East Asian Languages and Cultures

Departmental Office: 407 Kent; 212-854-5027
ealac.columbia.edu/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Paul Anderer, 414 Kent; 212-854-1525; pja1@columbia.edu

The program in East Asian studies offers a wide range of courses in a variety of disciplines, as well as training in the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Tibetan languages. The program is designed to provide a coherent curriculum for undergraduates wishing to major in East Asian studies, with disciplinary specialization in anthropology, art history, economics, history, literature, philosophy, political science, sociology, or religion. The department also offers a series of introductory and thematic courses especially designed for students seeking to acquire some knowledge of East Asia as part of their broader undergraduate experience.

Admission to Language Courses

All students wishing to enter the language program at another point besides the first term of the first level must pass a language placement test before registering. The language placement exams are held during the change of program period, the week before classes begin.

Students who have been absent from the campus for one term or more must take a placement test before enrolling in a language course beyond the first term of the first level.

Students who wish to place out of the Columbia College Foreign Language Requirement for a language taught in the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures must consult with the director of the relevant language program. The names of the directors, and additional information about East Asian language programs, can be accessed via the department website at ealac.columbia.edu.

Language Laboratory

An additional hour of study in the language laboratory is required in first-year Japanese (JPNS UN101 and JPNS UN1102). 

JPNS UN1101
 - JPNS UN1102
First-Year Japanese I
and First-Year Japanese II

Students taking these courses must attend all assigned language laboratory sessions. Grades for written and oral work in the language laboratory and for additional work in oral drill sessions count as 10% of the final grade in the course. Assignments of laboratory hours are made during the first session of the regular classes.

Course Numbering

The following are general guidelines to the numbering of department courses open to undergraduates. Students with questions about the nature of a course should consult with the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies.

  • 1000-level: Introductory-level undergraduate courses and first-year language courses
  • 2000-level: Intermediate-level undergraduate courses and second-year language courses
  • 3000-level: Advanced-level undergraduate courses and third-year language courses
  • 4000-level: Advanced courses geared toward undergraduate students available to graduate students or geared toward both undergraduate and graduate students, fourth-year and above language courses

Study Abroad

East Asian Studies majors or concentrators who plan to spend their junior spring abroad must contact the director of undergraduate studies for information about course selection in the sophomore year. 

The Kyoto Center for Japanese Studies

The Kyoto Center offers Columbia students the opportunity to study in Japan in a program combining intensive instruction in the Japanese language with courses taught in English on a wide range of topics in Japanese studies. Students should have at least the equivalent of two years of Japanese by the time of their departure. The program is most appropriate for the junior year, although other arrangements are considered.

East Asian Studies majors or concentrators who opt to spend their junior spring at the Kyoto Center must take the required disciplinary and senior thesis-related courses in the spring of their sophomore year (contact the director of undergraduate studies for details). For further information about the Kyoto Center, please consult Robin Leephaibul: rl2705@columbia.edu.

Grading

Courses in which the grade of D or P has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements.

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors are conferred only on East Asian Studies majors who have earned a grade point average of at least 3.6 for courses in the major, have pursued a rigorous and ambitious program of study, and have submitted senior theses of superior quality, clearly demonstrating originality and excellent scholarship. Qualified seniors are nominated by their thesis advisers. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year. Concentrators are not eligible for departmental honors.

Special Service Professors

  • William Theodore de Bary (John Mitchell Mason Professor and Provost Emeritus of the University)
  • Donald Keene (Shincho Professor Emeritus)

Professors

  • Paul Anderer
  • Charles Armstrong (History)
  • Bernard Faure
  • Carol Gluck (History)
  • Robert E. Harrist Jr. (Art History)
  • Robert Hymes
  • Dorothy Ko (Barnard History)
  • Feng Li
  • Lydia Liu
  • Rachel McDermott (Barnard)
  • Matthew McKelway (Art History)
  • Wei Shang
  • Haruo Shirane (Chair)
  • Tomi Suzuki
  • Madeleine Zelin

Associate Professors

  • Lisbeth Kim Brandt
  • Michael Como (Religion)
  • Theodore Hughes
  • Adam McKeown (History)
  • Eugenia Lean
  • David Lurie
  • David (Max) Moerman (Barnard)
    Lien-Hang Nguyen (History)
  • Gregory Pflugfelder
  • Jonathan Reynolds (Art History, Barnard)
  • Gray Tuttle

Assistant Professors

  • Nicholas Barlett (Barnard)
  • Jue Guo (Barnard)
  • Lauran Hartley
  • Harrison Huang
  • Jungwon Kim
  • Paul Kreitman
  • Ying Qian
  • Zhaohua Yang (Religion)

Adjunct Faculty

  • Robert Barnett
  • Itsuki Hayashi
  • Laurel Kendall
  • Tuo Li
  • Morris Rossabi
  • Conrad Schirokauer

Senior Lecturers

  • Shigeru Eguchi
  • Ling Yan
  • Lening Liu
  • Yuan-Yuan Meng
  • Fumiko Nazikian
  • Miharu Nittono
  • Carol Schulz
  • Zhirong Wang

Lecturers

  • Pema Bhum
    Yu-Shan Chen
  • Eunice Chung
  • Lingjun Hu
  • Tianqi Jiang
  • James Lap
  • Beom Lee
  • Kyoko Loetscher
  • Keiko Okamoto
  • Jisuk Park
  • Shaoyan Qi
  • Zhongqi Shi
  • Sunhee Song
  • Naofumi Tatsumi
  • Sonam Tsering
  • Asami Tsuda
  • Hailong Wang
  • Xiaodan Wang
  • Chen Wu
  • Jia Xu
  • Hyunkyu Yi

On Leave

Harrison Huang
Eugenia Lean
Gregory Pflugfelder

Major in East Asian Studies

The requirements for this program were modified in the Spring 2017 semester. Students who declared an EAS major before this semester have the option of following the old or the new requirements. If you have any questions, please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Prerequisite

Students must meet the following prerequisite prior to declaring the East Asian Studies major: two years of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan, or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). 

Language Requirement

Third-year Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan (completion of the UN3005-UN3006 level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean; TIBT UN3611-UN3612 level in Tibetan), or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination).  Students of Chinese may also complete UN3003-UN3004 to meet the third-year requirement.

One of the following sequences (in the target language):
CHNS UN3003
 - CHNS UN3004
Third-Year Chinese I (N)
and Third-Year Chinese II (N)
Or, for heritage students:
Third-Year Chinese I (W)
and Third-Year Chinese II (W)
JPNS UN3005
 - JPNS UN3006
Third-Year Japanese I
and Third-Year Japanese II
KORN UN3005
 - KORN UN3006
Third-Year Korean I
and Third-Year Korean II
TIBT UN3611
 - TIBT UN3612
Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I
and Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan II

Students who test out of three years or more of a language must take an additional year of that language or another East Asian language at Columbia in order to satisfy the language requirement.

Introductory Courses

Students are required to take:
AHUM UN1400Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia
Students must also select two of the following:
ASCE UN1359Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China
ASCE UN1361Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan
ASCE UN1363Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea
ASCE UN1365Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet
ASCE UN1367Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Vietnam

First-year students and sophomores, prior to declaring an East Asian studies major, are strongly urged to take one or more of the introductory courses.

Methodology Course

All majors must also take EAAS UN3990 Approaches to East Asian Studies which is offered every spring.

Elective Courses

For students must take four elective courses in East Asian studies, to be chosen in consultation with the DUS. Two of these courses must be EALAC or AMEC courses. Courses in a second East Asian language (one year minimum) or a classical East Asian language (one semester minimum) may be used to fulfill one elective course.

Senior Thesis Program

East Asian Studies majors who wish to write a senior thesis apply to the EALAC Senior Thesis Program at the end of their junior year. Students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.6 in courses taken in the major at the time of the application. Students interested in applying to the Senior Thesis Program should submit the EALAC Senior Thesis Program Application (see Undergraduate Planning Sheets and Forms) to the DUS by Monday, May 1, 2017. Decisions will be made by the week of May 15th.

All potential thesis writers are required to enroll in the Senior Thesis Research Workshop (EAAS UN3999) in the fall of the senior year. Students who perform satisfactorily in this workshop, successfully complete a thesis proposal, and find a faculty adviser will then write the Senior Thesis itself in the spring semester under the direction of the adviser and a graduate student tutor (EAAS UN3901).

The senior thesis typically consists of about 30-35 pages of text (double-spaced, normal typeface and margins) and 5-8 pages of references. Under no circumstances should a thesis exceed a total of 50 pages (including references), without the special permission of the faculty adviser.

Successful completion of the thesis by the April 1 deadline in the spring semester will be necessary but not sufficient for a student to receive departmental honors. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year; as such, not all thesis writers will receive honors.


Concentration in East Asian Studies

Prerequisite

Students must meet the following prerequisite prior to declaring the East Asian Studies concentration: two years of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan, or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination). 

Language Requirement

Third-year Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan (completion of the UN3005-UN3006 level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean; TIBT UN3611-UN3612 level in Tibetan), or the proficiency equivalent (to be demonstrated by placement examination).  Students of Chinese may also complete UN3003-UN3004 to meet the third-year requirement.

One of the following sequences (in the target language):
CHNS UN3003
 - CHNS UN3004
Third-Year Chinese I (N)
and Third-Year Chinese II (N)
Or, for heritage students:
Third-Year Chinese I (W)
and Third-Year Chinese II (W)
JPNS UN3005
 - JPNS UN3006
Third-Year Japanese I
and Third-Year Japanese II
KORN UN3005
 - KORN UN3006
Third-Year Korean I
and Third-Year Korean II
TIBT UN3611
 - TIBT UN3612
Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I
and Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan II

Students who test out of a third-year level East Asian language must take either an additional year of the same language, one year of a classical East Asian language, one year of an additional East Asian language, or two electives.

Introductory Courses

AHUM UN1400Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia
Select one of the following:
ASCE UN1359Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China
ASCE UN1361Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan
ASCE UN1363Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea
ASCE UN1365Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet
ASCE UN1367Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Vietnam

Electives

Two courses in East Asian Studies at Columbia or Barnard at the 3000- or 4000-level, subject to approval by the DUS. Concentrators may count Classical Chinese, Classical Japanese, or Classical Tibetan as one of the electives for this requirement.

Concentrators are not eligible for the Senior Thesis Program or for departmental honors.

NOTE: Courses without scheduling information are not offered during this current semester.  Please also consult the Directory of Classes for course information before emailing the contact below.

For questions, please contact Youngmi Jin (yj2180@columbia.edu).

Content Courses

ASCE UN1002 Introduction to Major Topics in Asian Civilizations: East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

An interdisciplinary and topical approach to the major issues and phases of East Asian civilizations and their role in the contemporary world. 

Fall 2017: ASCE UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1002 001/62484 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Hl-2 Heyman Center For Humanities
Conrad Schirokauer 4 15/22
Spring 2018: ASCE UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1002 001/65467 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Harrison Huang 4 12/22

ASCE UN1359 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE V2360
Corequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE V2360

The evolution of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on characteristic institutions and traditions.

Fall 2017: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/13153 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Anatoly Detwyler 4 65/90
Spring 2018: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/24276 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
501 Northwest Corner
Harrison Huang 4 75/90

ASCE UN1361 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE V2371
Corequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE V2371

A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century.

Fall 2017: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/70734 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
David Lurie 4 71/90
Spring 2018: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/17200 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Paul Kreitman 4 88/90

ASCE UN1363 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The evolution of Korean society and culture, with special attention to Korean values as reflected in thought, literature, and the arts.

Spring 2018: ASCE UN1363
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1363 001/74226 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Seong-Uk Kim 3 53/60

ASCE UN1365 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Tibet. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course seeks to introduce the sweep of Tibetan civilization and its history from its earliest recorded origins to the present. The course examines what civilizational forces shaped Tibet, especially the contributions of Indian Buddhism, sciences and literature, but also Chinese statecraft and sciences. Alongside the chronological history of Tibet, we will explore aspects of social life and culture.

Fall 2017: ASCE UN1365
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1365 001/15813 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
312 Mathematics Building
Gray Tuttle 4 88/90

ASCE UN1367 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Vietnam. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course provides a survey of Vietnamese civilization from prehistoric origins to the French colonization in the 19th century, with special emphasis on the rise and development of independent kingship over the 2nd millennium CE.  We begin by exploring ethnolinguistic diversity of the Red River plain over the first millenium BCE, culminating in the material bronze culture known as the Dong Son.  We then turn towards the introduction of high sinitic culture, and the region's long membership within successive Chinese empires.  We pay special attention to the rise of an independent state out of the crumbling Tang Dynasty, and the specific nation-building effects of war with the Mongols and the Ming Dynasty, in the 14th and 15th centuries respectively.  Our class ends with the French colonization of the region, and the dramatic cultural and intellectual transformations that were triggered as a result.  Our course will interrogate Vietnamese culture as a protean object, one that is defined and redefined at virtually every level, throughout a history marked by foreign interest, influence, and invasion.

Fall 2017: ASCE UN1367
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1367 001/22696 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
John Phan 4 19/30

AHUM UN1400 Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Fall 2017: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/05400 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
214 Milbank Hall
David Moerman 4 17/22
AHUM 1400 002/67259 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
411 Kent Hall
Seong-Uk Kim 4 14/22
AHUM 1400 003/64631 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Paul Anderer 4 23/27
AHUM 1400 004/24981 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
424 Kent Hall
John Phan 4 14/22
Spring 2018: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/28477 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Hl-2 Heyman Center For Humanities
Conrad Schirokauer 4 24/24
AHUM 1400 002/15398 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
602 Lewisohn Hall
Itsuki Hayashi 4 27/24
AHUM 1400 003/23384 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
101 80 Claremont
Michael Como 4 22/22

EAAS UN3230 Labor, Love, and Leisure in Contemporary China. 3 points.

This course offers an introduction to life in Reform era China. We will employ anthropological analysis to examine how Maoist legacies and recent state liberalization efforts shape everyday experiences of labor, romance, and consumption. Scholarly texts will be supplemented with primary materials including political speeches, testimonies, and documentaries.

Spring 2018: EAAS UN3230
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3230 001/85896 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
212a Lewisohn Hall
Nicholas Bartlett 3 13/18

EAAS UN3322 East Asian Cinema. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course introduces students to major works, genres and waves of East Asian cinema from the Silent era to the present, including films from Japan, Korea, Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. How has cinema participated in East Asian societies’ distinct and shared experiences of industrial modernity, imperialism and (post)colonialism? How has cinema engaged with questions of class, gender, ethnic and language politics? In what ways has cinema facilitated transnational circulations and mobilizations of peoples and ideas, and how has it interacted with other art forms, such as theatre, painting, photography and music? In this class, we answer these questions by studying cinemas across the region sideby- side, understanding cinema as deeply embedded in the region’s intertwining political, social and cultural histories and circulations of people and ideas. We cover a variety of genres such as melodrama, comedy, historical epic, sci-fi, martial arts and action, and prominent film auteurs such as Yasujirō Ozu, Akira Kurosawa, Yu Hyŏnmok, Chen Kaige, Hou Hsiao-hsien, and Ann Hui. As cinema is, among other things, a creative practice, in this course, students will be given opportunities to respond to films analytically and creatively, through writing as well as creative visual projects. As a global core course, this class does not assume prior knowledge of East Asian culture or of film studies.

AHUM UN3830 Colloquium On Modern East Asian Texts. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: AHUM V3400 is recommended as background.

Introduction to and exploration of modern East Asian literature through close reading and discussion of selected masterpieces from the 1890s through the 1990s by Chinese, Japanese, and Korean writers such as Mori Ogai, Wu Jianren, Natsume Soseki, Lu Xun, Tanizaki Jun’ichiro, Shen Congwen, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, Yi Sang, Oe Kenzaburo, O Chong-hui, and others. Emphasis will be on cultural and intellectual issues and on how literary forms manifested, constructed, or responded to rapidly shifting experiences of modernity in East Asia.

Fall 2017: AHUM UN3830
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 3830 001/72674 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
411 Kent Hall
Charles Woolley 4 16/20
Spring 2018: AHUM UN3830
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 3830 001/17345 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Theodore Hughes 4 12/22

HSEA UN3863 The History of Modern Korea. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Recommended: HSEA W3862.

Korean history from the mid 19th century to the present, with particular focus on politics, society, and culture in the 20th century. Major Cultures Requirement: East Asian Civilization List B. Group(s): C

Spring 2018: HSEA UN3863
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 3863 001/74063 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
233 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Charles Armstrong 3 19/35

HSEA UN3871 Modern Japan: Images and Words. 3 points.

This course relies primarily on visual materials to familiarize students with the history of Japan from the beginning of the nineteenth century through the present. It follows a chronological order, introducing students to various realms of Japanese visual culture—from woodblock prints to film, anime, and manga—along with the historical contexts that they were shaped by, and in turn helped shape. Special attention will paid to the visual technologies of nation-building, war, and empire; to historical interactions between Japanese and Euro-American visual culture; to the operations of still versus moving images; and to the mass production of visual commodities for the global marketplace. Students who take the course will emerge not only with a better understanding of Japan’s modern historical experience, but also with a more discerning eye for the ways that images convey meaning and offer access to the past.

HSEA UN3898 The Mongols in History. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Study of the role of the Mongols in Eurasian history, focusing on the era of the Great Mongol Empire. The roles of Chinggis and Khubilai Khan and the modern fate of the Mongols to be considered.

Spring 2018: HSEA UN3898
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 3898 001/69308 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
214 Pupin Laboratories
Morris Rossabi 3 30/25

EAAS UN3901 Senior Thesis. 2 points.

Prerequisites: Senior majors only.

Senior Seminar required of all majors in East Asian Studies. Open only to senior majors.

Spring 2018: EAAS UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3901 001/15174  
Paul Anderer 2 7/15

EAAS UN3990 Approaches to East Asian Studies. 4 points.

Enrollment is limited to EALAC and AMEC majors and concentrators only.

This course is intended to provide a focal point for undergraduate majors in East Asian Studies. It introduces students to the analysis of particular objects of East Asian historical, literary, and cultural studies from various disciplinary perspectives. The syllabus is composed of a series of modules, each centered around an object, accompanied by readings that introduce different ways of understanding its meaning.

Spring 2018: EAAS UN3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3990 001/24240 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
467 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Robert Hymes 4 20/25

EAAS UN3999 Research in East Asian Studies. 1 point.

Introduces students to research and writing techniques and requires the preparation of a senior thesis proposal. Required for majors and concentrators in the East Asian studies major in the spring term of the junior year.

Fall 2017: EAAS UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3999 001/15171 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Paul Anderer, Chloe Estep 1 9/15

EARL GU4010 Buddhist Inspirations in 20th Cent. Japanese Thought. 4 points.

This course explores the Buddhist inspirations in the thought of some of the most important thinkers of 20th century Japan: Nishida Kitaro (1870-1945), Tanabe Hajime (1885-1962), and Nishitani Keiji (1900-1990).  Additionally, since the Japanese philosophers develop their thoughts essentially by synthesizing eastern and western religions, we will discuss the issue of interreligious dialogue and religious pluralism throughout the course.  No background in western intellectual tradition is required.

Fall 2017: EARL GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4010 001/25516 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
4c Kraft Center
Itsuki Hayashi 4 9/20

EAAS GU4027 Disability in East Asia and Beyond. 4 points.

“The world isn’t built with a ramp,” writes disabled adventurer Walt Balenovich in his book Travels in a Blue Chair. Neither is the world built with any universal understanding of disability. This course examines what it means to be disabled in both theory and practice, especially in East Asian contexts. We begin by closely examining the concept of “disability” and its various connotations, then look at permutations of disability in Japan, China, and the Koreas before ending with recent, more radical ways of thinking about disability. This interdisciplinary course is framed by feminist approaches to definitions and applications of disability theory, drawing further on literary and technological approaches to representation of minority subjects. Multimedia engagement with issues ranging from guide dogs to nanotechnology will aid in understanding overlaps between, and barriers of, disability on an international scale, while also building a critical toolkit for understanding “able-bodied” assumptions in ourselves.

Fall 2017: EAAS GU4027
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4027 001/93450 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
411 Kent Hall
Tyran Grillo 4 8/15

HSEA GU4027 Issues in Early Chinese Civilization: Theories and Debates. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic issues and problems in the study of early Chinese civilization, some theoretical and others methodological. Through the review of a long series of debates the course offers a quick entrance both to this early period of history and to these studies. Organized around problems, the course encourages critical thinking and contesting arguments and helps the students weigh different positions addressing the problems. By doing so, the course guides the students to search for frontline questions and to probe possible ways to solve the problems. The course deals with both the written records (inscriptional and textual) and the material evidence, and the student can well expect this course to serve as also updates of the most fascinating archaeological discoveries in China made in the past decades. The course is designed as an upper-level undergraduate and MA course; therefore, it is recommended that undergraduate students should take "ASCE V2359: Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China" before participating in this course.

Fall 2017: HSEA GU4027
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4027 001/26687 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
424 Kent Hall
Feng Li 4 9/15

EAAS GU4029 Jin Ping Mei in a New Light. 4 points.

In this course we will probe the dark vision of the human condition presented in the sixteenth-century masterwork of Chinese fiction Jin Ping Mei, as it develops in two different directions: first, in the devastating de-construction of human values in Xingshi yinyuanzhuan in the seventeenth century, then in the lyricization of desire and its ultimate failure in Hongloumeng in the eighteenth century.

Spring 2018: EAAS GU4029
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4029 001/80944 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
101 Kent Hall
Andrew Plaks 4 12/6

JPNS GU4035 Reading and Translating Modern Japanese Literature. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Equivalent of four years of Modern Japanese, or three years of Modern Japanese with Classical Japanese.

In this course, students will have the opportunity to apply and improve their Japanese language skills through translating works of modern Japanese literature in a variety of genres, including narrative fiction, personal essay, and criticism, while considering the various interpretive, aesthetic, and linguistic challenges posed by literary translation generally, and the translation of Japanese into English, specifically. Students are required to have either completed the equivalent of four years of Modern Japanese or three years of Modern Japanese in conjunction with Classical Japanese. 

Spring 2018: JPNS GU4035
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4035 001/29533 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
522a Kent Hall
Charles Woolley 4 8/10

EAAS GU4034 Modern Chinese Literature and the Economic Imagination. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Some background knowledge of China recommended, but not required.

This course explores the history of modern Chinese literature from 1600 to the present, with a topical focus on the "economic imagination"--forms of reflection about the epistemology and significance of money, markets, and exchange. Issues will include: the relationship between capitalism and the novel, money and literary realism, and theories of value and exchange.

Spring 2018: EAAS GU4034
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4034 001/82296 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Anatoly Detwyler 4 10/18

EARL GU4120 Chan/Zen Buddhism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Some background in East Asian Buddhism, or instructor permission required.

Zen has become a household term, but the reality behind this term is not well known. Originating in China around the 6th century C.E., the Chan/Zen tradition became one of the major Buddhist schools and rapidly spread to Korea, Japan, Vietnam (and, to a certain extent, Tibet). This course examines some aspects of this tradition, emphasizing its historical development, its mythological elements, and its multifaceted practice, which has for too long been reduced in the Western mind to meditation.

Spring 2018: EARL GU4120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4120 001/28747 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
212a Lewisohn Hall
Bernard Faure 4 15/20

EAAS GU4160 CULTURES IN COLONIAL KOR. 4 points.

This course examines the processes of colonization that played a central role in locating Korea in an integrated world in the first half of the twentieth century. We will analyze the ways in which the intersections among an array of contemporary global issues and concerns (to name a few- social Darwinism, migration, urban space, gender, sexuality, militarism, race, liberalism, socialism, capitalism) shaped the modern experience in Korea under Japanese rule (1910-1945). Our approach will be multidisciplinary. We will look, for example, at art, architecture, literature, film, philosophy, religion, and historiography. Throughout, we will pay special attention to the place of Korea and Koreans in the expanding Japanese empire and, more broadly, in the global colonial context. Class will be held as a discussion seminar based on close reading of primary-source documents and recent scholarship.

Spring 2018: EAAS GU4160
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4160 001/25430 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Theodore Hughes 4 16/15

EAAS GU4244 Chinese Internet Culture. 4 points.

This course introduces Chinese internet culture by examining interactive literary communities, multimedia platforms, cyber-nationalism, web-based activism, and the possibility of the internet commons in mainland China.  We will pay close attention to the figure of netizen, online piracy, cyberbullying, censorship, and growing addiction to virtual reality among the Chinese youth.  Topics of discussion include, for example, the tension between connectivity and control, between imitation and innovation, and between the real and the virtual.  We will explore these new developments in media technology primarily from social, political, and international perspectives.  The goal is to understand how the rapid proliferation of digital technologies has helped create a new landscape of popular culture across mass media and transformed contemporary Chinese society.

Fall 2017: EAAS GU4244
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4244 001/28047 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
423 Kent Hall
Yan Wang 4 12/15

EAAS GU4277 Japanese Anime and Beyond: Gender, Power and Transnational Media. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This is an upper-level undergraduate and graduate (MA) seminar. It would be helpful if students have some background in film/media studies, cultural studies, and/or East Asian studies, though no prerequisite is required. The guiding questions of the course: The animated films variably have become sites of knowledge formation and aesthetic experiments in different regions of the world. How so? What were the underlying historical and cultural conditions that led to the invention and circulation of animation? What would be a heuristic and effective narrative mode to examine the transnational history of animation? In order to go beyond the narrow confines of area studies that often separate the treatment of Japanese animation from the Euro-American and/or Asian contexts, this course provides a comparative approach. The tripartite course begins by introducing canonical works of Japanese animated film (anime) and provides an overview of the state of field. The next session discusses historically important films (from Europe, US and China) which students examine along with the selected readings from animation theories. The final section explores, in addition to recent animated films, comics and graphic novels (Japan and Korea), which are vital media for understanding animation.

Fall 2017: EAAS GU4277
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4277 001/68968 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
602 Northwest Corner
Tom Looser 4 20/20

EARL GU4310 Life-Writing in Tibetan Buddhist Literature. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course engages the genre of life writing in Tibetan Buddhist culture, addressing the permeable and fluid nature of this important sphere of Tibetan literature. Through Tibetan biographies, hagiographies, and autobiographies, the class will consider questions about how life-writing overlaps with religious doctrine, philosophy, and history. For comparative purposes, we will read life writing from Western (and Japanese or Chinese) authors, for instance accounts of the lives of Christian saints, raising questions about the cultural relativity of what makes up a life's story.

Fall 2017: EARL GU4310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4310 001/69271 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Gray Tuttle 4 12/15

HSEA GU4232 EMPIRES IN THE FORMATION OF MODERN EAST ASIA, 1700-1950. 4 points.

This course, a seminar for advanced undergraduates and M.A. students, explores themes in the history of empires in East Asia, from the early 18th century to the end of World War II. The main geographical focus will the region now corresponding to mainland China (including a part of Inner Asia), Japan, Korea and Taiwan. Colonial empires and their possessions in Southeast Asia will also be discussed. The master narrative of modern political history has long been one of transition from Empire to Nation: decaying empires – Mughal, Ottoman, Qing – proved unable to adapt to the challenges of modern international competition, and were replaced more or less violently with more homogeneous nation-states. We have come to see, however, that empires are more flexible and durable political forms than previously thought, and also that East Asian polities were far from stagnant when Western imperialism burst onto the scene. Imperialism itself was not foreign to the region; the Qing Empire, for example, vastly expanded its territory in the 18th century. Both in Japan and in China, although in different ways, modern nation-building was inseparable from the imperial control of remote and heterogeneous lands. Lastly, in the East Asian context of the 19th and early 20th centuries, framing Western powers as aggressive “nations” is partial at best: what East Asians dealt with were colonial empires, whose policies were often determined at the margins rather than in the metropole. It is therefore appropriate to consider the international history of East Asia from the 18th century to World War II through the lens of interactions and conflict among Empires and Empires in the making. 

Spring 2018: HSEA GU4232
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4232 001/20484 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Victor Louzon 4 11/20

HSEA GU4234 History of Political Thought in Modern East Asia. 4 points.

This seminar, which is intended for advanced undergraduates and MA students, is an introduction to the history of political thought in East Asia from the late nineteenth century to the present day. The course will also introduce students to a variety of approaches to intellectual history.

Spring 2018: HSEA GU4234
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4234 001/68296 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
606 Lewisohn Hall
Victor Louzon 4 11/15

EAAS GU4272 Remaking Japan: Hollywood and Japanese Film. 4 points.

Remaking Japan: Hollywood and Japanese Film examines the politics, profit motives, and visual substitutions common to Hollywood's remakes of Japanese films. This course is designed to foster deeper understandings of issues related to the art of remaking, and to direct those understandings toward rigorous analyses of films as tools of social representation in the context of Japanese-American cultural exchange.

Spring 2018: EAAS GU4272
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4272 001/11198 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
420 Pupin Laboratories
Tyran Grillo 4 14/15

EARL GU4312 Tibetan Sacred Space (in Comparative Context). 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Through interdisciplinary theoretical approaches (mostly in the fields of religion, anthropology, literature, and history), this course engages the genre of writing about sacred space in Tibetan Buddhist culture, addressing the micro (built environment) and macro (natural environment) levels of this important sphere of Tibetan literature. Through Tibetan pilgrimage accounts, place (monasteries, temples, etc) based guidebooks, geographically focused biographies, and pictorial representations of place, the class will consider questions about how place-writing overlaps with religious practice, politics, and history. For comparative purposes, we will read place based writing from Western and other Asian authors, for instance accounts of the guidebooks to and inscriptions at Christian churches, raising questions about the cultural relativity of what makes up sacred space.

Spring 2018: EARL GU4312
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4312 001/26048 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
467 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Gray Tuttle 4 19/20

EARL GU4322 Enlightenment or Salvation: Practices and Rituals of Korean Buddhism. 4 points.

In this course, we will explore basic doctrines and practices of Korean Buddhism.  Since Buddhism was first introduced to Korea 1,600 years ago, it has attracted and inspired almost all classes of people in the peninsula with its diverse and sophisticated philosophy and rituals. Korean Buddhists not only transformed this imported tradition to meet their own religious needs, but also contributed to the development of pan-East Asian Buddhist traditions such as Huayan/ Hwaŏm/ Kegon Buddhism. In this course, we will explore Hwaŏm and Sŏn as well as Maitreya and Amitābha worships and death rituals in Korea. In particular, we will examine how Korean Buddhists integrated Hwaŏm and Sŏn traditions into a unified system; how they developed unique Sŏn theories of meditation; and how devotional/ worship practices interacted the indigenous traditions of Korea. Throughout the course, we will also pay careful attention to the close interactions between Korean and other East Asian Buddhist traditions.

Fall 2017: EARL GU4322
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4322 001/88046 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
405 Kent Hall
Seong-Uk Kim 4 3/15

EARL GU4324 Religion and Politics in Korea. 4 points.

This course explores diverse aspects of the interactions between religion and politics in modern, pre-modern, and contemporary Korea. It focuses on how Korean religions such as Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, and new religions have influenced and been influenced by politics, thereby leading to the mutual transformation of the two major social phenomena.

Spring 2018: EARL GU4324
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4324 001/61597 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Seong-Uk Kim 4 9/15

EAAS GU4360 Kurosawa Seminar. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Thank you for your interest in Kurosawa Seminar (Spring, 2015). The course is intended for advanced undergraduates. There are no strict prerequisites, but it helps to have already taken classes related to one or more of the following: modern Japan, East Asia, film, art and architecture, comparative literature. You need not be majoring in any of these areas to be considered. I will favor students who are juniors or seniors, but do not exclude the possibility that a sophomore could join the class (a first year would be a real stretch, and would need to make an exceptional case). Note that for reasons better known to College instruction committees, the seminar does not count as a "Global Core" course (though I have joined successful student appeals to see that the course does count in this way). Please send me a brief statement, describing your academic background (esp. in light of the criteria above), then arrange to see me either this Friday (Nov. 21), or else the Friday after Thanksgiving (Dec. 5), sometime between 3 and 5, 414 Kent. If you cannot meet with me, your written appeal will be all the more crucial in my decision-making. For now, feel free to put yourself on the Courseworks "Waitlist" for this seminar. As soon as I can make a decision, I will approve or deny your admission. By mid-December, at the latest, anyone who applies will know where she/he stands. I appreciate your patience and efforts in this process.

Spring 2018: EAAS GU4360
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4360 001/76197 M 6:10pm - 10:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Paul Anderer 4 17/25

EAAS GU4412 History of Writing in a Cosmopolitan East Asia. 3 points.

This course examines the invention of writing in ancient China, and its spread across the continent to emerging cultures in Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. We then examine how Korean, Japanese, and Vietnamese societies adapted Sinitic writing to create new "vernacular" scripts for their own respective languages, and how these scripts and literary traditions coexisted alongside--and eventually eclipsed--Sinitic writing and language by the 20th century.

Spring 2018: EAAS GU4412
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4412 001/78036 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
616 Hamilton Hall
John Phan 3 12/18

EAAS GU4553 Survey of Tibetan Literature. 4 points.

This course introduces a sampling of Tibetan literary works spanning from the Tibetan imperial period to present-day.  We shall focus on Tibetan belles-lettres and vernacular literary forms (all in English translation) that remain salient in current Tibetan intellectual discourse.  We will engage in close readings of those texts, in addition to discussing characteristics of the genres they represent.

Fall 2017: EAAS GU4553
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4553 001/71196 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 International Affairs Bldg
Lauran Hartley 4 4/18

EAAS GU4557 FILM & TV IN TIBET-INNER. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Fall 2017: EAAS GU4557
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4557 001/14312 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Robert Barnett 4 4/18

EAAS GU4572 Chinese Documentary Cinema. 4 points.

What defines a “documentary” film? How do documentaries inform, provoke and move us?  What formal devices and aesthetic strategies do documentaries use to construct visions of reality and proclaim them as authentic, credible and authoritative? What can documentary cinema teach us about the changing Chinese society, and about cinema as a medium for social engagement?    This seminar introduces students to the aesthetics, epistemology and politics of documentary cinema in China from the 1940s to the present, with an emphasis on contemporary films produced in the past two decades.  We examine how documentaries contended history, registered subaltern experiences, engaged with issues of gender, ethnicity and class, and built new communities of testimony and activism to foster social change. Besides documentaries made by Chinese filmmakers, we also include a small number of films made on China by western filmmakers, including those by Joris Ivens, Michelangelo Antonioni, Frank Capra and Carma Hinton.  Topics include documentary poetics and aesthetics, evidence, performance and authenticity, the porous boundaries between documentary and fiction, and documentary ethics. As cinema is, among other things, a creative practice, in this course, students will be given opportunities to respond to films analytically and creatively, through writing as well as creative visual projects.  

Spring 2018: EAAS GU4572
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 4572 001/63988 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
414 Pupin Laboratories
Ying Qian 4 15/15

HSEA GU4844 GLOBAL HONG KONG. 4 points.

This seminar examines modern world history through the lens of Hong Kong. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and a final paper, we will investigate Hong Kong’s outsized historical impact on the world—from its seizure by British forces during the First Opium War to its 1997 handover to the People’s Republic of China. We will dig into Hong Kong’s dramatic evolutions over this century and a half, from an entrepôt and migration hub to a manufacturing powerhouse and financial center. This agenda will also offer us new perspectives on the history of global capitalism and push us to interweave traditionally disconnected histories, such as that of the opium trade, the Chinese diaspora, modern Chinese politics, the Cold War and decolonization, neoliberal globalization, and China’s post-1978 development.

Fall 2017: HSEA GU4844
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4844 001/21433 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Peter Hamilton 4 9/22

HSEA GU4847 Modern Japan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the history of Japan between 1800 and the present, with a particular focus on the 20th century. The course draws upon a combination of primary source materials (political documents, memoirs, oral histories, journalism, fiction, film) and scholarly writings in order to gain insight into the complex and tumultuous process by which Japan became an industrialized society, a modern nation-state, and a world power.

Fall 2017: HSEA GU4847
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4847 001/29577 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
411 Kent Hall
Paul Kreitman 4 16/25

HSEA GU4880 History of Modern China I. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

China’s transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

Fall 2017: HSEA GU4880
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4880 001/73046 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
413 Kent Hall
Madeleine Zelin 3 47/60

HSEA GU4882 History of Modern China II. 3 points.

China's transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

HSEA GU4893 Family in Chinese History. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ASCE V2359.

The history of the Chinese family, its changing forms and cultural expressions: marriage and divorce; parent and child; clan and lineage; ancestor worship; the role of women; the relation of family and state; Western parallels and contrasts.

Fall 2017: HSEA GU4893
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4893 001/13380 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Robert Hymes 3 16/20

Chinese Language Courses

CHNS UN1010 Introductory Chinese A. 2.5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18.

The program is designed to develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing colloquial Chinese. This course (Part I) is offered in Spring only. Course II is offered in the fall. The two parts together cover the same materials as Chinese C1101/F1101 (Fall) and fulfill the requirement for admission to Chinese C1102/F1102 (Spring). Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled.

Spring 2018: CHNS UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1010 001/22025 M W 8:50am - 9:55am
522b Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 10/15
CHNS 1010 002/20698 T Th 8:50am - 9:55am
522b Kent Hall
Shaoyan Qi 2.5 14/15
CHNS 1010 003/24755 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 13/15
CHNS 1010 004/16539 T Th 11:50am - 12:55pm
522b Kent Hall
Shaoyan Qi 2.5 13/15

CHNS UN1011 Introductory Chinese B. 2.5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18.

Prerequisites: CHNS W1010y (offered in the Spring only) or the equivalent.

The program is designed to develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing colloquial Chinese. This course (Part II) is offered in the Fall only. The two parts (I and II) together cover the same materials as Chinese C1101/F1101 (Fall) and fulfill the requirement for admission to Chinese C1102/F1102 (Spring). Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN1011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1011 001/73361 M W 8:50am - 9:55am
522b Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 8/12
CHNS 1011 002/27804 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 2.5 12/12

CHNS UN1101 First-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

The course is designed to develop basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing modern colloquial Chinese. Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Students who can already speak Mandarin will not be accepted into this course. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1101 001/14655 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
522c Kent Hall
Jia Xu 5 8/21
CHNS 1101 002/26587 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
424 Kent Hall
Xiaodan Wang 5 10/12
CHNS 1101 003/64244 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
825 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Lingjun Hu 5 9/12
CHNS 1101 004/71440 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
522d Kent Hall
Chen Wu 5 8/12
CHNS 1101 005/19956 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522a Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 5 8/12
CHNS 1101 006/75781 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
255 International Affairs Bldg
Ling Yan 5 10/12
CHNS 1101 007/25681 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
522d Kent Hall
Yicheng Zhang 5 5/12

CHNS UN1102 First-Year Chinese II (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

The course is designed to develop basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing modern colloquial Chinese. Standard Chinese pronunciation, traditional characters. Students who can already speak Mandarin will not be accepted into this course. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1102 001/12098 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
522c Kent Hall
Jia Xu 5 9/15
CHNS 1102 002/19959 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
411 Kent Hall
Xiaodan Wang 5 9/15
CHNS 1102 003/71615 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
423 Kent Hall
Lingjun Hu 5 8/15
CHNS 1102 004/17612 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
522c Kent Hall
Chen Wu 5 9/15
CHNS 1102 005/10231 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
405 Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 5 9/15
CHNS 1102 006/66910 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Yicheng Zhang 5 5/15
CHNS 1102 007/26570 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Ling Yan 5 12/15

CHNS UN1111 First-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

The course is specially designed for students of Chinese heritage and advanced beginners with good speaking skills. It aims to develop the student's basic skills to read and write modern colloquial Chinese. Pinyin system is introduced; standard Chinese pronunciation, and traditional characters. Classes will be conducted mostly in Chinese. Open to students with Mandarin speaking ability in Chinese only. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN1111
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1111 001/20181 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
522b Kent Hall
Tianqi Jiang 5 10/12
CHNS 1111 002/62872 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
423 Kent Hall
Hailong Wang 5 8/12

CHNS UN1112 First-Year Chinese II (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

The course is specially designed for students of Chinese heritage and advanced beginners with good speaking skills. It aims to develop the student's basic skills to read and write modern colloquial Chinese. Pinyin system is introduced; standard Chinese pronunciation, and traditional characters. Classes will be conducted mostly in Chinese. Open to students with Mandarin speaking ability in Chinese only. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS UN1112
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 1112 001/10392 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
318 Hamilton Hall
Tianqi Jiang 5 16/20
CHNS 1112 002/21977 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
423 Kent Hall
Hailong Wang 5 3/15

CHNS UN2201 Second-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1101-1102 or CHNS F1101-1102, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Designed to further the student's four skills acquired in the elementary course, this program aims to develop higher level of proficiency through comprehensive oral and written exercises. Cultural aspects in everyday situations are introduced. Traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2201 001/23605 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
522c Kent Hall
Jia Xu 5 15/21
CHNS 2201 002/61136 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Xiaodan Wang 5 12/12
CHNS 2201 003/61594 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
405 Kent Hall
Shaoyan Qi 5 10/12
CHNS 2201 004/17305 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
6c Kraft Center
Ting Wen 5 5/12
CHNS 2201 005/22054 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
405 Kent Hall
Yunda Li 5 11/14
CHNS 2201 006/71816 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
522c Kent Hall
Wenlian Zhang 5 5/12

CHNS UN2202 Second-Year Chinese II (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 18. Additional weekly oral session and lab to be arranged.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1101-1102 or CHNS F1101-1102, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Designed to further the student's four skills acquired in the elementary course, this program aims to develop higher level of proficiency through comprehensive oral and written exercises. Cultural aspects in everyday situations are introduced. Traditional characters. Section subject to cancellation if under-enrolled. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS UN2202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2202 001/14094 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
522c Kent Hall
Jia Xu 5 15/15
CHNS 2202 002/62819 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
411 Kent Hall
Xiaodan Wang 5 10/15
CHNS 2202 003/62971 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
423 Kent Hall
Shaoyan Qi 5 6/15
CHNS 2202 004/63297 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522c Kent Hall
Ting Wen 5 10/15
CHNS 2202 005/27335 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Yunda Li 5 9/15
CHNS 2202 006/75434 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
424 Kent Hall
Wenlian Zhang 5 5/15

CHNS UN2221 Second-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS UN1112 or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Continuation of CHNS UN1112, with a focus on reading comprehension and written Chinese. Traditional characters. CC GS EN CE

CHNS UN2222 Second-Year Chinese II (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1112 or F1112, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

Continuation of CHNS C1112, with a focus on reading comprehension and written Chinese. Traditional characters.  CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS UN2222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 2222 001/20052 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Pupin Laboratories
Yicheng Zhang 5 10/15
CHNS 2222 002/15561 M W F 12:10pm - 1:25pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Yicheng Zhang 5 7/15

CHNS UN3003 Third-Year Chinese I (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1202 or F1202, or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

This course fulfills the language requirement for east Asian studies majors. Prepares for more advanced study of Chinese through rigorous vocabulary expansion, more sophisticated language usage patterns, and introduction to basics of formal and literary styles. Materials are designed to advance the student's fluency for everyday communicative tasks as well as reading skills. Simplified characters are introduced. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS UN3003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3003 001/16594 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
423 Kent Hall
Zhirong Wang 5 11/12
CHNS 3003 002/75616 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
4c Kraft Center
Yunda Li 5 7/12
CHNS 3003 003/69100 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Lingjun Hu 5 11/12
CHNS 3003 004/64043 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Zhongqi Shi 5 9/12
CHNS 3003 005/29369 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522c Kent Hall
Wenlian Zhang 5 10/12

CHNS UN3004 Third-Year Chinese II (N). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4003 or the equivalent. See Admission to Language Courses.

This course fulfills the language requirement for east Asian studies majors. Prepares for more advanced study of Chinese through rigorous vocabulary expansion, more sophisticated language usage patterns, and introduction to basics of formal and literary styles. Materials are designed to advance the student's fluency for everyday communicative tasks as well as reading skills. Simplified characters are introduced. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS UN3004
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3004 001/69884 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
511 Kent Hall
Yunda Li 5 7/15
CHNS 3004 002/63730 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
4a Kraft Center
Yunda Li 5 7/15
CHNS 3004 003/25454 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
411 Kent Hall
Lingjun Hu 5 14/15
CHNS 3004 004/12801 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Zhongqi Shi 5 8/15
CHNS 3004 005/15764 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
424 Kent Hall
Wenlian Zhang 5 8/15

CHNS UN3005 Third-Year Chinese I (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS C1222 or F1222, or the equivalent.

Admission after Chinese placement exam and an oral proficiency interview with the instructor. Especially designed for students who possess good speaking ability and who wish to acquire practical writing skills as well as business-related vocabulary and speech patterns. Introduction to semiformal and formal Chinese used in everyday writing and social or business-related occasions. Simplified characters are introduced.

Fall 2017: CHNS UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3005 001/64460 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
6c Kraft Center
Hailong Wang 5 5/12

CHNS UN3006 Third-Year Chinese II (W). 5 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4005 or the equivalent.

Admission after Chinese placement exam and an oral proficiency interview with the instructor. Especially designed for students who possess good speaking ability and who wish to acquire practical writing skills as well as business-related vocabulary and speech patterns. Introduction to semiformal and formal Chinese used in everyday writing and social or business-related occasions. Simplified characters are introduced.

Spring 2018: CHNS UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 3006 001/11945 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Hailong Wang 5 5/15

CHNS GU4012 Business Chinese. 5 points.

Prerequisites: two years of Chinese study at college level.

This course is designed for students who have studied Chinese for two years at college level and are interested in business studies concerning China. It offers systematic descriptions of Chinese language used in business discourse. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4012 001/19537 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
522a Kent Hall
Zhongqi Shi 5 11/12

CHNS UN4013 Business Chinese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of Chinese study at college level.

This course is designed for students who have studied Chinese for two years at college level and are interested in business studies concerning China. It offers systematic descriptions of Chinese language used in business discourse. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS UN4013
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4013 001/62953 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
424 Kent Hall
Zhongqi Shi 4 8/15

CHNS GU4014 Media Chinese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least 3 years of intensive Chinese language training at college level and the instructor's permission.

This advanced course is designed to specifically train students' listening and speaking skills in both formal and colloquial language through various Chinese media sources. Students view and discuss excerpts of Chinese TV news broadcasts, soap operas, and movie segments on a regular basis. Close reading of newspaper and internet articles and blogs supplements the training of verbal skills.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4014
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4014 001/26444 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
522d Kent Hall
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 8/12
CHNS 4014 002/69445 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
522d Kent Hall
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 5/12

CHNS GU4015 Fourth-Year Chinese I (N). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4004 or the equivalent.

Implements a wide range of reading materials to enhance the student’s speaking and writing as well as reading skills. Supplemented by television broadcast news, also provides students with strategies to increase their comprehension of formal style of modern Chinese. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4015
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4015 001/60897 M W 10:10am - 11:00am
369 Grace Dodge Hall (Tc)
Ting Wen 4 11/12
CHNS 4015 001/60897 T Th 10:10am - 11:00am
537 Grace Dodge Hall (Tc)
Ting Wen 4 11/12
CHNS 4015 002/25896 M W Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
255 International Affairs Bldg
Ling Yan 4 9/15
Spring 2018: CHNS GU4015
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4015 001/62333 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
423 Kent Hall
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 8/15
CHNS 4015 002/17972 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
423 Kent Hall
Yuan-Yuan Meng 4 3/15

CHNS GU4016 Fourth-Year Chinese II (N). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS G4015 or the equivalent.

Implements a wide range of reading materials to enhance the student’s speaking and writing as well as reading skills. Supplemented by television broadcast news, also provides students with strategies to increase their comprehension of formal style of modern Chinese. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS GU4016
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4016 001/11467 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
420 Pupin Laboratories
Ting Wen 4 3/15
CHNS 4016 002/26281 M W Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Ling Yan 4 11/15

CHNS GU4017 Readings In Modern Chinese I (W) (Level 4). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4006 or the equivalent.

This is a non-consecutive reading course designed for those whose proficiency is above 4th level. See Admission to Language Courses. Selections from contemporary Chinese authors in both traditional and simplified characters with attention to expository, journalistic, and literary styles.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4017 001/70711 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
522c Kent Hall
Chen Wu 4 4/12

CHNS GU4018 Readings In Modern Chinese II (W) (Level 4). 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4017 or the equivalent.

This is a non-consecutive reading course designed for those whose proficiency is above 4th level. See Admission to Language Courses. Selections from contemporary Chinese authors in both traditional and simplified characters with attention to expository, journalistic, and literary styles.

Spring 2018: CHNS GU4018
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4018 001/72176 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
522d Kent Hall
Chen Wu 4 6/15

CHNS GU4019 History of Chinese Language. 3 points.

Introduces the evolution of Chinese language. It reveals the major changes in Chinese sound, writing and grammar systems, and social and linguistic factors which caused these changes. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4019 001/27635 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
423 Kent Hall
Zhirong Wang 3 12/12

CHNS GU4301 Introduction To Classical Chinese I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4301
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4301 001/17836 M W F 11:00am - 11:50am
1102 International Affairs Bldg
Lening Liu 3 14/12

CHNS GU4302 Introduction To Classical Chinese II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W3301: Classical Chinese I; completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

Please see department.  Prerequisites: CHNS W3301: Classical Chinese I; completion of three years of modern Chinese at least, or four years of Japanese or Korean.

Spring 2018: CHNS GU4302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4302 001/25079 F 11:10am - 12:00pm
301 Hamilton Hall
Feng Li 3 10/20
CHNS 4302 001/25079 M W 3:10pm - 4:00pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Feng Li 3 10/20

CHNS GU4507 Readings in Classical Chinese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W3302 or the equivalent.

Admission after placement exam. Focusing on Tang and Song prose and poetry, introduces a broad variety of genres through close readings of chosen texts as well as the specific methods, skills, and tools to approach them. Strong emphasis on the grammatical and stylistic analysis of representative works. CC GS EN CE

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4507
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4507 001/74054 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
315 Hamilton Hall
Wei Shang 4 11/15

CHNS GU4508 Readings in Classical Chinese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CHNS W4007 or the equivalent.

Admission after placement exam. Focusing on Tang and Song prose and poetry, introduces a broad variety of genres through close readings of chosen texts as well as the specific methods, skills, and tools to approach them. Strong emphasis on the grammatical and stylistic analysis of representative works. CC GS EN CE

Spring 2018: CHNS GU4508
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4508 001/22352 T Th 10:20am - 11:35am
Levien Warren Hall (Law)
I-Hsien Wu 4 6/15

CHNS GU4904 Acquisition of Chinese as a Second Language. 4 points.

For more than forty years, second language acquisition (SLA) has been emerging as an independent field of inquiry with its own research agenda and theoretical paradigms. The study of SLA is inherently interdisciplinary, as it draws on scholarship from the fields of linguistics, psychology, education, and sociology. This course explores how Chinese is acquired by non-native speakers. Students will learn about general phenomena and patterns during the process of acquiring a new language. They will become familiar with important core concepts, theoretical frameworks, and research practices of the field of SLA, with Chinese as the linguistic focus.

Fall 2017: CHNS GU4904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHNS 4904 001/15775 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
522b Kent Hall
Shaoyan Qi 4 8/12

Japanese Language Courses

JPNS UN1001 Introductory Japanese A. 2.5 points.

The sequence begins in the spring term. JPNS W1001-W1002 is equivalent to JPNS C1101 or F1101 and fulfills the requirement for admission to JPNS C1102 or F1102. Aims at the acquisition of basic Japanese grammar and Japanese culture with an emphasis on accurate communication in speaking and writing. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Spring 2018: JPNS UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1001 001/67278 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Naoko Sourial 2.5 16/15
JPNS 1001 002/29729 M W 5:40pm - 6:45pm
411 Kent Hall
Toshiko Omori 2.5 17/15
JPNS 1001 003/72197 T Th 10:10am - 11:15am
405 Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 2.5 16/15
JPNS 1001 004/12780 T Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
411 Kent Hall
Nestor Serrano 2.5 14/15

JPNS UN1002 Introductory Japanese B. 2.5 points.

Prerequisites: C+ or above in JPNS W1001 or pass the placement test.

The sequence begins in the spring term. JPNS W1001-W1002 is equivalent to JPNS C1101 or F1101 and fulfills the requirement for admission to JPNS C1102 or F1102. Aims at the acquisition of basic Japanese grammar and Japanese culture with an emphasis on accurate communication in speaking and writing. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Fall 2017: JPNS UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1002 001/61521 M W 5:40pm - 6:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Toshiko Omori 2.5 13/16
JPNS 1002 002/25510 T Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
423 Kent Hall
Nestor Serrano 2.5 10/15

JPNS UN1101 First-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Lab Required

Basic training in Japanese through speaking, listening, reading and writing in various cultural contexts. 

Fall 2017: JPNS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1101 001/67089 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
405 Kent Hall
Keiko Okamoto 5 16/16
JPNS 1101 002/64031 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
405 Kent Hall
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 10/16
JPNS 1101 003/77397 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
6c Kraft Center
Naoko Sourial 5 8/12
JPNS 1101 004/20184 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
522c Kent Hall
Kyoko Loetscher 5 12/16
JPNS 1101 005/73538 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522d Kent Hall
Fumiko Nazikian 5 9/13
JPNS 1101 006/76978 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522a Kent Hall
Asami Tsuda 5 10/12
JPNS 1101 007/65311 M T W Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
522a Kent Hall
Asami Tsuda 5 7/12

JPNS UN1102 First-Year Japanese II. 5 points.

Lab Required

Prerequisites: JPNS C1101, F1101, or W1001-W1002, or the equivalent.

Basic training in Japanese through speaking, listening, reading and writing in various cultural contexts. 

Spring 2018: JPNS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 1102 001/18822 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Keiko Okamoto 5 13/15
JPNS 1102 002/25958 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
4c Kraft Center
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 12/15
JPNS 1102 003/28861 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
4c Kraft Center
Kyoko Loetscher 5 15/15
JPNS 1102 004/62942 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Fumiko Nazikian 5 11/15
JPNS 1102 005/28135 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
405 Kent Hall
Asami Tsuda 5 12/15
JPNS 1102 006/66199 M T W Th 5:40pm - 6:45pm
405 Kent Hall
Asami Tsuda 5 7/15

JPNS UN2201 Second-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Lab Required

Prerequisites: JPNS C1102 or the equivalent.

Further practice in the four language skills. Participation in a once a week conversation class is required.

Fall 2017: JPNS UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 2201 001/76393 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
255 International Affairs Bldg
Jisuk Park 5 16/16
JPNS 2201 002/17379 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
522d Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 5 13/13
JPNS 2201 003/68479 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
423 Kent Hall
Miharu Nittono 5 12/15
JPNS 2201 004/64767 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522d Kent Hall
Fumiko Nazikian 5 11/13

JPNS UN2202 Second-Year Japanese II. 5 points.

Lab Required

Prerequisites: JPNS C1201 or the equivalent.

Further practice in the four language skills. Participation in a once a week conversation class is required.

Spring 2018: JPNS UN2202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 2202 001/22815 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
253 International Affairs Bldg
Jisuk Park 5 10/15
JPNS 2202 002/22273 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
405 Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 5 8/15
JPNS 2202 003/15303 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Miharu Nittono 5 14/15
JPNS 2202 004/62138 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Fumiko Nazikian 5 15/15

JPNS UN3005 Third-Year Japanese I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS C1202 or the equivalent.

Readings in authentic/semi-authentic texts, videos, and class discussions.

Fall 2017: JPNS UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 3005 001/28350 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
332 Horace Mann Hall
Keiko Okamoto 5 14/16
JPNS 3005 002/74373 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
423 Kent Hall
Kyoko Loetscher 5 13/15
JPNS 3005 003/65201 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
411 Kent Hall
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 5/12

JPNS UN3006 Third-Year Japanese II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4005 or the equivalent.

Readings in authentic/semi-authentic texts, videos, and class discussions.

Spring 2018: JPNS UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 3006 001/60316 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Keiko Okamoto 5 12/15
JPNS 3006 002/70564 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
4a Kraft Center
Kyoko Loetscher 5 9/15
JPNS 3006 003/64662 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
4c Kraft Center
Naofumi Tatsumi 5 5/15

JPNS GU4007 Introduction To Classical Japanese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS C1202 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Japanese grammar. Trains students to read Japanese historical and literary texts from the early period up to the 20th century.

Fall 2017: JPNS GU4007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4007 001/70248 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
502 Northwest Corner
David Lurie 4 13/19

JPNS GU4008 Readings in Classical Japanese. 4 points.

Close readings of specific texts, as well as methods, skills, and tools. 

Spring 2018: JPNS GU4008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4008 001/14527 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
6c Kraft Center
Tomi Suzuki 4 9/15

JPNS GU4017 Fourth-Year Japanese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4006 or the equivalent.

Sections 1 & 2: Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political, and journalistic texts, and class discussions about current issues and videos. Exercises in scanning, comprehension, and English translation. Section 3: Designed for advanced students interested in developing skills for reading and comprehending modern Japanese scholarship.

Fall 2017: JPNS GU4017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4017 001/14893 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
253 International Affairs Bldg
Shigeru Eguchi 4 12/12
JPNS 4017 002/64476 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
424 Kent Hall
Jisuk Park 4 12/12

JPNS GU4018 Fourth-Year Japanese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4017 or the equivalent.

Sections 1 & 2: Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political, and journalistic texts, and class discussions about current issues and videos. Exercises in scanning, comprehension, and English translation. Section 3: Designed for advanced students interested in developing skills for reading and comprehending modern Japanese scholarship.

Spring 2018: JPNS GU4018
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4018 001/22829 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
405 Kent Hall
Shigeru Eguchi 4 9/15
JPNS 4018 002/18826 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Jisuk Park 4 11/15

JPNS GU4516 Fifth Year Japanese I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4018 or the equivalent.

This course is intended to help students to develop language skills necessary for academic research. Students will read articles of various genres, watch videos, and debate issues from a wide range of fields, including economics, politics, history, comparative literature and current issues.

Fall 2017: JPNS GU4516
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4516 001/28899 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
423 Kent Hall
Miharu Nittono 3 9/12

JPNS GU4517 Fifth Year Japanese II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS G5016 or the equivalent.

This course is intended to help students to develop language skills necessary for academic research. Students will read articles of various genres, watch videos, and debate issues from a wide range of fields, including economics, politics, history, comparative literature and current issues.

Spring 2018: JPNS GU4517
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4517 001/29389 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
522a Kent Hall
Miharu Nittono 3 4/15

Korean Language Courses

KORN UN1001 Introductory Korean A. 2.5 points.

This course provides basic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean. Elementary Korean A (1001y) is equivalent to the first half of Elementary Korean I. Elementary Korean B (1002x) is equivalent to the second half of Elementary Korean I.

Spring 2018: KORN UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1001 001/64573 M W 2:40pm - 3:45pm
411 Kent Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 16/16
KORN 1001 002/70115 T Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
411 Kent Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 17/18
KORN 1001 003/16629 M W 11:40am - 12:45pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Seunghyo Ryu 2.5 12/15
KORN 1001 004/21550 T Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
4a Kraft Center
Seunghyo Ryu 2.5 7/15

KORN UN1002 Introductory Korean B. 2.5 points.

This course provides basic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean. Elementary Korean A (1001y) is equivalent to the first half of Elementary Korean I. Elementary Korean B (1002x) is equivalent to the second half of Elementary Korean I.

Fall 2017: KORN UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1002 001/26494 M W 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 10/18
KORN 1002 002/60639 T Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
4a Kraft Center
Hyunkyu Yi 2.5 4/18

KORN UN1101 First-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Lab Required
Students who are unsure which section to register for should see the director of the Korean Language Program.

An introduction to written and spoken Korean. Textbook: Integrated Korean, Beginning I and II.

Fall 2017: KORN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1101 001/14103 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Eunice Chung 5 19/23
KORN 1101 002/25526 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
522b Kent Hall
Carol Schulz 5 9/18
KORN 1101 003/27171 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
4c Kraft Center
Sunhee Song 5 13/18

KORN UN1102 First-Year Korean II. 5 points.

Lab Required
Students who are unsure which section to register for should see the director of the Korean Language Program.

An introduction to written and spoken Korean. Textbook: Integrated Korean, Beginning I and II.

Spring 2018: KORN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 1102 001/70209 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
522c Kent Hall
Eunice Chung 5 15/18
KORN 1102 002/13115 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
424 Kent Hall
Joowon Suh 5 8/15
KORN 1102 003/77521 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
411 Kent Hall
Carol Schulz 5 13/15
KORN 1102 004/69947 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
424 Kent Hall
Joowon Suh 5 10/15

KORN UN2201 Second-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1102 or the equivalent. Consultation with the instructors is required before registration for section assignment.

Further practice in reading, writing, listening comprehension, conversation, and grammar.

Fall 2017: KORN UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 2201 001/77702 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
522c Kent Hall
Eunice Chung 5 19/21
KORN 2201 002/72965 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
424 Kent Hall
Beom Lee 5 19/22

KORN UN2202 Second-Year Korean II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1102 or the equivalent. Consultation with the instructors is required before registration for section assignment.

Further practice in reading, writing, listening comprehension, conversation, and grammar.

Spring 2018: KORN UN2202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 2202 001/65645 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
405 Kent Hall
Eunice Chung 5 16/16
KORN 2202 002/61202 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
4c Kraft Center
Sunhee Song 5 4/15
KORN 2202 003/17468 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Beom Lee 5 17/18

KORN UN3005 Third-Year Korean I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1202 or the equivalent and consultation with instructor. (See Entrance to Language Courses Beyond the Elementary Level in the main bulletin under Department of Instruction -- East Asian Languages and Cultures.)

Readings in modern Korean. Selections from modern Korean writings in literature, history, social sciences, culture, and videos and class discussions.

Fall 2017: KORN UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 3005 001/74344 T Th 10:10am - 11:15am
262 Macy Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 5 8/15
KORN 3005 001/74344 M W 10:10am - 11:15am
347a Macy Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 5 8/15
KORN 3005 002/65916 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
4a Kraft Center
Beom Lee 5 10/15

KORN UN3006 Third-Year Korean II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W1202 or the equivalent and consultation with instructor. (See Entrance to Language Courses Beyond the Elementary Level in the main bulletin under Department of Instruction -- East Asian Languages and Cultures.)

Readings in modern Korean. Selections from modern Korean writings in literature, history, social sciences, culture, and videos and class discussions.

Spring 2018: KORN UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 3006 001/64576 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
522d Kent Hall
Hyunkyu Yi 5 11/15
KORN 3006 002/63942 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
36 Union Theological Seminary
Beom Lee 5 9/15

KORN GU4105 Fourth-Year Korean I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4006 or the equivalent.

Selections from advanced modern Korean writings in social sciences, literature, culture, history, journalistic texts, and intensive conversation exercises.

Fall 2017: KORN GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 4105 001/68296 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
402 Kent Hall
Seunghee Back 4 3/15

KORN GU4106 Fourth-Year Korean II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4006 or the equivalent.

Selections from advanced modern Korean writings in social sciences, literature, culture, history, journalistic texts, and intensive conversation exercises.

Spring 2018: KORN GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
KORN 4106 001/13983 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
416 Kent Hall
Seunghee Back 4 4/12

KORN W5011 Modern Korean I (Fifth Year). 3 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4105-W4106 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political and journalistic texts, and a wide range of materials.

KORN W5012 Modern Korean II (Fifth Year). 3 points.

Prerequisites: KORN W4105-W4106 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Readings of advanced modern literary, historical, political and journalistic texts, and a wide range of materials.

Tibetan Language Courses

TIBT G4600 First Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 5 points.

This is an introductory course and no previous knowledge is required. It focuses on developing basic abilities to speak as well as to read and write in modern Tibetan, Lhasa dialect. Students are also introduced to modern Tibetan studies through selected readings and guest lectures.

TIBT G4601 First Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan II. 5 points.

This is an introductory course and no previous knowledge is required. It focuses on developing basic abilities to speak as well as to read and write in modern Tibetan, Lhasa dialect. Students are also introduced to modern Tibetan studies through selected readings and guest lectures.

TIBT G4603 Second Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the First Year course. The course focuses on the further development of their skills in using the language to engage with practical topics and situations, such as seeing a doctor, reading news, writing letters, and listening to music.

TIBT G4604 Second Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan II. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the First Year course. The course focuses on the further development of their skills in using the language to engage with practical topics and situations, such as seeing a doctor, reading news, writing letters, and listening to music.

TIBT G4611 Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan I. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the Second Year course. The course develops students’ reading comprehension skills through reading selected modern Tibetan literature. Tibetan is used as the medium of instruction and interaction to develop oral fluency and proficiency.

TIBT UN3612 Third Year Modern Colloquial Tibetan II. 4 points.

For those whose knowledge is equivalent to a student who’s completed the Second Year course. The course develops students’ reading comprehension skills through reading selected modern Tibetan literature. Tibetan is used as the medium of instruction and interaction to develop oral fluency and proficiency.

Spring 2018: TIBT UN3612
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 3612 001/17348 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
352b International Affairs Bldg
Sonam Tsering 4 3/15

TIBT UN1410 FIRST YEAR CLASSICAL TIBETAN I. 4 points.

First year Classical Tibetan

Fall 2017: TIBT UN1410
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 1410 001/72600 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
351c International Affairs Bldg
Kunchog Tseten 4 1/12

TIBT UN1411 Elementary Classical Tibetan II. 3 points.

Spring 2018: TIBT UN1411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
TIBT 1411 001/69401 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
351c International Affairs Bldg
Kunchog Tseten 3 2/15

TIBT W4412 Intermediate Classical Tibetan I/II. 3 points.

TIBT W4413 Intermediate Classical Tibetan I/II. 3 points.

Vietnamese Language Courses

VIET UN1201 Second Year Vietnamese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: both VIET W1101 and VIET W1102, or equivalent.

The objective of this course is to help students strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Vietnamese. Students will be thoroughly grounded in communicative activities such as conversations, performance simulations, drills, role-plays, games, etc. and improve their reading and writing abilities by developing their vocabulary and grammar. Each lesson includes dialogue, vocabulary, grammar practice and development, task-based activities, narratives and situation dialogues.

Fall 2017: VIET UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIET 1201 001/29302 T Th 12:00pm - 1:40pm
4c Kraft Center
James Lap 4 7/12

VIET UN1202 Second Year Vietnamese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: both VIET W1101 and VIET W1102, or equivalent.

The objective of this course is to help students strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Vietnamese. Students will be thoroughly grounded in communicative activities such as conversations, performance simulations, drills, role-plays, games, etc. and improve their reading and writing abilities by developing their vocabulary and grammar. Each lesson includes dialogue, vocabulary, grammar practice and development, task-based activities, narratives and situation dialogues.

Spring 2018: VIET UN1202
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIET 1202 001/63823 T Th 12:00pm - 1:40pm
6c Kraft Center
James Lap 4 4/15

Of Related Interest

History
HIST UN2881Vietnam in the World
HIST UN3866Wars for Indochina
Religion
RELI GU4411Religion, Mind, and Science Fiction
RELI GU4526Food and Sex in Premodern Chinese Buddhism