advanced undergraduate lectures and seminars
  • 4000-level: Third- and fourth-year language courses, and advanced undergraduate seminars, which may be open to graduate students
  • 5000-level: Fifth-year language courses

Study Abroad

East Asian Studies majors or concentrators who plan to spend their junior spring abroad must contact the director of undergraduate studies for information about course selection in the sophomore year. 

The Kyoto Center for Japanese Studies

The Kyoto Center offers Columbia students the opportunity to study in Japan in a program combining intensive instruction in the Japanese language with courses taught in English on a wide range of topics in Japanese studies. Students should have at least the equivalent of two years of Japanese by the time of their departure. The program is most appropriate for the junior year, although other arrangements are considered.

East Asian Studies majors or concentrators who opt to spend their junior spring at the Kyoto Center must take the required disciplinary and senior thesis-related courses in the spring of their sophomore year (contact the director of undergraduate studies for details). For further information about the Kyoto Center, please consult Robin Leephaibul: rl2705@columbia.edu.

Grading

Courses in which the grade of D or P has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements.

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors are conferred only on East Asian Studies majors who have earned a grade point average of at least 3.6 for courses in the major, have pursued a rigorous and ambitious program of study, and have submitted senior theses of superior quality, clearly demonstrating originality and excellent scholarship. Qualified seniors are nominated by their thesis advisers. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year. Concentrators are not eligible for departmental honors.

Special Service Professors

  • William Theodore de Bary (John Mitchell Mason Professor and Provost Emeritus of the University)
  • Donald Keene (Shincho Professor Emeritus)

Professors

  • Paul Anderer
  • Charles Armstrong (History)
  • Bernard Faure
  • Carol Gluck (History)
  • Robert E. Harrist Jr. (Art History)
  • Robert Hymes
  • Dorothy Ko (Barnard History)
  • Gari Ledyard (emeritus)
  • Feng Li
  • Lydia Liu
  • Rachel McDermott (Barnard)
  • Matthew McKelway (Art History)
  • Wei Shang
  • Haruo Shirane (Chair)
  • Henry Smith (emeritus)
  • Tomi Suzuki
  • Chun-Fang Yu (emeritus)
  • Madeleine Zelin

Associate Professors

  • Lisbeth Kim Brandt
  • Michael Como (Religion)
  • Theodore Hughes
  • Adam McKeown (History)
  • Eugenia Lean
  • David Lurie
  • David (Max) Moerman (Barnard)
  • Gregory Pflugfelder
  • Jonathan Reynolds (Art History, Barnard)
  • Gray Tuttle

Assistant Professors

  • Hikari Hori
  • Harrison Huang
  • Jue Guo (Barnard)
  • Jungwon Kim
  • Annabella Pitkin (Barnard)
  • Ying Qian
  • Zhaohua Yang (Religion)

Adjunct Faculty

  • Robert Barnett
  • Rachel Chung
  • Masato Hasegawa
  • Laurel Kendall
  • Tuo Li
  • Morris Rossabi

Senior Scholars

  • Conrad Schirokauer

Senior Lecturers

  • Shigeru Eguchi
  • Lening Liu
  • Yuan-Yuan Meng
  • Fumiko Nazikian
  • Miharu Nittono
  • Carol Schulz
  • Zhirong Wang

Lecturers

  • Yushan Cheng
  • Eunice Chung
  • Lingjun Hu
  • Tianqi Jiang
  • Rong Jiang
  • James Lap
  • Beom Lee
  • Kyoko Loetscher
  • Keiko Okamoto
  • Jisuk Park
  • Shaoyan Qi
  • Zhongqi Shi
  • Sunhee Song
  • Qiuyu Tan
  • Naofumi Tatsumi
  • Sonam Tsering
  • Asami Tsuda
  • Hailong Wang
  • Yoshiko Watanabe
  • Chen Wu
  • Jia Xu
  • Ling Yan
  • Hyunkyu Yi

On Leave

Major in East Asian Studies

The requirements for this program, under the 'Disciplinary Specialty' section, were modified on May 1, 2015. Students who declared this program before this date should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their correct course of study.

Prerequisite

Students must meet the following prerequisite prior to declaring the East Asian Studies major: two years of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan, or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). 

Language Requirement

Third-year Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan (completion of the W4005-W4006 level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean; TIBT G4611-G4612 level in Tibetan), or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). Students of Chinese may also complete W4003-W4004 to meet the third year requirement.

One of the following sequences (in the target language):
CHNS UN3005Third-Year Chinese I (W)
Or, for heritage students:
CHNS UN3003Third-Year Chinese I (N)
JPNS UN3005Third-Year Japanese I
KORN UN3005Third-Year Korean I
TIBT UN3611Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I

Students who test out of three years or more of a language must take an additional year of that language or another East Asian language at Columbia in order to satisfy the language requirement.

Introductory Courses

Students are required to take:
AHUM UN1400Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia
Students must also select two of the following:
ASCE UN1359Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China
ASCE UN1361Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan
ASCE UN1363Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea
ASCE UN1365Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet

First-year students and sophomores, prior to declaring an East Asian studies major, are strongly urged to take one or more of the introductory courses.

Disciplinary Specialty

The 'Disciplinary Specialty' requirements for this program were modified on May 1, 2015. Students who declared this program before this date should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their correct course of study.

On entering the major, each student must choose an academic discipline in which to specialize and complete a specific number of more specialized East Asia-related disciplinary courses. All majors must also take EAAS W3990 , which is offered every spring.

Disciplinary Specialty
Select one of the following academic disciplines in which to specialize and complete the number of East Asia-related disciplinary courses as required below: *
Anthropology: two courses
Art History: two courses
Economics: three courses
History: two courses
Literature: two courses
Philosophy: two courses
Political Science: three courses
Religion: two courses
Sociology: two courses
Required Methodology Course for All Disciplines
All majors are also required to take:
EAAS W3990
(offered every spring)
*

Courses in closely related disciplines may be substituted with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies.

Elective Courses

For students specializing in history, literature, anthropology, art history, philosophy, religion, or sociology, two courses. For students specializing in economics or political science, one course. Courses are to be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. East Asia–related courses offered in other departments may be counted toward the elective requirement. Courses in a second East Asian language (one year minimum) or a classical East Asian language (one semester minimum) may be used to fulfill one of the two elective requirements, but placement examinations may not be used to do so.

Senior Thesis Program

East Asian Studies majors who wish to write a senior thesis apply to the EALAC Senior Thesis Program at the end of their junior year. Students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.6 in courses taken in the major at the time of the application. Students interested in applying to the Senior Thesis Program should submit a hard copy of the EALAC Senior Thesis Program Application (see Undergraduate Planning Sheets and Forms) to the EALAC Academic Coordinator in 407 Kent by Friday, April 29, 2016, at 5:00 PM. Decisions will be made by June 1, 2016, when grades for the spring semester have been received.

All potential thesis writers are required to enroll in the Senior Thesis Research Workshop (EAAS UN3999) in the fall of the senior year. Students who perform satisfactorily in this workshop, successfully complete a thesis proposal, and find a faculty adviser will then write the Senior Thesis itself in the spring semester under the direction of the adviser and a graduate student tutor (EAAS W3901).

The senior thesis typically consists of about 30-35 pages of text (double-spaced, normal typeface and margins) and 5-8 pages of references. Under no circumstances should a thesis exceed a total of 50 pages (including references), without the special permission of the faculty adviser.

Successful completion of the thesis by the April 1 deadline in the spring semester will be necessary but not sufficient for a student to receive departmental honors. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year; as such, not all thesis writers will receive honors.


Concentration in East Asian Studies

Prerequisite

Students must meet the following prerequisite prior to declaring the East Asian Studies concentration: two years of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan, or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). 

Language Requirement

Third-year Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan (completion of the W4005-W4006 level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean; TIBT G4611-G4612 level in Tibetan), or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). Students of Chinese may also complete W4003-W4004 to meet the third year requirement.

One of the following sequences (in the target language):
CHNS UN3005Third-Year Chinese I (W)
Or, for heritage students:
CHNS UN3003Third-Year Chinese I (N)
JPNS UN3005Third-Year Japanese I
KORN UN3005Third-Year Korean I
TIBT UN3611Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I

Students who test out of three years or more of a language must take an additional year of that language or another East Asian language at Columbia in order to satisfy the language requirement.

Introductory Courses

AHUM UN1400Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia
Select one of the following:
ASCE UN1359Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China
ASCE UN1361Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan
ASCE UN1363Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea
ASCE UN1365Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet

Electives

Two courses in East Asian Studies at Columbia or Barnard at the 3000- or 4000-level, subject to approval by the director of undergraduate studies. Concentrators may count Classical Chinese, Classical Japanese, or Classical Tibetan as one of the electives for this requirement.

Concentrators are not eligible for the Senior Thesis Program or for departmental honors.

NOTE: Courses without scheduling information are not offered during this current semester.  Please also consult the Directory of Classes for course information before emailing the contact below.

For questions, please contact Youngmi Jin (yj2180@columbia.edu).

Content Courses

AHUM V3340 Art In China, Japan, and Korea. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement, Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea--their similarities and differences--through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia.

ASCE UN1359 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE V2360
Corequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE V2360

The evolution of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on characteristic institutions and traditions.

Spring 2017: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/19107 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Harrison Huang 4 53/80
Fall 2017: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/13153 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
4 90/90

AHUM UN1400 Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Spring 2017: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/25120 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Paul Anderer 4 16/22
AHUM 1400 002/11851 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Wei Shang 4 19/22
AHUM 1400 003/23430 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Hl-2 Heyman Center For Humanities
Conrad Schirokauer 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 004/66938 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Itsuki Hayashi 4 21/20
AHUM 1400 005/16505 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
420 Pupin Laboratories
Seong-Uk Kim 4 17/20
AHUM 1400 006/81397 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Charles Woolley 4 16/20
Fall 2017: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/05400 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
David Moerman 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 002/67259 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Seong-Uk Kim 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 003/64631 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Anderer 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 004/24981 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
John Phan 4 14/22

ASCE UN1361 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE V2371
Corequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE V2371

A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century.

Spring 2017: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10261 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Gregory Pflugfelder 4 54/80
Fall 2017: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/70734 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
David Lurie 4 90/90

ASCE UN1363 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The evolution of Korean society and culture, with special attention to Korean values as reflected in thought, literature, and the arts.

ASCE UN1365 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course seeks to introduce the sweep of Tibetan civilization and its history from its earliest recorded origins to the present. The course examines what civilizational forces shaped Tibet, especially the contributions of Indian Buddhism, sciences and literature, but also Chinese statecraft and sciences. Alongside the chronological history of Tibet, we will explore aspects of social life and culture.

Fall 2017: ASCE UN1365
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1365 001/15813 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Gray Tuttle 4 90/90

ASCE UN1002 Introduction to Major Topics in Asian Civilizations: East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

An interdisciplinary and topical approach to the major issues and phases of East Asian civilizations and their role in the contemporary world. 

Fall 2017: ASCE UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1002 001/62484 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Conrad Schirokauer 4 22/22

AHUM W4027 Colloquium On Major Works of Chinese Philosophy, Religion, and Literature. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: AHUM V3400, ASCE V2359, or ASCE V2002.

Extends the work begun in AHUM V3400 by focusing on reading and discussion of major works of Chinese philosophy, religion, and literature, including important texts of Confucian, Daoist, Mohist, Legalist, Huang-Lao, and neo-Daoist traditions and recently discovered texts. Forms a sequence with AHUM W4028, but may also be taken separately. 

AHUM W4029 Colloquium on Major Works of Japanese Philosophy, Religion, and Literature. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: AHUM 3400, ASCE V2361, or ASCE V2002.

Reading and discussion of major works of Chinese philosophy, religion, and literature, including important texts of the Buddhist and Neo-Confucian traditions. Sequence with AHUM W4030, but either may be taken separately if the student has adequate preparation.

AHUM UN3830 Colloquium On Modern East Asian Texts. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: AHUM V3400 is recommended as background.

Introduction to and exploration of modern East Asian literature through close reading and discussion of selected masterpieces from the 1890s through the 1990s by Chinese, Japanese, and Korean writers such as Mori Ogai, Wu Jianren, Natsume Soseki, Lu Xun, Tanizaki Jun’ichiro, Shen Congwen, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, Yi Sang, Oe Kenzaburo, O Chong-hui, and others. Emphasis will be on cultural and intellectual issues and on how literary forms manifested, constructed, or responded to rapidly shifting experiences of modernity in East Asia.

Fall 2017: AHUM UN3830
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 3830 001/72674 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Charles Woolley 4 20/20

CLEA W4101 Literary and Cultural Theory East and West. 3 points.

This course examines the universalism of major literary and cultural theories from the 20th century to the present with a focus on the centrality of comparative reasoning (commensurability/incommensurability, the logic of inclusion/exclusion, etc.) that sustains such universalism. Our goal is to develop methods for analyzing the literary and cultural productions of East Asian societies in conversation with other traditions and for understanding global processes in China, Japan, and Korea in particular. Topics of discussion include, for example, text and context, writing and orality, genre, media technology, visual culture, problems of translation, social imaginary, imperial and colonial modernity. Our readings include narrative theory, structural linguistics, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, feminist theory, critical translation studies, postmodernism, and postcolonial scholarship. Select literary works and films are incorporated to facilitate our understanding of theoretical issues and to test the validity of all universalist claims we encounter in the course. Students are strongly encouraged to think critically and creatively about any theoretical arguments or issues that emerge in the course of our readings and discussions rather than treat theoretical idiom as an instrument to be applied to a literary text. Our expectation is for students to develop interpretive and analytical skills that are essential to the task of interpreting literary, cultural, and historical texts as well as society and the world.  

EAAS V3214 Major Topics on Modern Korea. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the vicissitudes of Korea since its encounter with the world in the late 19th century to the new challeneges in recent years. By exploring the events, thoughts, and the new developments and challeneges in the economic, political, socio-cultural spheres, the course aims to provide better undesrtanding of Korea's struggle to find its place in an increasingly globalizing world.

EAAS V3215 Korean Literature and Film. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Corequisites: weekly film screening required.

Traces the history of Korean cinema and literature from 1945 to the present. Particular attention is given to the relationship between visual and literary representations of national division, war, gender, rapid industrialization, authoritarianism, and contemporary consumer culture.

EAAS V3220 Korean Film and the Making of Cold War Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course traces the early history of South Korean film, focusing on the ways in which issues central to the formation of global Cold War culture in the 1950s and 1960s cut across four genres: comedy, combat/military film, melodrama, and the spy thriller. We pay particular attention to the comedic representation of family and the developmental state, the negotiation of race and sexuality in combat/military films, the role of sentimental masculinity in the melodramatic imagination, and the relation between modern discourses of attention and vigilance in the spy thriller. Linking Korean cinema to the transnational context of the Pax Americana, we will also examine cross-cultural representations of Cold War culture in Korean and Hollywood filmic productions. In addition to the secondary sources on Korean/U.S. Cold War culture and Korean literary works, our reading of selected theoretical texts will serve as a point of departure for analyzing such issues as the relation between film as visual medium and the global "red scare"; motion picture and mobilization/militarization; and gender/ways of seeing. Mandatory weekly film screening.

EAAS V3350 Japanese Fiction and Film. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is about literary and visual story-telling in Japan, with close attention to significant styles and themes. The chronology covers writing from the late 19th century and cinema from the silent era, through to stories and film-making from the last decade of the 20th century. This period of roughly one hundred years is marked by convulsive social transformations, cultural shifts in every field of cultural endeavor, as well as by fire, earthquake, and the horror of war. The work we will encounter differently faces, evades, or attempts to survive such realities, providing multiple angles of imaginative vision on Japan and the modern world.

EAAS V3352 Major Works of Japanese Cinema. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Corequisites: Weekly Film screening required.

EAAS V3615 Japanese Literature and Film. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course focuses on the theme “Cuties, Fighters and Geeks” in the history of Japanese cinema and examines the representational politics of gender and sexuality (cuties and fighters), and fan pathology/audience reception (geeks). Selected films include animation, chambara/samurai, monster, and documentary. All the films are shown with English subtitles. Reading assignments include film reviews and writings drawn from perspectives of auteurism, national cinema, cultural studies, feminist critique and globalization. Engaging in close viewing/reading of both cinematic and written texts and existing research on them, we will attend to the discursive constellations of gender, ethnicity, nationalism, cultural imperialism, and the process of othering.

EAAS UN3927 China in the Modern World. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The rise of China has impacted world politics and economy in significant ways. How did it happen? This course introduces some unique angles of self-understanding as suggested by Chinese writers, intellectuals, and artists who have participated in the making of modern China and provided illuminating and critical analyses of their own culture, history, and the world. Readings cover a wide selection of modern Chinese fiction and poetry, autobiographical writing, photography, documentary film, artworks, and music with emphasis on the interplays of art/literature, history, and politics. Close attention is paid to the role of storytelling, the mediating powers of technology, new forms of visuality and sense experience, and the emergence of critical consciousness in response to global modernity. In the course of the semester, a number of contemporary Chinese artists, filmmakers, and writers are invited to answer students’ questions.   This course draws on cross-disciplinary methods from art history, film studies, anthropology, and history in approaching texts and other works. The goal is to develop critical reading skills and gain in-depth understanding of modern China and its engagement with the modern world beyond the cold war rhetoric. Our topics of discussion include historical rupture, loss and melancholy, exile, freedom, migration, social bonding and identity, capitalism, nationalism, and the world revolution. All works are read in English translation.

EAAS W3340 The Culture of Postwar Japan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An intensive look at a transformative period of Japanese artistic and intellectual culture. Topics include memory and war responsibility, revolutions of everyday life, the reimagination of eros, and avant-garde experimentation, with materials from philosophy to film and the visual arts.

EAAS W3405 Gender, Genre, and Modern Japanese Literature. 4 points.

This course engages in close readings of major works of Japanese literature from the 18th-century to the present with particular attention to the issues of gender and genre as major categories of socio-cultural and textual organization, construction, and analysis. The course considers literary representations of such cultural figures as male and female ghosts, wives and courtesans, youth and schoolgirls, the new woman and the modern girl, among others. Readings highlight the role of literary genres, examining the ways in which the literary texts engage with changing socio-historical conditions and experiences of modernity, especially with regard to gender and social relations. Genres include puppet plays, ghost stories, Bildungsroman, domestic fiction, feminist treatises, diaries, autobiographical fiction, and the fantastic. Related critical issues are women’s writings; body and sexuality; media and the development of urban mass culture; translations and adaptations; history and memory; globalization and the question of the tradition. All readings are in English.

EAAS UN2342 Mythology of East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Through close readings of major myths of China, Japan, and Korea, this course provides a survey of significant themes of East Asian culture. Inclusion of selected comparative readings also leads students to reconsider the nature of ‘world mythology,’ a field often constituted by juxtaposing Greek and Latin classics with oral texts collected during anthropological fieldwork. The core materials for this class are from ancient written traditions, but they speak with force and clarity to modern readers, as is underlined by our attention to latter-day reception and reconceptualization of these narratives. This is an introductory, discussion-based class intended for undergraduates. No prior knowledge of East Asian history or culture is required, and all course readings are in English. Satisfies the Global Core requirement.

EAAS UN3412 Conflict and Culture in Korean History. 4 points.

This course considers how accounts of conflict in Korean history reflect the development of core values, ethical priorities and emotions, and perceptions among Koreans from the late sixteenth century to the late twentieth century. By carefully examining the narrative and rhetorical styles of major accounts of problems such as wars, political strife, family tensions, and intellectual and personal tribulations at a given cultural and historical time, students will not only understand how Koreans have dealt with conflict throughout history but will also develop reading strategies for primary sources contested by and narrated in a multiplicity of ideologies, genres, and voices.

Spring 2017: EAAS UN3412
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3412 001/62359 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Jungwon Kim 4 17/20

EAAS W3928 Japanese Literature: Beginning to 1900. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of the major genres -- poetry, prose fiction, historical narrative, drama, and philosophical writing -- of Japanese literature from the ancient period up to 1900 as they relate to larger historical changes and social, political and religious cross-currents.

EAAS W3931 Environment & Society in Chinese History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the changing environment of China from various angles, including economy, climate, demography, agriculture and politics. We will consider the entire sweep of Chinese history, beginning with the origins of agriculture, but will focus on the last 500 years or so. Although the focus will shift between the histories of specific regions and on processes that affected the entire subcontinent, the goal is to understand how the natural ecosystems of the region were transformed into the highly anthropogenic modern landscape.

EAAS W3935 The Fantastic in Pre-Modern China: Ghosts, Animals, and Other Worlds. 4 points.

This course concentrates on various strange beings, places, and relationships that are represented in works written in China and are usually categorized as the supernatural by modern readers. Presenting students with a picture different from the rational world, we ask questions: How does the supernatural constitute human experiences? In what sense is the supernatural real to us? How does our view of the supernatural resemble or conflict with views engendered in pre-modern society? The course deals with these questions in hopes of deepening the understanding of the supernatural in contrast to our material reality. It situates the Chinese notion of the supernatural in the Western cultural framework in order to gain new perspectives to understand Chinese culture. All readings are in English.

EAAS W3936 Reading the City in Early Modern Japan. 4 points.

In this course, we explore the rich and multi-faceted urban spaces of early modern (1600-1868) Japan. In doing so, we seek first to understand the origins, structure and social functions of the early modern Japanese city in its diverse forms and historical transformations (its links to what came before and after), but beyond simply constructing a history of the city in its Japanese context, we aim to develop an image of the city as it appeared to its contemporary observers and inhabitants -- as it was seen, heard, walked, thought, and lived.

EAAS W4015 Buddhism & Islam in Tibet and China. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Course explores interactions between Tibetan Buddhist and Muslim communities in Tibetan, Turkic, Mongol, and Chinese regions of Inner and East Asia, and relations of these communities with a succession of Chinese states. The course examines cross-cultural encounters, including mutual influences; discourses of conflict, conversion, and tolerance; and contemporary issues.

EAAS W4101 Literary and Cultural Theory East and West. 3 points.

Designed to familiarize students with major paradigms of contemporary literary and cultural theory to generate critical contexts for analyzing East Asian literature and culture in a comparative framework. Takes up a wide but interrelated range of issues, including feminist criticism, film theory, postcolonialism, social theory, post modernism, and issues of national and ethnic identity.

EAAS GU4102 Critical Approaches to East Asia in the Social Sciences. 4 points.

This seminar is designed to equip students with essential tools to further their scholarly research into the cultures of East Asia, with a focus primarily on China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.  These tools are those native to the Social Sciences, with our primary materials drawn from the disciplines of Cultural (and Historical) Anthropology and Sociology.  This seminar will familiar students with significant sociological and anthropological works by scholars past and present -- works with which any student serious about continuing social scientific research in East Asia should be familiar.  Beyond this, the seminar aims to equip students with the methodological tools to conduct solid social scientific scholarship and the understanding of sociological and anthropological theory whereby to assess critically the relative efficacy, and potential pitfalls, of various approaches to research.

Fall 2017: EAAS GU4102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4102 001/01120 T 10:00am - 11:50am
Room TBA
Nicholas Bartlett 4 3

EAAS W4109 Japanese Religious Landscapes: Practices and Representations. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: One course on Japanese or East Asian cultures or Art History or permission of instructor.

Examination of the concept of landscape in Japanese religious culture, focusing on the ways in which physical and imaginary landscapes were represented, in theory and practice, in literature, art, and ritual. Topics to be explored include cosmology, pilgrimage, and syncretism, and the relationship such world views have on politics, gender, and social institutions.

EAAS W4120 A Cultural History of Japanese Cartography. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Examines Japanese history through the media of cartographic self-representation and analyzes the ways of seeing and ways of thinking that the map allows. Chronological and thematic survey of the historical contexts and historical objects of Japanese cartography: agricultural estates, religious sites, roadways, cities, provinces, countries, and worlds.

EAAS W4160 Cultures of Colonial Korea. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the processes of colonization that played a central role in locating Korea in an integrated world in the first half of the twentieth century. We will analyze the ways in which the intersections among an array of contemporary global issues and concerns (to name a few- social Darwinism, migration, urban space, gender, sexuality, militarism, race, liberalism, socialism, capitalism) shaped the modern experience in Korea under Japanese rule (1910-1945). Our approach will be multidisciplinary. We will look, for example, at art, architecture, literature, film, philosophy, religion, and historiography. Throughout, we will pay special attention to the place of Korea and Koreans in the expanding Japanese empire and, more broadly, in the global colonial context. Class will be held as a discussion seminar based on close reading of primary-source documents and recent scholarship.

EAAS GU4202 The Dead in Ancient China. 4 points.

What did the dead become? Ancestors, spirits, or ghosts? Are these postmortem categories and roles ontologically distinct and mutually exclusive? How did the dead become ancestors, spirits, or ghosts? Where did the dead go and what kind of "lives after" did they have? With these questions in mind, this course explores the realm of the dead in ancient China (ca. 5000 B.C.E.-600 C.E.) instantiated by the living in rituals, objects, and writings. Focusing on contemporaneous materials obtained through archaeology, facilitated with transmitted history and literature when available, students will read about and learn to analyze a variety of conceptions of the dead and corresponding afterlife options recorded in diverse kinds of sources including material culture, architecture, artifacts, pictorial representations, and texts from ancient China.

Spring 2017: EAAS GU4202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4202 001/09964 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Jue Guo 4 11/15

EAAS W4221 Trad Lit/Contemp Film Of China. 4 points.

The past is seen through today’s concerns and perspective. In view of this dialogue between pre-modern and modern culture, this course eschews a chronological coverage of Chinese literature and culture that proceeds from one dynasty or time period to the next. Instead, this course will focus on touchstone texts from pre-modern Chinese traditions, and then attend to how this cultural legacy is remembered, appropriated, and re-invented in contemporary cinema.

EAAS W4222 War and Society in Modern China. 4 points.

As we examine the history of China in the modern period, we notice the indelible and profound mark that wars, armed uprisings, and violence have left on collective consciousness and social and state structures. On a social level, the impact of large-scale violence often transcended territorial boundaries both locally and nationally. Historical sources also show that countless families and communities were left disintegrated as a consequence of intra- and inter-regional military conflict. This course will examine a wide array of war experiences in China in the modern period, roughly defined as the period from the sixteenth to twentieth centuries. We will ask how the history of war might shed light on the lives of ordinary people in China. Particular attention will be paid to war experiences behind the front lines and the nature of the relation between war and society during and in the wake of battle. The general course format consists of class discussion on, and close analysis of, the assigned readings, which will include monographs by contemporary scholars as well as primary materials in translation. Some background knowledge of Chinese history will be helpful. No knowledge of the Chinese language is required.

EAAS W4223 China and the World since 1350. 4 points.

This seminar examines the history of China's relations with the outside world from the mid-fourteenth through mid-twentieth centuries, covering the period from the founding of the Ming dynasty to the twentieth century. We will begin with a discussion of the historiographical debate concerning China's so-called "tribute system" and "Sinocentric world order." Inquiries will be made into ways in which China interacted with, and was viewed by, outside societies and civilizations. Our analytical approach will be wide-ranging, and we will consider a variety of source materials, research methods, and narrative structures in our examination of China's relations with the outside world. Some background knowledge of Chinese history will be helpful. No knowledge of the Chinese language is required.

EAAS W4224 History of Chinese Cinemas. 4 points.

This survey class introduces Chinese cinemas produced in Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Thematic, stylistic and industrial developments will be explored alongside continuing trends toward local and regional diversity in the context of globalization. To address the issue of nation/nationalism and the evolving rapport between the local and transnational, in conjunction with the changing dynamic between the film industries and filmmakers, emphasis is given to specific film genres (e.g. wenyi melodrama and martial arts), major film movements (from the leftist filmmaking in 1930s Shanghai to the new cinemas in three Chinas of the 1980s), and influential film auteurs, such as Xie Jin, King Hu, Zhang Yimou, Jia Zhangke, Tsui Hark, Wong Kar-wai, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Tsai Ming-liang, and Ang Lee. Other topics include, for instance, how cinema approaches history, ramifications of realism, representation of gender, ethnicity and sexuality, the reintegration of Greater China’s screen industries since the 1990s, and the recent industrial capitalization on neo-localism in Taiwan.

EAAS W4227 East Asia and the Rise of a Global Middle Class. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course looks at East Asian history through the rise of a global middle class. What is a "middle class" and how did the idea evolve in East Asia? How has the middle class in East Asia converged and diverged from global trends? How has the idea of a middle class driven politics, economics, education, and gender, or vice versa? What role has the middle class played in the shared and divergent histories of Japan and China? How have middle-class experiences become the dream of the social mainstream in East Asia? Through select primary and secondary sources, students will obtain an inside glimpse of East Asia, global modernity, and the discipline of social and cultural history. Students will produce two short essays, participate in class discussion, and submit a final paper.

EAAS W4230 The Rise of Modern Chinese Thought. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Critical introduction to the intellectual trajectory of modern China with emphasis on imperial legacy, nation building, social change, internationalism, public discourse, knowledge production and world revolution.  Readings include seminal primary as well as secondary texts in English translations. 

EAAS W4357 Contemporary Japanese Cinema. 4 points.

Corequisites: Film screening is mandatory.

The course examines the notions of humanity, post-humanity and machines, as represented in Japanese cinema from the 1980s to the present. Some anime, documentary and live action films will be discussed. Reading assignments include the writings of auteurism, national cinema, globalization and cultural theories. Mandatory weekly screening.

EAAS W4360 Kurosawa Seminar. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Thank you for your interest in Kurosawa Seminar (Spring, 2015). The course is intended for advanced undergraduates. There are no strict prerequisites, but it helps to have already taken classes related to one or more of the following: modern Japan, East Asia, film, art and architecture, comparative literature. You need not be majoring in any of these areas to be considered. I will favor students who are juniors or seniors, but do not exclude the possibility that a sophomore could join the class (a first year would be a real stretch, and would need to make an exceptional case). Note that for reasons better known to College instruction committees, the seminar does not count as a "Global Core" course (though I have joined successful student appeals to see that the course does count in this way). Please send me a brief statement, describing your academic background (esp. in light of the criteria above), then arrange to see me either this Friday (Nov. 21), or else the Friday after Thanksgiving (Dec. 5), sometime between 3 and 5, 414 Kent. If you cannot meet with me, your written appeal will be all the more crucial in my decision-making. For now, feel free to put yourself on the Courseworks "Waitlist" for this seminar. As soon as I can make a decision, I will approve or deny your admission. By mid-December, at the latest, anyone who applies will know where she/he stands. I appreciate your patience and efforts in this process.

EAAS W4406 Social Theory for the Study of East Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to major thinkers and intellectual viewpoints relevant for study of East Asian societies. Key topics include the nature of power, processes of social change, the role of religion, the discourses of tradition and modernity, and the ethical dimensions of scholarship.

EAAS W4408 Social Movements in Contemporary East Asia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Examines basic theories and concepts of social movement literature and how it is utlized for the study of social movements in contemporary East Asia from a comparative perspective. By navigating through major studies of social movements in China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan, the course focuses on the varying contexts and dynamics through which social movements emerge, develop, and leave traces. This course will help us better understand how social, political and cultural history unfolds through the intricate interaction between the status quo and the incessant challenges against it.

EAAS W4510 Contention and Democracy in South Korea. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of the interaction between popular contention and formal politics, long characteristic of the dynamic, if unstable nature of South Korean political processes. By examining major paradigms and testing them against historical realities, students acquire a better understanding of the interplay between contention and democracy in general and South Korean politics in particular.

EAAS W4520 Modern Korean Literature in Translation. 3 points.

EAAS W4548 Tibetan Cultures and Societies. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to major themes and issues in traditional and contemporary Tibetan culture. Key topics include conceptions of sacred landscape, the human body as a microcosm of the universe, and the social order, including contested ideas of regional identity and of ‘Tibet" itself. We examine these themes via Buddhist and non-Buddhist literature, poetry, epic, auto/biographies, traditional histories, medical texts, pilgrimage guides, travelers' accounts, ritual materials, and artistic works, as well as though ethnographies and related studies. There will be several NYC field trips and 4 required films. No language or other prerequisites.

EAAS GU4553 Survey of Tibetan Literature. 4 points.

This course introduces a sampling of Tibetan literary works spanning from the Tibetan imperial period to present-day.  We shall focus on Tibetan belles-lettres and vernacular literary forms (all in English translation) that remain salient in current Tibetan intellectual discourse.  We will engage in close readings of those texts, in addition to discussing characteristics of the genres they represent.

Fall 2017: EAAS GU4553
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4553 001/71196 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Lauran Hartley 4 0/18

EAAS W4557 Film and TV in Tibet and Inner Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we look at films and television dramas made in Tibet, Xinjiang and Mongolia from the 1920s onwards, mainly by Chinese filmmakers, but also by Russians, Tibetans and Mongolians. These suggest local perspectives on the history of these areas during their ongoing integration into the PRC since the 1950s. Through the films, the seminar explores the different ways notions of the state, nationality, “being good” and the political are expressed at different times in these areas. No prerequisites or previous knowledge required.

EAAS W4560 Women Visionaries in Tibet and East Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the lives, roles and creativity of Tibetan, Chinese and Korean women visionaries--meditators, shemans, oracles, nuns and yoginis--from traditions including buddhism and indigenous religions, and links between visionary practice and these women's work as teachers, artists, healers and patrons.  Mateirals include first-person accounts, biography, poetry, and secondary sources

EAAS W4562 Transnational Identities in East/Inner Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines networks of mobility and connection linking Chinese, Tibetan, Himalayan, and Inner Asian people, places, and institutions to each other, and to other regions of Asia and the world. We will look at examples of transregional identities as they emerge out of trade, religious networks, patronage networks, educational travel, pilgrimage, diaspora migrations, labor migrations, and modern day leisure travel, focusing on the period from the late 19th century to the present. What social formations, economic developments, or religious ties emerge from transregional flows of people, things, and ideas? How have East and Inner Asian individuals negotiated hybrid identities produced by cross-cultural encounters? In addressing these questions we will consider issues of identity, language, nationalism and transnationalism, religious affiliation and globalization.

EAAS GU4561 Studying Closed Societies: Tibet, Xijiang, and China's Socialist Neighbors. 4 points.

A number of regions or countries in East, North East and South East Asia remain closed to foreigners or have political conditions that make it impractical, unethical or dangerous for foreigners to speak in depth with local residents. In many of these areas research by scholars or journalists is only rarely permitted if at all, and academic publications from within the country may be extremely limited in the issues they can discuss or the opinions they can express. These areas include Tibet and Xinjiang within the PRC, and its neighbours North Korea, Vietnam, and Laos. Is it possible to study such places to a reasonable academic standard without access to them? How should students and researchers approach the study of contemporary conditions in these areas? Can carrying out close readings of official texts from such countries lead to a reliable understanding of conditions there?

EAAS W4618 Biography, Memory and Modern Tibet: The Reading and Writing of Life Stories. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A study of modern Tibet through its biographies, autobiographies, testimonies and life-stories. The course involves reading and analyzing texts by officials, intellectuals, lamas, and revolutionaries in translation, studying their influences, and carrying out interviews with Tibetans in the community. No prerequisites for this class. If you need to meet the Major Cultures Requirement, this meets East Asian Civilization List B when paired with Introduction to East Asian Civilization: Tibet or Introduction to East Asian Civilization: China.

EAAS W4890 Historiography of East Asia. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Two-hour seminar plus additional one-hour workshop in bibliography and research methods. Designed primarily for majors in East Asian Studies in their junior year. Permission of instructor required for others.

Major issues in the practice of history illustrated by critical reading of important historical work on East Asia.

HSEA BC3861 Chinese Cultural History 1500-1800. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: An introductory Asian history course preferred but not required.

Introduction to visual and material cultures of China, including architecture, food, fashion, printing, painting, and the theatre. Using these as building blocks, new terms of analyzing Chinese history are explored, posing such key questions as the meaning of being Chinese and the meaning of being modern.

HSEA W3850 Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A sociological survey of contemporary China. Examines major institutions (economy, politics, media) and the sources and consequences of their transformation. Studies main forms of sicoal inequality and social conflicts. Explores popular culture, civic associations, the environmental crisis, and the prospects for democratic political change.

HSEA W3862 The History of Korea to 1900. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Issues pertaining to Korean history from its beginnings to the early modern era. Issues will be examined in the Korean context and also from a comparative East Asian perspective.

HSEA W3869 Modern Japan, 1800 to the Present. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

HSEA UN3871 Modern Japan: Images and Words. 3 points.

This course relies primarily on visual materials to familiarize students with the history of Japan from the beginning of the nineteenth century through the present. It follows a chronological order, introducing students to various realms of Japanese visual culture—from woodblock prints to film, anime, and manga—along with the historical contexts that they were shaped by, and in turn helped shape. Special attention will paid to the visual technologies of nation-building, war, and empire; to historical interactions between Japanese and Euro-American visual culture; to the operations of still versus moving images; and to the mass production of visual commodities for the global marketplace. Students who take the course will emerge not only with a better understanding of Japan’s modern historical experience, but also with a more discerning eye for the ways that images convey meaning and offer access to the past.

Spring 2017: HSEA UN3871
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 3871 001/15146 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Gregory Pflugfelder 3 14/18

HSEA W3873 The Culture of Early Modern Japan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the social, economic, political and cultural foundations of modern China as established during the last imperial regime. Special attention is given to issues of frontier expansion, state and nation building, economic and social transformation, the evolution of a multi-ethnic polity, and China's interactions with the West and Japan. In the process we will explore the new politics that evolved out of the fall of the Ming and the rise of an alien Manchu Qing regime, social and economic change in the lived experience of rural and urban men and women and their effects on the rise of new organizational, occupational and status opportunities. The history of the Qing dynasty traces the formation of the state we now know as China and the challenges and opportunities that faced all who lived within its borders as they engaged with the world in new ways and began to reshape both their discursive and institutional identities. Throughout this course we will be alert to the ways in which the struggles to create a new China during the last dynasty inform our understanding of the China we know today.

HSEA W3881 History of Modern China II -- China in the Twentieth Century. 3 points.

The social, political and cultural history of twentieth-century China with a focus on issues of nationalism, revolution, "modernity" and gender.

HSEA W3880 History of Modern China I. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

China’s transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

EAAS W3934 The Tea Ceremony: Understanding Japanese Culture through the History and Practice of Tea. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The focus of this course is the Japanese Tea Ceremony, or chanoyu. It introduces the world of the first medieval tea-masters and follows the transformation of chanoyu (lit. ‘water for tea') into a popular pastime, a performance art, a get-together of art connoisseurs, and a religious path for samurai warriors, merchants, and artists in Early Modern Japan. It also explores the metamorphosis of chanoyu under 20th century nationalisms and during the postwar economic boom, with particular attention to issues of patronage, gender, and social class. Each session will cover a different aspect of chanoyu, focusing on a rigorous analysis of historical texts (primary sources) and of modern studies and current research (secondary sources). Understanding chanoyu requires experiencing it in person and through one's own hands. For this reason, in addition to text-based learning this course offers students access to the actual rare materials that are at the heart of chanoyu. They will participate in a tea ceremony at the teahouse of the New York branch of the traditional Urasenke school of tea and they will get hands-on access to the hidden treasures of the Japanese collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where they will be able to interact with historical artifacts.

HSEA W4223 War and Society in Modern China. 4 points.

As we examine the history of China in the modern period, we notice the indelible and profound mark that wars, armed uprisings, and violence have left on collective consciousness and social and state structures. On a social level, the impact of large-scale violence often transcended territorial boundaries both locally and nationally. Historical sources also show that countless families and communities were left disintegrated as a consequence of intra- and inter-regional military conflict. This course will examine a wide array of war experiences in China in the modern period, roughly defined as the period from the sixteenth to twentieth centuries. We will ask how the history of war might shed light on the lives of ordinary people in China. Particular attention will be paid to war experiences behind the front lines and the nature of the relation between war and society during and in the wake of battle. The general course format consists of class discussion on, and close analysis of, the assigned readings, which will include monographs by contemporary scholars as well as primary materials in translation. Some background knowledge of Chinese history will be helpful. No knowledge of the Chinese language is required.

EAAS W4545 Culture and Art in Contemporary Tibet. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course, we study films, poems, stories, paintings, pop songs and other forms of cultural product that have been made by Tibetans in the last 3 or 4 decades, together with some made by others in their name or in their areas. We discuss questions of identity, survival, history and the politics of representation. We’ll look at questions about cultures and continuity; about whether and how we as outsiders can come to understand or interpret the culture of a country whose language and history we may barely know; about the interplay of texts, politics, and power; and about ways of reading and interpreting artworks and the meanings that they generate in politically charged societies and communities.

HSEA W4710 Exploring Tibet: 17th-20th Century Travel Accounts. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Studies history of descriptions of Tibet with a focus on new explorations. The course starts with a look back to the legacy of Catholic religious and British trade missions to Tibet, as well as Tibetan missions that expanded the frontiers of Tibet. But the main focus is on 19th and 20th century topics including adventure and scientific missions in the service of imperial expansion, Tibetan pilgrimage and claims for territory, the "Great Game" for dominance of Central Asia, the role of photojournalism & the photographic representation of Tibet and the globalization of markets and culture.

HSEA W4712 Local History in Tibet. 4 points.

Tibetan culture covers an area roughly the size of Western Europe, yet most regions have not been the subject of sustained historical study. This course is designed for students interested in studying approaches to local history that attempt to ask large questions of relatively small places. Historiographic works from Tibetan studies (where they exist) will be examined in comparison with approaches drawn mainly from European and Chinese studies, as well as theories drawn from North/South American and Southeast Asian contexts. Given the centrality of Buddhist monasteries to Tibetan history (as “urban” centers, banks, governments, educational institutions, etc.) much of the course will deal with these.

HSEA W4725 Tibetan Material History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: one page applications stating a student's interest and background (if any).

A seminar exploring the nature and implications of Tibetan visual and cultural material in historical context, with biweekly visits to NYC area museum collections. Topics include object biographies, Buddhist art & ritual objects, Tibetan arms & armor, clothing & jewelry, rugs & furniture. As we explore the incredibly rich Tibetan material resources of New York City's museums, students will have the opportunity to encounter first hand objects from Tibet's past. While the class as a whole will survey a wide variety of materials‑‑from swords & armor to Buddhist images & ritual implements, from rugs & clothes to jewelry & charms—students will select one or two objects as the subject of their object biographies. There will also be opportunities to explore the process and motivations for building collections and displaying Tibetan material culture.

HSEA W4837 Postwar Japan in the World. 4 points.

Field(s): EA

HSEA W4839 Family in Chinese History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Field(s): EA

HSEA W4845 Modern Japan in History and Memory. 3 points.

Open without prerequisite to graduate, undergraduate, and SIPA students.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The history of modern Japan as interpreted in twentieth-century Japanese history, writing, and public memory. Emphasis on the ways in which different versions of the past have been affected by changes in the present, from the 1880s through the 1990s.

HSEA W4862 Writing, the State and Communities in Choson Korea, 1392-1910. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines the process through which the political ideology of the Choson state was constructed, and how it evolved on the one hand, and the way in which this was related to the development of genres of writing in public space. By analyzing and contextualizing such writings as edicts, memorials, circular letters, exhortations, joint memorials, petitions, and travel diaries, this seminar hopes to trace the political and cultural meaning of the expanding discursive and communicative public space of the Choson.

HSEA W4866 Competing Nationalisms in East Asia: Representing Chinese and Tibetan Relations in History. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

After an introduction to nationalism in general and in Asia, this seminar will examine the issue of nationalist influences on the writing of Asian history through the lens of Chinese and Tibetan historiography. By critically examining the historical arguments for and against the inclusion of Tibet as part of the modern Chinese nation-state, students will have an opportunity to compare two important cultural traditions presented as competing national entities and apply this to their own topics (on China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, or Tibet) for the final research paper.

HSEA W4867 Civil Society, Public Sphere, and Popular Protest in Contemporary China. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Systematics and critical assessment of the developments and challenges of civil society in reform era China by focusing on civic associations, public sphere, and popular protest.

HSEA W4869 History of Ancient China to the End of Han. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this upper level course, we will detail the development of early Chinese civilization and discuss a series of cultural and institutional inventions. The course will also provide a systematic introduction to the most fascinating archaelogical discoveries in the past century.

HSEA W4870 Japan Before 1600. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Through deep consideration of human experience in the Japanese archipelago from the 14th millennium B.C.E. through the 16th century C.E., this course introduces fundamental problems of the cultural, political, social, and economic history of the premodern world. Each class meeting centers on primary source materials, but readings from various English-language secondary sources are also assigned. The course is loosely organized around particular places or spaces of premodern Japan, but these topoi are considered in terms of interconnections with mainland East Asia, especially China and Korea, and also in a broader comparative framework. This is an introductory, discussion-based class intended for undergraduates. No prior knowledge of Japanese history is required, and all course readings are in English. This is a Global Core approved course.

HSEA W4875 Japanese Imperialism in East Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

HSEA GU4881 History of Modern China II. 3 points.

The social and cultural history of Chinese religion from the earliest dynasties to the present day, examined through reading of primary Chinese religious documents (in translation) as well as the work of historians and anthropologists. Topics include: Ancestor worship and its changing place in Chinese religion;  the rise of clergies and salvationist religion; state power, clerical power, and lay power; Neo-Confucianism as secular religion; and the modern "popular religious" synthesis.

HSEA W4886 Gender, Passions and Social Order In China Since 1500. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the themes of love, virtue, and sexuality and their roles in the construction of orthodox morality, gender relations, medical and judicial knowledge, and political order in late imperial, modern and contemporary China. Fiction, drama, and cultural theory are among the sources used to examine such topics as the Cult of Desire, love and Ming loyalism, the Chastity Cult, New Womanhood and Nationalism, and Maoist Revolutionary ardor.

HSEA W4890 Historiography of East Asia. 3 points.

This course is designed primarily for majors in East Asian studies in their junior year; others may enroll with the instructor's permission.

Major issues in the practice of history illustrated by critical reading of important historical works on East Asia. Group(s): A, C Field(s): EA

HSEA W4888 Woman and Gender in Korean History. 4 points.

While the rise of women's history and feminist theory in the 1960s and 1970s fostered more general reevaluations of social and cultural history in the West, such progressions have been far more modest in Korean history. To introduce one of the larger challenges in current Korean historiography, this course explores the experiences, consciousness and representations of women Korea at home and abroad from premodern times to the present. Historical studies of women and gender in Korea will be analyzed in conjunction with theories of Western women's history to encourage new methods of rethinking "patriarchy" within the Korean context. By tracing the lives of women from various socio-cultural aspects and examining the multiple interactions between the state, local community, family and individual, women's places in the family and in society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender and sexuality throughout Korea's complicated past will be reexamined through concrete topics with historical specificity and as many primary sources as possible. With understanding dynamics of women's lives in Korean society, this class will build an important bridge to understand the construction of New Women in early twentieth-century Korea, when women from all walks of life had to accommodate their "old-style" predecessors and transform themselves to new women, as well as the lives of contemporary Korean women. This will be very much a reading-and-discussion course. Lectures will review the readings in historical perspective and supplement them. The period to be studied ranges from the pre-modern time up to the turn of twentieth century, with special attention to the early modern period.

HSEA W4891 Law in Chinese History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

EAAS UN3999 Research in East Asian Studies. 1 point.

Introduces students to research and writing techniques and requires the preparation of a senior thesis proposal. Required for majors and concentrators in the East Asian studies major in the spring term of the junior year.

Fall 2017: EAAS UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3999 001/15171  
1 9/15

EAAS GU4118 Topics in Japanese Cinema. 3 points.

This course introduces important Japanese films across the genres of dramatic feature, documentary and animation. The films are organized according to the following three topics: global genres, war and documentary, the animation theories of ‘cinematism/animetism’. The reading assignments cover issues ranging from technological and structural changes in film history, to critical theories of gender and sexuality as well as  globalization/national cinema, and to analyses of medium specificity. The course closely examines filmic languages of works by auteur directors such as Akira Kurosawa, Hiroshi Teshigahara and Hayao Miyazaki.


No prerequisite necessary, though familiarity with Japanese history is helpful.  Film screenings Tuesdays 8:10-10 P.M.

HSEA GU4700 Rise of Modern Tibet: History and Society, 1600-1913. 4 points.

Rise of Modern Tibet

Chinese Language Courses

CHNS UN1010 Introductory Chinese A. 2.5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18.

The program is designed to develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing colloquial Chinese. This course (Part I) is offered in Spring only. Course II is offered in the fall. The two parts together cover the same materials as Chinese C1101/F1101 (Fall) and fulfill the requirement for admission to Chinese C1102/F1102 (Spring). Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled.

Spring 2017: CHNS UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1010 001/68347 M W 8:50am - 9:55am
522c Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 15/20
CHNS 1010 002/76896 T Th 8:50am - 9:55am
511 Kent Hall
Yu-Shan Cheng 2.5 6/15
CHNS 1010 003/28352 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
423 Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 12/15
CHNS 1010 004/82147 T Th 11:50am - 12:55pm
423 Kent Hall
Yu-Shan Cheng 2.5 14/20

CHNS UN1011 Introductory Chinese B. 2.5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18.

Prerequisites: CHNS W1010y (offered in the Spring only) or the equivalent.

The program is designed to develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing colloquial Chinese. This course (Part II) is offered in the Fall only. The two parts (I and II) together cover the same materials as Chinese C1101/F1101 (Fall) and fulfill the requirement for admission to Chinese C1102/F1102 (Spring). Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN1011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1011 001/73361 M W 8:50am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 8/12
CHNS 1011 002/27804 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 12/12

CHNS UN1101 First-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

The course is designed to develop basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing modern colloquial Chinese. Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Students who can already speak Mandarin will not be accepted into this course. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1101 001/14655 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Jia Xu 5 5/12
CHNS 1101 002/26587 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Xiaodan Wang 5 5/12
CHNS 1101 003/64244 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Lingjun Hu 5 7/12
CHNS 1101 004/71440 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Room TBA
Chen Wu 5 3/12
CHNS 1101 005/19956 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
5 2/12
CHNS 1101 006/75781 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
Ling Yan 5 4/12
CHNS 1101 007/25681 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
Room TBA
Yicheng Zhang 5 1/12

CHNS UN1102 First-Year Chinese II (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

The course is designed to develop basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing modern colloquial Chinese. Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Students who can already speak Mandarin will not be accepted into this course. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2017: CHNS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1102 001/88398 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
405 Kent Hall
Lingjun Hu 5 10/20
CHNS 1102 002/21248 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
522b Kent Hall
Jia Xu 5 16/18
CHNS 1102 003/22646 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
411 Kent Hall
Xiaodan Wang 5 4/20
CHNS 1102 004/27533 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
4c Kraft Center
Chen Wu 5 13/18
CHNS 1102 005/76030 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
405 Kent Hall
Ling Yan 5 14/20
CHNS 1102 006/82030 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Yicheng Zhang 5 8/18

CHNS UN1111 First-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

The course is specially designed for students of Chinese heritage and advanced beginners with good speaking skills. It aims to develop the student's basic skills to read and write modern colloquial Chinese. Pinyin system is introduced; standard Chinese pronunciation, and traditional characters. Classes will be conducted mostly in Chinese. Open to students with Mandarin speaking ability in Chinese only. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN1111
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1111 001/20181 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Tianqi Jiang 5 6/12
CHNS 1111 002/62872 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Hailong Wang 5 8/12

CHNS UN1112 First-Year Chinese II (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

The course is specially designed for students of Chinese heritage and advanced beginners with good speaking skills. It aims to develop the student's basic skills to read and write modern colloquial Chinese. Pinyin system is introduced; standard Chinese pronunciation, and traditional characters. Classes will be conducted mostly in Chinese. Open to students with Mandarin speaking ability in Chinese only. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2017: CHNS UN1112
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1112 001/10531 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
522c Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 5 9/20
CHNS 1112 002/28286 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
424 Kent Hall
Hailong Wang 5 10/18

CHNS UN2201 Second-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1101-1102 or CHNS F1101-1102, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Designed to further the student's four skills acquired in the elementary course, this program aims to develop higher level of proficiency through comprehensive oral and written exercises. Cultural aspects in everyday situations are introduced. Traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2201 001/23605 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Jia Xu 5 11/12
CHNS 2201 002/61136 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Xiaodan Wang 5 11/12
CHNS 2201 003/61594 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Room TBA
Shaoyan Qi 5 12/12
CHNS 2201 004/17305 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
5 3/12
CHNS 2201 005/22054 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
5 4/12
CHNS 2201 006/71816 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
Room TBA
Wenlian Zhang 5 4/12
CHNS 2201 007/26343 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
5 1/12

CHNS UN2202 Second-Year Chinese II (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1101-1102 or CHNS F1101-1102, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Designed to further the student's four skills acquired in the elementary course, this program aims to develop higher level of proficiency through comprehensive oral and written exercises. Cultural aspects in everyday situations are introduced. Traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2017: CHNS UN2202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2202 001/61848 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
522c Kent Hall
Shaoyan Qi 5 13/18
CHNS 2202 002/73697 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
522c Kent Hall
Xiaodan Wang 5 19/18
CHNS 2202 003/76147 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522c Kent Hall
Shaoyan Qi 5 11/20
CHNS 2202 004/76549 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
405 Kent Hall
Wenlian Zhang 5 11/18
CHNS 2202 005/97896 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
522b Kent Hall
Jia Xu 5 9/18
CHNS 2202 006/83530 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Yu-Shan Cheng 5 16/18

CHNS C1221 Second-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1112 or F1112, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Continuation of CHNS C1112, with a focus on reading comprehension and written Chinese. Traditional characters. CC GS EN CE

CHNS UN2222 Second-Year Chinese II (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1112 or F1112, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Continuation of CHNS C1112, with a focus on reading comprehension and written Chinese. Traditional characters.  CC GS EN CE

Spring 2017: CHNS UN2222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2222 001/97496 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
317 Hamilton Hall
Yicheng Zhang 5 19/18
CHNS 2222 001/97496 Th 10:10am - 11:25am
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Yicheng Zhang 5 19/18

CHNS C2221 Second-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1112 or F1112, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Continuation of CHNS C1112, with a focus on reading comprehension and written Chinese. Traditional characters. CC GS EN CE

CHNS UN3003 Third-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1202 or F1202, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

This course fulfills the language requirement for east Asian studies majors. Prepares for more advanced study of Chinese through rigorous vocabulary expansion, more sophisticated language usage patterns, and introduction to basics of formal and literary styles. Materials are designed to advance the student's fluency for everyday communicative tasks as well as reading skills. Simplified characters are introduced. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN3003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3003 001/16594 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Zhirong Wang 5 4/12
CHNS 3003 002/75616 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
5 7/12
CHNS 3003 003/69100 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Room TBA
Lingjun Hu 5 11/12
CHNS 3003 004/64043 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Zhongqi Shi 5 10/12
CHNS 3003 005/29369 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
Wenlian Zhang 5 8/12

CHNS UN3004 Third-Year Chinese II (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4003 or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

This course fulfills the language requirement for east Asian studies majors. Prepares for more advanced study of Chinese through rigorous vocabulary expansion, more sophisticated language usage patterns, and introduction to basics of formal and literary styles. Materials are designed to advance the student's fluency for everyday communicative tasks as well as reading skills. Simplified characters are introduced. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2017: CHNS UN3004
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3004 001/12948 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
405 Kent Hall
Zhirong Wang 5 14/15
CHNS 3004 002/13448 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Lingjun Hu 5 11/15
CHNS 3004 004/16148 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Zhongqi Shi 5 12/15
CHNS 3004 005/16499 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522d Kent Hall
Wenlian Zhang 5 4/15

CHNS UN3005 Third-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1222 or F1222, or the equivalent.

Admission after Chinese placement exam and an oral proficiency interview with the instructor. Especially designed for students who possess good speaking ability and who wish to acquire practical writing skills as well as business-related vocabulary and speech patterns. Introduction to semiformal and formal Chinese used in everyday writing and social or business-related occasions. Simplified characters are introduced.

Fall 2017: CHNS UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3005 001/64460 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Hailong Wang 5 3/12

CHNS UN3006 Third-Year Chinese II (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4005 or the equivalent.

Admission after Chinese placement exam and an oral proficiency interview with the instructor. Especially designed for students who possess good speaking ability and who wish to acquire practical writing skills as well as business-related vocabulary and speech patterns. Introduction to semiformal and formal Chinese used in everyday writing and social or business-related occasions. Simplified characters are introduced.

Spring 2017: CHNS UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3006 001/77282 M W F 10:10am - 11:15am
405 Kent Hall
Hailong Wang 5 13/18

CHNS GU4012 Business Chinese. 5 points.

Prerequisites: two years of Chinese study at college level.

This course is designed for students who have studied Chinese for two years at college level and are interested in business studies concerning China. It offers systematic descriptions of Chinese language used in business discourse. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4012 001/19537 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
Room TBA
Zhongqi Shi 5 12/12

CHNS GU4014 Media Chinese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least 3 years of intensive Chinese language training at college level and the instructor's permission.

This advanced course is designed to specifically train students' listening and speaking skills in both formal and colloquial language through various Chinese media sources. Students view and discuss excerpts of Chinese TV news broadcasts, soap operas, and movie segments on a regular basis. Close reading of newspaper and internet articles and blogs supplements the training of verbal skills.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4014
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4014 001/26444 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
Room TBA
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 7/12
CHNS 4014 002/69445 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
Room TBA
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 6/12

CHNS GU4015 Fourth-Year Chinese I (N). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4004 or the equivalent.

Implements a wide range of reading materials to enhance the student’s speaking and writing as well as reading skills. Supplemented by television broadcast news, also provides students with strategies to increase their comprehension of formal style of modern Chinese. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4015
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4015 001/60897 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
Room TBA
4 11/12
CHNS 4015 002/25896 M W Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Ling Yan 4 15/15

CHNS GU4016 Fourth-Year Chinese II (N). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS G4015 or the equivalent.

Implements a wide range of reading materials to enhance the student’s speaking and writing as well as reading skills. Supplemented by television broadcast news, also provides students with strategies to increase their comprehension of formal style of modern Chinese. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2017: CHNS GU4016
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4016 001/65948 M T W Th 10:00am - 10:50am
423 Kent Hall
Wenlian Zhang 4 6/15
CHNS 4016 002/60947 M W Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
411 Kent Hall
Ling Yan 4 15/15

CHNS GU4018 Readings In Modern Chinese II (W) (Level 4). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4017 or the equivalent.

This is a non-consecutive reading course designed for those whose proficiency is above 4th level. See Admission to Language Courses. Selections from contemporary Chinese authors in both traditional and simplified characters with attention to expository, journalistic, and literary styles.

Spring 2017: CHNS GU4018
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4018 001/62747 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
4a Kraft Center
Chen Wu 4 3/15

CHNS GU4019 History of Chinese Language. 3 points.

Introduces the evolution of Chinese language. It reveals the major changes in Chinese sound, writing and grammar systems, and social and linguistic factors which caused these changes. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Spring 2017: CHNS GU4019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4019 001/67849 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
405 Kent Hall
Zhirong Wang 3 15/15
Fall 2017: CHNS GU4019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4019 001/27635 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Zhirong Wang 3 7/12

CHNS W3301 Introduction To Classical Chinese I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

CHNS GU4302 Introduction To Classical Chinese II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W3301: Classical Chinese I; completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

Please see department.  Prerequisites: CHNS W3301: Classical Chinese I; completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

Spring 2017: CHNS GU4302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4302 001/72996 M W 3:10pm - 4:00pm
522b Kent Hall
Lening Liu 3 8/15

CHNS GU4507 Readings in Classical Chinese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W3302 or the equivalent.

Admission after placement exam. Focusing on Tang and Song prose and poetry, introduces a broad variety of genres through close readings of chosen texts as well as the specific methods, skills, and tools to approach them. Strong emphasis on the grammatical and stylistic analysis of representative works. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4507
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4507 001/74054 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Wei Shang 4 12/15

CHNS GU4508 Readings in Classical Chinese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4007 or the equivalent.

Admission after placement exam. Focusing on Tang and Song prose and poetry, introduces a broad variety of genres through close readings of chosen texts as well as the specific methods, skills, and tools to approach them. Strong emphasis on the grammatical and stylistic analysis of representative works. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2017: CHNS GU4508
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4508 001/20765 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Harrison Huang 4 8/20

CHNS GU4017 Readings In Modern Chinese I (W) (Level 4). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4006 or the equivalent.

This is a non-consecutive reading course designed for those whose proficiency is above 4th level. See Admission to Language Courses. Selections from contemporary Chinese authors in both traditional and simplified characters with attention to expository, journalistic, and literary styles.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4017 001/70711 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Chen Wu 4 5/12

CHNS GU4301 Introduction To Classical Chinese I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4301
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4301 001/17836 M W F 11:00am - 11:50am
Room TBA
Lening Liu 3 9/12

CHNS GU4904 Acquisition of Chinese as a Second Language. 4 points.

For more than forty years, second language acquisition (SLA) has been emerging as an independent field of inquiry with its own research agenda and theoretical paradigms. The study of SLA is inherently interdisciplinary, as it draws on scholarship from the fields of linguistics, psychology, education, and sociology. This course explores how Chinese is acquired by non-native speakers. Students will learn about general phenomena and patterns during the process of acquiring a new language. They will become familiar with important core concepts, theoretical frameworks, and research practices of the field of SLA, with Chinese as the linguistic focus.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4904 001/15775 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Shaoyan Qi 4 7/12

Japanese Language Courses

JPNS UN1001 Introductory Japanese A. 2.5 points.

The sequence begins in the spring term. JPNS W1001-W1002 is equivalent to JPNS C1101 or F1101 and fulfills the requirement for admission to JPNS C1102 or F1102. Aims at the acquisition of basic Japanese grammar and Japanese culture with an emphasis on accurate communication in speaking and writing. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Spring 2017: JPNS UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1001 001/83548 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Naofumi Tatsumi 2.5 15/18
JPNS 1001 002/86097 M W 5:40pm - 6:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Toshiko Omori 2.5 16/18
JPNS 1001 003/87247 T Th 10:10am - 11:15am
522c Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 2.5 16/18
JPNS 1001 004/87797 T Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Toshiko Omori 2.5 17/18

JPNS UN1002 Introductory Japanese B. 2.5 points.

Prerequisites: C+ or above in JPNS W1001 or pass the placement test.

The sequence begins in the spring term. JPNS W1001-W1002 is equivalent to JPNS C1101 or F1101 and fulfills the requirement for admission to JPNS C1102 or F1102. Aims at the acquisition of basic Japanese grammar and Japanese culture with an emphasis on accurate communication in speaking and writing. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Fall 2017: JPNS UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1002 001/61521 M W 5:40pm - 6:45pm
Room TBA
Toshiko Omori 2.5 12/12
JPNS 1002 002/25510 T Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
Room TBA
Toshiko Omori 2.5 12/12

JPNS UN1101 First-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Lab Required

Basic training in Japanese through speaking, listening, reading and writing in various cultural contexts. 

Fall 2017: JPNS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1101 001/67089 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Keiko Okamoto 5 11/12
JPNS 1101 002/64031 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 4/12
JPNS 1101 003/77397 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Naoko Sourial 5 4/12
JPNS 1101 004/20184 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Room TBA
Kyoko Loetscher 5 10/12
JPNS 1101 005/73538 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
Fumiko Nazikian 5 11/12
JPNS 1101 006/76978 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
Asami Tsuda 5 4/12
JPNS 1101 007/65311 M T W Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
Room TBA
Asami Tsuda 5 5/12

JPNS UN1102 First-Year Japanese II. 5 points.

Lab Required

Prerequisites: JPNS C1101, F1101, or W1001-W1002, or the equivalent.

Basic training in Japanese through speaking, listening, reading and writing in various cultural contexts. 

Spring 2017: JPNS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1102 001/91597 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
424 Kent Hall
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 15/18
JPNS 1102 002/93748 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
411 Kent Hall
Jisuk Park 5 18/18
JPNS 1102 003/96846 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
405 Kent Hall
Kyoko Loetscher 5 17/18
JPNS 1102 004/97697 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Keiko Okamoto 5 13/18
JPNS 1102 005/76031 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
423 Kent Hall
Naoko Sourial 5 14/18

JPNS UN2201 Second-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Lab Required

Prerequisites: JPNS C1102 or the equivalent.

Further practice in the four language skills. Participation in a once a week conversation class is required.

Fall 2017: JPNS UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 2201 001/76393 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Jisuk Park 5 12/12
JPNS 2201 002/17379 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Shigeru Eguchi 5 12/12
JPNS 2201 003/68479 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Room TBA
Miharu Nittono 5 9/12
JPNS 2201 004/64767 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
Fumiko Nazikian 5 11/12

JPNS UN2202 Second-Year Japanese II. 5 points.

Lab Required

Prerequisites: JPNS C1201 or the equivalent.

Further practice in the four language skills. Participation in a once a week conversation class is required.

Spring 2017: JPNS UN2202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 2202 001/72192 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
601b Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Jisuk Park 5 10/18
JPNS 2202 002/87192 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 5 16/18
JPNS 2202 003/94695 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
423 Kent Hall
Miharu Nittono 5 10/18
JPNS 2202 004/19258 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 11/18

JPNS UN3005 Third-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS C1202 or the equivalent.

Readings in authentic/semi-authentic texts, videos, and class discussions.

Fall 2017: JPNS UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 3005 001/28350 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Keiko Okamoto 5 12/12
JPNS 3005 002/74373 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
Kyoko Loetscher 5 10/12
JPNS 3005 003/65201 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 4/12

JPNS UN3006 Third-Year Japanese II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4005 or the equivalent.

Readings in authentic/semi-authentic texts, videos, and class discussions.

Spring 2017: JPNS UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 3006 001/26001 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
255 International Affairs Bldg
Keiko Okamoto 5 16/15
JPNS 3006 002/26250 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
423 Kent Hall
Kyoko Loetscher 5 11/15

JPNS G4210 Japanese Pedagogy for Elementary Japanese. 0 points.

3 weeks

The theory and practice of teaching elementary Japanese courses.  Practicum on teaching practice

JPNS G4214 Japanese Pedagogy for Intermediate/Advanced Japanese. 0 points.

3 weeks

The theory and practice of teaching intermediate and advanced Japanese courses.  Practicum on teaching practice

Summer 2017: JPNS G4214
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4214 001/19694 M T W Th F 8:30am - 4:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Mutsuko Hudson, Shigeru Eguchi, Mariko Moroishi Wei 0 1/16
JPNS 4214 002/17696 M T W Th F 8:30am - 4:00pm
522d Kent Hall
Fumiko Nazikian 0 1/16

JPNS GU4007 Introduction To Classical Japanese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS C1202 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Japanese grammar. Trains students to read Japanese historical and literary texts from the early period up to the 20th century.

Fall 2017: JPNS GU4007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4007 001/70248 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
David Lurie 4 11/15

JPNS GU4017 Fourth-Year Japanese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4006 or the equivalent.

Sections 1 & 2: Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political, and journalistic texts, and class discussions about current issues and videos. Exercises in scanning, comprehension, and English translation. Section 3: Designed for advanced students interested in developing skills for reading and comprehending modern Japanese scholarship.

Fall 2017: JPNS GU4017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4017 001/14893 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Shigeru Eguchi 4 12/12
JPNS 4017 002/64476 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Jisuk Park 4 8/12

JPNS GU4018 Fourth-Year Japanese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4017 or the equivalent.

Sections 1 & 2: Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political, and journalistic texts, and class discussions about current issues and videos. Exercises in scanning, comprehension, and English translation. Section 3: Designed for advanced students interested in developing skills for reading and comprehending modern Japanese scholarship.

Spring 2017: JPNS GU4018
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4018 001/86781 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
522a Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 4 10/10

JPNS GU4516 Fifth Year Japanese I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4018 or the equivalent.

This course is intended to help students to develop language skills necessary for academic research. Students will read articles of various genres, watch videos, and debate issues from a wide range of fields, including economics, politics, history, comparative literature and current issues.

Fall 2017: JPNS GU4516
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4516 001/28899 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Miharu Nittono 3 5/12

JPNS GU4008 Readings in Classical Japanese. 4 points.

Close readings of specific texts, as well as methods, skills, and tools. 

Spring 2017: JPNS GU4008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4008 001/27495 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Tomi Suzuki 4 8/15
JPNS 4008 002/60280 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
522d Kent Hall
Mo Li 4 4/10

JPNS GU4517 Fifth Year Japanese II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS G5016 or the equivalent.

This course is intended to help students to develop language skills necessary for academic research. Students will read articles of various genres, watch videos, and debate issues from a wide range of fields, including economics, politics, history, comparative literature and current issues.

Spring 2017: JPNS GU4517
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4517 001/97195 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
522d Kent Hall
Miharu Nittono 3 6/10

JPNS GU4519 Kanbun. 3 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4007 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the fundamentals of reading Chinese-style Japanese and related forms, using literary and historical texts. CC GS EN CE GSAS

JPNS GR8040 Graduate Seminar In Pre-Modern Literature. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4007-W4008 or the equivalent, and the instructor’s permission.

Fall 2017: JPNS GR8040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 8040 001/18415 T 1:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Haruo Shirane 4 5/15

Korean Language Courses

KORN UN1001 Introductory Korean A. 2.5 points.

This course provides basic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean. Elementary Korean A (1001y) is equivalent to the first half of Elementary Korean I. Elementary Korean B (1002x) is equivalent to the second half of Elementary Korean I.

Spring 2017: KORN UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1001 001/81147 M W 2:40pm - 3:45pm
411 Kent Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 14/18
KORN 1001 002/82698 T Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 19/18
KORN 1001 003/83449 T Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Eunice Chung 2.5 10/18

KORN UN1002 Introductory Korean B. 2.5 points.

This course provides basic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean. Elementary Korean A (1001y) is equivalent to the first half of Elementary Korean I. Elementary Korean B (1002x) is equivalent to the second half of Elementary Korean I.

Spring 2017: KORN UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1002 001/86548 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Eunice Chung 2.5 16/18
Fall 2017: KORN UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1002 001/26494 M W 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 9/18
KORN 1002 002/60639 T Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 6/18

KORN UN1101 First-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Lab Required
Students who are unsure which section to register for should see the director of the Korean Language Program.

An introduction to written and spoken Korean. Textbook: Integrated Korean, Beginning I and II.

Fall 2017: KORN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1101 001/14103 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
Room TBA
Eunice Chung 5 13/18
KORN 1101 002/25526 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
Carol Schulz 5 3/18
KORN 1101 003/27171 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
5 6/18

KORN UN1102 First-Year Korean II. 5 points.

Lab Required
Students who are unsure which section to register for should see the director of the Korean Language Program.

An introduction to written and spoken Korean. Textbook: Integrated Korean, Beginning I and II.

Spring 2017: KORN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1102 001/88347 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
411 Kent Hall
Sunhee Song 5 20/18
KORN 1102 002/91798 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
411 Kent Hall
Beom Lee 5 18/18

KORN UN2201 Second-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1102 or the equivalent. Consultation with the instructors is required before registration for section assignment.

Further practice in reading, writing, listening comprehension, conversation, and grammar.

Fall 2017: KORN UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 2201 001/77702 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
Eunice Chung 5 17/18
KORN 2201 002/72965 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
Beom Lee 5 22/18

KORN UN2202 Second-Year Korean II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1102 or the equivalent. Consultation with the instructors is required before registration for section assignment.

Further practice in reading, writing, listening comprehension, conversation, and grammar.

Spring 2017: KORN UN2202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 2202 001/96596 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
424 Kent Hall
Carol Schulz 5 8/18
KORN 2202 002/96847 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
405 Kent Hall
Sunhee Song 5 21/18

KORN UN3005 Third-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1202 or the equivalent and consultation with instructor. (See Entrance to Language Courses Beyond the Elementary Level in the main bulletin under Department of Instruction -- East Asian Languages and Cultures.)

Readings in modern Korean. Selections from modern Korean writings in literature, history, social sciences, culture, and videos and class discussions.

Fall 2017: KORN UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 3005 001/74344 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Hyunkyu Yi 5 3/15
KORN 3005 002/65916 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Beom Lee 5 8/15

KORN UN3006 Third-Year Korean II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1202 or the equivalent and consultation with instructor. (See Entrance to Language Courses Beyond the Elementary Level in the main bulletin under Department of Instruction -- East Asian Languages and Cultures.)

Readings in modern Korean. Selections from modern Korean writings in literature, history, social sciences, culture, and videos and class discussions.

Spring 2017: KORN UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 3006 001/13349 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
522d Kent Hall
Eunice Chung 5 5/15
KORN 3006 002/13697 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
A36 Union Theological Seminary
Beom Lee 5 6/15

KORN GU4105 Fourth-Year Korean I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4006 or the equivalent.

Selections from advanced modern Korean writings in social sciences, literature, culture, history, journalistic texts, and intensive conversation exercises.

Fall 2017: KORN GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 4105 001/68296 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
4 4/15

KORN GU4106 Fourth-Year Korean II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4006 or the equivalent.

Selections from advanced modern Korean writings in social sciences, literature, culture, history, journalistic texts, and intensive conversation exercises.

Spring 2017: KORN GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 4106 001/24782 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
4a Kraft Center
Hyunkyu Yi 4 11/15
KORN 4106 001/24782 Th 10:10am - 11:25am
6c Kraft Center
Hyunkyu Yi 4 11/15

KORN GR8010 Advanced Korean in Mixed Script. 2 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W5011 and W5012 or equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to provide M.A. and Ph.D. students in Korean Studies with the necessary skills for reading advanced Korean in mixed script.  It focuses on materials from the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries.

Fall 2017: KORN GR8010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 8010 001/17487 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Hyunkyu Yi, Beom Lee 2 2/15

KORN W4200 Modern Korean Literature. 3 points.

This course engages in a critical study of representative Korean literary texts of the twentieth century. Texts are drawn from both the Japanese colonial period (1910-1945) and the post-liberation period (1945-present). Reading of literary works are supplemented with theoretical texts and recent scholarship on modern Korea. Discussion of works written in the colonial period, considers the formation of “modern literature,” the emergence of rival literary camps, representations of gender, nationalism, assimilation, and resistance against Japanese rule.  Topics central to the Korean postcolonial experience include national division, war, the emergence of women writers, rapid industrialization, and authoritarianism.

KORN W5011 Modern Korean I (Fifth Year). 3 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4105-W4106 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political and journalistic texts, and a wide range of materials.

KORN W5012 Modern Korean II (Fifth Year). 3 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4105-W4106 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political and journalistic texts, and a wide range of materials.

Tibetan Language Courses

TIBT W4416 Advanced Classical Tibetan. 3 points.

TIBT UN1410 FIRST YEAR CLASSICAL TIBETAN I. 4 points.

First year Classical Tibetan

Fall 2017: TIBT UN1410
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 1410 001/72600 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Kunchog Tseten 4 0/12

TIBT W4550 Understanding Modern Tibet. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

TIBT G4600 First Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 5 points.

This is an introductory course and no previous knowledge is required. It focuses on developing basic abilities to speak as well as to read and write in modern Tibetan, Lhasa dialect. Students are also introduced to modern Tibetan studies through selected readings and guest lectures.

TIBT G4603 Second Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the First Year course. The course focuses on the further development of their skills in using the language to engage with practical topics and situations, such as seeing a doctor, reading news, writing letters, and listening to music.

TIBT G4611 Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the Second Year course. The course develops students’ reading comprehension skills through reading selected modern Tibetan literature. Tibetan is used as the medium of instruction and interaction to develop oral fluency and proficiency.

TIBT UN3611 Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the Second Year course. The course develops students’ reading comprehension skills through reading selected modern Tibetan literature. Tibetan is used as the medium of instruction and interaction to develop oral fluency and proficiency.

Fall 2017: TIBT UN3611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 3611 001/60902 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Sonam Tsering 4 0/12

Vietnamese Language Courses

VIET UN1101 Elementary Vietnamese I. 4 points.

This course introduces students to the linguistic and grammatical structures of Vietnamese, a major language of South East Asia.

VIET UN1102 Elementary Vietnamese II. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to the linguistic and grammatical structures of Vietnamese, a major language of South East Asia.

Spring 2017: VIET UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIET 1102 001/67698 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
James Lap 4 5/20

VIET UN1201 Second Year Vietnamese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: both VIET W1101 and VIET W1102, or equivalent.

The objective of this course is to help students strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Vietnamese. Students will be thoroughly grounded in communicative activities such as conversations, performance simulations, drills, role-plays, games, etc. and improve their reading and writing abilities by developing their vocabulary and grammar. Each lesson includes dialogue, vocabulary, grammar practice and development, task-based activities, narratives and situation dialogues.

Fall 2017: VIET UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIET 1201 001/29302 T Th 12:00pm - 1:40pm
Room TBA
James Lap 4 4/12

VIET W2202 Second Year Vietnamese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: both VIET W1101 and VIET W1102, or equivalent.

The objective of this course is to help students strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Vietnamese. Students will be thoroughly grounded in communicative activities such as conversations, performance simulations, drills, role-plays, games, etc. and improve their reading and writing abilities by developing their vocabulary and grammar. Each lesson includes dialogue, vocabulary, grammar practice and development, task-based activities, narratives and situation dialogues.

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RELI W4006Japanese Religion through Manga and Film
RELI W4010Chan/Zen Buddhism
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