Philosophy

Departmental Office: 708 Philosophy; 212-854-3196
www.philosophy.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: David Albert, 706 Philosophy; 212-854-3519; da5@columbia.edu

Economics-Philosophy Adviser: Melissa Fusco, 717 Philosophy; 212-854-0126; mf3095@columbia.edu

Students interested in philosophy may pursue a major either in philosophy or in economics-philosophy. Because philosophy treats issues fundamental to both the sciences and the humanities, students are also welcome to combine their philosophy major with work in other fields. Before declaring a major in philosophy or economics-philosophy, and before deciding to combine philosophy with another discipline, students should meet with the director of undergraduate studies to formulate the program best for them.

Philosophy majors are given a foundation in logic and philosophical methodology, and are asked to confront fundamental questions in the main areas of philosophy: epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy, philosophy of mind and language, and history of philosophy. The department requires that all majors take at least one seminar (PHIL UN3912), designed to allow students to focus on particular philosophical issues or texts in greater depth. Outstanding seniors may also pursue their own philosophical project in a senior thesis.

Over and above the courses required of all majors, there is room for considerable flexibility. Through an appropriate choice of electives from among the department’s offerings (and from related courses in other departments), there are special opportunities for focusing more intensively on one or two subfields of philosophy, e.g., logic and the philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of science, ethics and political philosophy, or the history of philosophy. Students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies on how best to pursue such programs.

Study Abroad: Reid Hall, Paris

For information on the Columbia in Paris Program at Reid Hall, including summer courses, consult the Columbia University in Paris Bulletin (available in 606 Kent and online at the Office of Global Programs website), call 212-854-2559, or send an email to reidhall@columbia.edu. For information on applicability of Reid Hall courses to the major or concentration, consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Grading

Courses in which a grade of D has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements.

Senior Thesis

Undergraduates majoring in Philosophy or Economics-Philosophy may propose to write a senior thesis. Students who wish to write a thesis should approach a faculty member at the end of their junior or beginning of their senior year, and begin working on the proposal early in the fall semester of their senior year.  Proposals are due in early December, and will be reviewed by a committee which will include the Director of Undergraduate Studies; students will be notified of the committee’s decision within two weeks.  Students whose proposals are approved should register for their faculty advisor’s section of Supervised Independent Research for the spring term of the senior year. Theses are due in early April. 

Students who have a grade point average of 3.6 or above in the major and who complete a thesis will be placed into consideration for departmental honors, though any senior may complete a thesis regardless of their grade point average (upon approval of the proposal).

See the full policy and procedure concerning senior theses on the departmental webpage:

http://philosophy.columbia.edu/content/senior-thesis-philosophy

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors are highly competitive.  Normally no more than 10% of the majors graduating in the department each year will receive departmental honors.  

In order to qualify for departmental honors in philosophy, a student must have a grade point average of at least 3.6 in the major.  
For students with a GPA of 3.6 or above, there are two possible routes to consideration:

  1. A student may complete a senior thesis; those students who complete senior theses will automatically be considered for honors without having to be nominated.
  2. A student may be nominated by a faculty member early in the spring semester of the senior year; nominated students will be invited to submit a writing sample at least 15 pages in length.  A nominated student who is also writing a thesis may submit their thesis as the writing sample, or may choose to submit a different work.

Both the senior theses and writing samples are due in early April.  The departmental honors committee will then review the submitted material and the academic records of the writers, and will report to the full faculty.  

The full faculty will then decide which students to recommend for departmental honors to the Columbia College and General Studies administrations.  

Professors

  • David Albert
  • Akeel Bilgrami
  • Taylor Carman (Barnard)
  • Haim Gaifman
  • Lydia Goehr
  • Robert Gooding-Williams
  • Axel Honneth
  • Wolfgang Mann 
  • Christia Mercer
  • Michele Moody-Adams
  • John Morrison (Barnard)
  • Fred Neuhouser (Barnard)
  • Christopher Peacocke 
  • Carol Rovane
  • Achille Varzi
  • Katja Vogt

Associate Professors

  • Justin Clarke-Doane
  • Jessica Collins
  • Tamar Lando

Assistant Professors

  • Allison Aitken
  • Melissa Fusco
  • Dhananjay Jagannathan
  • Karen Lewis (Barnard)
  • Francey Russell (Barnard)
  •  
  •  

Affiliated Faculty

  • Souleymane Bachir Diagne (French and Romance Philology)
  • Jon Elster (Political Science)
  • Kent Greenawalt (University Professor)
  • Wayne Proudfoot (Religion)
  • Gayatri Spivak (University Professor)

Major in Philosophy

Students considering a major in philosophy are strongly encouraged to meet with the director of undergraduate studies early in their sophomore year. All majors must consult with the director of undergraduate studies each term before registering for classes in order to plan and update their individual programs of study.

Students planning to major in philosophy are advised to begin with PHIL UN1010 METHDS/PROB OF PHILOS THOUGHT. Beginning students are especially encouraged to take 2000-level courses, both in the history of philosophy and in systematic philosophy. These courses are typically less specialized and less narrowly focused than higher-numbered ones. More advanced students are encouraged to take 3000-level courses. The department requires that all majors take at least one seminar, PHIL UN3912.

No more than one course at the 1000-level can be counted toward the major. In order to enroll in one of the 4000-level courses, students must have taken at least four courses in Philosophy.

The major requires a minimum of 30 points in philosophy chosen from courses prefixed with UN or GU:

PHIL UN2101The History of Philosophy I: Presocratics to Augustine
PHIL UN2201History of Philosophy II: Aquinas to Kant
PHIL UN3411SYMBOLIC LOGIC
At least one course in either metaphysics or epistemology e.g., PHIL W3960, or a related course to be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
Select at least one course in either ethics or social and political philosophy from the following:
Contemporary Moral Problems
ETHICS
SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
A related course to be chosen in consultation with the director of undergradute studies.
PHIL UN3912SEMINAR

Concentration in Philosophy

Philosophy, as an academic discipline, has significant points of contact with a wide range of other subjects—in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. A concentration in philosophy thus can be an attractive option for many students. Those considering becoming concentrators are strongly encouraged to meet with the director of undergraduate studies early in their sophomore year, in order to discuss their specific interests and to plan their programs of study. All concentrators should consult with the director of undergraduate studies each term before registering for courses.

The concentration requires a minimum of 24 points in philosophy, chosen from courses prefixed with UN or GU. There are no specific courses required for the concentration.

Students may choose courses prefixed with GR only with the instructor’s permission. 

PHIL UN3912 is open to junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four courses in philosophy.


Major in Economics-Philosophy

Please read Guidelines for all Economics Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors in the Economics section of this Bulletin.

Economics-Philosophy is an interdisciplinary major that, while introducing students to the basic methodologies of economics and philosophy, stresses areas of particular concern to both. These include subjects such as rationality and decision making, justice and efficiency, freedom and collective choice, and the logic of empirical theories and their testing. Many of the issues are dealt with historically, and classic texts of Plato, Kant, Mill, Marx, and Smith are reviewed.

Two advisers are assigned for the interdepartmental major, one in the Department of Economics and one in the Department of Philosophy. Please note that the Economics adviser can only advise on the Economics requirements and the Philosophy adviser can only advise on the Philosophy requirements.

The Economics-Philosophy major requires a total minimum of 54 points: 25 points in Economics, 16 points in Philosophy, 6 points in Mathematics, 3 points in Statistics, and 4 points in the interdisciplinary seminar as follows:

Economics Core Courses
ECON UN1105Principles of Economics
ECON UN3211Intermediate Microeconomics
ECON UN3213Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON UN3412Introduction To Econometrics
Mathematics Sequence
Select a mathematics sequence
Statistics
Select a statistics course
Economics Electives
Three electives are required; refer to the Economics section of this bulletin.
Philosophy Courses
PHIL UN1010METHDS/PROB OF PHILOS THOUGHT
PHIL UN3411SYMBOLIC LOGIC
PHIL UN3701ETHICS (a social or political philosophy course may be substituted, please consult the Philosophy DUS)
PHIL UN3551PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
or PHIL UN3960 EPISTEMOLOGY
PHIL GU4561Probability and Decision Theory
Seminar
ECPH GU4950Economics and Philosophy Seminar (or another seminar in philosophy or economics approved by advisers in both department)

Students who declared before Spring 2014:

The requirements for this program were modified in 2014. Students who declared this program before Spring 2014 should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their options for major requirements.

Fall 2022

PHIL UN1001 Introduction to Philosophy. 3 points.

Survey of some of the central problems, key figures, and great works in both traditional and contemporary philosophy.  Topics and texts will vary with instructor and semester.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1001 001/00160 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
203 Diana Center
Christopher Prodoehl 3 35/40
PHIL 1001 002/00161 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
207 Milbank Hall
Christopher Prodoehl 3 27/40
Fall 2022: PHIL UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1001 001/00406 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
203 Diana Center
Christopher Prodoehl 3 15/15
PHIL 1001 002/00407 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
202 Milbank Hall
Christopher Prodoehl 3 19/20

PHIL UN1010 METHDS/PROB OF PHILOS THOUGHT. 3.00 points.

Critical introduction to philosophical problems, ideas and methods

Spring 2022: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/11991 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
141 Uris Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3.00 55/80
PHIL 1010 AU1/18572 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
141 Uris Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3.00 5/5
Fall 2022: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/11482 M W 7:40pm - 8:55pm
Room TBA
Justin Clarke-Doane 3.00 54/80

PHIL UN2101 The History of Philosophy I: Presocratics to Augustine. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL V2111 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Exposition and analysis of the positions of the major philosophers from the pre-Socratics through Augustine.  This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Fall 2022: PHIL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2101 001/11485 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Dhananjay Jagannathan 4 60/60

PHIL UN2110 Philosophy and Feminism. 3 points.

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a "normal" way of being "queer"? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

Fall 2022: PHIL UN2110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2110 001/11492 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Christia Mercer 3 70/70

PHIL UN2685 Introduction to Philosophy of Language. 3 points.

This course gives students an introduction to various topics in the Philosophy of Language.

Fall 2022: PHIL UN2685
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2685 001/00408 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
202 Milbank Hall
Karen Lewis 3 34/34

PHIL UN3000 BUDDHIST PHILOSOPHY. 3.00 points.

Buddhist philosophers generally agree about what doesn’t exist: an enduring, unitary, and independent self. But there is surprisingly little consensus across Buddhist traditions about what does exist and what it’s like. In this course, we will examine several Buddhist theories about the nature and structure of reality and consider the epistemological and ethical implications of these radically different pictures of the world. We will analyze and evaluate arguments from some of the most influential Indian Buddhist philosophers from the second to the eleventh centuries, including Nāgārjuna, Vasubandhu, Dignāga, Candrakīrti, Śāntarakṣita, Śāntideva, and Ratnakīrti. Topics will include the existence and nature of the external world, the mind, and the self; practical and epistemological implications of the Buddhist no-self principle; personal identity; the problem of other minds; and causal determinism and moral responsibility

Fall 2022: PHIL UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3000 001/15015 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Allison Aitken 3.00 0/20

PHIL UN3264 19th Century Philosophy: Hegel. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PHIL UN2201 or PHIL UN3251

Examines major themes of Hegel's philosophy, with emphasis on social and political thought. Topics include Hegel's critique of Kant, the possibility of metaphysics, the master-slave dialectic, and the role of freedom in a rational society. Readings from Kant’s Third Critique help explain how Hegel's project develops out of Kant's transcendental idealism. Some knowledge of Kant's moral theory and his Critique of Pure Reason is presupposed. Prerequisite: at least one of PHIL UN2201, PHIL UN2301, or PHIL UN3251.

Fall 2022: PHIL UN3264
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3264 001/00409 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
203 Diana Center
Frederick Neuhouser 3 21/30

PHIL UN3353 European Social Philosophy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one philosophy course.

A survey of Eurpoean social philosophy from the 18th to the 20th century, with special attention to theories of capitalism and the normative concepts (freedom, alienation, human flourishing) that inform them.  Also: the relationship between civil society and the state.

Fall 2022: PHIL UN3353
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3353 001/00410 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
328 Milbank Hall
Frederick Neuhouser 3 39/40

PHIL UN3411 SYMBOLIC LOGIC. 4.00 points.

Corequisites: PHILV3413 Required Discussion Section (0 points). Advanced introduction to classical sentential and predicate logic. No previous acquaintance with logic is required; nonetheless a willingness to master technicalities and to work at a certain level of abstraction is desirable

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/11998 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Achille Varzi 4.00 103/100
PHIL 3411 AU1/18574 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Achille Varzi 4.00 4/5
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/11474 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Tamar Lando 4.00 80/80

PHIL UN3551 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. 3.00 points.

Enrollment limited to 40.

Prerequisites: one philosophy course or the instructor's permission.
Philosophical problems within science and about the nature of scientific knowledge in the 17th-20th centuries. Sample problems: causation and scientific explanation; induction and real kinds; verification and falsification; models, analogies and simulations; the historical origins of the modern sciences; scientific revolutions; reductionism and supervenience; differences between physics, biology and the social sciences; the nature of life; cultural evolution; human nature; philosophical issues in cosmology

Fall 2022: PHIL UN3551
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3551 001/11493 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
716 Philosophy Hall
David Albert 3.00 24/35

PHIL UN3601 Metaphysics. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL V3611 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Systematic treatment of some major topics in metaphysics (e.g. modality, causation, identity through time, particulars and universals). Readings from contemporary authors.

Fall 2022: PHIL UN3601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3601 001/11487 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Achille Varzi 4 75/75

PHIL UN3701 ETHICS. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.
Corequisites: PHIL V3711 Required Discussion Section (0 points).
Prerequisites: one course in philosophy. Corequisites: PHIL V3711 Required Discussion Section (0 points). This course is mainly an introduction to three influential approaches to normative ethics: utilitarianism, deontological views, and virtue ethics. We also consider the ethics of care, and selected topics in meta-ethics

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/12024 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
414 Pupin Laboratories
Michele Moody-Adams 4.00 35/35
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/11477 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Carol Rovane 4.00 46/50

PHIL UN3751 SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. 3.00 points.

Six major concepts of political philosophy including authority, rights, equality, justice, liberty and democracy are examined in three different ways. First the conceptual issues are analyzed through contemporary essays on these topics by authors like Peters, Hart, Williams, Berlin, Rawls and Schumpeter. Second the classical sources on these topics are discussed through readings from Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Marx, Plato, Mill and Rousseau. Third some attention is paid to relevant contexts of application of these concepts in political society, including such political movements as anarchism, international human rights, conservative, liberal, and Marxist economic policies as well as competing models of democracy

Fall 2022: PHIL UN3751
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3751 001/11484 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
716 Philosophy Hall
Axel Honneth 3.00 35/35

PHIL UN3756 Critical Philosophy of Race: What is Race?. 3 points.

This course is a philosophical examination of the meaning and significance of the concept of race. The course will chiefly aim to answer: What do we mean by the term “race”? And why is it often tied to the existence of racism?  From where does the concept come? And what role did “race” play in the philosophical thought and the culture of Western modernity? Among the questions that can be asked are, How do concepts of race contribute to the formation and justification of various economic, political, and social institutions and practices, such as slavery, colonialism, and segregation? However, we will also inquire at the end of the course whether “race” is always a destructive concept, or whether it can be re-defined as part of a liberation project centered on racial identity: the appreciation and celebration of racial difference and solidarity.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3756
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3756 001/12029 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
602 Hamilton Hall
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 28/80
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3756
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3756 001/11491 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 16/35

PHIL UN3863 HAPPINESS AND WELL-BEING. 3.00 points.

“What is it to be happy?” Philosophers have passionately debated this question from antiquity until now. Especially in times when happiness seems difficult to find, we naturally want to know what happiness is and how best to secure it. In this course, we will consider happiness in relation to well-being, examining four major theories of well-being (hedonism, desire-fulfillment theories, objective list theories, and eudaimonism/perfectionism). We will gain a nuanced understanding of each view by juxtaposing their ancient and modern advocates and opponents

Fall 2022: PHIL UN3863
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3863 001/13034 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Anthony Marsh 3.00 15/15

PHIL UN3912 SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

Required of senior majors, but also open to junior majors, and junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four philosophy courses. This exploration will typically involve writing a substantial research paper. Capped at 20 students with preference to philosophy majors

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 003/00165 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Ll018 Milstein Center
Francey Russell 3.00 11/20
PHIL 3912 004/13770 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Jessica Collins 3.00 8/20
PHIL 3912 005/13768 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Allison Aitken 3.00 15/20
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 008/11510 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Melissa Fusco 3.00 10/20
PHIL 3912 020/13957 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Katja Vogt 3.00 17/20

PHIL UN3960 EPISTEMOLOGY. 4.00 points.

Corequisites: PHIL UN3963
Corequisites: PHIL W3963 Required Discussion Section (0 points). What can we know? What is knowledge? What are the different kinds of knowledge? We will read classic and contemporary texts for insight into these questions

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3960 001/12036 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
413 Kent Hall
Justin Clarke-Doane 4.00 45/80
PHIL 3960 AU1/18577 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
413 Kent Hall
Justin Clarke-Doane 4.00 1/5
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3960 001/11473 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Jessica Collins 4.00 20/50

PHIL UN3996 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

PHIL UN3997 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/15239  
Allison Aitken 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 002/15240  
David Albert 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 003/15245  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 004/15244  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 005/15246  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 006/15247  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 007/15248  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 008/15249  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 009/15251  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 010/15269  
Axel Honneth 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 011/15274  
Jenann Ismael 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 012/15360  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 013/15361  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 014/15363  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 015/15365  
Christia Mercer 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 016/15367  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 017/15368  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 018/15369  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 019/15370  
Achille Varzi 3 4/5
PHIL 3997 020/15371  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 021/00744  
Taylor Carman 3 0/10
PHIL 3997 022/00719  
Karen Lewis 3 1/10
PHIL 3997 025/00745  
Francey Russell 3 1/10
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/13036  
Allison Aitken 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 002/13038  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 003/13039  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 004/13040  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 005/13042  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 006/13044  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 007/13045  
Axel Honneth 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 008/13046  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 009/13047  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 010/13048  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 011/13049  
Christia Mercer 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 012/13050  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 013/13055  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 014/13056  
Achille Varzi 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 015/13057  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 016/13058  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 017/13037  
David Albert 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 018/13043  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5

PHIL GU4424 Modal Logic. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Fall 2022: PHIL GU4424
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4424 001/11481 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Tamar Lando 3 28/40

PHIL GU4471 Philosophy of Mathematics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2021-22 academic year.

Prerequisites: mathematical background, or familiarity with formal reasoning. The instructor's permission in borderline cases is required.

Topics: Mathematical reasoning and intuition, as illustrated in simple problem solving and historical examples. The source of mathematical validity. Views of mathematics of some major philosophers: Kant, Mill, Frege Russell, Wittgenstein. Realism and Constructivism. Hilbert's program. Mathematics as a formal deductive activity. Formal systems and the significance of Gödel's incompleteness results. Some more recent debates in the philosophy of mathematics.

Fall 2022: PHIL GU4471
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4471 001/11496 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Haim Gaifman, Justin Clarke-Doane 3 16/40

PHIL GU4495 Perception. 3 points.

This course addresses the fabulously rich range of issues about the nature of perception, including: perceptual mental representation and its content; computational explanation; justifying beliefs; knowledge and thought about perception; and perception of music. Perception is an interdisciplinary subject par excellence. Readings will be drawn from philosophy and psychology, aesthetics, and artificial intelligence.

Fall 2022: PHIL GU4495
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4495 001/11509 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Christopher Peacocke 3 17/40

PHIL GU4561 Probability and Decision Theory. 3 points.

Examines interpretations and applications of the calculus of probability including applications as a measure of degree of belief, degree of confirmation, relative frequency, a theoretical property of systems, and other notions of objective probability or chance. Attention to epistimological questions such as Hume's problem of induction, Goodman's problem of projectibility, and the paradox of confirmation.

Fall 2022: PHIL GU4561
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4561 001/11511 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Haim Gaifman 3 25/40

PHIL GU4602 PHILOSOPHICAL TEXTS IN GREEK. 3.00 points.

Careful reading and translation of a major philosophical text in ancient Greek to be chosen by the course participants in consultation with the instructor. Special attention is to be paid to the linguistic and conceptual problems of translating ancient Greek philosophical texts. Prerequisite: equivalent of at least two years of study of ancient Greek at university level

Fall 2022: PHIL GU4602
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4602 001/11506 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Wolfgang Mann 3.00 0/40

PHIL GU4675 The Direction of Time. 3 points.

A survey of the various attempts to reconcile the macroscopic directionality of time with the time-reversibility of the fundamental laws of physics. The second law of thermodynamics and the concept of entropy, statistical mechanics, cosmological problems, the problems of memory, the possibility of multiple time direction.

Fall 2022: PHIL GU4675
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4675 001/11476 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
David Albert 3 11/40

Spring 2022

PHIL UN1010 METHDS/PROB OF PHILOS THOUGHT. 3.00 points.

Critical introduction to philosophical problems, ideas and methods

Spring 2022: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/11991 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
141 Uris Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3.00 55/80
PHIL 1010 AU1/18572 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
141 Uris Hall
Akeel Bilgrami 3.00 5/5
Fall 2022: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/11482 M W 7:40pm - 8:55pm
Room TBA
Justin Clarke-Doane 3.00 54/80

PHIL UN2201 History of Philosophy II: Aquinas to Kant. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PHIL UN2211 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

PHIL UN2101 is not a prerequisite for this course. Exposition and analysis of the metaphysics, epistemology, and natural philosophy of the major philosophers from Aquinas through Kant. Authors include Aquinas, Galileo, Gassendi, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.  This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2201 001/11992 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
B60 Alfred Lerner Hall
Christina Van Dyke 4 76/80

PHIL UN2301 History of Philosophy III: Kant to Nietzsche. 4 points.

Prerequisites: None.

Exposition and analysis of major texts and figures in European philosophy since Kant. Authors include Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Required discussion section (PHIL UN2311).  Attendance in the first week of classes is mandatory.  

Spring 2022: PHIL UN2301
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2301 001/00163 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
405 Milbank Hall
Frederick Neuhouser 4 25/50

PHIL UN3131 ARISTOTLE. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: One philosophy course or permission of the instructor.

Introduction to Aristotle's philosophy through analysis of selected texts.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3131
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3131 001/11994 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3.00 38/80
PHIL 3131 AU1/18573 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3.00 5/5

PHIL UN3351 Phenomenology and Existentialism. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Two prior philosophy courses. Enrollment limited to 30.

Survey of selected works of Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. Topics include intentionality, consciousness and self-consciousness, phenomenological and hermeneutical method, the question of being, authenticity and inauthenticiy, bad faith, death, and the role of the body in perception.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3351
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3351 001/00164 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
323 Milbank Hall
Taylor Carman 3 21/40

PHIL UN3411 SYMBOLIC LOGIC. 4.00 points.

Corequisites: PHILV3413 Required Discussion Section (0 points). Advanced introduction to classical sentential and predicate logic. No previous acquaintance with logic is required; nonetheless a willingness to master technicalities and to work at a certain level of abstraction is desirable

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/11998 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Achille Varzi 4.00 103/100
PHIL 3411 AU1/18574 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Achille Varzi 4.00 4/5
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/11474 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Tamar Lando 4.00 80/80

PHIL UN3576 Physics and Philosophy. 3 points.

Philosophical problems at the foundations of quantum theory, especially those having to do with the uncertainty of relations and nature of quantum mechanical indeterminacy. Exploration of a variety of interpretation and hidden variable theory.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3576
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3576 001/12013 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
627 Seeley W. Mudd Building
David Albert 3 25/80

PHIL UN3685 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE. 3.00 points.

This course is a survey of analytic philosophy of language. It addresses central issues about the nature of meaning, including: sense and reference, speech acts, pragmatics, and the relationship between meaning and use, meaning and context, and meaning and truth

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3685
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3685 001/12019 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
214 Pupin Laboratories
Melissa Fusco 3.00 25/80
PHIL 3685 AU1/18575 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
214 Pupin Laboratories
Melissa Fusco 3.00 6/7

PHIL UN3701 ETHICS. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.
Corequisites: PHIL V3711 Required Discussion Section (0 points).
Prerequisites: one course in philosophy. Corequisites: PHIL V3711 Required Discussion Section (0 points). This course is mainly an introduction to three influential approaches to normative ethics: utilitarianism, deontological views, and virtue ethics. We also consider the ethics of care, and selected topics in meta-ethics

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/12024 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
414 Pupin Laboratories
Michele Moody-Adams 4.00 35/35
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/11477 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Carol Rovane 4.00 46/50

PHIL UN3870 PHILOSOPHY AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. 3.00 points.

Artificial intelligence (AI) promises—or threatens—to transform every area of our lives and societies. It has already begun to upend our understanding of human nature, radically alter our social institutions, and revolutionize scientific practice. And in some circles, there is increasing concern that AI is developing intelligence to rival our own. This course will explore these issues through the philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and ethics. We will ask whether AI systems could have minds like ours, whether they could be conscious, whether they might eventually deserve moral consideration, and how we can use them fairly in our current societies

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3870
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3870 001/14710 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Andrew Richmond 3.00 15/15

PHIL UN3912 SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

Required of senior majors, but also open to junior majors, and junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four philosophy courses. This exploration will typically involve writing a substantial research paper. Capped at 20 students with preference to philosophy majors

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 003/00165 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Ll018 Milstein Center
Francey Russell 3.00 11/20
PHIL 3912 004/13770 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Jessica Collins 3.00 8/20
PHIL 3912 005/13768 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Allison Aitken 3.00 15/20
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 008/11510 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Melissa Fusco 3.00 10/20
PHIL 3912 020/13957 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Katja Vogt 3.00 17/20

PHIL UN3756 Critical Philosophy of Race: What is Race?. 3 points.

This course is a philosophical examination of the meaning and significance of the concept of race. The course will chiefly aim to answer: What do we mean by the term “race”? And why is it often tied to the existence of racism?  From where does the concept come? And what role did “race” play in the philosophical thought and the culture of Western modernity? Among the questions that can be asked are, How do concepts of race contribute to the formation and justification of various economic, political, and social institutions and practices, such as slavery, colonialism, and segregation? However, we will also inquire at the end of the course whether “race” is always a destructive concept, or whether it can be re-defined as part of a liberation project centered on racial identity: the appreciation and celebration of racial difference and solidarity.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3756
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3756 001/12029 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
602 Hamilton Hall
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 28/80
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3756
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3756 001/11491 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 16/35

PHIL UN3800 THE PHILOSOPHY OF LAW. 3.00 points.

In his Theses on Feuerbach, Karl Marx writes, “Philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways; the point is to change it.” The questions to ask in response to Marx’s exhortation include: how do we recognize the need for change and appropriately effect it? What are the relations between our goals and the means to them? How can we better understand our goals to make the means more suitable? When we organize to produce results, what are we doing? Do we know exactly who and what we want to change? What are the “ethics of process”? What exactly do we do when we organize? A tentative definition: to organize is to bring together individuals who have common interests in a way that will enhance their power. What kind of power is this? What other forms of power are there? What is the best form of coordinating among individuals? If we better understand the dynamics of organizing, should we reconceive our goals accordingly? How do we better tap into shared values and concerns? What temptations and distractions get in the way of our goals? What problems prevent us from achieving them? Do we have goals that can be achieved? If not, how can we revise them?

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3800
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3800 001/13763 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
602 Northwest Corner
Christia Mercer 3.00 18/20

PHIL UN3852 PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE. 3.00 points.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3852
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3852 001/12034 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
413 Kent Hall
Lydia Goehr 3.00 47/80
PHIL 3852 AU1/18576 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
413 Kent Hall
Lydia Goehr 3.00 8/8

PHIL UN3960 EPISTEMOLOGY. 4.00 points.

Corequisites: PHIL UN3963
Corequisites: PHIL W3963 Required Discussion Section (0 points). What can we know? What is knowledge? What are the different kinds of knowledge? We will read classic and contemporary texts for insight into these questions

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3960 001/12036 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
413 Kent Hall
Justin Clarke-Doane 4.00 45/80
PHIL 3960 AU1/18577 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
413 Kent Hall
Justin Clarke-Doane 4.00 1/5
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3960 001/11473 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Jessica Collins 4.00 20/50

PHIL GU4140 Hellenistic Philosophy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2021-22 academic year.

Ancient scepticism, and ancient debates between sceptics and non-sceptical philosophers. Topics include: belief, criteria of truth, proof, concepts, Stoic theory of cognitive impressions, Epicurean claim "all sense-perceptions are true," appearances, belief and action, belief and language.

Spring 2022: PHIL GU4140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4140 001/12359 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
B60 Alfred Lerner Hall
Katja Vogt 3 31/75

PHIL GU4250 ROUSSEAU. 3.00 points.

Spring 2022: PHIL GU4250
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4250 001/00166 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
501 Diana Center
Frederick Neuhouser 3.00 23/40

PHIL GU4900 Topics in Early Modern Philosophy. 3 points.

Open to undergraduates with previous work in the history of philosophy and to graduate students. Focuses either on an important topic in the history of early modern philosophy (e.g., skepticism, causation, mind, body) or on the philosophy of a major figure in the period (e.g., Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Gassendi, Conway). 

Spring 2022: PHIL GU4900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4900 001/12361 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Christia Mercer 3 10/40

PHIL UN3997 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/15239  
Allison Aitken 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 002/15240  
David Albert 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 003/15245  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 004/15244  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 005/15246  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 006/15247  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 007/15248  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 008/15249  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 009/15251  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 010/15269  
Axel Honneth 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 011/15274  
Jenann Ismael 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 012/15360  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 013/15361  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 014/15363  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 015/15365  
Christia Mercer 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 016/15367  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 017/15368  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 018/15369  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 019/15370  
Achille Varzi 3 4/5
PHIL 3997 020/15371  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 021/00744  
Taylor Carman 3 0/10
PHIL 3997 022/00719  
Karen Lewis 3 1/10
PHIL 3997 025/00745  
Francey Russell 3 1/10
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/13036  
Allison Aitken 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 002/13038  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 003/13039  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 004/13040  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 005/13042  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 006/13044  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 007/13045  
Axel Honneth 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 008/13046  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 009/13047  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 010/13048  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 011/13049  
Christia Mercer 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 012/13050  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 013/13055  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 014/13056  
Achille Varzi 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 015/13057  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 016/13058  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 017/13037  
David Albert 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 018/13043  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5

PHIL UN3998 Supervised Individual Research. 3 points.

Spring 2022: PHIL UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3998 001/15503  
Allison Aitken 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 002/15504  
David Albert 3 1/5
PHIL 3998 003/15505  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 004/15506  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 005/15507  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 006/15508  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 007/15509  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 008/15511  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 009/15512  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 010/15513  
Axel Honneth 3 1/5
PHIL 3998 011/15515  
Jenann Ismael 3 1/5
PHIL 3998 012/15516  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 013/15517  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 014/15586  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 015/15588  
Christia Mercer 3 1/5
PHIL 3998 016/15589  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 017/15591  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 018/15592  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 019/15594  
Achille Varzi 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 020/15595  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 021/00746  
Taylor Carman 3 0/10
PHIL 3998 022/00720  
Karen Lewis 3 0/10
PHIL 3998 025/00747  
Francey Russell 3 0/10
Fall 2022: PHIL UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3998 001/13059  
Allison Aitken 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 003/13062  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 004/13063  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 005/13064  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 006/13065  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 007/13066  
Axel Honneth 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 008/13067  
Dhananjay Jagannathan 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 009/13068  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 010/13069  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 011/13070  
Christia Mercer 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 012/13080  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 013/13081  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 014/13082  
Achille Varzi 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 015/13083  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 016/13084  
David Albert 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 017/13085  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5

ECPH GU4950 Economics and Philosophy Seminar. 4 points.

Open only to economics-philosophy majors who are in their senior year.

Prerequisites: ECON W3211, ECON W3213, ECON W3412. Students will be contacted by the Economics department for pre-enrollment.

Explores topics in the philosophy of economics such as welfare, social choice, and the history of political economy. Sometimes the emphasis is primarily historical and someimes on analysis of contemporary economic concepts and theories.

Spring 2022: ECPH GU4950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECPH 4950 001/12636 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
716 Philosophy Hall
Melissa Fusco 4 13/40