History

Departmental Office: 413 Fayerweather; 212-854-4646
http://www.history.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Stephanie McCurry , 603 Fayerweather; sm4041@columbia.edu

Undergraduate Administrator: Michael Adan, undergraduate-history@columbia.edu

The History curriculum covers most areas of the world and most periods of history. It encourages students to develop historical understanding in the widest sense of the word: a thorough empirical grasp along with the kind of analytical skills that come with a genuinely historical sensibility. This is done through two types of courses: lectures and seminars. Lectures range from broad surveys of the history of a place or period to more thematically oriented courses. Seminars offer students the opportunity to work more closely with historical sources in smaller groups and to do more sophisticated written work. Because history courses usually have no prerequisites, there are no preordained sequences to follow. It is advisable, however, that students take a relevant lecture course in preparation for a seminar. Majors wishing to follow a more intensive program are advised to enroll in a historiography course and to undertake a senior thesis project. Historically, majors have pursued careers in a very wide range of areas including medicine, law, mass media, Wall Street, and academia.

Advanced Placement

Students may receive 3 credits toward the overall degree requirements for a score of 5 on the AP European History exam or the AP United States History exam. No points count toward or fulfill any requirements of the history major or concentration.

Advising

During their junior and senior years, majors and concentrators are advised by the faculty members of the Undergraduate Education Committee (UNDED). UNDED advisers also review and sign Plan of Study (POS) forms for majors and concentrators at least once per year. POS forms track students’ progress toward completing all major and concentration requirements. New history majors and concentrators may see any member of UNDED. For the most up-to-date information on UNDED members, please see the undergraduate advising page of the departmental website.

Majors and concentrators can also receive pure academic interest advising (non-requirement advising) from any faculty member and affiliated faculty member of the department.

First-years and sophomores considering a history major or concentration can seek advising from UNDED or any other faculty member.

For questions about requirements, courses, or the general program, majors and concentrators can also contact the undergraduate administrator.

Departmental Honors

To be eligible for departmental honors, the student must have a GPA of at least 3.6 in courses for the major, an ambitious curriculum, and an outstanding senior thesis. Honors are awarded on the basis of a truly outstanding senior thesis. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Course Numbering

Courses are numbered by type:
UN 1xxx - Introductory Survey Lectures 
UN 2xxx - Undergraduate Lectures 
UN 3xxx - Undergraduate Seminars 
GU 4xxx - Joint Undergraduate/Graduate Seminars 

and field (with some exceptions):
x000-x059: Ancient
x060-x099: Medieval
x100-x199: Early modern Europe
x200-x299: East Central Europe
x300-x399: Modern Western Europe
x400-x599: United States
x600-x659: Jewish
x660-x699: Latin America
x700-x759: Middle East
x760-x799: Africa
x800-x859: South Asia
x860-x899: East Asia
x900-x999: Research, historiography, and transnational

Seminars

Seminars are integral to the undergraduate major in history. In these courses, students develop research and writing skills under the close supervision of a faculty member. Enrollment is normally limited to approximately 15 students. In order to maintain the small size of the courses, admission to most seminars is by instructor's permission or application.

In conjunction with the Barnard History Department and other departments in the University (particularly East Asian Languages and Cultures), the History Department offers about 25 seminars each semester that majors may use to meet their seminar requirements. While there are sufficient seminars offered to meet the needs of majors seeking to fulfill the two-seminar requirement, given the enrollment limits, students may not always be able to enroll in a particular seminar. Students should discuss with UNDED their various options for completing the seminar requirement.

The History Department has developed an on-line application system for some seminars. The department regularly provides declared majors and concentrators with information on upcoming application periods, which typically occur midway through the preceding semester. Students majoring in other fields, or students who have not yet declared a major, must inform themselves of the application procedures and deadlines by checking the undergraduate seminar page of the departmental website.

Professors

  • Elazar Barkan (SIPA)
  • Volker Berghahn (emeritus)
  • Richard Billows
  • Elizabeth Blackmar
  • Casey Blake
  • Christopher Brown
  • Richard Bulliet (emeritus)
  • Euan Cameron (UTS)
  • Elisheva Carlebach  
  • Mark Carnes (Barnard)
  • Zeynep Çelik
  • George Chauncey
  • John Coatsworth (Provost)
  • Matthew Connelly
  • Victoria de Grazia
  • Andrew Delbanco (English and Comparitive Literature)
  • Mamadou Diouf (Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies)
  • Alan Dye (Barnard)
  • Catherine Evtuhov 
  • Barbara Fields
  • Eric Foner (emeritus)
  • Pierre Force (French and Romantic Philology)
  • Carol Gluck
  • Martha Howell (emerita)
  • Robert Hymes (East Asian Language and Cultures)
  • Kenneth Jackson (emeritus)
  • Karl Jacoby
  • Richard John (Journalism)
  • Matthew Jones
  • Ira Katznelson (Political Science)
  • Joel Kaye (Barnard)
  • Alice Kessler-Harris (emerita)
  • Rashid Khalidi
  • Dorothy Ko (Barnard)
  • Adam Kosto
  • William Leach (emeritus)
  • Eugenia Y. Lean (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Feng Li (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Mark Lilla (Religion)
  • Claudio Lomnitz (Anthropology)
  • John Ma (Classics)
  • Gregory Mann
  • Mark Mazower
  • Stephanie McCurry
  • Jose Moya (Barnard)
  • Celia Naylor (Barnard)
  • Mae Ngai
  • Susan Pedersen
  • Pablo Piccato
  • Rosalind Rosenberg (Barnard)
  • David Rosner (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • David Rothman (Physicians and Surgeons)
  • Emmanuelle Saada (French and Romance Philology)
  • Simon Schama (University Professor)
  • Seth Schwartz
  • Herbert Sloan (Barnard, emeritus)
  • Pamela Smith 
  • Robert Somerville (Religion)
  • Michael Stanislawski
  • Anders Stephanson
  • Lisa Tiersten (Barnard)
  • Adam Tooze
  • Deborah Valenze (Barnard)
  • Michael Witgen
  • Marc Van de Mieroop
  • David Weiman (Barnard College)
  • Carl Wennerlind (Barnard College)
  • Richard Wortman (emeritus)
  • Madeleine Zelin (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  •  

Associate Professors

  • Manan Ahmed
  • Gergely Baics (Barnard)
  • Lisbeth Kim Brandt (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Paul Chamberlin 
  • Amy Chazkel
  • Charly Coleman
  • Marwa Elshakry
  • Ansley Erickson (Teachers College)
  • Abosde George (Barnard)
  • Frank Guridy
  • Hilary Hallett
  • Rebecca Kobrin
  • Natasha Lightfoot
  • David Lurie (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Malgorzata Mazurek
  • Nara Milanich (Barnard)
  • Lien-Hang Nguyen
  • Gregory Pflugfelder (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Caterina Pizzigoni
  • Anupama Rao (Barnard)
  • Camille Robcis
  • Samuel Roberts
  • Sarah Haley
  • Neslihan Senocak
  • Kavita Sivaramakrishnan (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • Rhiannon Stephens
  • Gray Tuttle (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Carl Wennerlind (Barnard)
  •  

Assistant Professors

  • Merlin Chowkwanyun (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • Hannah Farber
  • Gulnar Kendirbai (visiting)
  • Paul Kreitman (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Andrew Lipman (Barnard)
  • A. Tunç Şen
  • Alma Steingart
  • Sailakshmi Ramgopal
  • James Stafford
  •  

Lecturers in Discipline

  • Victoria Phillips 
  •  

On Leave

Fall 2021:  Blake, Brown, Diouf (MESAAS), George (BC), Guridy, Jacoby, Lipman (BC), Ma (Classics), Mann, Moya (BC), Pedersen, Rao (BC), Robcis, Roberts, Saada (French), Senocak, Stephanson, Van De Mieroop, 

Spring 2022:  Blake, Brown, Carlebach, Diouf (MESAAS), Evtuhov, George (BC), Gluck, Khalidi, Kobrin, Ma (Classics), Mann, Moya (BC), Pedersen, Robcis, Roberts, Saada (French), Senocak, Sivaramakrishnan (Mailman), Van De Mieroop

Guidelines for all History Majors and Concentrators

For detailed information about the history major or concentration, as well as the policies and procedures of the department, please refer to the History at Columbia Undergraduate Handbook, available for download on the departmental website.


Major in History

Students must complete a minimum of nine courses in the department, of which four or more must be in an area of specialization chosen by the student and approved by a member of UNDED. Students must also fulfill a breadth requirement by taking three courses outside of their specialization. Two of the courses taken in the major must be seminars (including one seminar in the chosen specialization).

The requirements of the undergraduate program encourage students to do two things:

  1. Develop a deeper knowledge of the history of a particular time and/or place. Students are required to complete a specialization by taking a number of courses in a single field of history of their own choosing. The field should be defined, in consultation with a member of UNDED, according to geographical, chronological, and/or thematic criteria. For example, a student might choose to specialize in 20th C. U.S. History, Medieval European History, Ancient Greek and Roman History, or Modern East Asian History. The specialization does not appear on the student's transcript, but provides an organizing principle for the program the student assembles in consultation with UNDED.
  2. Gain a sense of the full scope of history as a discipline by taking a broad range of courses. Students must fulfill a breadth requirement by taking courses outside their own specialization -- at least one course removed in time and two removed in space.
    1. Time: majors and concentrators must take at least one course removed in time from their specialization:
      • Students specializing in the modern period must take at least one course in the pre-modern period; students specializing in the pre-modern period must take at least one course in the modern period.

      • If the course proposed is in the same regional field as a student's specialization, special care must be taken to ensure that it is as far removed as possible; please consult with UNDED to make sure a given course counts for the chronological breadth requirement. 

    2. Space: majors must take at least two additional courses in regional fields not their own:

      • These two "removed in space" courses must also cover two different regions.
      • For example, students specializing in some part of Europe must take two courses in Africa, East or South Asia, Latin America/Caribbean, Middle East, and/or the U.S.
      • Some courses cover multiple geographic regions. If a course includes one of the regions within a student's specialization, that course cannot count towards the breadth requirement unless it is specifically approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. For example, if a student is specializing in 20th C. U.S. history and takes the class World War II in Global Perspective, the class is too close to the specialization and may not count as a regional breadth course.

All courses in the Barnard History Department as well as select courses in East Asian Languages and Cultures; Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies; and other departments count toward the major. Eligible inter-departmental courses may include: 

  • African Civilizations (AFCV UN1020) (when taught by Professor Gregory Mann, Professor Rhiannon Stephens, or PhD students in the Columbia University Department of History; the course does NOT count for History when taught by anyone else)
  • Primary Texts of Latin American Civilization (LACV UN1020) (when taught by Professor Pablo Piccato, Professor Caterina Pizzigoni, or PhD students in the Columbia University Department of History; the course does NOT count for History when taught by anyone else)
  • Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China (ASCE UN1359), INTRO EAST ASIAN CIV: JPN (ASCE UN1361)Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea (ASCE UN1363) or other ASCE UN1xxx courses (when taught by Professors Charles Armstrong, Carol Gluck, Robert Hymes, Dorothy Ko, Eugenia Lean, Feng Li, David Lurie, Jungwon Kim, Paul Kreitman, Gregory Pflugfelder, Gray Tuttle, or Madeleine Zelin, and NOT when they are taught by anyone else)
  • Please see the Courses section on the departmental website to see which of these might count in a given semester. Any courses not listed or linked on the departmental website, however historical in approach or content, do not count toward the history major or concentration, except with explicit written approval of the UNDED chair.
  • If you suspect a History course has escaped being listed at the above link and want to confirm whether or not it counts for History students, please contact the Undergraduate Administrator.

Thematic Specializations

Suitably focused thematic and cross-regional specializations are permitted and the breadth requirements for students interested in these topics are set in consultation with a member of UNDED. Classes are offered in fields including, but not limited to:

  • Ancient history
  • Medieval history
  • Early modern European history
  • Modern European history
  • United States history
  • Latin American and Caribbean history
  • Middle Eastern history
  • East Asian history
  • South Asian history

Additionally, classes are offered in thematic and cross-regional fields which include, but are not limited to:

  • Intellectual history
  • Jewish history
  • Women's history
  • International history
  • History of science

These fields are only examples. Students should work with a member of UNDED to craft a suitably focused specialization on the theme or field that interests them.

Thesis Requirements

Majors may elect to write a senior thesis, though this is not a graduation requirement. Only senior thesis writers are eligible to be considered for departmental honors. The senior thesis option is not available to concentrators.

The yearlong HIST UN3838-HIST UN3839 Senior Thesis Seminar carries 8 points, 4 of which typically count as a seminar in the specialization. For the most up-to-date information on the field designations for history courses, please see the Courses section of the departmental website.


Concentration in History

Effective February 2018, students must complete a minimum of six courses in history. At least three of the six courses must be in an area of specialization, one far removed in time, and one on a geographic region far removed in space. There is no seminar requirement for the concentration.

Fall 2021 History Courses

HIST UN1020 The Romans and Their World. 4 points.

This course examines the history of the Roman Empire from the formation of the Roman monarchy in 753 BCE to the collapse of the Western Empire in 476 CE. At the heart of the class is a single question: how did the Roman Empire come to be, and why did it last for so long? We will trace the rise and fall of the Republic, the extension of its power beyond Italy, and the spread of Christianity. Epic poetry, annalistic accounts, coins, papyri, inscriptions, and sculpture will illuminate major figures like Cleopatra, and features of daily life like Roman law and religion. The destructive mechanics by which Rome sustained itself--war, slavery, and environmental degradation--will receive attention, too, with the aim of producing a holistic understanding this empire.  Discussion Section Required.

HIST UN1488 Indigenous History of North America. 4.00 points.

This course is an introduction to the history of the Native peoples of North America. Instruction will focus on the idea that indigenous people in North America possess a shared history in terms of being forced to respond to European colonization, and the emergence of the modern nation-state. Native peoples, however, possess their own distinct histories and culture. In this sense their histories are uniquely multi-faceted rather than the experience of a singular racial group. Accordingly, this course will offer a wide-ranging survey of cultural encounters between the Native peoples of North America, European empires, colonies, and emergent modern nation-states taking into account the many different indigenous responses to colonization and settler colonialism. This course will also move beyond the usual stories of Native-White relations that center either on narratives of conquest and assimilation, or stories of cultural persistence. We will take on these issues, but we will also explore the significance of Native peoples to the historical development of modern North America. This will necessarily entail an examination of race formation, and a study of the evolution of social structures and categories such as nation, tribe, citizenship, and sovereignty

Fall 2022: HIST UN1488
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1488 001/10644 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Michael Witgen 4.00 0/40

HIST UN2003 Empire & Nation-Building East Central Europe. 4.00 points.

This lecture course investigates nation-building as a process of decolonization of Europe’s land empires (Ottoman, German, Russian, and Habsburg) from 18th century to present. It was a turbulent historical process: decolonization of European East’s ‘small peoples’ paved the way to anti-imperial and anti-colonial movements outside Europe only to be crushed, in the mid-twentieth-century, by imperial politics of Hitler’s Germany and the Soviet Union. We will study different ways in which culture – local languages, vernacular heritage, religion, and material culture – became politically weaponized to achieve goals of national self-determination and social revolution. Throughout the 19th and 20th century nation-building in the European East produced particular forms of non-Western modernity that found expression in built environments, visual arts, letters, music, public activism, and domestic sphere. We will study how resistance and enforced accommodation to Empire turned into spaces of cultural production, mass movements, economic upheaval, state-building, and last but not least, physical violence. Finally, we will investigate how ordinary Eastern Europeans experienced and gave meaning to the processes of nation-building. The course is intended for students interested in cultural, intellectual, social and gender history, histories of nationalism and communism, as well as local and transnational histories of Eastern European ‘peoples’ (Jewish, Muslim, Christian Slavic; German, Russian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Southern Slavic/Yugo-Slav, Greek, and Roma)

HIST UN2088 The Historical Jesus and the Origin of Christianity. 4 points.

The goal of this course will be to subject the source materials about Jesus and the very beginnings of Christianity (before about 150 CE) to a strictly historical-critical examination and analysis, to try to understand the historical underpinnings of what we can claim to know about Jesus, and how Christianity arose as a new religion from Jesus' life and teachings. In addition, since the search or quest for the "historical Jesus" has been the subject of numerous studies and books in recent times, we shall examine a selection of prominent "historical Jesus" works and theories to see how they stand up to critical scrutiny from a historical perspective.

HIST UN2112 The Scientific Revolution in Western Europe: 1500-1750. 4 points.

Introduction to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of the upheavals of astronomy, anatomy, mathematics, alchemy from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Field(s): EME

HIST UN2432 The United States In the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction. 4 points.

The coming of the Civil War and its impact on the organization of American society afterwards. 

HIST UN2501 The Early American Republic: How the Rebels Became the Empire . 4 points.

The American Revolution is often imagined as a rebellion against a mighty empire that gave rise to a self-governing republic. But during the first decades of American independence, some of the new republic’s political leaders set about building an empire of their own. This introductory-level course lays out a narrative of the early American republic in which one Anglo-American empire was broken and another arose to take its place. The course also asks: at what cost came this new American empire, and what alternatives—practical, radical, or utopian—were passed over in the course of its creation? 

HIST UN2533 US LESBIAN & GAY HISTORY. 4.00 points.

This course explores the social, cultural, and political history of lesbians, gay men, and other socially constituted sexual and gender minorities, primarily in the twentieth century. Since the production and regulation of queer life has always been intimately linked to the production and policing of “normal” sexuality and gender, we will also pay attention to the shifting boundaries of normative sexuality, especially heterosexuality, as well as other developments in American history that shaped gay life, such as the Second World War, Cold War, urbanization, and the minority rights revolution. Themes include the emergence of homosexuality and heterosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the changing relationship between homosexuality and transgenderism; the development of diverse lesbian and gay subcultures and their representation in popular culture; the sources of antigay hostility; religion and sexual science; generational change and everyday life; AIDS; and gay, antigay, feminist, and queer movements

Fall 2022: HIST UN2533
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2533 001/10592 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
George Chauncey 4.00 0/200

HIST UN2535 History of the City of New York. 4 points.

The social, cultural, economic, political, and demographic development of America's metropolis from colonial days to present. Slides and walking tours supplement the readings (novels and historical works).Field(s): US

Fall 2022: HIST UN2535
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2535 001/10628 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
4 0/35

HIST UN2580 THE HISTORY OF UNITED STATES RELATIONS WITH EAST ASIA. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This lecture course examines the history of the relationship between the United States and the countries of East Asia in the 19th and 20th centuries. The first half of the course will examine the factors drove the United States to acquire territorial possessions in Asia, to vie for a seat at the imperial table at China’s expense, and to eventual confrontation with Japan over mastery in the Pacific from the turn of the century leading to the Second World War. The second half of the course will explore the impact of U.S. policy toward East Asia during the Cold War when Washington’s policy of containment, which included nation-building, development schemes, and waging war, came up against East Asia’s struggles for decolonization, revolution, and modernization.  Not only will this course focus on state-to-state relations, it will also address a multitude of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese perspectives on the United States and American culture through translated text, oral history, fiction, and memoir.


Participation in weekly discussion sections, which will begin no later than the third week of classes, is mandatory. 

HIST UN2618 The Modern Caribbean. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This lecture course examines the social, cultural, and political history of the islands of the Caribbean Sea and the coastal regions of Central and South America that collectively form the Caribbean region, from Amerindian settlement, through the era of European imperialism and African enslavement, to the period of socialist revolution and independence. The course will examine historical trajectories of colonialism, slavery, and labor regimes; post-emancipation experiences and migration; radical insurgencies and anti-colonial movements; and intersections of race, culture, and neocolonialism. It will also investigate the production of national, creole, and transborder indentities. Formerly listed as "The Caribbean in the 19th and 20th centuries". Field(s): LAC 

HIST UN2628 History of the State of Israel, 1948-Present. 3 points.

The political, cultural, and social history of the State of Israel from its founding in 1948 to the present. Group(s): C Field(s): ME

HIST UN2689 COLONIAL CITIES OF THE AMERICAS, c. 1500-1800. 4 points.

This course examines the history of cities in the Americas in the colonial era, c. 1500-1800, organized around three large themes. First, we study the precolonial origins of American urban systems, focusing especially on Mesoamerica and the Andes, and exploring questions of urban continuity, disruption and change, and the forms of indigenous cities. Second, we study various patterns of city foundations and city types across the Americas, examining Spanish, Portuguese, British, Dutch and French colonial urban systems. Third, we focus on the cities more closely by looking at key issues such as urban form, built environment, social structure. Specific themes include a critical analysis of the Spanish colonial grid, the baroque city, and 18th-century urban reforms, as well as race and class, urban slavery, and urban disease environments. 

HIST UN2719 History of the Modern Middle East. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6998 version of this course.

This course will cover the history of the Middle East from the 18th century until the present, examining the region ranging from Morocco to Iran and including the Ottoman Empire. It will focus on transformations in the states of the region, external intervention, and the emergence of modern nation-states, as well as aspects of social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the region. Field(s): ME

Fall 2022: HIST UN2719
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2719 001/10614 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Rashid Khalidi 4 0/120

HSWM UN2761 Gender and Sexuality in African History. 4 points.

This course examines the history of gender, sexuality and ways of identifying along these lines in Africa from early times through the twentieth century. It asks how gender and sexuality have shaped key historical developments, from African kingdoms and empires to postcolonial states, from colonial conquest to movements for independence, from indigenous healing practices to biomedicine, from slavery to the modern forms of work. It will also explore the history of different sexualities and gender identities on the continent. A key objective is to extend the historical study of gender and sexual identity in Africa beyond ‘women’s history’ to understand gender as encompassing all people in society and their relationships, whether domestic or public.

HIST UN3011 THE SECOND WORLD WAR. 3.00-4.00 points.

This course surveys some of the major historiographical debates surrounding the Second World War. It aims to provide student with an international perspective of the conflict that challenges conventional understandings of the war. In particular, we will examine the ideological, imperial, and strategic dimensions of the war in a global context. Students will also design, research, and write a substantial essay of 15-18 pages in length that makes use of both primary and secondary sources

Fall 2022: HIST UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3011 001/10596 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Chamberlin 3.00-4.00 0/15

HIST UN3017 Sexuality and the City. 4 points.

The city has classically been represented as the site of sexual freedom, but also of sexual immorality and danger.  This course explores the interrelated histories of sexuality and the city in the twentieth-century United States (especially New York) by exploring how urban conditions and processes shaped sexual practices, identities, communities, and ethics, and how sexual matters shaped urban processes, politics, and representation.   

Fall 2022: HIST UN3017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3017 001/10595 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
George Chauncey 4 0/12

HIST UN3032 Pre-Colonial Mesoamerican Societies and Cultures, ca. 1200 BCE-1600 CE. 4 points.

This course explores the histories, social organizations, and material cultures of the pre-colonial peoples of Central America and Mexico between ca. 1200 BCE and 1600 CE, with a particular focus on the three best-attested societies: the Olmecs, the Maya, and the Aztecs. Through an interdisciplinary examination of textual and archaeological sources, the class will address the extent to which one can highlight a common ‘Mesoamerican’ worldview as a lens to better understand the societies of this region. (No prerequisites)

HIST UN3061 ISLAM AND EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES. 4 points.

This course explores the encounter between Europe, broadly conceived, and the Islamic world in the period from the seventh to the thirteenth centuries.  While the Latin Christian military expeditions that began in the late eleventh century known as the Crusades are part of this story, they are not the focus.  The course stresses instead the range of diplomatic, commercial, intellectual, artistic, religious, and military interactions established well before the Crusades across a wide geographical expanse, with focal points in Iberia and Southern Italy.  Substantial readings in primary sources in translation are supplemented with recent scholarship.  [Students will be assigned on average 150-200 pages of reading per week, depending on the difficulty of the primary sources; we will read primary sources every week.]

HIST UN3164 Novels of Empire. 4.00 points.

Literary and visual texts sometimes express the essence of historical experience more powerfully than “factual” narratives or historical debates. This class will focus on four such texts – three novels and one film – which take empire as their central theme. They are taken from different empires, different chronological periods, and different (but sometimes interrelated) phases of imperial conquest, development, and decline. Our task will essentially be a close reading of the texts, and the reconstruction of their historical and geographical context. The empires in question for this semester are the British, Ottoman, Russian, and French

HIST UN3180 Conversion in Historical Perspective. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Boundary crossers have always challenged the way societies imagined themselves. This course explores the political, religious, economic, and social dynamics of religious conversion. The course will focus on Western (Christian and Jewish) models in the medieval and early modern periods. It will include comparative material from other societies and periods. Autobiographies, along with legal, religious and historical documents will complement the readings. 

HIST UN3341 Social Science and the British City. 4.00 points.

British cities have served as a seedbed of the modern social science disciplines, from public health to urban sociology—in fact, the term “gentrification” emerged out of the nexus of race and class in postwar London. This undergraduate seminar introduces students to methods of urban inquiry by focusing on the ways in which social scientists—urban planners, sociologists, ethnographers, cultural theorists—have sought to make the city legible, from the late nineteenth century to the present. How has urban development intersected with modes of knowledge production? In what ways has urban space fostered new identities and practices spanning race, class, and gender? And how does the view from Britain reorient our perspective on the processes of growth and stratification that have shaped the contemporary city? Secondary readings will be supplemented by primary sources by figures including Ebenezer Howard, Jane Jacobs, and Stuart Hall

HIST UN3357 Montaigne and the Modern Self. 4.00 points.

This seminar, which focuses on Montaigne’s Essays, is one of a series on the history of the modern self. The series has included seminars on figures like Pascal, Rousseau, and Tocqueville, and will continue to expand

HIST UN3418 The Carceral United States. 4.00 points.

Examination of the development of U.S. carceral systems and logics from the late 18th century through the present. Through course readings and class discussion, students will explore the changes and continuities in technologies of punishment and captivity over time, interrogating how the purpose and political economy of captivity and policing shifted over time, and analyzing the relationship between carceral institutions and constructions of race, gender, and sexuality

HIST UN3601 Jews in the Later Roman Empire, 300-600 CE. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will explore the background and examine some of the manifestations of the first Jewish cultural explosion after 70 CE. Among the topics discussed: the Late Roman state and the Jews, the rise of the synagogue, the redaction of the Palestinian Talmud and midrashim, the piyyut and the Hekhalot.

HIST UN3622 Islam and the Modern World I. 4.00 points.

In this course, we will survey historical texts that emerge in and around Europe’s engagement with Muslim societies and the creation of a “modern world.” How do we understand Islam(s), colonialism and anti-colonialism in light of texts and practices from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries. We will explore key issues surrounding the history of the Enlightenment, the rise of historicism and the growing interest in universal histories through the engagement with Arabic texts and North African histories from the mid-eighteenth century to the mid twentieth century

HIST UN3753 Istanbul: Places, People, and Everyday Life. 4 points.

The Seminar will open several perspectives into the Ottoman capital Istanbul, following a cross-disciplinary approach. The premise is that Istanbul’s multi-layered, socially complicated, and culturally rich historic fabric can be understood well in focused episodes. Selected episodes will hence constitute the weekly discussion topics. Ranging from the representation of the city in artistic productions to the construction of the skyline, the impact of modernizing reforms on urban forms, everyday life in public and private spaces, and the decisive role played by new educational and cultural institutions, these fragments will complement each other, coalescing into a complex overall picture. While the chronological frame is defined by the long nineteenth century, critical earlier phases will be covered as well and parallels will be drawn to present-day. The nineteenth century marks a dynamic and radical era of urban transformations, intertwined with key political, economic, social, and cultural turns that redefined the Ottoman Empire in many ways. It also corresponds to an intense period of international communication and transaction, resulting in a “connected world of empires.” Istanbul served as a major stage for these developments. 

HIST UN3838 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. 

Fall 2022: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/10641 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Rhiannon Stephens 4 0/12
HIST 3838 002/10585 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Blackmar 4 0/12
HIST 3838 003/10640  
Michael Stanislawski 4 0/12
HIST 3838 004/10618 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Natasha Lightfoot 4 0/12

HIST UN3914 THE FUTURE AS HISTORY. 4.00 points.

This course explores how people have thought about their future and tried to change it. It examines the philosophical aspects of studying history and the future, and how they are related. It begins with the origins of future thinking in eschatology and millenarian movements, the enlightenment challenge to revelation and religious authority, and utopias and dystopias. Classic texts and scholarly studies will illuminate modern approaches to shaping the future, such as socialism, imperialism, risk analysis, and “modernization” theory, and areas where they have had a particular impact, including urban planning and eugenics

HIST UN3928 SLAVERY/ABOLITION-ATLANTC WRLD. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.
This seminar investigates the experiences of slavery and freedom among African-descended people living and laboring in the various parts of the Atlantic World. The course will trace critical aspects of these two major, interconnected historical phenomena with an eye to how specific cases either manifested or troubled broader trends across various slaveholding societies. The first half of the course addresses the history of slavery and the second half pertains to experiences in emancipation. However, since the abolition of slavery occurs at different moments in various areas of the Atlantic World, the course will adhere to a more thematic and less chronological structure, in its examination of the multiple avenues to freedom available in various regions. Weekly units will approach major themes relevant to both slavery and emancipation, such as racial epistemologies among slaveowners/employers, labor regimes in slave and free societies, cultural innovations among slave and freed communities, gendered discourses and sexual relations within slave and free communities, and slaves’ and free people’s resistance to domination. The goal of this course is to broaden students’ comprehension of the history of slavery and freedom, and to promote an understanding of the transition from slavery to freedom in the Americas as creating both continuities and ruptures in the structure and practices of the various societies concerned

HIST UN3942 Constitutions and Democracy in the Middle East. 4 points.

Prerequisites: application requirements: SEE UNDERGRAD SEMINAR SECTION OF DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

Where the establishment of sustainable democracies is concerned, the Middle East has perhaps the poorest record of all regions of the world since World War II. This is in spite of the fact that two of the first constitutions in the non-Western world were established in this region, in the Ottoman Empire in 1876 and in Iran in 1906. Notwithstanding these and other subsequent democratic and constitutional experiments, Middle Eastern countries have been ruled over the past century by some of the world's last absolute monarchies, as well as a variety of other autocratic, military-dominated and dictatorial regimes. This course, intended primarily for advanced undergraduates, explores this paradox. It will examine the evolution of constitutional thought and practice, and how it was embodied in parliamentary and other democratic systems in the Middle East. It will examine not only the two Ottoman constitutional periods of 1876-78 and 1908-18, and that of Iran from 1905 onwards, but also the various precursors to these experiments, and some of their 20th century sequels in the Arab countries, Turkey and Iran. This will involve detailed study of the actual course of several Middle Eastern countries' democratic experiments, of the obstacles they faced, and of their outcomes. Students are expected to take away a sense of the complexities of the problems faced by would-be Middle Eastern democrats and constitutionalists, and of some of the reasons why the Middle East has appeared to be an exception to a global trend towards democratization in the post-Cold War era.

HIST UN3982 The Quantified State: How Democracy Includes, Excludes, and Governs with Numbers. 4.00 points.

Numbers have become indispensable to how American know themselves and understand their society. Further, statistical reasoning plays an essential role in the government’s operations. Why have numbers come to play such an important role in modern America? How has numerical data and calculation enabled us to analyze, order, and control the world around us? The course offers a survey of quantification across various domains from politics to governance, crime, education, and economic development. Students will learn how to think critically about the power of quantitative arguments and the ways they are marshalled in specific contexts

HIST GU4151 A Trans-Imperial Society: the History of the Danube River Basin. 4.00 points.

For several millennia, the Danube irrigated Central European empires. It formed a river basin that offers historians an exceptional laboratory for the study– over a longue durée–of trans-imperial, multi-confessional and multicultural societies. The Danube and its tributaries were both an obstacle and a resource. They guided human societies in the definition of territorial boundaries. Cities, bridges and roads were also scattered along them, crossed them, connected them. The Danube river basin shaped the dynamic Anthropocene in which the East Central European societies developed. From the Alps to the Black Sea: the Danube, the Sava, the Drina, the Mura and many other rivers inspired identity narratives, artistic and literary productions, but they also were the theater of intense military conflicts. This seminar is an introduction to the history of East Central Europe from prehistory to WWI. It presents some of the disciplines that a river history can address, and it offers a dialogue between history and anthropology. This is a history of empires from the ground, and from the flows that challenge some of our cultural and political narratives

HIST GU4253 Ukraine in New York. 4 points.

Ukraine in New York is a multidisciplinary exploration of the Ukrainian-American community in New York City from its beginning in the late 19th century to the present.  The course focuses on the history, demographics, economics, politics, religion, education, and culture of the community, devoting particular attention to the impact thereon of the New York setting, shifting attitudes towards American politics and culture and homeland politics and culture, the tensions encountered in navigating between American, Soviet Ukraine, and independent Ukraine...

HIST GU4301 Politics and Justice in Latin America through Crime Fiction. 4.00 points.

This seminar will use fiction to understand some of the most urgent problems of contemporary Latin American reality. We will read and discuss works of crime fiction from Latin America in the context of the history of crime and justice in the region. It will be an effort to understand those works both in the literary field, as a part of a popular genre of literature, and in their connections with everyday life, often expressed in the media. In other words, the seminar will be an exercise of reading in context, in a historical perspective but also relation to the expectations that readers and critics had about narratives that dealt with violence and the pursuit of justice

HIST GU4305 The European Enlightenment. 4.00 points.

This course aims to introduce students to classic and more recent literature on the intellectual and cultural history of the European Enlightenment. The field has expanded far beyond the cohort of free-thinking philosophes around which it was initially conceived to encompass the broader cultural, economic, and religious preoccupations. Given these tendencies, how has the significance of the Enlightenment shifted as a historical period and interpretive framework? In what ways do scholars explicate its origins, outcomes, and legacies? In response to such questions, the readings trace the development of Enlightenment thought and practices from their early manifestations in Britain and the United Provinces, before shifting attention to France, which became the geographical focal point of the movement by mid-century. Topics to be addressed include the relationship of traditional political authorities to an emerging public sphere, the rise of society as a means of mediating human relationships, the entrepreneurial and epistemological innovations made possible by new media, the struggles of the philosophe movement for legitimacy, debates surrounding luxury consumption and commercial society, and arguments between Christian apologists and radical atheists over traditional religious doctrines and practice

HIST GU4426 People of the Old South. 4 points.

No place or period in American history has ignited more passion or brought into being a richer trove of first-rate scholarship than the South during the years before the Civil War.  On the other hand, no place or period in American history has generated more misguided scholarship or more propaganda. In this course, students will sample historical literature and primary sources about the Old South, evaluating the interpretations historians have offered and scrutinizing some of the documents on which historians of the Old South have based their conclusions.

HIST GU4481 CULTURE, MEMORY, CRISIS IN US. 3.00 points.

TBA

HIST GU4512 Property and Power in 20th Century U.S.. 4.00 points.

This seminar examines debates over meanings, value, and enforcement of property rights in the US over the twentieth century. The course begins with a focus on landed property and its management as real estate and natural resources, raising questions about ownership, tenancy, zoning, eminent domain, public trust doctrines, and contests in Indian Country. It then takes up corporate property and debates over shareholder and managers’ rights and responsibilities, changing structures of investment, and countervailing claims of workers to the property and value of labor and the means of production. With a brief examination of neo-classical economists’ theories and policies of transactional property rights, the course ends with the history of intellectual property rights. Readings include classic theoretical/ideological texts (e.g. MacPherson, Ely, Berle and Means, Coase, Sax, Epstein); social histories, and major legal opinions. Students will write a 20 page research paper using primary sources on a topic of their own interest in this broad field of inquiry

HIST GU4518 Research Seminar: Columbia and Slavery. 4 points.

In this course, students will write original, independent papers of around 25 pages, based on research in both primary and secondary sources, on an aspect of the relationship between Columbia College and its colonial predecessor King's College, with the institution of slavery.

HIST GU4632 Jews in the Ancient City: Politics and Materiality. 4.00 points.

This course will examine the experience of Jews in the cities of the eastern Roman Empire, offering a challenge to modern hypotheses of Jewish corporate stability in that setting and contributing to modern discussions of the relations between the Roman state, Greek cities, and Jewish and Christian subjects

HIST GU4641 HOLOCAUST GENOCIDE-AMER CULTRE. 4.00 points.

When the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. opened in 1993, some people asked why a "European" catastrophe was being memorialized alongside shrines to Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln while there was still no museum documenting the experience of African slaves in the United States or the effort to exterminate the Native Americans on this continent. How American intellectuals have thought about the Nazi regime and the Holocaust in Europe since before the Second World War and in the latter half of the twentieth century is te focus on this course. The course will also compare the ways the United States narrates, conceptualizes and deals with the Holocaust as oppsed to other genocidal events. This course is comparative at its core as it examines how intellectuals and institutions spanning from Hannah Arendt to the United Nations to the US Holocaust Museum have woven this event into American culture

HIST GU4727 The History of the End of the World. 4.00 points.

For thousands of years people have been getting ready for the end of the world, giving rise to millenarian movements that have sometimes changed history. More than once, large numbers of people have experienced events such as the Black Death, the Little Ice Age, colonial conquest, and “strategic” bombing that seemed very much like the end of their world. And over the last seventy-five years, governments and international organizations have made major investments in predicting and preparing for catastrophic threats. Efforts to manage or mitigate these dangers have had world-changing consequences, including “preventative” wars, and new forms of global governance. The very idea of the end of the world, in other words, has a long history, with a demonstrable impact, which provides instructive lessons as we contemplate things to come. This course will explore this history, beginning with eschatology and millenarian movements. In part two, students will learn how different conceptual frameworks can be applied to assessing and managing risk, and understanding how people perceive or misperceive danger. They will learn how they can be applied to identify the most important challenges, drawing insights from different disciplinary approaches. The third and main part of the course will consist of comparative and connected analyses of the age-old apocalyptic threats -- war, pestilence, and famine -- in their modern forms, i.e. nuclear armageddon, pandemics, and ecological collapse. By examining them together, we can compare the magnitude and probability of each danger, and also explore their interconnections. We will see, for instance, how nuclear testing helped give rise to the environmental movement, and how modeling the aftereffects of nuclear exchanges helped advance understanding of climate change. Similarly, scenario exercises have shaped threat perceptions and disaster-preparedness for pandemics and bio-warfare as much as they did for nuclear war and terrorism. Readings and discussions will explore how planetary threats are interconnected, and not just in the techniques used to predict and plan for them. Applying nuclear power to the problem of global warming, for instance, could undermine longstanding efforts to stop nuclear proliferation. Climate change and mass migration, on the other hand, create new pandemic threats, as a more crowded and interconnected world becomes a single ecosystem. Yet billions spent on building up defenses have created more capacity and opportunity for bio-terrorism. Who would actually use a nuclear or biological weapon? Perhaps a millenarian group hoping to ride death, the fourth horse of the apocalypse, straight to heaven

Fall 2022: HIST GU4727
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4727 001/10604 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Matthew Connelly 4.00 0/15

HIST GU4904 WRITING LIVES: A SURVEY OF HISTORICAL APPROACHES AND TECHNIQUES. 4 points.

Ranging from ancient chronicles and saints’ lives to the emergence of modern subjectivity, the rise of the diary, the novel and the bureaucratic questionnaire, this course explores how historians across the ages have written about people’s lives. It asks what has happened to the notion of a life as a moral example, the changing value of ‘experience’ and the ‘ordinary person’, and charts how democracy altered the sense of what was worth recording and commemorating. It draws for its sources on a very wide range of cultures and epochs and concludes by asking the student to conduct their own life history research.

HIST GU4962 Making and Knowing in Early Modern Europe: Hands-On History. 4.00 points.

This course introduces undergraduate and graduate students to the materials, techniques, contexts, and meanings of skilled craft and artistic practices in early modern Europe (1350-1750), in order to reflect upon a series of topics, including craft knowledge and artisanal epistemology; the intersections between craft and science; and questions of historical methodology in reconstructing the material world of the past. The course will be run as a “Laboratory Seminar,” with discussions of primary and secondary materials, as well as hands-on work in a laboratory. The first semester long course to use the published Edition of Fr. 640 as its focus, it will test the use of the Edition in a higher education classroom to inform the development of the Companion. This course is associated with the Making and Knowing Project of the Center for Science and Society at Columbia University.The first semester-long course to use the published Edition of Fr. 640 as its focus, it will test the use of the Edition in a higher education classroom to inform the development of Phase II of the Making and Knowing Project - a Research and Teaching Companion. Students’ final projects (exploratory and experimental work in the form of digital/textual analysis of Ms. Fr. 640, reconstruction insight reports, videos for the Companion, or a combination) will be published as part of the Companion or the Sandbox depending on content and long-term maintenance considerations

Spring 2022: HIST GU4962
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4962 001/12840 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
513 Fayerweather
Pamela Smith 4.00 17/30

Fall 2021 Cross-listed Courses

PLEASE READ: The passage below lists *all* sections being offered by a Columbia instructor for a given course, including sections which *do not* count for History students. NOT ALL sections of the courses listed below count for History majors and concentrators. Particular sections only count towards the History degree if the section instructor is a History faculty member or an affiliate with the History Department. For additional information, please review the "Requirements" tab or consult Undergraduate Administrator at undergraduate-history@columbia.edu. All courses from the Barnard History Department also count towards the History degree.

EAAS UN2342 Mythology of East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Through close readings of major myths of China, Japan, and Korea, this course provides a survey of significant themes of East Asian culture. Inclusion of selected comparative readings also leads students to reconsider the nature of ‘world mythology,’ a field often constituted by juxtaposing Greek and Latin classics with oral texts collected during anthropological fieldwork. The core materials for this class are from ancient written traditions, but they speak with force and clarity to modern readers, as is underlined by our attention to latter-day reception and reconceptualization of these narratives. This is an introductory, discussion-based class intended for undergraduates. No prior knowledge of East Asian history or culture is required, and all course readings are in English. Satisfies the Global Core requirement.

CLST UN3041 The Ancient City and Us: Archaeology of a Relationship. 4.00 points.

The object of this course is Greek and Roman cities in their historical and trans-historical dimensions. In studying their social, economic, and political features, we will discuss models and approaches to this historical form of the city and compare it with other pre-modern and modern examples in world history. The course, open to undergraduate students of different departments and various backgrounds, will ultimately serve as an exercise in historical estrangement to look with fresh and informed eyes at the cities of today

MDES UN3048 Pandemics: A Global History. 3.00 points.

With an interdisciplinary perspective, this course seeks to expand the understanding of past pandemic crises and recent, lived pandemics such as COVID-19. COVID-19 has brought up urgent questions about how we can understand and historicize pandemics and trace the changing relationship between disease and its vectors, humans and their environments. This course seeks to expand the understanding of past and recent pandemics through a historical lens that traces the deep seated racial and class disparities, social and cultural stigma, and political responses and control that they were expressed and deployed during these historical crises. It seeks to understand and analyze pandemics as representing complex, disruptive and devastating crises that effect profound transformations in ideas, social and economic relations and challenge interdependent networks and cultures. Pandemics are balanced in a global-local flux between dramaturgic, proliferating, contagious outbreaks; and endemic, chronic infections that have prolonged periods of latency before again remerging through new transmissions. They also serve as a crucial lens to analyze a range of historical connections, ensions and movements ranging from colonialism and the politics of borders, global capitalism and labor, migration and mobility, decolonization and development, and neoliberalism and global health politics

CSER UN3928 Colonization/Decolonization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 22.

Prerequisites: Open to CSER majors/concentrators only. Others may be allowed to register with the instructor's permission.

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; and European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

Spring 2022: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/10725 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Emma Crane 4 23/22
Fall 2022: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/11569 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Karl Jacoby 4 0/22
CSER 3928 002/11570 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Natasha Lightfoot 4 0/22

AMST UN3930 Topics in American Studies. 4 points.

Please refer to the Center for American Studies website for course descriptions for each section. americanstudies.columbia.edu

Fall 2022: AMST UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 3930 001/10028 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 0/18
AMST 3930 002/10029 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
James Shapiro 4 0/18
AMST 3930 003/10030 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
John McWhorter 4 0/18
AMST 3930 004/11089 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Roosevelt Montas 4 0/18
AMST 3930 005/12000 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Michael Hindus 4 0/18

AMHS GU4462 IMMIGRANT NEW YORK. 4.00 points.

Spring 2022 History Courses

HIST UN1010 The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.. 4 points.

A review of the history of the Greek world from the beginnings of Greek archaic culture around 800 B.C., through the classical and hellenistic periods to the definitive Roman conquest in 146 B.C., with concentration on political history, but attention also to social and cultural developments.Field(s): ANC

Spring 2022: HIST UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1010 001/12631 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Richard Billows 4 55/75
Fall 2022: HIST UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1010 001/10582 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Richard Billows 4 0/75

HIST UN1061 Introduction to the Early Middle Ages: 250-1050. 3 points.

This course surveys the history of the Mediterranean world and northern Europe from the Late Roman Empire to the eleventh century. We will begin (Part 1) by considering the interconnected Roman world of Late Antiquity, focusing on the changes brought about by Christianity. The second half (Part 2) will trace the emergence of new religious and political communities around the Mediterranean and in Northern Europe. Special attention will be given to the circulation of people, products and ideas across Europe and the Mediterranean and the changes that this brought about.   This course emphasizes the diverse but fragmentary textual and material evidence that survives from the period and the problems of interpreting this evidence. Students will begin acquiring the skills of a historian and learn why and how other historians have studied the period. No previous background in medieval history is required.

Spring 2022: HIST UN1061
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1061 001/12635 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
332 Uris Hall
Adam Matthews 3 22/30

HIST UN1512 The Battle for North America: An Indigenous History of the Seven Years War, the American Revolution, and the War of 1812. 4.00 points.

This course will explore the struggle to control the continent of North America from an Indigenous perspective. After a century of European colonization Native peoples east of the Mississippi River Valley formed a political confederation aimed at preserving Native sovereignty. This Native confederacy emerged as a dominant force during the Seven Years War, the American Revolution, and the War of 1812. At times Native political interests aligned with the French and British Empires, but remained in opposition to the expansion of Anglo-American colonial settlements into Indian country. This course is designed to engage literature and epistemology surrounding these New World conflicts as a means of the colonial and post-colonial past in North America. We will explore the emergence of intersecting indigenous and European national identities tied to the social construction of space and race. In this course I will ask you to re-think American history by situating North America as a Native space, a place that was occupied and controlled by indigenous peoples. You will be asked to imagine a North America that was indigenous and adaptive, and not necessarily destined to be absorbed by European settler colonies. Accordingly, this course we will explore the intersections of European colonial settlement and Euro-American national expansion, alongside of the emergence of indigenous social formations that dominated the western interior until the middle of the 19th century. This course is intended to be a broad history of Indigenous North America during a tumultuous period, but close attention will be given to use and analysis of primary source evidence. Similarly, we will explore the necessity of using multiple genres of textual evidence – archival documents, oral history, material artifacts, etc., -- when studying indigenous history

Spring 2022: HIST UN1512
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1512 001/14400 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Michael Witgen 4.00 27/50

HIST UN1786 History of the City in Latin America. 4 points.

This course covers the historical development of cities in Latin America. Readings, lectures, and discussion sections will examine the concentration of people in commercial and political centers from the beginnings of European colonization in the fifteenth century to the present day and will introduce contrasting approaches to the study of urban culture, politics, society, and the built environment. Central themes include the reciprocal relationships between growing urban areas and the countryside; changing power dynamics in modern Latin America, especially as they impacted the lives of cities’ nonelite majority populations; the legalities and politics of urban space; planned versus unplanned cities and the rise of informal economies; the way changing legal and political rights regimes have affected urban life; and the constant tension between tradition and progress through which urban society was formed. There are no prerequisites for this course.  Attendance at weekly Discussion Sections required.

Spring 2022: HIST UN1786
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1786 001/12637 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Fayerweather
Amy Chazkel 4 48/60

HIST UN2060 Laws of War in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

The perception and regulation of war and wartime practices in Europe and the Mediterranean World in the period 300-1500, from the standpoint of legal and institutional history rather than of military history. Topics include: the Just War tradition, Holy War and Crusade, the Peace and Truce of God, prisoners and ransom, the law of siege, non-combatants, chivalry, and ambassadors and diplomacy. Readings are principally primary sources in translation.

Spring 2022: HIST UN2060
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2060 001/12641 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
303 Hamilton Hall
Adam Kosto 4 23/30
HIST 2060 AU1/20001 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
303 Hamilton Hall
Adam Kosto 4 5/5

HIST UN2100 Early Modern Europe: Print and Society. 4 points.

Standing at the intersection of the religious, cultural, and scientific upheavals within early modern Europe, the study of print and its intersection with culture allows students to learn how shifts in technology (much like those we are witnessing today) affect every aspect of society. This course will examine the signal cultural, political, and religious developments in early modern Western Europe, using the introduction and dissemination of printed materials as a fulcrum and entry point. From the sixteenth century Europeans were confronted with a technological revolution whose cultural consequences were incalculable and whose closest parallel might be the age of electronic information technology in our own day. From the Reformation of Luther, to the libelles of pre-revolutionary France, from unlocking the mysteries of the human body to those of the heavens, from humanist culture to the arrival of the novel, no important aspect of European culture in the sixteen- through eighteenth centuries can be understood without factoring in the role of print: its technology, its marketing and distribution channels, and its creation of new readers and new "republics." This course will examine key political, religious, and cultural movements in early modern western European history through the prism of print culture.

Spring 2022: HIST UN2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2100 001/12642 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
301m Fayerweather
Elisheva Carlebach 4 10/30

HIST UN2305 WAR IN GERMANY 1618-2018. 4.00 points.

For much of modern history Germany was Europe’s battlefield. Its soldiers wrote themselves into the annals of military history. But it was also a place where war was discussed, conceptualized and criticized with unparalleled vigor. Nowhere did the extreme violence of the seventeenth century and the early twentieth century leave a deeper mark than on Germany. Today, as we enter the twenty-first century, Germany is the nation that has perhaps come closest to drawing a final, concluding line under its military history. This course will chart the rise and fall of modern militarism in Germany. For those interested in military history per se, this course will not hold back from discussing battles, soldiers and weapons. But it will also offer an introduction to German history more generally. And through the German example we will address questions in political philosophy that haunted modern European history and continue to haunt America today. How is state violence justified? How can it be regulated and controlled? What is its future?

Spring 2022: HIST UN2305
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2305 001/15294 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
329 Pupin Laboratories
Adam Tooze 4.00 46/70
HIST 2305 AU1/19996 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
329 Pupin Laboratories
Adam Tooze 4.00 18/20

HIST UN2307 ITALY IN THE WIDER WORLD. 4.00 points.

Spring 2022: HIST UN2307
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2307 001/13087 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
503 Hamilton Hall
Victoria De Grazia 4.00 8/40

HIST UN2342 Britain, Ireland and Empire, 1789-1901. 4.00 points.

Nineteenth-century Britain has traditionally been portrayed as the dominant power in the world of its time: one that forged a path towards various kinds of ‘modernity’ at home, while ruthlessly subjugating and exploiting the peoples subject to its colonial empire. In this course, we will take a sceptical look at these claims. How coherent a political entity was ‘Britain’—a monarchy composed of at least four distinct and fractious nations, presiding over a scattered empire of trade, conquest and settlement? Who in Britain really benefited from the prosperity made possible by the dramatic industrial and imperial expansion that characterised the period? What forms of freedom, and what kinds of social control, were made possible by Victorian ideologies of ‘liberal’ government and laissez-faire economics? Why were British elites so often uncertain and divided when it came to questions of imperial rule—especially in Ireland, the oldest and nearest dependency of the empire? In the course of asking these questions, we will of course be learning about the history of Britain itself, alongside the parts of the world it interacted with during the nineteenth century: something that, thanks to a wealth of primary sources (many of them now online) and a strong tradition of sophisticated historiography, will be a highly rewarding intellectual experience. We will also, however, be learning and thinking about other things—the histories of capitalism, religion, gender, empire, fossil fuels, migration, agriculture, slavery and political ideology, among others—that are of a much more general, and contemporary relevance. We do not have to buy into simplistic narratives of nineteenth-century Britain’s importance or distinctiveness to recognize it as an interesting place for thinking through some of the central problems of global history and modern politics

Spring 2022: HIST UN2342
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2342 001/12649 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
James Stafford 4.00 24/75

HIST UN2353 Shadow of the Sun King: Early Modern France. 4.00 points.

This course will offer a survey of French history from the Wars of Religion to the Revolution, when the kingdom was the predominant power in Europe. Topics to be addressed include the rise of the Bourbon monarchy, the crystallization of absolutism as a political theology, the spectacular rise and collapse of John Law’s financial system, the emergence of the philosophe movement during the Enlightenment, and the gradual de-legitimation of royal power through its association with despotism. Thematically, the course will focus on shifting logics of representation—that is, the means by which political, economic, and religious power was not only reflected, but also generated and projected, through a range of interrelated practices that include Catholic liturgy, courtly protocols, aristocratic codes of honor, financial experimentation, and the critical styles of thinking and reading inculcated by the nascent public sphere

Spring 2022: HIST UN2353
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2353 000/12704 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
413 Kent Hall
Charly Coleman 4.00 28/50

HIST UN2377 INTERNATIONAL & GLOBAL HISTORY SINCE WWII. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

In this course students will explore contemporary international and global history, focusing on how states have cooperated and competed in the Cold War, decolonization, and regional crises. But lectures will also analyze how non-governmental organizations, cross-border migration, new means of communication, and global markets are transforming the international system as a whole. Group(s): B, C, D Field(s): INTL

Spring 2022: HIST UN2377
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2377 001/12714 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Matthew Connelly 4 101/125
Fall 2022: HIST UN2377
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2377 001/10605 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Matthew Connelly 4 0/125

HIST UN2491 US FOREIGN RELATIONS 1890-1990. 4.00 points.

This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role and identity of the United States in the world, roughly between the 1890s and the late 20th century; (ii) to provide an empirical grasp of U.S. foreign relations during that period; and (iii) to subject to critical inquiry the historiographical views on the various periods and events which have come to make up that history. The lectures, on the whole, will be supplementary to the readings, not a commentary on them

Spring 2022: HIST UN2491
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2491 001/12754 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
214 Pupin Laboratories
Anders Stephanson 4.00 33/50

HIST UN2540 History of the South. 4 points.

A survey of the history of the American South from the colonial era to the present day, with two purposes: first, to afford students an understanding of the special historical characteristics of the South and of southerners; and second, to explore what the experience of the South may teach about America as a nation. 

Spring 2022: HIST UN2540
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2540 001/12774 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Fayerweather
Barbara Fields 4 49/75
HIST 2540 AU1/20002 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Fayerweather
Barbara Fields 4 6/6

HIST UN2565 American History at the Movies. 4 points.

This lecture explores major topics in modern American history through an examination of the American film industry and some of its most popular films and stars. It begins with the emergence of “Hollywood” as an industry and a place in the wake of WWI and ends with the rise of the so-called ‘New Hollywood’ in the 1970s and its treatment of the 1960s and the Vietnam War. For much of this period, Hollywood’s films were not protected free speech, making movies and stars peculiarly reflective of, and vulnerable to, changes in broader cultural and political dynamics. Students will become familiar with Hollywood’s institutional history over this half-century in order to understand the forces, both internal and external, that have shaped the presentation of what Americans do and don’t see on screens and to become skilled interpreters of American history at the movies.

Spring 2022: HIST UN2565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2565 001/13357 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
310 Fayerweather
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 66/75

HIST UN2611 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must also enroll in required discussion section.

  Field(s): ANC

Spring 2022: HIST UN2611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2611 001/12782 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Seth Schwartz 4 17/30

HIST UN2660 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION I. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course aims to give a portrait of the development of Latin America from the first contact with the Europeans to the creation of independent states. We will focus on society and interaction among the various ethnic and socio-economic groups at the level of daily life. For each class, students will have to read sections of a core text as well as a primary source, or document, from the period; before the end of every class there will be 15 minutes to discuss the document together. In addition, students will enroll in discussion sections held by TAs

Spring 2022: HIST UN2660
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2660 001/12784 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Ren Kraft Center
Caterina Pizzigoni 4.00 76/77
Fall 2022: HIST UN2660
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2660 001/10718 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Caterina Pizzigoni 4.00 0/60

HIST UN2701 THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will cover the seven-century long history of the Ottoman Empire, which spanned Europe, Asia, and Africa as well as the medieval, early modern, and modern period. The many levels of continuity and change will be the focus, as will issues of identities and mentalities, confessional diversity, cultural and linguistic pluralism, and imperial governance and political belonging of the empire within larger regional and global perspectives over the centuries. The course also seeks to cultivate appreciation of the human experience through the multifarious experiences culled from the Ottoman past

Spring 2022: HIST UN2701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2701 001/12809 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
310 Fayerweather
Tunc Sen 4.00 71/75
HIST 2701 AU1/18556 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
310 Fayerweather
Tunc Sen 4.00 5/5

HIST UN2881 Vietnam in the World. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course examines the history of Vietnam in the World and serves as a follow-up to ASCE UN1367: Introduction to East Asian Civilizations, Vietnam (though it is not a prerequisite). This course will explore Vietnam’s multifaceted relations with the wider world from the late 19th Century to present day as war – ranging from civil, imperial, global, decolonization, and superpower interventions – forged the modern imperial polity to the current nation-state.

Spring 2022: HIST UN2881
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2881 001/13375 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
209 Havemeyer Hall
Lien-Hang Nguyen 4 66/90

HSAM UN2901 Data: Past, Present, and Future. 3 points.

Lect: 1.5. Lab: 1.5.

Data-empowered algorithms are reshaping our professional, personal, and political realities, for good--and for bad. "Data: Past, Present, and Future" moves from the birth of statistics in the 18th century to the surveillance capitalism of the present day, covering racist eugenics, World War II cryptography, and creepy personalized advertising along the way. Rather than looking at ethics and history as separate from the science and engineering, the course integrates the teaching of algorithms and data manipulation with the political whirlwinds and ethical controversies from which those techniques emerged. We pair the introduction of technical developments with the shifting political and economic powers that encouraged and benefited from new capabilities. We couple primary and secondary readings on the history and ethics of data with computational work done largely with user-friendly Jupyter notebooks in Python.

Spring 2022: HSAM UN2901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSAM 2901 001/12834 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Chris Wiggins, Matthew Jones 3 65/150

HSPB UN2950 Social History of U.S. Public Health. 4.00 points.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical understanding of the role public health has played in American history. The underlying assumptions are that disease, and the ways we define disease, are simultaneously reflections of social and cultural values, as well as important factors in shaping those values. Also, it is maintained that the environments that we build determine the ways we live and die. The dread infectious and acute diseases in the nineteenth century, the chronic, degenerative conditions of the twentieth and the new, vaguely understood conditions rooted in a changing chemical and human-made environment are emblematic of the societies we created. Among the questions that will be addressed are: How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape our history? How do ideas about health reflect broader attitudes and values in American history and culture? How does the American experience with pain, disability, and disease affect our actions and lives? What are the responsibilities of the state and of the individual in preserving health? How have American institutions--from hospitals to unions to insurance companies--been shaped by changing longevity, experience with disability and death?

Spring 2022: HSPB UN2950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSPB 2950 001/15299 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
310 Fayerweather
James Colgrove 4.00 83/90
HSPB 2950 AU1/18559 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
James Colgrove 4.00 5/5

HIST UN2978 Science and Pseudoscience: Alchemy to AI. 4.00 points.

During the 2020 US presidential election and the years of the COVID-19 pandemic, science and “scientific truths” were fiercely contested. This course provides a historical perspective on the issues at stake. The course begins with an historical account of how areas of natural knowledge, such as astrology, alchemy, and “natural magic,” which were central components of an educated person’s view of the world in early modern Europe, became marginalized, while a new philosophy of nature (what we would now call empirical science) came to dominate the discourse of rationality. Historical developments examined in this course out of which this new understanding of nature emerged include the rise of the centralized state, religious reform, and European expansion. The course uses this historical account to show how science and pseudoscience developed in tandem in the period from 1400 to 1800. This historical account equips students to examine contemporary issues of expertise, the social construction of science, pluralism in science, certainty and uncertainty in science, as well as critical engagement with contemporary technologies

Spring 2022: HIST UN2978
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2978 001/12839 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Pamela Smith, Madisson Whitman 4.00 65/95
HIST 2978 AU1/19997 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Pamela Smith, Madisson Whitman 4.00 20/21
Fall 2022: HIST UN2978
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2978 001/10637 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Pamela Smith, Madisson Whitman 4.00 0/90

HIST UN3012 African Voices & Colonial Documents: Uganda. 4.00 points.

This course introduces students to researching and writing African colonial history with a specific focus on Uganda. Students will be guided through the missionary sources available at Columbia and we will discuss how African voices can and cannot be found in these archives. At the end of the semester students will have produced an original primary source paper on Ugandan history

Spring 2022: HIST UN3012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3012 001/12868 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Rhiannon Stephens 4.00 10/15

HIST UN3023 Mobility and Identity in the Roman World. 4 points.

This course considers how identity increased, limited, controlled, or otherwise shaped the mobility of individuals and groups in the Roman world, including women, slaves, freedpeople, and diaspora communities. We will identify the structures that produced differences in mobility and consider how such groups understood and represented themselves in a variety of media as possessing a specific, shared identity and community. The course will draw on a range of primary sources, including inscriptions and literary texts (both poetry and prose), and cover the period from the second century BCE to the third century CE.

Fall 2022: HIST UN3023
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3023 001/10630 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Sailakshmi Ramgopal 4 0/15

HIST UN3069 History of the American Middle Class . 4 points.

What does it mean to be middle class in America, and what has it meant historically? This course examines the history of middle-class status in America, from the early days of professionalization and corporate bureaucracy, to the progressive era political mobilization, to the mid-century consumerist era, to the present white collar precariat. By looking at cultural habits, social organization, and political engagement, and by examining materials from living room furniture to avocado toast, we'll chart the rise and fall of the most sought-after class denomination in American history.

Spring 2022: HIST UN3069
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3069 001/12872 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Joshua Schwartz 4 17/15

HIST UN3099 Socialist Stuff: Material Culture of the USSR and Post-Soviet Space, 1917-present. 4 points.

This course examines the experience of people living in the Soviet Union via things.  Objects under socialist regimes were supposed to be transformative, turning yesterday’s backwards peasants into new communist men and women. Communism promised unheard of abundance, but those who lived under it often suffered from severe shortages. Things from outside of the communist world often took on an aura of forbidden fruit. People learned a variety of tricks to survive, and today are even nostalgic for many of its trappings.

Spring 2022: HIST UN3099
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3099 001/12880 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Brandon Schechter 4 11/15

HIST UN3252 Animals in the History of East Central Europe. 4.00 points.

Over the last two decades scholars in the humanities and social sciences have embraced “the animal turn”: by asking questions about the place of animals in human societies and about animals’ experiences in various times and places they have instigated a field that has come to be known as Animal Studies. This research has expanded the range of analytical tools we have at our disposal to examine social worlds and to study meaning, representation, agency, and context and it also encouraged us to re-consider fundamental questions about the human–animal divide: what it is, where it is, and what its significance is. Moreover, it has become evident that animals are not just passive recipients of human action, but at times they can act as autonomous agents that can contributing the shaping of the world that we share with them. Although this course adopts a perspective which is first and foremost historical, it also emphasizes the field’s interdisciplinary embedding and intersectional potentials. It shows that the study of historical developments through the lens of animals is not only intellectually rewarding in its own right, but it also provides new perspectives on a range of crucial topics, such as the history of war, capitalism, colonialism, consumption and entertainment. The majority of accounts in the field addresses developments in the Anglophone world. While also paying attention to the results of that research, the regional focus of this course will be on East Central Europe. After the first three sessions that serve as an introduction to the field, a number of case studies will reveal that animals have always been an integral part of the region’s social, cultural and economic life and that studying them in a historical perspective provides potentials for nuancing or even revising established knowledge on the history of East Central Europe

Spring 2022: HIST UN3252
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3252 001/15520 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg
Monika Baar 4.00 7/15

HIST UN3258 Disability Histories of Europe in the Twentieth Century. 4.00 points.

Approximately 10%-15% of the world’s population is estimated to have a disability and this number is expected to rise in the next decades. Moreover, as the saying goes: everyone is just one accident away from disability. Although the potentials of the concept as a category of historical analysis are comparable to those of class, race, gender, sexuality and ethnicity; until recently, the history of people of disabilities has remained a rather neglected field and its promise to enrich and revise mainstream narratives on European history has not sufficiently been explored. This course responds to calls to bring disability from the margins to the center of historical inquiry. Rather than treating disability as merely a medical impairment, it will explore its historical and cultural variability.Unlike the overwhelming majority of academic accounts and courses which study the Anglophone world, this course will primarily focus on (continental) Europe, while also paying attention to global aspects. It is not restricted to one particular type of disability; instead, it historicizes the emergence of various categories and classifications. Topics will include disability and war, the Cold War, welfare, social movements and disability rights, culture and identity, the Deaf community, disability as a concern of global governance and global health. Special attention will be paid to regions that often remain peripheral in comprehensive studies, such as Eastern and Northern Europe. In doing so, the course seeks to reveal how the application of disability as an analytical tool can contribute to rethink the overall dynamics of European history

Spring 2022: HIST UN3258
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3258 001/15448 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Monika Baar 4.00 10/15

HIST UN3272 Modern Southeast Asian History. 4 points.

This seminar explores the modern history of Southeast Asia, a diverse region of nearly a dozen nations that includes an extraordinary ethnic mix, all of the world’s major religions, and a broad spectrum of political systems. Considered one of the “main crossroads of the world,” we will explore the region’s modern history, including western colonial conquest, resistance struggles for decolonization, differing modes of economic development, thorough-going revolutions, and inter-ethnic violence set against the backdrop of increasing globalization.

Spring 2022: HIST UN3272
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3272 001/13414 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
212a Lewisohn Hall
Lien-Hang Nguyen 4 11/15

HIST UN3429 Telling About the South. 4 points.

A remarkable array of Southern historians, novelists, and essayists have done what Shreve McCannon urges Quentin Compson to do in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!--tell about the South--producing recognized masterpieces of American literature.  Taking as examples certain writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, this course explores the issues they confronted, the relationship between time during which and about they wrote, and the art of the written word as exemplified in their work. Group(s): D Field(s): US  Limited enrollment. Priority given to senior history majors. After obtaining permission from the professor, please add yourself to the course wait list so the department can register you in the course.

Spring 2022: HIST UN3429
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3429 001/12781 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Barbara Fields 4 13/15

HIST UN3437 Poisoned Worlds: Corporate Behavior and Public Health. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

In the decades since the publication of Silent Spring and the rise of the environmental movement, public awareness of the impact of industrial products on human health has grown enormously. There is growing concern over BPA, lead, PCBs, asbestos, and synthetic materials that make up the world around us. This course will focus on environmental history, industrial and labor history as well as on how twentieth century consumer culture shapes popular and professional understanding of disease. Throughout the term the class will trace the historical transformation of the origins of disease through primary sources such as documents gathered in lawsuits, and medical and public health literature. Students will be asked to evaluate historical debates about the causes of modern epidemics of cancer, heart disease, lead poisoning, asbestos-related illnesses and other chronic conditions. They will also consider where responsibility for these new concerns lies, particularly as they have emerged in law suits. Together, we will explore the rise of modern environmental movement in the last 75 years. 

Spring 2022: HIST UN3437
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3437 001/12896 W 8:10am - 10:00am
301m Fayerweather
David Rosner 4 13/20

HIST UN3490 The Global Cold War. 4 points.

The superpower competition between the US and the USSR dominated international affairs during the second half of the twentieth century. Though this Cold War was born from ideological differences and initially focused on Europe, it soon became entangled with the concurrent global process of decolonization. In this way, the US-Soviet rivalry shaped events on every continent. This course will examine the intersection of the superpower competition and the emergence of the postcolonial world. Through course readings and class discussion, students will examine the global dimensions of the Cold war. Each student will prepare a research paper on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Spring 2022: HIST UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3490 001/12897 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Paul Chamberlin 4 12/15

HIST UN3497 Calculating Power: Knowledge, Technology, and Risk in the United States after 1900. 4.00 points.

This course introduces students to a variety of mediated numerical practices employed by a variety of actors and institutions in the US to make legible individuals and coteries both at home and abroad in the 20th and 21st centuries. Attention is given to how statistical innovations and infrastructures were used to measure and justify social claims about race, gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class, and how these practices changed the very definitions of the social phenomena they purported to describe. While emphasis is on the US after 1945, the course begins at the outset of the 20th century in which a variety of statistical practices were developed to facilitate decision making under uncertainty. Topics include eugenics, the US census, public health, citizenship, histories of computing, Cold War rationality, history of the social sciences, criminal justice, civil rights, advertising, modernization theory, the military-industrial complex, artificial intelligence, machine learning, free press, and censorship. No prerequisites are required

Spring 2022: HIST UN3497
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3497 001/15479 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 International Affairs Bldg
Aaron Plasek 4.00 10/15

HIST UN3501 Indians and Empires in North America. 4.00 points.

In this course you will be asked to re-think American history. That is, we will approach the history of America as a continental history. This will require that we think of North America as a New World space, a place that was inhabited and occupied by indigenous peoples, and then remade by the arrival and settlement of Europeans. You will be asked to imagine a North America that was indigenous and adaptive, as well as colonial and Euro-American. This approach to the study of North American history is designed to challenge the epistemology and literature of the history of colonization and American expansion, which displaces Native peoples from the central narrative of American history by placing them at the physical margins of colonial and national development. Instead we will explore the intersection and integration of indigenous and Euro-American national identity and national space in North America and trace their co-evolution from first contact through the early nineteenth century

Spring 2022: HIST UN3501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3501 001/15461 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Michael Witgen 4.00 10/15

HIST UN3517 The Historical Imagination in Caribbean Literature. 4.00 points.

Caribbean literature offers complicated and vivid portrayals of the Caribbean’s past, and grapples with difficult histories lived by its people that compromised colonial archives can only partially capture. Literary works far exceed the limited narratives of Caribbean history by imagining entire worlds that official documents could never contain, rich selves, cultures and communities built by many generations of Caribbean people. This course is aimed at bringing forth a broader understanding of Caribbean history by examining a body of creative works by feminist and womanist writers that continuously remain attuned to the complexities of the past, which are either underrepresented or absent in the record. Chosen literary texts will also be paired with historical works that will illuminate and contextualize the multiple themes with which these Caribbean authors frequently engage, including slavery, and colonialism, racism and colorism, migration and immigration, gender and sexuality, poverty and globalization. From these pairings, students will explore both the divergences and alignments in how writers and historians approach the work of retelling the past, and will acquire reading and writing skills that will foster thoughtful critical analysis of the ever-changing contours of the Caribbean’s history

HIST UN3529 Landscapes of American Modernity, 1880-1940. 4.00 points.

This course examines the transformation of rural and urban landscapes in the U.S. in the critical era of industrial consolidation, 1880-1940. We investigate the creation of an infrastructure for agriculture that transformed natural environments; the changing vernacular architecture of domestic and industrial workplaces; the development of central downtowns as sites of office buildings, department stores, and civic centers; the spatial instantiation of the Jim Crow segregationist regime in the North as well as the South; the relation between real estate and finance that fueled the Great Depression; and the development of New Deal policies that underwrote public works—including highways-- and public housing, while also subsidizing home ownership, agribusiness, and segregation (the historical context for debates over the “Green New Deal.”. Reading assignments combine social history and vernacular architectural studies with primary sources that include urban planning and government documents, personal narratives, and both historical and contemporary photographs, maps, and city plans

Spring 2022: HIST UN3529
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3529 001/12923 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
602 Northwest Corner
Elizabeth Blackmar 4.00 20/25
Fall 2022: HIST UN3529
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3529 001/10687 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Blackmar 4.00 0/25

HIST UN3552 Beyond Battlefields: Key Themes in American Military History. 4.00 points.

This seminar examines the American military experience and its relationship to American society from 1775 to the Vietnam War. It shows that military history is about more than generals and battles. It's about the evolution of institutions and the lived experiences of the people who made up these institutions. The seminar begins with the origins and development of the United States military and continues chronologically to introduce different approaches to examine it. Each week focuses on a specific period and centers on a distinct theme, including political economy, legal history, class and gender relations, racism, and violence

Spring 2022: HIST UN3552
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3552 001/15472 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg
Yoav Hamdani 4.00 13/15

HIST UN3572 The Climate Crisis: A History of the Present. 4.00 points.

The climate crisis is a defining feature of contemporary life. How did we get here? This course takes a historical approach to the question, exploring the multiple overlapping histories required to understand the present climate age. Themes and topics include: the expansion of fossil fuel capitalism; the history of climate science and climate denialism; the relationship between science and policy; the geopolitics of climate knowledge production; environmental diplomacy and climate justice; indigenous-led activist movements; and debates about geoengineering solutions versus structural changes to the energy system

Spring 2022: HIST UN3572
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3572 001/12926 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Leah Aronowsky 4.00 15/15

HIST UN3645 Spinoza to Sabbatai: Jews in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

A seminar on the historical, political, and cultural developments in the Jewish communities of early-modern Western Europe (1492-1789) with particular emphasis on the transition from medieval to modern patterns. We will study the resettlement of Jews in Western Europe, Jews in the Reformation-era German lands, Italian Jews during the late Renaissance, the rise of Kabbalah, and the beginnings of the quest for civil Emancipation. Field(s): JWS/EME

Spring 2022: HIST UN3645
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3645 001/13060 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Elisheva Carlebach 4 11/15

HIST UN3789 Histories of Poverty in Africa. 4 points.

In this course we will explore in a critical manner the concept of poverty in Africa. The emphasis is on historicizing categories such as poverty and wealth, debt and charity and on the ways in which people in Africa have understood such categories. As such the course takes a longue durée approach spanning over a millennium of history, ending with contemporary understandings of poverty. 

Spring 2022: HIST UN3789
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3789 001/12869 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Rhiannon Stephens 4 8/15

HIST UN3839 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. Field(s): ALL

Spring 2022: HIST UN3839
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3839 001/13066 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Matthew Jones 4 7/11
HIST 3839 002/13070 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
507 Lewisohn Hall
Adam Matthews 4 8/8
HIST 3839 003/13075 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
402 International Affairs Bldg
Mae Ngai 4 12/12
HIST 3839 004/13078 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Joshua Schwartz 4 8/10

HIST GU4110 FRENCH AMERICA 1534-1804. 4.00 points.

A study of the French Atlantic World from the exploration of Canada to the Louisiana Purchase and Haitian Independence, with a focus on the relationship between war and trade, forms of intercultural negotiation, the economics of slavery, and the changing meaning of race. The demise of the First French Colonial Empire occurred in two stages: the British victory at the end of the Seven Years War in 1763, and the proclamation of Haitian Independence by insurgent slaves in 1804. The first French presence in the New World was the exploration of the Gulf of St. Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534. At its peak the French Atlantic Empire included one-third of the North American continent, as well as the richest and most productive sugar and coffee plantations in the world. By following the history of French colonization in North America and the Caribbean, this class aims to provide students with a different perspective on the history of the Western hemisphere, and on US history itself. At the heart of the subject is the encounter between Europeans and Native Americans and between Europeans and Africans. We will focus the discussion on a few issues: the strengths and weaknesses of French imperial control as compared with the Spanish and the British; the social, political, military, and religious dimensions of relations with Native Americans; the extraordinary prosperity and fragility of the plantation system; evolving notions of race and citizenship; and how the French Atlantic Empire shaped the history of the emerging United States

Spring 2022: HIST GU4110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4110 001/13082 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Pierre Force 4.00 10/15

HIST GU4229 POLITICS & SEXUALITY IN THE COLD WAR. 4.00 points.

The course presents new approaches for revisiting the study of this key period, moving away from more conventional angles to focus on global dynamics by looking at Latin America through the lens of sexuality and family. From this perspective, it will map out different problems and it will prompt a stimulating debate, allowing for discussions on generational as well as gender clashes, everyday life, and affective and emotional bonds, but also on the political strategies of the forces in conflict, public policies and cultural interventions. Discussions will underline interpretative and methodological dilemmas in relation with the historical reconstruction. Particularly, it will consider the relation between political and socio-cultural processes and the connection between the “longue durée” and contingency of the historical events. The course will allow students to explore these problems by themselves and promote their active participation, requesting different type of production from them such as oral intervention, an essay, etc. To sum up, this course offers the opportunity to rethink the Cold War, which still stir sensitivities and which is part of the political agenda even today, in a deeper and more complex way

Spring 2022: HIST GU4229
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4229 001/14341 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
802 International Affairs Bldg
Isabelle Cosse Larghero 4.00 10/15

HIST GU4231 Eastern Europe’s Cold War . 4 points.

This seminar explores the Cold War's impact on Eastern Europe (1940s-1980s) and Eastern Europe's Cold War-era engagements with the wider world. We will address the methodologies used by historians to answer questions like these: What was the Cold War? What did it mean, and for whom? We will also look at the Cold War as something more than a series of events; we will consider its value, uses, and limits as a device for framing the second half of the twentieth century.

Spring 2022: HIST GU4231
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4231 001/13427 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Elidor Mehilli 4 16/15

HIST GU4344 Truth from the Past: Introduction to the Philosophy of History. 4.00 points.

Exploring philosophies of history from the ancient Greeks to the present

Spring 2022: HIST GU4344
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4344 001/15570 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
405 Kent Hall
Mark Mazower 4.00 16/15

HIST GU4357 Rousseau and the Modern Self. 4.00 points.

This course is one of a series on the history of the modern self that includes courses on Montaigne, Pascal, and Tocqueville as well. This semester we focus on Rousseau, and in particular Emile, his treatise on education and psychology. We also examine hisautobiographical work, the Confessions, and consider how Rousseau’s theory of the self shapes and is shaped by his understanding of himself

Spring 2022: HIST GU4357
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4357 001/14078 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Kent Hall
Mark Lilla 4.00 10/15

HIST GU4380 THE IDEA OF EUROPE. 4.00 points.

Spring 2022: HIST GU4380
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4380 001/13096 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Victoria De Grazia 4.00 16/20

HIST GU4489 Early American Law and Society. 4.00 points.

How does law shape the way that people live together in society, and how do changes in society bring about changes in the law? How is law lived on the ground, and how did its subjects think about it and use it for their own purposes? In this class, we will read recent and significant scholarship in the history of the early American republic (c. 1776-1840) that explores these questions, drawing on the history of the law and legal sources. Although this class will touch on some of the better-known arguments among scholars of legal history, its approach will be more practical than theoretical. Its primary focus will not be on the evolution of American law as a conceptual matter, or on philosophical arguments about the nature of the law. Rather, students in this class will read in order to become better researchers: to learn more about how law worked in the early American republic, about the institutions through which it operated, about how it changed over time, and how it formed (and was formed by) American society. This reading-intensive class is intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students who are interested in the history of the law, or in conducting research projects that draw extensively on legal sources. For undergraduates, previous coursework in US history is strongly recommended

Spring 2022: HIST GU4489
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4489 001/14076 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
329 Uris Hall
Hannah Farber 4.00 16/15

HIST GU4509 PROBLEMS IN INT'L HISTORY. 4.00 points.

The object of this course is to illuminate how histories of the realm we think of as "international" are structured by means of key concepts, foundational concepts that form semantic fields of politics and policy. The seminar will chiefly be devoted to some ways of this in the empirical context of what is now being called the subfield of ‘the U.S. in the World.’

Spring 2022: HIST GU4509
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4509 000/12862 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Anders Stephanson 4.00 10/15

HIST GU4511 The Philosophical Life. 4.00 points.

The history of philosophy is not only the story of how particular concepts and doctrines — regarding cosmology, metaphysics, mind, language, ethics, politics — developed in the past. It also is the story of different conceptions of the philosophical life itself. In recent decades historians and philosophers have become increasingly interested in this subject. This seminar is devoted to examining different themes and episodes in this history, from antiquity to the present. In the spring of 2022 we will focus on ideas about the philosophical life in classic modern thinkers, from Bacon to Kant

Spring 2022: HIST GU4511
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4511 001/14079 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
522c Kent Hall
Mark Lilla 4.00 6/15

HIST GU4532 TOPICS IN AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION. 4.00 points.

Few events in American history can match the significance of the American Civil War and Reconstruction and few left a better cache of records for scholars seeking to understand its signal events, actors, and processes. Starting with the secession of eleven southern states, white southerners’ attempts to establish a proslavery republic (the Confederate States of America) unleashed an increasingly radical, even revolutionary war. Indeed, as the war assumed a massive scope it drove a process of state building and state-sponsored slave emancipation in the United States that ultimately reconfigured the nation and remade the terms of political membership in it

Spring 2022: HIST GU4532
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4532 001/13181 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Stephanie McCurry 4.00 16/15

HIST GU4711 OCCULT IN THE MUSLIM PAST. 4.00 points.

This seminar is designed to explore the rich but sorely understudied occult scientific lore in the pre-modern Islamic world. For over a millennium, from the seventh through even the twenty-first century, and spanning a broad geographical spectrum from the Nile to Oxus, different forms and praxis of occult scientific knowledge marked intellectual and political endeavors, everyday lives and customs, and faith-based matters of individuals constituting the so-called Islamicate world. However, despite the impressive array of textual, material, and visual sources coming down to us from the Muslim past, the topic has been severely marginalized under the post-Enlightenment definitions of scientific knowledge, which also shaped how the history of sciences in the Islamicate world was written in the last century. One of this seminar’s main objectives is to rehabilitate such biased perspectives through a grand tour of occult knowledge and practice appealed in the pre-modern Muslim world. Over the semester, by relying on a set of secondary studies and translated primary sources, we will revisit the question of the marginalization of Islamicate occult sciences, explore the actors’ definitions and discussions about the epistemic value of these sciences, trace their social and political implications in everyday life and imperial politics, and examine the key textual, technical, and material aspects of the occult tradition. In several of our sessions, we will have hands-on practice to better familiarize ourselves with the instructed techniques and methods in different branches of occult sciences. We will also regularly visit the Columbia University Rare Book & Manuscript Library to view texts and materials available in our collection

Spring 2022: HIST GU4711
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4711 001/12821 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Tunc Sen 4.00 11/15

HIST GU4723 Politics of Archaeology. 4.00 points.

“Who owns antiquities?” “Who owns culture?” These questions that appear frequently today in both popular and scholarly discourse are deeply embedded in political issues and have a long history, going back to the nineteenth century. The seminar will investigate the origins of the battles over antiquities and their links empire building, colonialism, Orientalism, modernity, power, identity construction, racial hierarchies, and money. The chronological frame is from the 1850s to1914 and the geographical focus in the Ottoman Middle East, which was the major theater of contestations. We will look closely into two areas: archaeological excavations and museums. If objects were unearthed (“discovered”) in the first, they were displayed in the second; the Middle East was crowded with the first, while the major museums were in the West, with the exception of the Museum of Antiquities in Istanbul. We will also consider the vast and complex human landscape around the antiquities. In addition to archaeologists, this community included emperors, sultans, diplomats, spies, artists, inspectors, bureaucrats, technocrats, and workers, hence a cohort of individuals from many nationalities, economic strata, ethnic groups, and religions

Spring 2022: HIST GU4723
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4723 001/14077 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Zeynep Celik 4.00 15/17

HIST GU4926 Spatial History Lab. 2 points.

Spatial History Lab for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Students will learn theory and methods in spatial history while exploring key topics from the corequisite research seminar. This course will train students in the fundamentals of geographic information systems (GIS). Students will use skills learned in this lab to conduct a final research project in the corequisite research seminar. No previous experience necessary, but basic computer literacy highly recommended. Corequisite- HIST GU4927

Spring 2022: HIST GU4926
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4926 001/14362 Th 11:30am - 1:00pm
102 Milstein Center
Gergely Baics, S. Wright Kennedy 2 13/15

HIST GU4927 Mapping 19th Century New York. 4.00 points.

Spatial history of New York City in the 19th century for graduate students and advanced undergraduates.Students explore key topics in New York City spatial history, and learn historical GIS skills in an attached lab. For their final projects, students will use newly constructed, large GIS data from the Mapping Historical New York project. Corequisite - HIST GU4926

Spring 2022: HIST GU4927
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4927 001/14363 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
119 Milstein Center
Gergely Baics, S. Wright Kennedy 4.00 13/15

HIST GU4962 Making and Knowing in Early Modern Europe: Hands-On History. 4.00 points.

This course introduces undergraduate and graduate students to the materials, techniques, contexts, and meanings of skilled craft and artistic practices in early modern Europe (1350-1750), in order to reflect upon a series of topics, including craft knowledge and artisanal epistemology; the intersections between craft and science; and questions of historical methodology in reconstructing the material world of the past. The course will be run as a “Laboratory Seminar,” with discussions of primary and secondary materials, as well as hands-on work in a laboratory. The first semester long course to use the published Edition of Fr. 640 as its focus, it will test the use of the Edition in a higher education classroom to inform the development of the Companion. This course is associated with the Making and Knowing Project of the Center for Science and Society at Columbia University.The first semester-long course to use the published Edition of Fr. 640 as its focus, it will test the use of the Edition in a higher education classroom to inform the development of Phase II of the Making and Knowing Project - a Research and Teaching Companion. Students’ final projects (exploratory and experimental work in the form of digital/textual analysis of Ms. Fr. 640, reconstruction insight reports, videos for the Companion, or a combination) will be published as part of the Companion or the Sandbox depending on content and long-term maintenance considerations

Spring 2022: HIST GU4962
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4962 001/12840 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
513 Fayerweather
Pamela Smith 4.00 17/30

HIST GU4971 What Can States Really Do? State Power & Popular Resistance in Global Historical Perspective. 4.00 points.

The Covid-19 pandemic showed that states had various ways of mobilizing their populations and imposing regulations. Some resorted to authoritarian measures, others to suasion, voluntary participation, or social pressure. People's compliance or resistance to these requirements greatly varied across countries and regions, as in the case of face-mask or vaccination mandates. Whatever the circumstances, trust in the state and law obedience played a crucial role for anti-epidemic policy and its effectiveness. This raises a fundamental historical issue about how states build legitimacy and compliance over time and space, despite facing numerous popular resistances and oppositions. How are state obligations such as vaccination, conscription, taxation, compulsory education, social insurance, etc., implemented, respected, or contested? Is it a mere story of violence and power, or does it also imply collective negotiation, voluntary participation, and consent? Why are some states fiercely resisted by their population, while others inspire trust and compliance? The goal of this discussion seminar is to explore this puzzle through the lenses of comparative and global history, in a longue durée perspective and in close interaction with social sciences (anthropology, political science, sociology, and psychology). Each session will be devoted to one facet of the state, bringing together European, American, and imperial situations and case studies

Spring 2022: HIST GU4971
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4971 001/15587 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Nicolas Delalande 4.00 13/18

Spring 2022 Cross-listed Courses

PLEASE READ: The passage below lists *all* sections being offered by a Columbia instructor for a given course, including sections which *do not* count for History students. NOT ALL sections of the courses listed below count for History majors and concentrators. Particular sections only count towards the History degree if the section instructor is a History faculty member or an affiliate with the History Department. For additional information, please review the "Requirements" tab or consult Undergraduate Administrator at undergraduate-history@columbia.edu. All courses from the Barnard History Department also count towards the History degree.


AFAS UN1002 Major Debates in African-American Studies. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must register for discussion section, AFAS UN1003.

This course will focus on the major debates in African-American Studies from the role of education to the political uses of art. The class will follow these debates historically with attention to the ways in which earlier discussions on migration and emigration, for example, were engaged with the specific historical conjuncture in which they took place as well as in the myriad ways in which earlier debates continue to resonate today. There will be a mix of primary documents and secondary sources and commentary.

Spring 2022: AFAS UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFAS 1002 001/15362 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Frank Guridy 4 15/15
Fall 2022: AFAS UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFAS 1002 001/13511 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Frank Guridy 4 0/12

ASCE UN1361 INTRO EAST ASIAN CIV: JPN. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371
Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371 A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century

Spring 2022: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/11335 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Gregory Pflugfelder 4.00 53/60
Fall 2022: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10648 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Paul Kreitman 4.00 0/90

ASCE UN1363 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE UN1366

The evolution of Korean society and culture, with special attention to Korean values as reflected in thought, literature, and the arts.

Spring 2022: ASCE UN1363
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1363 001/11336 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
415 Schapiro Cepser
Jungwon Kim 4 46/42

AFRS BC2006 Introduction to African Diaspora. 3 points.

Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the African diaspora in the Americas: its motivations, dimensions, consequences, and the importance and stakes of its study. Beginning with the contacts between Africans and the Portuguese in the 15th century, this class will open up diverse paths of inquiry as students attempt to answer questions, clear up misconceptions, and challenge assumptions about the presence of Africans in the 'New World.'

Spring 2022: AFRS BC2006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 2006 001/00463 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
409 Barnard Hall
Celia Naylor 3 15/20

AFRS BC3110 THE AFRICANA COLLOQUIUM. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Priority will be given to Africana majors and CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies).
In this colloquium we will examine the complexities of race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and nationality within Caribbean contexts. Some of the themes we will analyze include conceptions of home and nation; the use, creation, and politics of language; intergenerational relationships between women; the rites and rights of girlhood and womanhood; and intersecting identities. We will specifically address how Caribbean women scholars/activists/artists critique racism, sexism, classism, heterosexism, colonialism, neocolonialism, and tourism within Caribbean sociocultural landscapes. In addition, we will analyze how Caribbean women/womyn frame and interrogate the politics of slavery, emancipation, freedom, resistance, rebellion, and independence during different historical eras. The required readings for this course reflect a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary methodologies, as well as a range of genres

Spring 2022: AFRS BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3110 001/00465 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Celia Naylor 4.00 15/15

LATN UN3310 Selections from Latin Literature: Roman Britain. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2022: LATN UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3310 001/12348 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Seth Schwartz 3 11/25

WMST GU4555 Abolitionist Feminism. 3.00 points.

This seminar is a deep study of the feminist history, theory, and practice of criminal punishment abolition from the 19th century through the present. It explores key conceptual frameworks, political conundrums, and genealogies of abolition especially in relation to Black, Native, women of color, queer, and Marxist feminisms. We will explore linkages and divergences from movements to abolish slavery. Students will engage past and current organizing movements and read and hear from activists who are organizing for prison abolition. We will explore the relationship between prison abolition and other movements for radical change and the tensions around abolition and carcerality that exist among feminists. Does abolitionist feminism have a cohesive set of political projects or philosophies? What tensions exist among feminists who advocate for abolition?

Spring 2022: WMST GU4555
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 4555 001/15165 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Sarah Haley 3.00 16/20

HSEA GU4882 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA II. 3.00 points.

China's search for a new order in the long twentieth century with a focus on political, social and cultural change

Spring 2022: HSEA GU4882
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4882 001/11350 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
825 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Eugenia Lean 3.00 26/40

HSEA GU4891 LAW IN CHINESE HISTORY. 4 points.

An introduction to major issues of concern to legal historians as viewed through the lens of Chinese legal history.  Issues covered include civil and criminal law, formal and informal justice, law and the family, law and the economy, the search for law beyond state-made law and legal codes, and the question of rule of law in China.  Chinese codes and course case records and other primary materials in translation will be analyzed to develop a sense of the legal system in theory and in practice.

Spring 2022: HSEA GU4891
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4891 001/11351 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Kent Hall
Madeleine Zelin 4 16/15