Germanic Languages

Departmental Office: 414 Hamilton; 212-854-3202
https://germanic.columbia.edu/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Stefan Andriopoulos, 418 Hamilton; 212-854-7802; sa610@columbia.edu

Language Instruction: Jutta Schmiers-Heller, 403A Hamilton; 212-854-4824; js2331@columbia.edu

The Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures is considered one of the very best in the country. Many of the faculty specialize in the study of German literature and culture from 1700 to the present. German majors acquire proficiency in examining literary, philosophical, and historical texts in the original, as well as critical understanding of modern German culture and society. Particular attention is given to German-speaking traditions within larger European and global contexts. Courses taught in translation build on Columbia’s Core Curriculum, thereby allowing students to enroll in upper-level seminars before completing the language requirement.

All classes are taught as part of a living culture. Students have ample opportunities to study abroad, to work with visiting scholars, and to take part in the cultural programs at Deutsches Haus. In addition, the department encourages internships with German firms, museums, and government offices. This hands-on experience immerses students in both language and culture, preparing them for graduate study and professional careers.

Upon graduation, German majors compete successfully for Fulbright or DAAD scholarships for research in Germany or Austria beyond the B.A. degree. Our graduating seniors are highly qualified to pursue graduate studies in the humanities and social sciences, as well as professional careers. Former majors and concentrators have gone on to careers in teaching, law, journalism, banking and consulting, international affairs, and communications.

German literature and culture courses are taught as seminars integrating philosophical and social questions. Topics include romanticism, revolution, and national identity; German intellectual history; minority literatures; Weimar cinema; German-Jewish culture and modernity; the Holocaust and memory; and the history and culture of Berlin. Classes are small, with enrollment ranging from 5 to 15 students.

The department regularly offers courses in German literature and culture in English for students who do not study the German language. The department also participates in Columbia’s excellent program in comparative literature and society.

Advanced Placement

The department grants 3 credits for a score of 5 on the AP German Language exam, which satisfies the foreign language requirement. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of a 3000-level (or higher) course with a grade of B or higher. This course must be for at least 3 points of credit and be taught in German. Courses taught in English may not be used for language AP credit. The department grants 0 credits for a score of 4 on the AP German Language exam, but the foreign language requirement is satisfied.

The Yiddish Studies Program

The Yiddish Studies Program at Columbia University, the global leader in Yiddish scholarship and teaching, focuses on the experiences and cultural efflorescence of Ashkenazic Jewry over a thousand years and five continents. It is a perfect exemplar of Columbia’s interests in global and transnational study, weaving together language, literature, and culture in a way that echoes the best of Columbia’s justly famed humanities programs.

The program in Yiddish studies offers both the undergraduate Major and Concentration, in addition to graduate studies leading to the Ph.D. In both the undergraduate and graduate program, emphasis is placed not merely on acquiring linguistic proficiency and textual study, but also viewing Yiddish literature in a larger cultural and interdisciplinary context. The graduate program, the only degree-granting Yiddish Studies Program in the United States, is considered one of the world’s most important, with its graduates holding many of the major university positions in the field.

Students of Yiddish have ample opportunities to enhance their studies through a number of fellowships. The Naomi Fellowship, a fully-subsidized Yiddish Study Abroad program allows students to explore Yiddish culture and history in Israel and Poland. The Irene Kronhill Pletka YIVO Fellowship enables students to expand on their archival research skills in New York. Upon graduation, our majors compete successfully for Fulbright and other prestigious scholarships, and are highly qualified to pursue careers in humanities, social sciences, as well as artistic and professional careers.

Students work with faculty in Germanic languages, Jewish studies, history, and Slavic studies to broaden their understanding of the literature, language, and culture of Eastern European Jewry. The Yiddish Studies Program is also closely affiliated with the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies, which offers diverse programming and other fellowship opportunities. Classes are small, and instruction is individualized and carefully directed to ensure that students gain both a thorough general grounding and are able to pursue their own particular interests in a wide-spanning field. The program also offers classes taught in translation for students who do not study Yiddish. The Yiddish programming, such as lectures, monthly conversation hours, Meet a Yiddish Celebrity series, as well as the activities of the Yiddish Club of Columbia’s Barnard/Hillel allows students to explore Yiddish culture outside the classroom.

The German Language Placement Exam

The German Language Placement exam is offered periodically to those students who already speak the language, in order to determine to determine their proficiency level (A, B or C). For more information, and for the latest exam dates, please click here

The German Language Program

First- and second-year German language courses emphasize spoken and written communication, and provide a basic introduction to German culture. Goals include mastery of the structure of the language and enough cultural understanding to interact comfortably with native speakers.

After successfully completing the elementary German sequence, GERM UN1101 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I-GERM UN1102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II, students are able to provide information about themselves, their interests, and daily activities. They can participate in simple conversations, read edited texts, and understand the main ideas of authentic texts. By the end of GERM UN1102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II, students are able to write descriptions, comparisons, and creative stories, and to discuss general information about the German-speaking countries.

The intermediate German sequence, GERM UN2101 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I-GERM UN2102 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II, increases the emphasis on reading and written communication skills, expands grammatical mastery, and focuses on German culture and literary texts. Students read short stories, a German drama, and increasingly complex texts. Regular exposure to video, recordings, the World Wide Web, and art exhibits heightens the cultural dimensions of the third and fourth semesters. Students create portfolios comprised of written and spoken work.

Upon completion of the second-year sequence, students are prepared to enter advanced courses in German language, culture, and literature at Columbia and/or at the Berlin Consortium for German Studies in Berlin. Advanced-level courses focus on more sophisticated use of the language structure and composition (GERM UN3001 ADVANCED GERMAN I-GERM UN3002 ADVANCED GERMAN II ); on specific cultural areas; and on literary, historical, and philosophical areas in literature-oriented courses (GERM UN3333 INTRO TO GERMAN LIT (GERMAN)).

In Fulfillment of the Language Requirement in German

Students beginning the study of German at Columbia must take four terms of the following two-year sequence:

GERM UN1101ELEMENTARY GERMAN I
GERM UN1102ELEMENTARY GERMAN II
GERM UN2101INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
GERM UN2102INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

Entering students are placed, or exempted, on the basis of their College Board Achievement or Advanced Placement scores, or their scores on the placement test administered by the departmental language director. Students who need to take GERM UN1101 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I-GERM UN1102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II may take GERM UN1125 Accelerated Elementary German I & II as preparation for GERM UN2101 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I.

University Study in Berlin

The Berlin Consortium for German Studies provides students with a study abroad program, administered by Columbia, which includes students from the other consortium member schools (Princeton, Yale, University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins, and the University of Chicago). Under the guidance of a senior faculty member, the program offers a home stay with a German family, intensive language instruction, and study in regular German university courses at the Freie Universität Berlin.

For additional information on the Berlin Consortium, see the Study Abroad—Sponsored Programs section in this Bulletin, visit the Center for Undergraduate Global Engagement, or consult the program's office in 606 Kent Hall; 212-854-2559; berlin@columbia.edu.

Deutsches Haus

Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th Street, provides a center for German cultural activities on the Columbia campus. It sponsors lectures, film series, and informal gatherings that enrich the academic programs of the department. Frequent events throughout the fall and spring terms offer students opportunities to practice their language skills.

Grading

Courses in which a grade of D has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements.

Departmental Honors

Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year. For the requirements for departmental honors, see the director of undergraduate studies.


Professors

  • Mark Anderson 
  • Stefan Andriopoulos 
  • Claudia Breger (Chair)
  • Jeremy Dauber 
  • Andreas Huyssen (emeritus)
  • Harro Müller (emeritus)
  • Dorothea von Mücke 
  • Annie Pfeifer (on leave, AY2023-2024)
  • Oliver Simons 

Senior Lecturers

  • Wijnie de Groot (Dutch)
  • Agnieszka Legutko (Yiddish)
  • Jutta Schmiers-Heller (German)

Lecturers

  • Evan Parks (German)
  • Julia Perrin (German)
  • Simona Vaidean (German)

Major in German Literature and Cultural History

The goal of the major is to provide students with reasonable proficiency in reading a variety of literary, philosophical, and historical texts in the original and, through this training, to facilitate a critical understanding of modern German-speaking cultures and societies. Students should plan their program of study with the director of undergraduate studies as early as possible. Competence in a second foreign language is strongly recommended, especially for those students planning to attend graduate school.

The major in German literature and cultural history requires a minimum of 30 points, distributed as follows:

GERM UN3001ADVANCED GERMAN I (can be waived and replaced by another 3000 level class upon consultation with the DUS)
or GERM UN3002 ADVANCED GERMAN II
GERM UN3333INTRO TO GERMAN LIT (GERMAN)
Select two of the following survey courses in German literature and culture (at least one of these must focus on pre–20th-century cultural history):
Literature in the 18th and 19th Centuries
SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT:19C (GER)
SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT:20C (GER)
German Literature After 1945 [In German]
One course in German intellectual history
GERM UN3991Advanced Topics in German Literature
The remaining courses to be chosen from the 3000- or 4000-level offerings in German and Comparative Literature–German in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Senior Thesis

A senior thesis is not required for the major. Students interested in a senior thesis or research project may do so through independent study with a faculty member over one or two semesters.


Major in Yiddish Studies

The program is designed as a combination of language and content courses. First- and second-year Yiddish language courses emphasize spoken and written communication, and provide a basic introduction to Eastern European Jewish culture. Goals include mastery of the structure of the language and enough cultural understanding to interact comfortably with native speakers.

After second-year Yiddish language courses are completed, students should feel sufficiently comfortable to begin to work with Yiddish literature in the original. Upper-level undergraduate/graduate courses are designed to accommodate students with a range of Yiddish language experience, and intensive language summer study abroad, such as the Naomi Prawer Kadar International Yiddish Summer Program (the Yiddish Studies program at Columbia offers the fully-subsidized Naomi Fellowship for students of Yiddish), or other academic summer programs, is also encouraged for improvement in language acquisition and comprehension.

The goal is to provide students with reasonable proficiency in reading a variety of literary, philosophical, and historical texts in the original and, through this training, to provide them with a critical understanding of Yiddish-speaking culture and society.

The second pillar of the Yiddish program is an intimate exposure to the literature and culture of the Yiddish-speaking Jewry. That exposure is achieved through several courses in Yiddish literature, which, although they may cover a variety of subjects or proceed from a number of methodological and disciplinary orientations, share a rigorous commitment to analyzing and experiencing that literature within an overarching historical and cultural framework.

These courses in Yiddish literature, culture and Jewish history will provide students with a solid interdisciplinary foundation in Yiddish studies. Inevitably and necessary, these courses, whether taught in Yiddish, English, or in a combination of the Yiddish text and English language instruction – cover the sweep of Yiddish literary history from the early modern period to today.

Students should plan their program of study with the director of undergraduate studies as early as possible. There is a prerequisite of two years of Yiddish, or equivalent to be demonstrated through testing.

The Major in Yiddish Studies requires a minimum of 30 points, distributed as follows:

  1. Two courses of advanced language study (6 points); YIDD UN3101, YIDD UN3102
  2. Three courses in Yiddish literature (9 points); e.g. YIDD UN3500, YIDD GU4420
  3. At least one course related to a senior thesis (3 points);
  4. Four related courses, at least one of which is in medieval or modern Jewish history (12 points); e.g. HIST UN4604, YIDD GU4113.

A senior thesis is required for the Major in Yiddish Studies. Students interested in a senior thesis or research project may do so through independent study with a faculty member over one or two semesters. Students must conduct original research, some of which must take place in the Yiddish language, and are required to submit a culminating paper, of no less that 35 pages.

Elective courses: Elective courses can be taken at Columbia as well as at affiliated institutions such as the Jewish Theological Seminary, Barnard College, New York University, etc. Columbia’s arrangements with the joint degree appointing program at JTS, i.e. JTS and GS Joint program with List College, offers students exposure to a wide variety of courses on Yiddish and Yiddish-related topics taught by experts in the field of Yiddish and comparative Jewish literature such as Profs. David Roskies and Barbara Mann.

Thanks to the consortial arrangements with other universities in the New York area (Barnard, NYU, Yale, Penn, etc.) students both in Columbia College and General Studies, can take courses at these institutions for degree credit, which allows for student exposure to experts in twentieth-century Soviet Yiddish literature, Yiddish women’s writing, Yiddish literature in Israel, and much more (Profs. Gennady Estraikh, Kathryn Hellerstein , and Hannan Hever). These arrangements allow students to have, if they so choose, an even broader intellectual experience than the already broad interdisciplinary opportunities available to them via the courses offered by the faculty on the Interdisciplinary Committee on Yiddish at Columbia.

Language courses need to be taken at Columbia.

Honors options: Departmental Honors in Yiddish Studies can be granted to a total of 10% of the students graduating with the Major in Yiddish Studies in a given year across both Columbia College and General Studies.


Concentration in German Literature and Cultural History

The concentration in German literature and cultural history requires a minimum of 21 points in German courses.

GERM UN3333INTRO TO GERMAN LIT (GERMAN)
At least one of the period survey courses in German literature and culture
Literature in the 18th and 19th Centuries
SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT:19C (GER)
SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT:20C (GER)
German Literature After 1945 [In German]
GERM UN3991Advanced Topics in German Literature
The remaining courses to be chosen from the 3000- or 4000-level offerings in German and Comparative Literature in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies

Concentration in Yiddish Studies

The concentration in Yiddish studies requires a minimum of 21 points, distributed as follows:

  1. Two courses of advanced language study (6 points); YIDD UN3101, YIDD UN3102
  2. Two courses in Yiddish literature (6 points); e.g. YIDD UN3500, YIDD GU4420
  3. Three related courses, at least one of which is in medieval or modern Jewish history (9 points); e.g. HIST UN4604, YIDD GU4113.

Special Concentration in German for Columbia College and School of General Studies Students in STEM fields

The special concentration in German requires a minimum of 15 points.

GERM UN3333INTRO TO GERMAN LIT (GERMAN)
At least one of the period survey courses in German Literature and Culture
Literature in the 18th and 19th Centuries
SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT:19C (GER)
SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT:20C (GER)
German Literature After 1945 [In German]
GERM UN3991Advanced Topics in German Literature
Two courses to be chosen from the 3000- or 4000-level (taught in German or English) offerings in German and Comparative Literature German in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies

Comparative Literature-German

CLGR UN3212 Postwar Modernism: Literature & Thought. 3.00 points.

This course will examine how postwar European authors grapple with the inadequacies of language in the wake of unspeakable violence. We will explore how postwar experimentation intensifies modernist innovations that were already underway, and the ways in which these texts perhaps reflect an unprecedented historical breach. The postwar period sees a number of philosophers who champion the ambiguity of literature as socially or morally salutary, and write in an increasingly expressive prose. Yet many literary works thematize their own limits and begin to adopt philosophical and political terminology. Why and how do the boundaries that typically distinguish literary genre, and literature and thought, break down at this particular point in the 20th century? How does art--and the reformulation of language and genre--play a role in healing, mourning, or changing society in the aftermath of mass death? An analogous question will be: how do these texts, written amid European crises of roughly a century ago, speak to us in our contemporary moment of crisis and upheaval? Readings will include works by Koeppen, Brecht, Beckett, Heidegger, Adorno, Ausländer, Celan, Bachmann, and Domin

Fall 2023: CLGR UN3212
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLGR 3212 001/11689 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Evan Parks 3.00 13/25

CLGR GU4241 Literature and Money. 3.00 points.

Money in its multiple forms has received renewed attention in recent decades, especially since the financial crises in 2008 and the emergence of new cryptocurrencies. Money has been described as a means of exchange, a store of value, a measure of debt, a commodity, a social institution, or a tool in the formation of identity. In all of these instances, money fuses economic purposes with social and cultural practices. Exploring the intersections between economics and aesthetics, this course will juxtapose some of the most influential theories of money from Adam Smith to the present with contemporaneous literary texts that reflect on various aspects of money in their poetics on a thematic or formal level. Literary texts include Shakespeare, Goethe, Balzac, Zola, Thomas Mann, and Martin Amis

Fall 2023: CLGR GU4241
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLGR 4241 001/13235 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Oliver Simons 3.00 16/25

Comparative Literature-Yiddish

CLYD UN3500 READINGS IN JEWISH LITERATURE: American Jewish Literature: A survey. 3.00 points.

This year has been designated the three hundred and fiftieth anniversary of Jewish life in America. In examining the work of some of the greatest Jewish writers to live in America – writers in English, Hebrew, and Yiddish, some well known, some less so – this course hopes to answer several related questions. How are the changing fortunes of American Jews reflected in their literary creativity? How does Jewish multilingualism – not only seen in different works, but within the same work – affect modes and styles of Jewish writing? And, perhaps most importantly, how does one define American Jewish writing in an age of increasingly complex affiliations and identifications among American Jews?

Fall 2023: CLYD UN3500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLYD 3500 001/11056 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
308a Lewisohn Hall
Jeremy Dauber 3.00 15/25

CLYD GU4250 Memory and Trauma in Yiddish Literature (in English). 3 points.

Trauma has become a defining aspect of the modern Jewish experience, while the recently emerged memory studies shed a new light on how we remember the past, and understand memory. As Cathy Caruth observes in Trauma: Explorations of Memory (1995), “The traumatized, we might say, carry an impossible history within them, or they become themselves the symptom of a history that they cannot entirely possess.” This course examines how memory, especially memory of trauma, is explored in Yiddish literature, film, and beyond. It focuses predominantly on the works relating to the Holocaust and its impact on the first, second, and third generations, but it also engages with other kinds of memory and other kinds of trauma (pogroms, Chmielnitsky massacres, loss, death, etc.). It approaches the questions of memory and trauma from the perspective of gender, body, and identity, as well as postmemory. The course aims for students to discuss and critically engage with the works listed on the syllabus, in order to develop the skills of analytical, and abstract thinking, as well as the ability to express that critical thinking in writing. Texts will be
offered in English translation, no knowledge of Yiddish required.

Fall 2023: CLYD GU4250
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLYD 4250 001/11057 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Agnieszka Legutko 3 10/25

Dutch

DTCH UN1101 ELEMENTARY DUTCH I. 4.00 points.

Fundamentals of grammar, reading, speaking, and comprehension of the spoken language. During the spring term supplementary reading is selected according to students' needs

Fall 2023: DTCH UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DTCH 1101 001/11119 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Wijnie de Groot 4.00 18/18
DTCH 1101 002/11304 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
352c International Affairs Bldg
Pieter Lauwaert 4.00 17/12

DTCH UN1102 ELEMENTARY DUTCH II. 4.00 points.

Fundamentals of grammar, reading, speaking, and comprehension of the spoken language. During the spring term supplementary reading is selected according to students needs

Spring 2024: DTCH UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DTCH 1102 001/13599 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Wijnie de Groot 4.00 18/18
DTCH 1102 002/13600 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
352c International Affairs Bldg
Pieter Lauwaert 4.00 9/15

DTCH UN2101 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH I. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: DTCH UN1101-UN1102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: DTCH UN1101-UN1102 or the equivalent. Continued practice in the four skills (aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing); review and refinement of basic grammar; vocabulary building. Readings in Dutch literature

Fall 2023: DTCH UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DTCH 2101 001/11305 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Wijnie de Groot 4.00 9/15
DTCH 2101 002/11306 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
352c International Affairs Bldg
Pieter Lauwaert 4.00 12/15

DTCH UN2102 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: DTCH UN1101-UN1102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: DTCH UN1101-UN1102 or the equivalent. Continued practice in the four skills (aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing); review and refinement of basic grammar; vocabulary building. Readings in Dutch literature

Spring 2024: DTCH UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DTCH 2102 001/13601 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Wijnie de Groot 4.00 8/15
DTCH 2102 002/13602 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
352c International Affairs Bldg
Pieter Lauwaert 4.00 8/15

DTCH UN3101 ADVANCED DUTCH I. 3.00 points.

This advanced course is a content-based language course, and is centered around the history of the Low Countries. Each week focuses on a specific era, such as the counts of Holland in the 13th century and the Reformation in the 16th century. Students will read texts about history and literature of the historical periods. Students will read texts at home and discuss them in class, explore history-related websites and watch short video clips. Attention will be paid to advanced grammar issues and vocabulary

Fall 2023: DTCH UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DTCH 3101 001/11118 T Th 1:15pm - 2:30pm
352a International Affairs Bldg
Wijnie de Groot 3.00 4/15

DTCH UN3102 ADVANCED DUTCH II. 3.00 points.

see department for details

Spring 2024: DTCH UN3102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DTCH 3102 001/13603 T Th 1:15pm - 2:30pm
352a International Affairs Bldg
Wijnie de Groot 3.00 3/15

DTCH UN3994 SPECIAL READING COURSE. 1.00 point.

See department for course description

Spring 2024: DTCH UN3994
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DTCH 3994 001/13604 W 10:10am - 11:40am
352a International Affairs Bldg
Wijnie de Groot 1.00 1/5

Finnish

FINN UN2101 INTERMEDIATE FINNISH I. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: FINN UN1101-UN1102 or the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: FINN UN1101-UN1102 or the instructor's permission. Continued practice in aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing; review and refinement of grammatical structures; vocabulary building. Readings include Finnish fiction and nonfiction

Fall 2023: FINN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FINN 2101 001/11114 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Heli Sirvioe 4.00 2/18

FINN UN2102 INTERMEDIATE FINNISH II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: FINN UN1101-UN1102 or the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: FINN UN1101-UN1102 or the instructors permission. Continued practice in aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing; review and refinement of grammatical structures; vocabulary building. Readings include Finnish fiction and nonfiction

Spring 2024: FINN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FINN 2102 001/13606 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Heli Sirvioe 4.00 2/15

German

GERM UN1101 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I. 4.00 points.

Upon completion of the course, students understand, speak, read, and write German at a level enabling them to communicate with native speakers about their background, family, daily activities, student life, work, and living quarters. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the four language skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing--within a cultural context. Daily assignments and consistent work are necessary in order to achieve basic communicative proficiency. Daily assignments and consistent work are the basis for achieving basic communicative proficiency

Fall 2023: GERM UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 1101 001/11314 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Hamilton Hall
Patrick Woodard 4.00 12/15
GERM 1101 002/11315 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Julia Perrin 4.00 11/15
GERM 1101 003/11316 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Julia Perrin 4.00 14/15
GERM 1101 004/11317 M T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Jutta Schmiers-Heller 4.00 14/15
GERM 1101 005/11318 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Simona Vaidean 4.00 11/15
GERM 1101 006/20994 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Hazel Rhodes 4.00 11/15
Spring 2024: GERM UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 1101 001/13578 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
315 Hamilton Hall
Patrick Woodard 4.00 13/15
GERM 1101 002/13579 M T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Jutta Schmiers-Heller 4.00 15/15
GERM 1101 003/13580 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Simona Vaidean 4.00 15/15

GERM UN1102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: GERM UN1101 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GERM UN1101 or the equivalent. Students expand their communication skills to include travel, storytelling, personal well-being, basic economics, and recent historical events. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the four language skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing--within a cultural context. Daily assignments and consistent work are necessary in order to achieve basic communicative proficiency

Fall 2023: GERM UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 1102 001/11320 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Romney Walker Wood 4.00 10/15
GERM 1102 002/11321 M T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Iloe Ariss 4.00 5/15
GERM 1102 003/11322 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Young Na 4.00 10/15
Spring 2024: GERM UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 1102 001/13581 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Hamilton Hall
Julia Perrin 4.00 10/15
GERM 1102 002/13582 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Julia Perrin 4.00 13/15
GERM 1102 003/13583 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Julia Perrin 4.00 14/15
GERM 1102 004/13584 M T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Jutta Schmiers-Heller 4.00 15/15
GERM 1102 005/13585 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Varol Kahveci 4.00 8/15

GERM UN2101 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: GERM UN1102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GERM UN1102 or the equivalent. Intermediate German UN2101 is conducted entirely in German and emphasizes the four basic language skills, cultural awareness, and critical thinking. A wide range of topics (from politics and poetry to art) as well as authentic materials (texts, film, art, etc.) are used to improve the 4 skills. Practice in conversation aims at enlarging the vocabulary necessary for daily communication. Grammar is practiced in the context of the topics. Learning and evaluation are individualized (individual vocabulary lists, essays, oral presentations, final portfolio) and project-based (group work and final group project)

Fall 2023: GERM UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 2101 001/11323 M T F 10:10am - 11:25am
315 Hamilton Hall
Nathaniel Wagner 4.00 4/15
GERM 2101 002/11324 M T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
302 Alfred Lerner Hall
Simona Vaidean 4.00 14/15
GERM 2101 003/11325 M T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Simona Vaidean 4.00 15/15
GERM 2101 004/00204 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
302 Milbank Hall
Irene Motyl 4.00 6/15
Spring 2024: GERM UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 2101 001/13586 M T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Iloe Ariss 4.00 8/15
GERM 2101 002/13587 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Young Na 4.00 14/15

GERM UN2102 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: GERM UN2101 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GERM UN2101 or the equivalent. Intermediate German UN2102 is conducted entirely in German and emphasizes the four basic language skills, cultural awareness, and critical thinking. A wide range of topics (from politics and poetry to art) as well as authentic materials (texts, film, art, etc.) are used to improve the 4 skill. Practice in conversation aims at enlarging the vocabulary necessary for daily communication. Grammar is practiced in the context of the topics. Learning and evaluation are individualized (individual vocabulary lists, essays, oral presentations, final portfolio) and project-based (group work and final group project)

Fall 2023: GERM UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 2102 001/11326 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Jutta Schmiers-Heller 4.00 16/15
Spring 2024: GERM UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 2102 001/13588 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Romney Walker Wood 4.00 9/15
GERM 2102 002/13589 M T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Simona Vaidean 4.00 15/15
GERM 2102 004/00498 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
202 Milbank Hall
Irene Motyl 4.00 12/15

GERM UN2521 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION I. 2.00 points.

Prerequisites: GERM UN1102 or the equivalent, or placement by the Director of German Language Program
Corequisites: GERM UN1201
Prerequisites: Completion of GERM UN1101 and UN1102 or the equivalent This 2-point conversation group is designed for students who are now taking Intermediate German UN2101 or who wish to maintain their spoken German at least at the advanced intermediate level. The course is designed to improve your ability to speak and understand and manage German in everyday situations; to provide opportunities to participate in conversational situations on any topics you are interested in; to strengthen and acquire skills to understand German spoken at normal conversational speed; to expand active and passive vocabularies speaking skills; and to maintain a certain level of written German through short written activities. This course does not count towards the language requirement

Fall 2023: GERM UN2521
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 2521 001/11328 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Varol Kahveci 2.00 3/15

GERM UN3001 ADVANCED GERMAN I. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: GERM UN2102 or the Director of the German Language Program's permission.
Prerequisites: GERM UN2102 or the Director of the German Language Program's permission. German UN3001 is an ambitious socio-cultural exploration of Berlin. Designed to follow up the language skills acquired in first- and second-year language courses (or the equivalent thereof), this course gives students greater proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing German while focusing on topics from German society today through German newspapers and periodicals through the lens of Germany’s capital, Berlin. The course represents a gateway class to literature courses. This course counts towards the major and concentration

Fall 2023: GERM UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 3001 001/11329 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Hamilton Hall
Julia Perrin 3.00 11/15

GERM UN3333 INTRO TO GERMAN LIT (GERMAN). 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: GERM UN2102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GERM UN2102 or the equivalent. Examines short literary texts and various methodological approaches to interpreting such texts in order to establish a basic familiarity with the study of German literature and culture

Fall 2023: GERM UN3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 3333 001/11044 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
316 Hamilton Hall
Mark Anderson 3.00 10/25

GERM UN3444 SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT:20C (GER). 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: GERM UN3333 or UN3334 or the director of undergraduate studies' or the instructor's permission.
. This course examines modernist literature, art, and music in the early twentieth century. In close readings, students will focus on the essential works from this period and learn to situate them in their historical contexts and the urban settings in which they were conceived: Munich, Prague, Vienna, and Berlin. The analysis of modernist works will be framed with introductions to questions of language, gender and sexuality, anti-Semitism, and the emergence of fascism. Authors include Arthur Schnitzler, Frank Wedekind, Robert Musil, Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, Irmgard Keun, Bertolt Brecht, Alfred Döblin, and Walter Benjamin; musical works by Berg, Schoenberg, and Weill. The course is taught in German

Fall 2023: GERM UN3444
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 3444 001/11045 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Mark Anderson 3.00 13/25

Swedish

SWED UN2101 Intermediate Swedish I. 3 points.

The goal of this course is to further develop the speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills you have acquired in the first year Swedish courses and broaden your knowledge about the Swedish culture and history. Topics emphasize contemporary Swedish life and corss-cultural awareness. In addition to the main text, newspaper articles, shorter literary texts, film, and internet resources will be used. Class will be conducted almost exclusively in Swedish. To succeed in this course, you must actively participate. You will be expected to attend class regularly, prepare for class daily, and speak as much Swedish as possible. Methodology The class will be taught in a communicative way. It will be conducted primarily, but not exclusively in Swedish. In-class activities and homework assignments will focus on improving and developing  speaking, reading, writing, listening skills, and deepening the students' understanding of Swedish culture through interaction and exposure to a broad range of authentic materials.

Fall 2023: SWED UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SWED 2101 001/11115 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
352c International Affairs Bldg
Heli Sirvioe 3 10/18

Yiddish

YIDD UN1101 ELEMENTARY YIDDISH I. 4.00 points.

This course offers an introduction to the language that has been spoken by the Ashkenazi Jews for more than a millennium, and an opportunity to discover a fabulous world of Yiddish literature, language and culture in a fun way. Using games, new media, and music, we will learn how to speak, read, listen and write in a language that is considered one of the richest languages in the world (in some aspects of vocabulary). We will also venture outside the classroom to explore the Yiddish world today: through field trips to Yiddish theater, Yiddish-speaking neighborhoods, Yiddish organizations, such as YIVO or Yiddish farm, and so on. We will also have Yiddish-speaking guests and do a few digital projects. At the end of the two-semester course, you will be able to converse in Yiddish on a variety of everyday topics and read most Yiddish literary and non-literary texts. Welcome to Yiddishland!

Fall 2023: YIDD UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 1101 001/11308 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
262 Macy Hall
Ethan Fraenkel 4.00 14/15
Spring 2024: YIDD UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 1101 001/13595 M W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Noa Tsaushu 4.00 5/15

YIDD UN1102 ELEMENTARY YIDDISH II. 4.00 points.

This course offers an introduction to the language that has been spoken by the Ashkenazi Jews for more than a millennium, and an opportunity to discover a fabulous world of Yiddish literature, language and culture in a fun way. Using games, new media, and music, we will learn how to speak, read, listen and write in a language that is considered one of the richest languages in the world (in some aspects of vocabulary). We will also venture outside the classroom to explore the Yiddish world today: through field trips to Yiddish theater, Yiddish-speaking neighborhoods, Yiddish organizations, such as YIVO or Yiddish farm, and so on. We will also have Yiddish-speaking guests and do a few digital projects. At the end of the two-semester course, you will be able to converse in Yiddish on a variety of everyday topics and read most Yiddish literary and non-literary texts. Welcome to Yiddishland!

Fall 2023: YIDD UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 1102 001/11309 M W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Noa Tsaushu 4.00 5/18
Spring 2024: YIDD UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 1102 001/13596 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Ethan Fraenkel 4.00 12/15

YIDD UN2101 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: YIDD UN1101-UN1102 or the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: YIDD UN1101-UN1102 or the instructor's permission. This year-long course is a continuation of Elementary Yiddish II. As part of the New Media in Jewish Studies Collaborative, this class will be using new media in order to explore and research the fabulous world of Yiddish literature, language, and culture, and to engage in project-oriented activities that will result in creating lasting multi-media online presentations. In addition to expanding the command of the language that has been spoken by the Ashkenazi Jews for more than a millennium, i.e. focusing on developing speaking, reading, writing and listening skills, and on the acquisition of more advanced grammatical concepts, students will also get some video and film editing training, and tutorials on archival research. The class will continue to read works of Yiddish literature in the original and will venture outside of the classroom to explore the Yiddish world today: through exciting field trips to Yiddish theater, Yiddish-speaking neighborhoods, YIVO, Yiddish Farm, and so on. And we will also have the Yiddish native-speaker guest series. Welcome back to Yiddishland!

Spring 2024: YIDD UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 2101 001/13597 M W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 Hamilton Hall
Mikhl Yashinsky 4.00 4/15

YIDD UN2102 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: YIDD UN1101-UN1102 or the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: YIDD UN1101-UN1102 or the instructor's permission. This year-long course is a continuation of Elementary Yiddish II. As part of the New Media in Jewish Studies Collaborative, this class will be using new media in order to explore and research the fabulous world of Yiddish literature, language, and culture, and to engage in project-oriented activities that will result in creating lasting multi-media online presentations. In addition to expanding the command of the language that has been spoken by the Ashkenazi Jews for more than a millennium, i.e. focusing on developing speaking, reading, writing and listening skills, and on the acquisition of more advanced grammatical concepts, students will also get some video and film editing training, and tutorials on archival research. The class will continue to read works of Yiddish literature in the original and will venture outside of the classroom to explore the Yiddish world today: through exciting field trips to Yiddish theater, Yiddish-speaking neighborhoods, YIVO, Yiddish Farm, and so on. And we will also have the Yiddish native-speaker guest series. Welcome back to Yiddishland!

Fall 2023: YIDD UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 2102 001/11311 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Mikhl Yashinsky 4.00 5/18

YIDD UN3333 ADVANCED YIDDISH. 3.00 points.

May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: YIDD UN2101-YIDD UN2102 or the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: YIDD UN2101-YIDD UN2102 or the instructor's permission. Reading of contemporary authors. Stress on word usage and idiomatic expression, discussion

Fall 2023: YIDD UN3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 3333 001/11312 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Agnieszka Legutko 3.00 3/18
Spring 2024: YIDD UN3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
YIDD 3333 001/13598 W 1:00pm - 2:00pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Agnieszka Legutko 3.00 3/15
YIDD 3333 001/13598 Th 2:30pm - 4:00pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Agnieszka Legutko 3.00 3/15

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