Creative Writing

Undergraduate Creative Writing Program Office: 609 Kent; 212-854-3774
http://arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Anelise Chen, 609 Kent; 212-854-3774; ac4132@columbia.edu

Undergraduate Executive Committee:

  • Undergraduate Advisory Committee:

    The Creative Writing Program in The School of the Arts combines intensive writing workshops with seminars that study literature from a writer's perspective. Students develop and hone their literary technique in workshops. The seminars (which explore literary technique and history) broaden their sense of possibility by exposing them to various ways that language has been used to make art. Related courses are drawn from departments such as English, comparative literature and society, philosophy, history, and anthropology, among others.

    Students consult with faculty advisers to determine the related courses that best inform their creative work. For details on the major, see the Creative Writing website: http://arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

  • Professors

    • Margo L. Jefferson
    • Phillip Lopate
    • Benjamin Marcus
    • Alan Ziegler

    Associate Professors

    • Susan Bernofsky
    • Timothy Donnelly
    • Heidi Julavits
    • Dorothea Lasky
    • Victor LaValle
    • Sam Lipsyte
    • Deborah Paredez

    Assistant Professors

    • Anelise Chen
    • Shane McCrae
    • Ben Metcalf
    • Lynn Xu

    Adjunct Professors

    • Bonnie Chau
    • Jon Cotner
    • Alex Dimitrov
    • Joseph Fasano
    • Crystal Hana Kim
    • Hilary Leichter
    • Daniel Magariel
    • Mark Rozzo
    • John Vincler
    • David Wallace
    • Madeleine Watts
    • Samantha Zighelboim

    Graduate Faculty Fellows

    • Edison Angelbello
    • Melanie Brodber
    • Melissa Connelly
    • Elias Diakolios
    • Flora Field
    • Rona Figueroa
    • Patrick Ford-Matz
    • Sylvia Gindick
    • Laura Green
    • Al Jacobs
    • Kimberly Liu
    • Odelia Lu
    • Cameron Menchel
    • Abhigna Mooraka
    • Kameron Morton
    • Galina Nemirovsky
    • Mariam Rahmani
    • Laina Richards
    • Nicole Saldarriaga
    • Darby Smith
    • Rafaela Yoneshigue Bassili

    Major in Creative Writing

    The major in creative writing requires a minimum of 36 points: five workshops, four seminars, and three related courses.

    Workshop Curriculum (15 points)

    Students in the workshops produce original works of fiction, poetry, or nonfiction, and submit them to their classmates and instructor for a close critical analysis. Workshop critiques (which include detailed written reports and thorough line-edits) assess the mechanics and merits of the writing pieces. Individual instructor conferences distill the critiques into a direct plan of action to improve the work. Student writers develop by practicing the craft under the diligent critical attention of their peers and instructor, which guides them toward new levels of creative endeavor.

    Creative writing majors select 15 points within the division in the following courses. One workshop must be in a genre other than the primary focus. For instance, a fiction writer might take four fiction workshops and one poetry workshop.

    Beginning Workshop
    Designed for students who have little or no previous experience writing literary texts in a particular genre.
    WRIT UN1100Beginning Fiction Workshop
    WRIT UN1200Beginning Nonfiction Workshop
    WRIT UN1300Beginning Poetry Workshop
    Intermediate Workshop
    Permission required. Admission by writing sample. Enrollment limited to 15. Course may be repeated in fulfillment of the major.
    WRIT UN2100Intermediate Fiction Workshop
    WRIT UN2200Intermediate Nonfiction Workshop
    WRIT UN2300Intermediate Poetry Workshop
    Advanced Workshop
    Permission required. Admission by writing sample. Enrollment limited to 15. Course may be repeated in fulfillment of the major.
    WRIT UN3100Advanced Fiction Workshop
    WRIT UN3200Advanced Nonfiction Workshop
    WRIT UN3300Advanced Poetry Workshop
    Senior Creative Writing Workshop
    Seniors who are creative writing majors are given priority. Enrollment limited to 12, by instructor's permission. The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major. This course is only offered by graduate faculty professors.
    WRIT UN3101Senior Fiction Workshop
    WRIT UN3201Senior Nonfiction Workshop
    WRIT UN3301Senior Poetry Workshop

    Seminar Curriculum (12 points)

    The creative writing seminars form the intellectual ballast of our program.  Our seminars offer a close examination of literary techniques such as plot, point of view, tone, and voice.  They seek to inform and inspire students by exposing them to a wide variety of approaches in their chosen genre.  Our curriculum, via these seminars, actively responds not only to historical literary concerns, but to contemporary ones as well.  Extensive readings are required, along with short critical papers and/or creative exercises.  By closely analyzing diverse works of literature and participating in roundtable discussions, writers build the resources necessary to produce their own accomplished creative work. 

    Creative writing majors select 12 points within the division. Any 4 seminars will fulfill the requirement, no matter the student's chosen genre concentration.  Below is a sampling of our seminars.  The list of seminars currently being offered can be found in the "Courses" section. 

    These seminars offer close examination of literary techniques such as plot, point of view, tone, suspense, and narrative voice. Extensive readings are required, along with creative exercises.
    FICTION
    WRIT UN3121Fiction Seminar: How To Build A Person
    WRIT UN3117Fiction Seminar: The Here & Now
    WRIT UN3122First Novels: How They Work
    WRIT UN3120Fiction Seminar: The Craft Of Writing Dialogue
    NONFICTION
    WRIT UN3213Nonfiction Seminar: The Literary Reporter
    WRIT UN3215WRITING THE VISUAL
    WRIT UN3216Nonfiction Seminar: Truths & Facts
    WRIT UN3217Nonfiction Seminar: Science And Sensibility
    POETRY
    WRIT UN2311Poetry Seminar: Traditions in Poetry
    WRIT UN3313Poetry Seminar: The Crisis of the I
    WRIT UN3314Poetry Seminar: 21st Century American Poetry and Its Concerns
    WRIT GU4310Poetry Seminar - Witness, Record, Document: Poetry & Testimony
    CROSS GENRE
    WRIT GU4011Cross Genre Seminar: Imagining Berlin
    WRIT GU4012Cross Genre Seminar: Diva Voice, Diva Style, Diva Lyrics
    WRIT UN3016Cross Genre Seminar: Walking
    WRIT UN3013Cross-Genre Seminar: Process Writing & Writing Process

    Related Courses (9 points)

    Drawn from various departments, these courses provide concentrated intellectual and creative stimulation, as well as exposure to ideas that enrich students' artistic instincts. Courses may be different for each student writer. Students should consult with faculty advisers to determine the related courses that best inform their creative work.

    Fiction Workshops

    WRIT UN1100 Beginning Fiction Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    The beginning workshop in fiction is designed for students with little or no experience writing literary texts in fiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. The focus of the course is on the rudiments of voice, character, setting, point of view, plot, and lyrical use of language.  Students will begin to develop the critical skills that will allow them to read like writers and understand, on a technical level, how accomplished creative writing is produced. Outside readings of a wide range of fiction supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN1100
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 1100 001/16689 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Online Only
    Victor Allard 3 12/15
    WRIT 1100 002/16692 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    Online Only
    Samantha Barron 3 15/15
    WRIT 1100 003/16693 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    Online Only
    John Boyle 3 14/15
    WRIT 1100 004/16821 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
    Online Only
    Julia Cannon 3 14/15
    WRIT 1100 005/16823 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    Online Only
    Sarah Klena 3 14/15
    WRIT 1100 006/16824 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Online Only
    Shalvi Shah 3 13/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN1100
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 1100 001/10413 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Room TBA
    Rona Figueroa 3 15/15
    WRIT 1100 002/10414 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    424 Kent Hall
    Alexander Jacobs 3 15/15
    WRIT 1100 003/10415 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    405a International Affairs Bldg
    Cameron Menchel 3 15/15
    WRIT 1100 004/10416 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
    Room TBA
    Kameron Morton 3 15/15
    WRIT 1100 005/18368 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    502 Northwest Corner
    Nicole Saldarriaga 3 10/15

    WRIT UN2100 Intermediate Fiction Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    Intermediate workshops are for students with some experience with creative writing, and whose prior work merits admission to the class (as judged by the professor).  Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops, and increased expectations to produce finished work.  By the end of the semester, each student will have produced at least seventy pages of original fiction.  Students are additionally expected to write extensive critiques of the work of their peers.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN2100
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2100 001/16694 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    410 International Affairs Bldg
    Heidi Julavits 3 16/15
    WRIT 2100 002/16695 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    Crystal Kim 3 13/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN2100
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2100 001/10422 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Heidi Julavits 3 0/15
    WRIT 2100 002/10423 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    3 0/15

    WRIT UN3100 Advanced Fiction Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    Building on the work of the Intermediate Workshop, Advanced Workshops are reserved for the most accomplished creative writing students. A significant body of writing must be produced and revised.  Particular attention will be paid to the components of fiction: voice, perspective, characterization, and form.  Students will be expected to finish several short stories, executing a total artistic vision on a piece of writing. The critical focus of the class will include an examination of endings and formal wholeness, sustaining narrative arcs, compelling a reader's interest for the duration of the text, and generating a sense of urgency and drama in the work.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3100
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3100 001/16696 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    Lincoln Michel 3 10/15
    WRIT 3100 002/16698 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Online Only
    Marie Lee 3 8/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3100
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3100 001/10426 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Victor Lavalle 3 0/15
    WRIT 3100 002/10427 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Daniel Magariel 3 0/15

    WRIT UN3101 Senior Fiction Workshop. 4 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    Seniors who are majors in creative writing are given priority for this course.  Enrollment is limited, and is by permission of the professor.  The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major.  Students in the senior workshops will produce and revise a new and substantial body of work.  In-class critiques and conferences with the professor will be tailored to needs of each student.

    ,

    Seniors who are majors in creative writing are given priority for this course.  Enrollment is limited, and is by permission of the professor.  The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major.  Students in the senior workshops will produce and revise a new and substantial body of work.  In-class critiques and conferences with the professor will be tailored to needs of each student.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3101
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3101 001/16700 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
    Online Only
    Jean Frazier 4 12/12
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3101
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3101 001/10428 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    317 Hamilton Hall
    Crystal Kim 4 0/12

    Fiction Seminars

    WRIT UN2110 Fiction Seminar: Approaches to the Short Story. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    The modern short story has gone through many transformations, and the innovations of its practitioners have often pointed the way for prose fiction as a whole. The short story has been seized upon and refreshed by diverse cultures and aesthetic affiliations, so that perhaps the only stable definition of the form remains the famous one advanced by Poe, one of its early masters, as a work of fiction that can be read in one sitting. Still, common elements of the form have emerged over the last century and this course will study them, including Point of View, Plot, Character, Setting, and Theme. John Hawkes once famously called these last four elements the "enemies of the novel," and many short story writers have seen them as hindrances as well. Hawkes later recanted, though some writers would still agree with his earlier assessment, and this course will examine the successful strategies of great writers across the spectrum of short story practice, from traditional approaches to more radical solutions, keeping in mind how one period's revolution - Hemingway, for example - becomes a later era's mainstream or "common-sense" storytelling mode. By reading the work of major writers from a writer's perspective, we will examine the myriad techniques employed for what is finally a common goal: to make readers feel. Short writing exercises will help us explore the exhilarating subtleties of these elements and how the effects created by their manipulation or even outright absence power our most compelling fictions.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN2110
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2110 001/17479 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Online Only
    Julia Pierpont 3 15/15

    WRIT UN3114 Fiction Seminar: Eccentrics & Outsiders. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    Some of the greatest works of fiction are narrated by characters who have become unhinged from the norms of society. They may stand apart from the mainstream because of willful eccentricity, madness, even social disgrace, but in each case their alienation provides them with a unique perspective, one that allows the reader to see the world they describe without the dulling lens of convention. We will explore what authors might gain by narrating their works from an "outsider" viewpoint, and we will study how the peculiar form and structure of these books reflects the modernist impulse in literature. This is a seminar designed for fiction writers, so we will spend time talking about not only the artistic merits of these books, but also about how the authors, who include Dostoevsky, Knut Hamsun, Jean Rhys, Denis Johnson, Joy Williams, Samuel Beckett and Amos Tutuola, achieve their specific effects. Over the course of the semester, we will use these texts as a springboard for writing original fiction.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3114
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3114 001/11714 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    David Wallace 3 16/15

    WRIT UN3115 Fiction Seminar: Make It Strange. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    Making the familiar strange, making the strange familiar: these are among the most dexterous, variously re-imagined, catholically deployed, and evergreen of literary techniques. From Roman Jakobson and the Russian Formalists, to postmodern appropriations of pop culture references, techniques of defamiliarization and the construction of the uncanny have helped literature succeed in altering the vision of habit, habit being that which Proust so aptly describes as a second nature which prevents us from knowing the first. In this course, we will examine precisely how writers have negotiated and presented the alien and the domestic, the extraordinary and the ordinary. Looking at texts that both intentionally and unintentionally unsettle the reader, the class will pay special attention to the pragmatics of writerly choices made at the levels of vocabulary, sentence structure, narrative structure, perspective, subject matter, and presentations of time. Students will have four creative and interrelated writing assignments, each one modeling techniques discussed in the preceding weeks.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3115
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3115 001/10583 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    311 Fayerweather
    Hilary Leichter 3 16/15

    WRIT UN3120 Fiction Seminar: The Craft Of Writing Dialogue. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Departmental approval NOT required.

    Whether texting, chatting, conversing, speechifying, recounting, confiding, gossiping, tweeting, praying, interviewing, exhorting, pitching, scheming, lecturing, nagging or begging, humans love to talk, and readers love narratives that contain dialogue.  Good dialogue makes characters and scenes feel real and alive.  Great dialogue reveals characters' fears, desires and quirks, forwards the narrative's plot and dramatic tension, and often contains subtext.  In this course, we'll read different kinds of novels and stories -- from noir to horror to sci-fi to realistice drama to comic romp -- that implement various types of dialogue effectively, and we'll study how to do it.  We'll read essays by masters that explain techniques for writing great dialogue, and we'll practice writing different styles of dialogue ourselves.  Coursework will consist of reading, in-class exercises, and two short creative assignments.

    WRIT UN3122 First Novels: How They Work. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    First Novels exist as a distinct category, in part, because all novelists must write one.  They may never write a second, but in order to be called novelists there always has to be a first.  As a result the first novel is a very special animal.  Every kind of writer must attempt one and despite vast differences in genre or style there are often many similarities between them.  In fact, one of the surest similarities are the flaws in each book.  Before each writer becomes an expert at his or her method, his or her style, there is room for experimentation and unsuccessful attempts. These "failures" are often much more illuminating for students than the successes of later books.  First novels contain the energy of youth, but often lack the precision that comes with maturity.  By examining a series of first novels students will learn to identify common craft elements of first novels and how to employ them to great effect in their own writing.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3122
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3122 001/15011 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Halle Butler 3 13/15

    WRIT UN3126 Animal Tales. 3.00 points.

    "We polish an animal mirror to look for ourselves." -Donna Haraway In the last several decades, Animal Studies has emerged as a robust interdisciplinary field that once again seeks to engage with “the question of the animal,” as Derrida puts it. In this course, we will look at works of cultural production that explore the myriad relationships between human and nonhuman animals. We will read stories that dissolve the barrier between the domestic and the wild. We will read stories about human-animal hybrids. We will read stories from an animal’s-eye-view, imagining the world as an animal might: as a worm digging through the dirt toward an imagined utopia, as an elephant seeking vengeance against poachers, as a cultivated monkey exhausted by the cruelty of human society. As the popular post-humanist scholar Donna Haraway puts it: We polish an animal mirror to look at ourselves. What can animals teach us about ourselves, and more importantly, what can animals teach us about how to survive our own nature? In the midst of this sixth extinction, animals are disappearing at a rapid rate due to human activity. Will it still be possible to cohabit peacefully, ecologically, with one another? By imagining the private lives of animals and writing stories from their perspective, can we still intervene and cultivate the necessary cross-species connections that will carry us into a more just and entwined future?

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3126
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3126 001/20651  
    Anelise Chen 3.00 0/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3126
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3126 001/11718 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    608 Lewisohn Hall
    Anelise Chen 3.00 17/15

    WRIT UN3127 Time Moves Both Ways. 3 points.

    What is time travel, really? We can use a machine or walk through a secret door. Take a pill or fall asleep and wake up in the future. But when we talk about magic machines and slipstreams and Rip Van Winkle, we are also talking about memory, chronology, and narrative. In this seminar, we will approach time travel as a way of understanding "the Fourth Dimension" in fiction. Readings will range from the speculative to the strange, to the realism of timelines, flashbacks, and shifts in perspective. Coursework will include short, bi-weekly writing assignments, a completed short story, and a time inflected adaptation. 

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3127
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3127 001/17699 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    Hilary Leichter 3 19/15

    Nonfiction Workshops

    WRIT UN1200 Beginning Nonfiction Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    The beginning workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with little or no experience in writing literary nonfiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually submit their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN1200
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 1200 001/16701 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    Online Only
    Aseye Agamah 3 12/15
    WRIT 1200 002/16702 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Online Only
    Rachel Keranen 3 14/15
    WRIT 1200 003/17844 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    Online Only
    Taylor Zhang 3 12/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN1200
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 1200 001/10417 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Room TBA
    Ye Lu 3 15/15
    WRIT 1200 002/10418 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    106b Lewisohn Hall
    Darby Smith 3 15/15
    WRIT 1200 003/10419 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    608 Lewisohn Hall
    Rafaela Yoneshigue Bassili 3 15/15

    WRIT UN2200 Intermediate Nonfiction Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    The intermediate workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with some experience in writing literary nonfiction. Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops and an expectation that students will produce finished work. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects. By the end of the semester, students will have produced thirty to forty pages of original work in at least two traditions of literary nonfiction.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN2200
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2200 001/16703 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    Online Only
    Melody Nixon 3 12/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN2200
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2200 001/10424 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    John Vincler 3 0/15

    WRIT UN3200 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    Advanced Nonfiction Workshop is for students with significant narrative and/or critical experience. Students will produce original literary nonfiction for the workshop, with an added focus on developing a distinctive voice and approach.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3200
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3200 001/10429 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    501 International Affairs Bldg
    James Yeh 3 0/15

    WRIT UN3201 Senior Nonfiction Workshop. 4 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    Senior Nonfiction Workshop

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3201
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3201 001/16704 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
    Online Only
    Phillip Lopate 4 15/24

    Nonfiction Seminars

    WRIT UN2211 Nonfiction Seminar: Traditions in Nonfiction. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    The seminar provides exposure to the varieties of nonfiction with readings in its principal genres: reportage, criticism and commentary, biography and history, and memoir and the personal essay.  A highly plastic medium, nonfiction allows authors to portray real events and experiences through narrative, analysis, polemic or any combination thereof.  Free to invent everything but the facts, great practitioners of nonfiction are faithful to reality while writing with a voice and a vision distinctively their own.  To show how nonfiction is conceived and constructed, class discussions will emphasize the relationship of content to form and style, techniques for creating plot and character under the factual constraints imposed by nonfiction, the defining characteristics of each author's voice, the author's subjectivity and presence, the role of imagination and emotion, the uses of humor, and the importance of speculation and attitude.  Written assignments will be opportunities to experiment in several nonfiction genres and styles.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN2211
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2211 001/10584 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Mark Rozzo 3 16/15

    WRIT UN3214 Hybrid Nonfiction Forms. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    Creative nonfiction is a frustratingly vague term. How do we give it real literary meaning; examine its compositional aims and techniques, its achievements and especially its aspirations? This course will focus on works that we might call visionary - works that combine art forms, genres and styles in striking ways. Works in which image and text combine to create a third interactive language for the reader. Works still termed "fiction" "history" or "journalism" that join fact and fiction to interrogate their uses and implications. Certain memoirs that are deliberately anti-autobiographical, turning from personal narrative to the sounds, sight, impressions and ideas of the writer's milieu. Certain essays that join personal reflection to arts and cultural criticism, drawing on research and imagination, the vernacular and the formal, even prose and poetry. The assemblage or collage that, created from notebook entries, lists, quotations, footnotes and indexes achieves its coherence through fragments and associations, found and original texts.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3214
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3214 001/20652 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Room TBA
    Margo Jefferson 3 0/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3214
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3214 001/13736 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    401 Chandler
    Margo Jefferson 3 17/15

    WRIT UN3219 Writing as Collecting. 3 points.

    In Writing as Collecting we will examine how the concept of collecting provides a way to think through writing.  We will read writing based from art, archives, and other collections, from antiquity to the contemporary, from the commonplace to the rarified. We will consider how writers have written distinctively through a collecting impulse or about specific collections.  While our focus will be on works of nonfiction, we will also take forays into fiction, poetry, visual art, and the cinematic essay. Students will present on specific objects or collections, and two classes will take place in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library (located on the 6th floor of Butler Library): the first as an introduction and orientation to the collections with a discussion of how research can feed creative writing, and, the second, for an in-class exercise in writing creatively about an specific object or collection (a book, manuscript, archival box, etc.).  Students will be encouraged to write about their own collections and to use the many public (or private) collections found throughout the city of New York.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3219
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3219 OO1/19358 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    John Vincler 3 7/15

    Poetry Workshops

    WRIT UN1300 Beginning Poetry Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    The beginning poetry workshop is designed for students who have a serious interest in poetry writing but who lack a significant background in the rudiments of the craft and/or have had little or no previous poetry workshop experience. Students will be assigned weekly writing exercises emphasizing such aspects of verse composition as the poetic line, the image, rhyme and other sound devices, verse forms, repetition, tone, irony, and others. Students will also read an extensive variety of exemplary work in verse, submit brief critical analyses of poems, and critique each other's original work.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN1300
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 1300 001/16706 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    Julia Burgdorff 3 14/15
    WRIT 1300 002/16707 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    Online Only
    Shyanne Figueroa Bennett 3 15/15
    WRIT 1300 003/17845 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    Online Only
    Elias Sorich 3 16/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN1300
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 1300 001/10420 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    501 International Affairs Bldg
    Flora Field 3 15/15
    WRIT 1300 002/10421 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    501 International Affairs Bldg
    Sylvia Gindick 3 15/15

    WRIT UN2300 Intermediate Poetry Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    Intermediate poetry workshops are for students with some prior instruction in the rudiments of poetry writing and prior poetry workshop experience. Intermediate poetry workshops pose greater challenges to students and maintain higher critical standards than beginning workshops. Students will be instructed in more complex aspects of the craft, including the poetic persona, the prose poem, the collage, open-field composition, and others. They will also be assigned more challenging verse forms such as the villanelle and also non-European verse forms such as the pantoum. They will read extensively, submit brief critical analyses, and put their instruction into regular practice by composing original work that will be critiqued by their peers. By the end of the semester each student will have assembled a substantial portfolio of finished work.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN2300
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2300 001/16708  
    Alexander Dimitrov 3 8/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN2300
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2300 001/10425 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Alexander Dimitrov 3 0/15

    WRIT UN3300 Advanced Poetry Workshop. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    This poetry workshop is reserved for accomplished poetry writers and maintains the highest level of creative and critical expectations. Students will be encouraged to develop their strengths and to cultivate a distinctive poetic vision and voice but must also demonstrate a willingness to broaden their range and experiment with new forms and notions of the poem. A portfolio of poetry will be written and revised with the critical input of the instructor and the workshop.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3300
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3300 001/20654  
    Dorothea Lasky 3 0/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3300
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3300 001/11721 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    302 Fayerweather
    Dorothea Lasky 3 0/15

    WRIT UN3301 Senior Poetry Workshop. 4 points.

    Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

    Seniors who are majors in creative writing are given priority for this course. Enrollment is limited, and is by permission of the professor. The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major. Students in the senior workshops will produce and revise a new and substantial body of work. In-class critiques and conferences with the professor will be tailored to needs of each student.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3301
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3301 001/19907 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    Online Only
    Asiya Wadud 4 7/12

    Poetry Seminars

    WRIT UN2310 Poetry Seminar: Approaches to Poetry. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    One advantage of writing poetry within a rich and crowded literary tradition is that there are many poetic tools available out there, stranded where their last practitioners dropped them, some of them perhaps clichéd and overused, yet others all but forgotten or ignored.  In this class, students will isolate, describe, analyze, and put to use these many tools, while attempting to refurbish and contemporize them for the new century.  Students can expect to imitate and/or subvert various poetic styles, voices, and forms, to invent their own poetic forms and rules, to think in terms of not only specific poetic forms and metrics, but of overall poetic architecture (lineation and diction, repetition and surprise, irony and sincerity, rhyme and soundscape), and finally, to leave those traditions behind and learn to strike out in their own direction, to write -- as poet Frank O'Hara said -- on their own nerve.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN2310
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2310 001/15012 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    3 5/15

    WRIT UN2311 Poetry Seminar: Traditions in Poetry. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    The avenues of poetic tradition open to today’s poets are more numerous, more invigorating, and perhaps even more baffling than ever before. The routes we chose for our writing lead to destinations of our own making, and we take them at our own risk—necessarily so, as the pursuit of poetry asks each of us to light a pilgrim’s candle and follow it into the moors and lowlands, through wastes and prairies, crossing waters as we go. Go after the marshlights, the will-o-wisps who call to you in a voice you’ve longed for your whole life. These routes have been forged by those who came before you, but for that reason, none of them can hope to keep you on it entirely. You must take your steps away, brick by brick, heading confidently into the hinterland of your own distinct achievement.

    ,

    For the purpose of this class, we will walk these roads together, examining the works of classic and contemporary exemplars of the craft. By companioning poets from a large spread of time, we will be able to more diversely immerse ourselves in what a poetic “tradition” truly means. We will read works by Edmund Spencer, Dante, and Goethe, the Romantics—especially Keats—Dickinson, who is mother to us all, Modernists, and the great sweep of contemporary poetry that is too vast to individuate.

    ,

    While it is the imperative of this class to equip you with the knowledge necessary to advance in the field of poetry, this task shall be done in a Columbian manner. Consider this class an initiation, of sorts, into the vocabulary which distinguishes the writers who work under our flag, each of us bound by this language that must be passed on, and therefore changed, to you who inherit it. As I have learned the words, I have changed them, and I give them now to you so that you may pave your own way into your own ways, inspired with the first breath that brought you here, which may excite and—hopefully—frighten you. You must be troubled. This is essential.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN2311
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 2311 001/10585 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    405a International Affairs Bldg
    Edison Angelbello 3 15/15

    WRIT UN3315 Poetry Seminar: Poetic Meter And Form. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    This course will investigate the uses of rhythmic order and disorder in English-language poetry, with a particular emphasis on 'formal' elements in 'free' verse. Through a close analysis of poems, we'll examine the possibilities of qualitative meter, and students will write original creative work within (and in response to) various formal traditions. Analytical texts and poetic manifestos will accompany our reading of exemplary poems. Each week, we'll study interesting examples of metrical writing, and I'll ask you to write in reponse to those examples. Our topics will include stress meter, syllable-stress meter, double and triple meter, rising and falling rhythms, promotion, demotion, inversion, elision, and foot scansion. Our study will include a greate range of pre-modern and modern writers, from Keats to W.D. Snodgrass, Shakespeare to Denise Levertov, Blake to James Dickey, Whitman to Louise Gluck etc. As writers, we'll always be thinking about how the formal choices of a poem are appropriate or inappropriate for the poem's content. We'll also read prose by poets describing their metrical craft.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3315
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3315 001/16709 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    Online Only
    Joseph Fasano 3 13/15

    WRIT UN3320 Provocations in Twentieth-Century Poetics. 3.00 points.

    This is a class about poetry and revolt. In a century of wars, unchecked proliferation of industrial and market systems in the continued legacy of settler-colonialism and the consolidation of state powers, does language still conduct with revolutionary possibilities? In this class, we will read manifestos, philosophical treatises, political tracts, literary polemics, poems, scores, and so on, as we consider poetry’s long-standing commitment to visionary practices that seek to liberate consciousness from the many and various structures of oppression. The term “poetry” is not limited to itself but becomes, in our readings, an open invitation to all adjacent experiments with and in the language arts. As such, we will look at the emergence of the international avant-gardes as well as a few student movements that populate and complicate the explorations of radical politics in the twentieth-century. In addition to our readings, students will be asked to produce creative responses for class discussion. Final projects will be provocations of their own design. Required Texts: Friedrich Nietzsche: On the Genealogy of Morality Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels: The Communist Manifesto Aimé Césaire: Notebook of A Return to the Native Land Hilda Hilst: The Obscene Madame D Marguerite Duras: Hiroshima Mon Amour Guy Debord: Society of the Spectacle

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3320
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3320 001/19340 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    Lynn Xu 3.00 7/15

    WRIT GU4310 Poetry Seminar - Witness, Record, Document: Poetry & Testimony. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    This seminar takes up the terms witness, record, and document as nouns and verbs. What is poetry of witness? Documentary poetry? Poetry as (revisionist ) historical record? What labor and what ethical, political, and aesthetic considerations are required of poets who endeavor to witness, record, or document historical events or moments of trauma? How is this approach to poetry informed by or contributing to feminist theories, aesthetic innovation, and revisionist approaches to official histories? Course materials include: 1) essays that explore the poetics and politics of "poetry of witness" or "documentary poetry"; 2) a range of contemporary American Poetry that has been classified as or has productively challenged these categories; 3) and audio, video, and photographic projects on which poets have collaborated. Our encounters with this work will be guided by and grounded in conversations about ideas of "truth," "text," the power relations of "documentation," and issues of language and representation in poetry.  We will also critically examine the formal (rhyme, rhythm, diction, form, genre, point of view, imagery, etc.) and philosophical components and interventions of the work we study and create.

    Spring 2021: WRIT GU4310
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 4310 001/20653  
    Deborah Paredez 3 0/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT GU4310
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 4310 001/11735 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Deborah Paredez 3 7/15

    Cross Genre Seminars

    WRIT UN3011 Translation Seminar. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Students do not need to demonstrate bilingual ability to take this course. Department approval NOT needed.
    Corequisites: This course is open to undergraduate & graduate students.

    This course will explore broad-ranging questions pertaining to the historical, cultural, and political significance of translation while analyzing the various challenges confronted by the art's foremost practitioners.  We will read and discuss texts by writers and theorists such as Benjamin, Derrida, Borges, Steiner, Dryden, Nabokov, Schleiermacher, Goethe, Spivak, Jakobson, and Venuti.  As readers and practitioners of translation, we will train our ears to detect the visibility of invisibility of the translator's craft; through short writing experiments, we will discover how to identify and capture the nuances that traverse literary styles, historical periods and cultures.  The course will culminate in a final project that may either be a critical analysis or an original translation accompanied by a translator's note of introduction.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3011
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3011 001/16710 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    Online Only
    Katrine Jensen 3 11/15
    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3011
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3011 001/17480 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
    106b Lewisohn Hall
    Bonnie Chau 3 3/15

    WRIT UN3014 Cross Genre Seminar: Structure and Style. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    This seminar explores fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama as related disciplines.  While each genre has its particular opportunities and demands, all can utilize such devices as narrative, dialogue, imagery, and description (scenes, objects, and thought processes).  Through a wide variety of readings and writing exercises, we will examine and explore approaches to language, ways of telling a story (linear and nonlinear), and how pieces are constructed. Some student work will be briefly workshopped.

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3014
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3014 001/10586 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Alan Ziegler 3 17/15

    WRIT UN3015 Daily Life. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    In his poem A Few Days, James Schuyler reflects" "A few days / are all we have.  So count them as they pass.  They pass too quickly / out of breath."  Before we know it, as Schuyler says, "Today is tomorrow."  This course will encourage us to slow down time and document today while it is still today.  One of the course's main points is to pursue the ordinary, and to recognize that the ordinary -- whether presented as poems, essays, stories, fragments, etc.  -- can become art.  Assignments will provide broad examples of how to portray dailiness.  Each week you will write a short piece (1-3 pages) that responds to these assignments while engaging your own daily life.  The form is open.  You could, for example, write a poem or story with a brief critical preface, or you could compose an essay that explores formal and/or thematic qualities.  You can also create multimedia work.  The important thing is to treat the materials we will read as springboards into your own artistic practice.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3015
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3015 001/16711 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
    Online Only
    John Cotner 3 15/15

    WRIT UN3016 Cross Genre Seminar: Walking. 3 points.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

    As Walter Benjamin notes in The Arcades Project: "Basic to flanerie, among other things, is the idea that the fruits of idleness are more precious than the fruits of labor.  The flaneur, as is well known, makes 'studies'."  This course will encourage you to make "studies" -- poems, essays, stories, or multimedia pieces -- based on your walks.  We will read depictions of walking from multiple disciplines, including philosophy, poetry, history, religion, visual art, and urban planning.  Occasionally we will walk together.  An important point of the course is to develop mobile forms of writing.  How can writing emerge from, and document, a walk's encounters, observations, and reflections?  What advantages does mobility bring to our work?  Each week you will write a short piece (1-3 pages) that engages your walks while responding to close readings of the assigned material. 

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3016
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3016 001/11927 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    John Cotner 3 15/15

    WRIT UN3017 Incarcerated Yet Inspired: Exploring Criminal Justice Through Creative Writing. 3 points.

    Welcome to the Incarcerated Yet Inspired, a cross-genre, creative writing seminar. Over the course of this semester, we will conduct a close reading of literary works that are based on the lives of individuals who have been ostracized, incarcerated, and isolated from their communities. While some of the writers we will  study have been personally affected by the criminal justice system, others have drawn upon their research, observations, and experiences working in prisons to tell a compelling story. Through our weekly analysis and discussion, we will explore the thematic elements and artistic choices each writer employs in their work. We will also challenge our existing thoughts about prisons as an institution and develop a better understanding of how the prism of art and justice can be valuable to you as writers.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3017
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3017 001/16819 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    Christopher Wolfe 3 14/15

    WRIT UN3018 Inhabiting Form: Writing the Body. 3 points.

    The body is our most immediate encounter with the world, the vessel through which we experience our entire lives: pleasure, pain, beauty, horror, limitation, freedom, fragility and empowerment. In this course, we will pursue critical and creative inquiries into invocations and manifestations of the body in multiple genres of literature and in several capacities. We will look at how writers make space for—or take up space with—bodies in their work.


    The etymology of the word “text” is from the Latin textus, meaning “tissue.” Along these lines, we will consider the text itself as a body. Discussions around body politics, race, gender, ability, illness, death, metamorphosis, monstrosity and pleasure will be parallel to the consideration of how a text might function itself as a body in space and time. We will consider such questions as: What is the connective tissue of a story or a poem? What is the nervous system of a lyric essay? How is formal constraint similar to societal ideals about beauty and acceptability of certain bodies? How do words and language function at the cellular level to build the body of a text? How can we make room to honor, in our writing, bodies that have otherwise been marginalized?


    We will also consider non-human bodies (animals & organisms) and embodiments of the supernatural (ghosts, gods & specters) in our inquiries. Students will process and explore these ideas in both creative and analytical writings throughout the semester, deepening their understanding of embodiment both on and off the page.

    Spring 2021: WRIT UN3018
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3018 001/16712 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    Online Only
    Samantha Zighelboim 3 15/15

    WRIT UN3019 Prose Poem or Poetic Prose?—Defining and Exploring a Literary Genre. 3.00 points.

    “Prose poem,” “lyrical prose,” “poetry in prose,” “poetic prose,” etc. Just what do we mean by any of these terms? What is it to write poetry without the techniques of enjambment and stanza? What is it to write “in prose” without a linear commitment to narrative? In short, what is that (perhaps) inexplicable place between verse (whether free or not) and fiction (whether linear in narrative or nonlinear)? This course will take a close look at literary works that live in the borderlands between verse and fiction. Through a close analysis of works by Arthur Rimbaud, Gertrude Stein, Claudia Rankine, Italo Calvino, Margaret Atwood, James Wright, Franz Kafka, Lydia Davis, and others, students will develop their own creative approaches to this elusive literary “genre.” Each week, we will study the work of one writer, and students will submit a one-page analytical response to that work. Our class discussions will focus on narrative tensions; prosodic techniques; imagery; diction; syntax; and historical, social, and political context. There will be a midterm paper (5-7 pages, double spaced) and a final paper (10 pages, double spaced). At the end of the semester, students will also submit a Portfolio of three creative pieces composed during the semester. We will have three in-class workshops to discuss those creative pieces. REQUIRED TEXTS: Arthur Rimbaud, Illuminations Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities Franz Kafka, Zurau Aphorisms Claudia Rankine, Don’t Let Me Be Lonely Mark Strand, Almost Invisible Margaret Atwood, Murder in The Dark All other materials will be distributed in a source book

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3019
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3019 001/10588 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Joseph Fasano 3.00 17/15

    WRIT UN3023 Hauntings: Ghosts, Presences & Residues in the Literary Imagination. 3.00 points.

    “I believe—I know that ghosts have wandered the earth. Be with me always— take any form—drive me mad!” —Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights In this course we’ll expand our understanding of how writing is often the site of lingering, numinous, immaterial presences. We’ll begin with the tradition of the ghost story— a literary device beloved by writers for centuries across many genres. Beyond the consideration of the supernatural, we’ll also investigate more abstract capacities in which texts—and writers (and sometimes editors!)—are inevitably possessed by an other, a presence that lingers persistently, making itself known whether we welcome it or not. Memory and trauma are their own kinds of ghosts. Similarly, we’ll discover how traces of works by writers we admire, our teachers, even a specific text or image, can manifest as spectral forms inhabiting our work. We’ll address the complexities of those vestiges in terms of appropriation and originality—what Harold Bloom calls “the anxiety of influence.” Students will process and explore these ideas in both creative and analytical writings throughout the semester. Course Books (available at Book Culture): Eileen Myles, Afterglow Diana Khoi Nguyen, Ghost Of Lucie Brock Broido, Trouble in Mind Mary Reufle, A Little White Shadow Max Porter, Grief is the Thing With Feathers All other readings will be posted on Courseworks as PDFs

    Fall 2021: WRIT UN3023
    Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
    WRIT 3023 001/10587 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
    511 Kent Hall
    Samantha Zighelboim 3.00 15/15