Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology

Departmental Office: Schermerhorn Extension, 10th floor; 212-854-9987
http://e3b.columbia.edu/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Dr. Matthew Palmer, 1010 Schermerhorn; 212-854-4767; mp2434@columbia.edu

Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species Adviser: Dr. Jill Shapiro, 1011 Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-5819; jss19@columbia.edu

Director, Administration and Finance: Kyle Bukhari, 1014B Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-8665; kb2337@columbia.edu

The Department of Ecology, Evolution & Environmental Biology (E3B) at Columbia University was established in 2001. Although we are a relatively new department, we have grown rapidly in the past decade. We now have an internationally diverse student body and a broad network of supporters at Columbia and throughout New York City. Our affiliated faculty members come from departments at Columbia as well as from the American Museum of Natural History, the New York Botanical Garden, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the EcoHealth Alliance. Together, we provide an unparalleled breadth and depth of research opportunities for our students.

In creating E3B, Columbia University recognized that the fields of ecology, evolutionary biology, and environmental biology constitute a distinct subdivision of the biological sciences with its own set of intellectual foci, theoretical foundations, scales of analysis, and methodologies.

E3B's mission is to educate a new generation of scientists and practitioners in the theory and methods of ecology, evolution, and environmental biology. Our educational programs emphasize a multi-disciplinary perspective to understand life on Earth from the level of organisms to global processes that sustain humanity and all life.

To achieve this multi-disciplinary perspective, the department maintains close ties to over 70 faculty members beyond its central core. Thus, many faculty members who teach, advise, and train students in research are based in other departments on the Columbia campus or at the partner institutions. Through this collaboration, the department is able to tap into a broad array of scientific and intellectual resources in the greater New York City area. The academic staff covers the areas of plant and animal systematics; evolutionary and population genetics; ecosystem science; demography and population biology; behavioral and community ecology; and related fields of epidemiology, ethnobiology, public health, and environmental policy. Harnessing the expertise of this diverse faculty and the institutions of which they are a part, E3B covers a vast area of inquiry into the evolutionary, genetic, and ecological relationships among all living things.

Facilities and Collaborative Institutions

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology (E3B)

In addition to the off-campus facilities detailed below, the Columbia community offers academic excellence in a range of natural and social science disciplines that are directly related to biodiversity conservation including: evolution, systematics, genetics, behavioral ecology, public health, business, economics, political science, anthropology, and public and international policy. These disciplines are embodied in world-class departments, schools, and facilities at Columbia. The divisions that bring their resources to bear on issues most relevant to E3B’s mission are: the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the School of International and Public Affairs, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the International Research Institute for Climate Predication, the Black Rock Forest Reserve in New York State, the Rosenthal Center for Alternative/Complementary Medicine, the Division of Environmental Health Sciences at the School of Public Health, and the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). Several of these units of the University are networked through the Earth Institute at Columbia, a division of the University that acts as an intramural network of environmental programs and supplies logistical support for constituent programs, through planning, research, seminars, and conferences. All of the above schools, centers, and institutes contribute to finding solutions for the world’s environmental challenges.

The Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability (EICES)

The Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability (EICES), formerly known as the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC), is actively involved in protecting biodiversity and ecosystems. The Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability is dedicated to the development of a rich, robust, and vibrant world within which we can secure a sustainable future. Through a diverse array of strategic partners in science, education, and outreach, the center builds unique programs that promote human well-being through the preservation, restoration, and management of biodiversity, and the services our ecosystems provide.

The Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC), a leading provider of cutting-edge environmental research, education, and training, since its inception in 1994, has grown into two institutions—an Earth institute center and a Secretariat for a major environmental consortium. The center’s new name is the Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability (EICES, pronounced “i-sees”). EICES also continues, however, as the Secretariat for the Consortium for Environmental Research and Conservation, continuing 15 years of collaborations between the Earth Institute, the American Museum of Natural History, the New York Botanical Garden, The Wildlife Conservation Society, and EcoHealth Alliance on biodiversity conservation.

American Museum of Natural History

The American Museum of Natural History is one of the world’s preeminent scientific, educational, and cultural institutions. Since its founding in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret, and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world, and the universe through a wide-reaching program of scientific research, education, and exhibitions. The institution comprises 45 permanent exhibition halls, state-of-the-art research laboratories, one of the largest natural history libraries in the Western Hemisphere, and a permanent collection of 32 million specimens and cultural artifacts. With a scientific staff of more than 200, the Museum supports research divisions in anthropology, paleontology, invertebrate and vertebrate zoology, and the physical sciences. The Museum’s scientific staff pursues a broad agenda of advanced scientific research, investigating the origins and evolution of life on Earth, the world’s myriad species, the rich variety of human culture, and the complex processes that have formed and continue to shape planet Earth and the universe beyond.

The Museum’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC) was created in June 1993 to advance the use of scientific data to mitigate threats to biodiversity. CBC programs integrate research, education, and outreach so that people, a key force in the rapid loss of biodiversity, will become participants in its conservation. The CBC works with partners throughout the world to build professional and institutional capacities for biodiversity conservation and heightens public understanding and stewardship of biodiversity. CBC projects are under way in the Bahamas, Bolivia, Madagascar, Mexico, Vietnam, and the Metropolitan New York region.

The Museum’s scientific facilities include: two molecular systematics laboratories equipped with modern high-throughput technology; the interdepartmental laboratories, which include a state-of-the-art imaging facility that provides analytical microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, science visualization, and image analysis to support the Museum’s scientific activities; a powerful parallel-computing facility, including a cluster of the world’s fastest computers, positioned to make significant contributions to bioinformatics; and a frozen tissue facility with the capacity to store one million DNA samples.

New York Botanical Garden

The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), with its 7 million specimen herbarium, the largest in the Western Hemisphere, and its LuEsther T. Mertz Library, the largest botanical and horticultural reference collection on a single site in the Americas, comprises one of the very best locations in the world to study plant science. NYBG’s systematic botanists discover, decipher, and describe the world’s plant and fungal diversity; and its economic botanists study the varied links between plants and people. The Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the United States, features some 6,000 species in a newly installed “Plants of the World” exhibit. The new International Plant Science Center stores the Garden collection under state-of-the-art environmental conditions and has nine study rooms for visiting scholars. All specimens are available for on-site study or loan.

In recent years, NYBG has endeavored to grow and expand its research efforts, supporting international field projects in some two dozen different countries, ranging from Brazil to Indonesia. In 1994, AMNH and NYBG established the Lewis and Dorothy Cullman Program for Molecular Systematics Studies to promote the use of molecular techniques in phylogenetic studies of plant groups. This program offers many opportunities for research in conservation genetics. NYBG operates both the Institute for Economic Botany (IEB) and the Institute of Systematic Botany (ISB). The ISB builds on the Garden’s long tradition of intensive and distinguished research in systematic botany—the study of the kinds and diversity of plants and their relationships—to develop the knowledge and means for responding effectively to the biodiversity crisis.

The Garden has also established a molecular and anatomical laboratory program, which includes light and electron microscopes, and has made enormous advances in digitizing its collection. There is currently a searchable on-line library catalog and specimen database collection with some half million unique records. Field sites around the world provide numerous opportunities for work in important ecosystems of unique biodiversity.

Wildlife Conservation Society

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), founded in 1895 as the New York Zoological Society, works to save wildlife and wild lands throughout the world. In addition to supporting the nation’s largest system of zoological facilities—the Bronx Zoo; the New York Aquarium; the Wildlife Centers in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Flushing Meadow Park; and the Wildlife Survival Center on St. Catherine’s Island, Georgia—WCS maintains a commitment to field-based conservation science. With 60 staff scientists and more than 100 research fellows, WCS has the largest professional field staff of any U.S.-based international conservation organization. Currently, WCS conducts nearly 300 field projects throughout the Americas, Asia, and Africa. The field program is supported by a staff of conservation scientists based in New York who also conduct their own research.

WCS’s field-based programs complement the organization’s expertise in veterinary medicine, captive breeding, animal care, genetics, and landscape ecology, most of which are based at the Bronx Zoo headquarters. WCS’s Conservation Genetics program places an emphasis on a rigorous, logical foundation for the scientific paradigms used in conservation biology and is linked to a joint Conservation Genetics program with the American Museum of Natural History. The Wildlife Health Sciences division is responsible for the health care of more than 17,000 wild animals in the five New York parks and wildlife centers. The departments of Clinical Care, Pathology, Nutrition, and Field Veterinary Programs provide the highest quality of care to wildlife.

EcoHealth Alliance

EcoHealth Alliance is an international organization of scientists dedicated to the conservation of biodiversity. For more than 40 years, EcoHealth Alliance has focused its efforts on conservation. Today, they are known for innovative research on the intricate relationships between wildlife, ecosystems, and human health.

EcoHealth Alliance's work spans the U.S. and more than 20 countries in Central and South America, the Caribbean, Africa, and Asia to research ways for people and wildlife to share bioscapes for their mutual survival. Their strength is built on innovations in research, education, and training and accessibility to international conservation partners.

Internationally, EHA programs support conservationists in over a dozen countries at the local level to save endangered species and their habitats, and to protect delicate ecosystems for the benefit of wildlife and humans.

Academic Programs

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology runs two undergraduate majors/concentrations. The primary major is in environmental biology and the second is evolutionary biology of the human species. The foci and requirements vary substantially and are intended for students with different academic interests.

The environmental biology major emphasizes those areas of biology and other disciplines essential for students who intend to pursue careers in the conservation of Earth’s living resources. It is designed to prepare students for graduate study in ecology and evolutionary biology, conservation biology, environmental policy and related areas, or for direct entry into conservation-related or science teaching careers.

Interdisciplinary knowledge is paramount to solving environmental biology issues, and a wide breadth of courses is thus essential, as is exposure to current work. Conservation internships are available through partner institutions and serve as research experience leading to the development of the required senior thesis.

Declaration of the environmental biology major must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies and filed in the departmental office located on the 10th floor of Schermerhorn Extension.

The major in evolutionary biology of the human species provides students with a foundation in the interrelated spheres of behavior, ecology, genetics, evolution, morphology, patterns of growth, adaptation, and forensics. Using the framework of evolution and with attention to the interplay between biology and culture, research in these areas is applied to our own species and to our closest relatives to understand who we are and where we came from. This integrated biological study is also known as biological anthropology. As an interdisciplinary major, students are also encouraged to draw on courses in related fields including biology, anthropology, geology, and psychology as part of their studies.

Professors

  • Marina Cords (also Anthropology)
  • Ruth DeFries (also Climate School)
  • Maria Diuk-Wasser
  • Kevin Griffin (also Earth and Environmental Sciences)
  • Shahid Naeem
  • Dustin Rubenstein
  • María Uriarte

Associate Professors

  • Duncan Menge

Assistant Professors

  • Andrés Bendesky
  • Deren Eaton

Lecturers

  • Bekka Brodie
  • Matthew Palmer
  • Jill Shapiro

Adjunct Faculty/Research Scientists

Columbia University

  • Hilary Callahan (Barnard Biology)
  • Steven Cohen (SIPA) 
  • Lisa Dale
  • Adela Gondek (SIPA)
  • Paul Hertz (Barnard)
  • Darcy Kelley (Biology)
  • Allison Lopatkin (Barnard Biology)
  • Alba Morales-Jimenez 
  • Brian Morton (Barnard Biology)
  • Paul Olsen (Lamont-Doherty)
  • Dorothy Peteet (Lamont-Doherty)
  • Miguel Pinedo Vasquez
  • Alison Pischedda (Barnard Biology)
  • Robert Pollack
  • Marya Pollack
  • Paige West (Barnard)
  • Natalie Boelman (Lamont-Doherty)

American Museum of Natural History

  • Felicity Arengo
  • Mary Blair
  • Frank Burbrink
  • Joel Cracraft
  • Suzanne Macey
  • Anna MacPherson
  • Christopher Raxworthy
  • Robert Rockwell
  • Nancy Simmons
  • Brian Smith
  • Jessica Ware

The New York Botanical Garden

  • Alex McAlvay
  • Michael Balick
  • Dennis Stevenson

Wildlife Conservation Society

  • Howard Rosenbaum
  • Scott Silver
  • Patrick R. Thomas

Ecohealth Alliance

  • Peter Daszak
  • Kevin Olival
  • Mindy Rostal

Others

Rachel Cox (Riverdale Country School)

Winslow Hansen (Cary Institute)

Sara Kross (University of Canterbury)

Chad Seewagen (Great Hollow)

Eleanor Sterling (Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology)

Guidelines for all Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology Majors and Concentrators

The grade of D is not accepted for any course offered in fulfillment of the requirements toward the majors or concentrations.


Major in Environmental Biology

The major in environmental biology requires 50 points, distributed as follows:

Lower Division Courses

Two terms of introductory or environmental biology such as the following:
EEEB UN2001
 - EEEB UN2002
Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
and Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere
Two terms of environmental science such as the following:
EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200EARTH'S ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS: THE SOLID EARTH
Two terms of chemistry such as the following:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I-LECTURES
and GENERAL CHEMISTRY II-LECTURES
One term of physics such as the following:
PHYS UN1201General Physics I
One term of statistics such as the following:
EEEB UN3005Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
BIOL BC2286Statistics and Research Design
STAT UN1101Introduction to Statistics
STAT UN1201Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
One term of calculus such as the following:
MATH UN1101CALCULUS I
MATH UN1102CALCULUS II
MATH UN1201Calculus III
MATH UN1202CALCULUS IV

Upper Division Courses

Students must complete five advanced elective courses (generally 3000-level or above) satisfying the following distribution. At least one of these courses must include a laboratory component. For more information and a list of appropriate courses, contact the director of undergraduate studies.

  1. Ecology, behavior, or conservation biology;
  2. Evolution or genetics;
  3. Morphology, physiology, or diversity;
  4. Policy or economics;
  5. One additional course from the preceding four groups.

Students must also complete a senior thesis, which involves completing a research internship (generally in the summer before the senior year) and completing at least one semester of the thesis research seminar, EEEB UN3991- EEEB UN3992 Senior Seminar. Enrollment in both semesters of the seminar, starting in the spring of the junior year, is recommended.

Students planning on continuing into graduate studies in environmental biology or related fields are encouraged to take organic chemistry and genetics.


Ecology and Evolution Track within the Environmental Biology Major

The ecology and evolution track within the environmental biology major requires 50 points, distributed as follows:

Lower Division Courses

Two terms of introductory or environmental biology such as the following:
EEEB UN2001
 - EEEB UN2002
Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
and Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere
Two terms of chemistry such as the following:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I-LECTURES
and GENERAL CHEMISTRY II-LECTURES
Chemistry laboratory such as the following:
CHEM UN1500GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
Two terms of physics such as the following:
PHYS UN1201
 - PHYS UN1202
General Physics I
and General Physics II
One term of statistics such as the following:
EEEB UN3005Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
BIOL BC2286Statistics and Research Design
STAT UN1101Introduction to Statistics
STAT UN1201Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
Two terms of calculus, or one term of calculus and second advanced course in math or statistics such as the following:
MATH UN1101CALCULUS I
MATH UN1102CALCULUS II
MATH UN1201Calculus III
MATH UN1202CALCULUS IV

Upper Division Courses

Students must complete five advanced elective courses (generally 3000-level or above) satisfying the following distribution. At least one of these courses must include a laboratory component. For more information and a list of appropriate courses, contact the director of undergraduate studies.

  1. Three courses in ecology, evolution, conservation biology, or behavior;
  2. One course in genetics. BIOL UN3031 GENETICS or BIOL BC2100 Molecular and Mendelian Genetics is recommended;
  3. One course in morphology, physiology, or diversity.

Students must also complete a senior thesis, which involves completing a research internship (generally in the summer before the senior year) and completing at least one semester of the thesis research seminar, EEEB UN3991-EEEB UN3992 Senior Seminar. Enrollment in both semesters of the seminar, starting in the spring of the junior year, is recommended.

Students planning on continuing into graduate studies in ecology or evolutionary biology are encouraged to take organic chemistry.


Major in Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species

The major in evolutionary biology of the human species requires 36 points, distributed as described below.

Students must take a minimum of 20 points from approved biological anthropology courses.  The additional courses may be taken in other departments with adviser approval.  These include up to 6 points of introductory biology/chemistry or calculus (in any combination).  Please speak with the major adviser about the extended list of courses from related areas including Biology, Psychology, Archaeology, Anthropology, Earth and Environmental Science, and Statistics that count toward this program.

For example, students interested in focusing on paleoanthropology would complement the requirements with additional courses in human evolution and morphology, evolutionary biology and theory, archaeology, genetics, and statistics.  Those interested in primate behavior would supplement the requirements with classes in behavioral biology, ecology, and statistics. 

Required Courses

EEEB UN1010Human Origins and Evolution
EEEB UN1011Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates
**Alternate options may be possible for all courses other than EEEB UN1010 Human Origins and Evolution and EEEB UN1011 Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates.  These will be considered on an individual basis in consultation with the major/concentration adviser.   

Conservation Course

EEEB UN3240Challenges and Strategies of Primate Conservation (This is the recommended conservation course but this requirement can be fulfilled with other classes such as Conservation Biology, Zoo Consevation, Ecology, Behavior and Conservation of Mammals, SEE-U in Jordan or Brazil, or other relevant offerings.)

Theoretical Foundation from Archaeology

Select one course of the following:  Nearly all archaeology courses (save for Rise of Civilization) can fulfill this requirement.  Check with the advisor.

Archaeology
ANTH UN1007The Origins of Human Society
ANTH UN2028Think Like an Archaeologist: Introduction to Method & Theory
ANTH UN3064Death and the Body
ANTH UN3823Archaeology Engaged: The Past in the Public Eye

Breadth Requirement

Select a minimum of one course from each of the three sections (may overlap seminar requirement for majors):

Genetics/Human Variation
BIOL BC2100Molecular and Mendelian Genetics
BIOL UN3031GENETICS
BIOL GU4560Evolution in the age of genomics
ANTH UN3970Biological Basis of Human Variation
EEEB GU4340HUMAN ADAPTATION
EEEB GU4700Race: The Tangled History of a Biological Concept
Primate Behavioral Biology and Ecology
EEEB UN3940Current Controversies in Primate Behavior and Ecology
BIOL BC2272Ecology
BIOL BC2280Animal Behavior
PSYC UN2420Animal Behavior
PSYC BC1119Systems and Behavioral Neuroscience
PSYC UN2450Behavioral Neuroscience
PSYC BC3372Comparative Cognition
PSYC UN3450Evolution of Intelligence, Animal Communication, & Language
PSYC UN3460Evolution of Behavior (Seminar)
PSYC UN3470Brain Evolution: Becoming Human (Seminar)
EEEB GU4010The Evolutionary Basis of Human Behavior
EEEB GU4134Behavioral Ecology
EEEB GU4201Ecology, Behavior, and Conservation of Mammals (can count for either breadth requirement or conservation requirement, but not both)
Human Evolution/Morphology
EEEB UN3208Explorations in Primate Anatomy
EEEB UN3215Forensic Osteology
EEEB UN3220The Evolution of Human Growth and Development
ANTH GU4147Human Skeletal Biology I
ANTH GU4148The Human Skeletal Biology II
EEEB UN3204Dynamics of Human Evolution
EEEB UN3910THE NEANDERTALS
ANTH GU4002Controversial Topics in Human Evolution
ANTH GU4200FOSSIL EVIDENCE FOR HUMAN EVOL
BIOL BC2278Evolution
BIOL UN3208Introduction to Evolutionary Biology
EEEB UN3030The Biology, Systematics, and Evolutionary History of the 'Apes'
BIOL BC2262Vertebrate Biology
BIOL UN3006PHYSIOLOGY
BIOL BC3360Physiology
EEEB GU4200Introduction to Mammalogy

Seminar

Selection at least one of the following seminars.  May also count toward the breadth requirement.

EEEB UN3204Dynamics of Human Evolution
EEEB UN3910THE NEANDERTALS
EEEB UN3940Current Controversies in Primate Behavior and Ecology
ANTH UN3970Biological Basis of Human Variation
EEEB UN3993
 - EEEB UN3994
EBHS SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR
and EBHS SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR
EEEB GU4321Human Nature: DNA, Race & Identity
ANTH GU4002Controversial Topics in Human Evolution (Fulfills the seminar requirement for the major)

Additional courses in the student's area of focus to complete the required 36 points overall including a minimum of 20 points of approved biological anthropology courses.

Students intending to pursue graduate study in this field should broaden their foundation by taking an introductory biology course (optimally either EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms or EEEB UN2002 Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere) or an advanced evolution course, a genetics course, and a statistics course.  We recommend that those interested in either biological anthropology or bioarchaeology take a foundation cultural anthropology course such as ANTH UN1002 The Interpretation of CultureANTH UN2004 INTRO TO SOC & CULTURAL THEORY, ANTH UN2005 THE ETHNOGRAPHIC IMAGINATION, or ANTH UN3040 Anthropological Theory I.  Students interested in forensic anthropology should take chemistry in lieu of of biology (though the latter is recommended as a foundation course for all students).  The adviser makes additional recommendations dependent on the student’s area of focus.

Approved Biological Anthropology Courses

Paleoanthropology and Morphology
EEEB UN1010Human Origins and Evolution
EEEB UN3204Dynamics of Human Evolution
EEEB UN3208Explorations in Primate Anatomy
EEEB UN3215Forensic Osteology
EEEB UN3220The Evolution of Human Growth and Development
EEEB UN3910THE NEANDERTALS
ANTH GU4147
 - ANTH GU4148
Human Skeletal Biology I
and The Human Skeletal Biology II
ANTH GU4200FOSSIL EVIDENCE FOR HUMAN EVOL taught intermittently
Primate Behavioral Ecology and Evolution
EEEB UN1011Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates
EEEB UN3030The Biology, Systematics, and Evolutionary History of the 'Apes'
EEEB UN3940Current Controversies in Primate Behavior and Ecology
EEEB GU4010The Evolutionary Basis of Human Behavior
Human Variation
ANTH UN3970Biological Basis of Human Variation
EEEB GU4340HUMAN ADAPTATION
EEEB GU4700Race: The Tangled History of a Biological Concept
Additional Courses
EEEB UN3240Challenges and Strategies of Primate Conservation
EEEB UN3993
 - EEEB UN3994
EBHS SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR
and EBHS SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR

Concentration in Environmental Biology

The concentration in environmental biology differs from the major in omitting calculus and physics from the lower division, requiring three advanced electives rather than five, and omitting the senior seminar with thesis project. It requires 36 points, distributed as follows:

Lower Division Courses

Two terms of introductory or environmental biology such as the following:
EEEB UN2001
 - EEEB UN2002
Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
and Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere (or equivalents)
Two terms of environmental science such as the following:
EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200EARTH'S ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS: THE SOLID EARTH
Two terms of chemistry such as the following:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I-LECTURES
and GENERAL CHEMISTRY II-LECTURES
One term of statistics. Select one of the following:
EEEB UN3005Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
BIOL BC2286Statistics and Research Design
STAT UN1101Introduction to Statistics
STAT UN1201Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics

Upper Division Courses

EEEB UN3087Conservation Biology
Two other 3000- or 4000- level courses from the advanced environmental biology courses listed for the major.

Concentration in Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species

The concentration in evolutionary biology of the human species requires 20 points including the required introductory courses EEEB UN1010 Human Origins and Evolution, EEEB UN1011 Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates, an approved conservation course (optimally Primate Conservation) , and three courses for the breadth distribution requirements as described for the major. Students must take a minimum of 15 points from approved biological anthropology courses as described for the major (the two introductory classes count toward that total). The additional courses may be taken in other departments with adviser approval.

Concentrators do not have to complete the theoretical foundation course from archaeology or a seminar.


Special Concentration in Environmental Science for Environmental Biology Majors

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental biology major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental biology major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

The special concentration in environmental science requires a minimum of 31.5 points, distributed as follows:

Introductory Environmental Science (13.5 points)

EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200EARTH'S ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS: THE SOLID EARTH
EESC UN2300Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System (equivalent to EEEB UN2002)

Introductory Science (6 points)

Two courses in chemistry, physics, mathematics, or environmental biology from the supporting mathematics and science list for the environmental science major.

Advanced Environmental Science (12 points)

Select four of the following:
EESC UN3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC BC3017Environmental Data Analysis
EESC BC3025Hydrology
EESC GU4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC GU4050Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
EESC GU4223SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY
EESC GU4550Plant Ecophysiology
EESC GU4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC GU4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC GU4917Earth/Human Interactions
EESC GU4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography

Advanced courses used to fulfill requirements in the environmental biology major cannot count toward requirements for the special concentration.


Special Concentration in Environmental Biology for Environmental Science Majors

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental science major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental science major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

The special concentration in environmental biology requires a minimum of 39 points, distributed as follows:

Introductory Environmental Biology and Environmental Science (17 points)

EEEB UN2001Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
EEEB UN2002Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere (equivalent to EESC UN2300)
EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200EARTH'S ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS: THE SOLID EARTH

Introductory Science (13 points)

Select one of the following chemistry sequences:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I-LECTURES
and GENERAL CHEMISTRY II-LECTURES
CHEM UN1604
 - CHEM UN2507
2ND TERM GEN CHEM (INTENSIVE)
and Intensive General Chemistry Laboratory
One term of statistics such as the following:
EEEB UN3005Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
BIOL BC2286Statistics and Research Design
STAT UN1101Introduction to Statistics
STAT UN1201Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
EEEB UN3087Conservation Biology

Advanced Environmental Biology (9 points)

Three additional advanced environmental biology courses (3000-level and above), each chosen from a different curricular area (evolution/genetics, ecology/behavior/conservation, anatomy/physiology/diversity, biology laboratory courses).

Fall 2022

EEEB UN1010 Human Origins and Evolution. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Lab fee: $25. Taught every fall.

This is an introductory course in human evolution. Building on a foundation of evolutionary theory, students explore primate behavioral morphology and then trace the last 65 million years of primate evolution from the earliest Paleocene forms to the fossil remains of earliest humans and human relatives. Along with Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates this serves as a core required class for the EBHS program.

Fall 2022: EEEB UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 1010 001/11996 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Jill Shapiro 3 47/86

EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Introductory biology course for majors in biology or environmental biology, emphasizing the ecological and evolutionary context of modern biology. 

Fall 2022: EEEB UN2001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 2001 001/12407 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Shahid Naeem, Andres Bendesky 3 32/60

EESC UN2330 SCIENCE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVPT. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

The course provides students with the natural science basis to appreciate co-dependencies of natural and human systems, which are central to understanding sustainable development. After completing the course, students should be able to incorporate scientific approaches into their research or policy decisions and be able to use scientific methods of data analysis. The semester will highlight the climate system and solutions from both physical and ecological perspectives; water resources; food production and the cycling of nutrients; and the role of biodiversity in sustainable development. The course emphasizes key scientific concepts such as uncertainty, experimental versus observational approaches, prediction and predictability, the use of models and other essential methodological aspects.

Fall 2022: EESC UN2330
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2330 001/11580 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
John Mutter, Jenna Lawrence 3 120/120

EEEB UN3005 Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: some background in ecology, evolutionary biology, and/or statistics is recommended.

An introduction to the theoretical principles and practical application of statistical methods in ecology and evolutionary biology. The course will cover the conceptual basis for a range of statistical techniques through a series of lectures using examples from the primary literature. The application of these techniques will be taught through the use of statistical software in computer-based laboratory sessions.

Fall 2022: EEEB UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3005 001/12408 M 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
3 35/35

EEEB UN3015 INTRO-STAT-ECOLGY/EVOL BIO-LAB. 0.00 points.

Required Lab for EEEB UN3005. An introduction to the theoretical principles and practical application of statistical methods in ecology and evolutionary biology. The course will cover the conceptual basis for a range of statistical techniques through a series of lectures using examples from the primary literature. The application of these techniques will be taught through the use of statistical software in computer-based laboratory sessions

Fall 2022: EEEB UN3015
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3015 001/12409 M 7:40pm - 8:55pm
Room TBA
0.00 7/20
EEEB 3015 002/12410 W 7:40pm - 8:55pm
Room TBA
0.00 6/20

EEEB UN3919 Trading Nature: A Conservaton Biology Perspective. 4 points.

This course explores the scientific and theoretical conceptualization of nature as a market commodity, through the lens of conservation biology.  Students will engage in critical analysis of the 'traditional' forms in which biodiversity has been appropriated as inputs into markets such as fisheries, resource extraction, bushmeat and medicine, as well as new market environmentalism.

Fall 2022: EEEB UN3919
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3919 001/12411 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Mary Blair 4 10/12

EEEB UN3991 Senior Seminar. 3 points.

Open only to seniors.

Guided, independent, indepth research experience culminating in the senior essay. Weekly meetings are held to review work in progress, to share results through oral and written reports, and to consider career options for further work in this field.

Fall 2022: EEEB UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3991 001/12415 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Matthew Palmer 3 9/25

EEEB UN3993 EBHS SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

Four points for the year-long course.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission and senior standing as a major in The Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species (EBHS).
Prerequisites: the instructor's permission and senior standing as a major or concentrator in The Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species (EBHS). Year-long seminar in which senior EBHS majors develop a research project and write a senior thesis. Regular meetings are held to discuss research and writing strategies,review work in progress, and share results through oral and written reports

Fall 2022: EEEB UN3993
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3993 001/12417 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
1012 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Jill Shapiro 3.00 3/8

EEEB UN3997 Independent Study. 1-3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Students conduct research in environmental biology under supervision of a faculty mentor. The topic and scope of the research project must be approved before the student registers for the course.

Fall 2022: EEEB UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3997 001/12419  
Matthew Palmer 1-3 1/10
EEEB 3997 002/12421  
Jill Shapiro 1-3 8/10

EEEB GU4100 FOREST ECOLOGY. 4 points.

Prerequisites: one year of college biology.

EEEB GU4100 Forest Ecology focuses on interpreting and understanding pattern and process in forested ecosystems. These ecosystems include the assemblages of trees and the biological communities and environments in which they exist. The complex interactions among the organisms and the physical environment are a major focus of this course. The course involves lecture, literature discussion, and field laboratory components, with an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of student-collected data. FRIDAY MEETINGS WILL RUN ALL DAY IN SEPTEMBER and OCTOBER

Fall 2022: EEEB GU4100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4100 001/12423 W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Matthew Palmer, Kevin Griffin 4 14/14
EEEB 4100 001/12423 F 9:00am - 1:00pm
Room TBA
Matthew Palmer, Kevin Griffin 4 14/14

EEEB GU4140 Ornithology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: EEEB UN2001, EEEB UN2002, or equivalent.

This basic ornithology class lays the foundation for more in-depth study as it presents an overview of avian evolution, ecology, and current conservation issues.

Fall 2022: EEEB GU4140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4140 001/12448 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Felicity Arengo, Chad Seewagen 3 14/14

EEEB GU4201 Ecology, Behavior, and Conservation of Mammals . 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: A course in either organismal biology, evolution, ecology or permission of the ,instructor if G4200 was not taken.

This course examines the wide ranging aspects of features of mammalian natural history, behavior and ecology, and considers the implications of these features on the conservation status of particular mammal taxa for the future.  We will also explore particular conservation challenges for mammals such as bats, grazing mammals, and large carnivores in increasingly human-dominated landscapes. This course will be a combination of lecture and student led discussions related to the conservation issues facing mammals today.

Fall 2022: EEEB GU4201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4201 001/12539 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Scott Silver 3 12/12

EEEB GU4321 Human Nature: DNA, Race & Identity. 4 points.

The course focuses on human identity, beginning with the individual and progressing to communal and global viewpoints using a framework of perspectives from biology, genetics, medicine, psychiatry, religion and the law.

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4321 001/12626 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Robert Pollack, Marya Pollack 4 15/20
Fall 2022: EEEB GU4321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4321 001/12540 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Robert Pollack, Marya Pollack 4 0/20

EEEB GU4350 Primate Sexuality. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: (EEEB UN1010) or (EEEB UN1011)

In this course we take an integrative and comparative approach to understanding the sexual lives of primates.  Focusing on mating and reproductive behavior with an explicitly evolutionary perspective, we will identify the fundamental principles of how and why selection has favored particular behaviors and morphologies in different primate species.

Fall 2022: EEEB GU4350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4350 001/12541 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Alba Lucia Morales Jimenez 3 8/20

EEEB GU4670 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems. 3.00 points.

Geographic information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for analyzing fundamental geographic questions. GIS involves generating, linking, manipulating, and analyzing different sorts of spatial data; creating outputs commonly visualized as two- and sometimes three- dimensional maps. This course will cover major topics in GIS with applications for the broad field of biology and natural sciences, using QGIS and R. The goal of this course is to teach students a level of GIS proficiency such that they will be self-sufficient in their further learning and use of GIS

Fall 2022: EEEB GU4670
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4670 001/12542 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Eric Glass 3.00 24/30

Spring 2022

EEEB UN1005 First Year Seminar in Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology. 1 point.

This course provides a brief introduction to ecology, evolution and environmental biology with an emphasis on key concepts, current research, and opportunities for undergraduates.  The course is taught jointly by the faculty in the department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology (E3B), with each session covering a different aspect of research and/or teaching in the department.  Students are expected to complete weekly readings and participate in discussion both in class and online.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN1005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 1005 001/13311 T 2:40pm - 3:55pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Jill Shapiro, Matthew Palmer 1 31/30

EEEB UN1011 Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: Corequisite EEEB UN1111

Study of non-human primate behavior from the perspective of phylogeny, adaptation, physiology and anatomy, and life history. Focuses on the four main problems primates face: finding appropriate food, avoiding being eaten themselves, reproducing in the face of competition, and dealing with social partners. Along with Human Origins & Evolution, this serves as a core required class for the EBHS program.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN1011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 1011 001/11958 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Marina Cords 3 36/50

EEEB UN2002 Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: EEEB UN2001

Second semester of introductory biology sequence for majors in enviromnental biology and environmental science, emphasizing the ecological and evolutionary aspects of biology. Also intended for those interested in an introduction to the principles of ecology and evolutionary biology.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN2002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 2002 001/11983 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Matthew Palmer, Sonya Dyhrman 4 20/60

EEEB UN3008 Animal Behavior and the Endocrine System. 3.00 points.

Why do birds sing in the spring? How does a tadpole become a frog? In this course, we will dive into the mechanisms that drive the fascinating behaviors of animals. Students will first learn about hormones, chemical messengers within the body, and how they function within the endocrine system. Then, we will focus on the manner in which hormones both regulate and respond to specific types of animal behavior: mating and reproduction, aggression, stress, sociality, and parental care. Through these topics, students will engage with and learn to critically assess scientific literature. This course is reading and writing intensive; students will have weekly readings from the textbook and from theoretical and empirical scientific papers, and will write weekly reflection papers. Students will also contribute to a community of learning through discussion groups and peer review sessions. At the end of the semester, students will use the skills they have built throughout the course to investigate a question of their choosing, propose potential hypotheses, and complete a scientific literature review contributing to the field of behavioral endocrinology. Additional skills required to complete this paper are bolstered by weekly exercises in select topics (e.g. interpreting figures, claims assessment techniques, conducting a literature search, etc.). These exercises will also encourage students to think critically about the biases and implications for how science in this field is conducted

Spring 2022: EEEB UN3008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3008 001/14395 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
413 Hamilton Hall
Stefanie Siller 3.00 10/17

EEEB UN3011 Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: introductory biology course in organismal biology and the instructor's permission. Corequisite EEEB UN3111

Survey of non-human primate behavior from the perspective of phylogeny, adaptation, physiology and anatomy, and life history. Focus on the four main problems primates face: finding appropriate food, avoid being eaten themselves, reproducing in the face of competition, and dealing with social partners.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3011 001/11963 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Marina Cords 3 6/10

EEEB UN3087 Conservation Biology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: introductory organismal biology course, ideally EEEB UN2002.

Applications of biological principles to the conservation of biodiverstiy. Because conservation biology is a cross-disciplinary field, some of the social, philosophical, and economic dimensions of biological conservation are also addressed.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN3087
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3087 001/11974 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Dustin Partridge 3 17/26

EEEB UN3215 Forensic Osteology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Taught every other year. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given at first class session to EBHS majors/concentrators.

Prerequisites: no prior experience with skeletal anatomy required. Not appropriate for students who have already taken either EEEB GU4147 or EEEB GU4148.

An exploration of the hidden clues in your skeleton. Students learn the techniques of aging, sexing, assessing ancestry, and the effects of disease, trauma and culture on human bone.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN3215
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3215 001/11978 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Jill Shapiro 3 15/16

EEEB UN3910 THE NEANDERTALS. 4.00 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Offered every other year/rotating with Dynamics of Human Evolution. Enrollment limited to 13. Priority given at first class session to EBHS majors/concentrators.Not offered during 2022-23 academic year.

Prerequisites: EEEB UN1010 Human Species or ANTH UN1007.
Nearly two hundred after discovery, Neandertals remain one of most enigmatic hominin taxa. What do we understand today about their biology, subsistence, culture, cognitive abilities, and eventual fate? Are they simply extinct relatives or do their genes continue in many of us today? In this seminar we will examine the primary research in an attempt to find answers to some of these questions

Spring 2022: EEEB UN3910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3910 001/11984 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Jill Shapiro 4.00 11/12

EEEB OC3920 Biology of African Animals and Ecosystems. 4 points.

Course consists of 6 separate modules, offered in rotation of four, each worth 4 points.Not offered during 2022-23 academic year.

Prerequisites: EEEB W2001 and EEEB W2002 Environmental Biology I and II, or the instructor's permission.

This course offers a small group of students the unique opportunity to study the ecology, evolution, and behavior of African animals and ecosystems in one of the world's most biologically spectacular settings, the wildlife-rich savannas of Kenya.  In addition to gaining sophisticated training in fieldwork, hypothesis-driven biological research, statistics, and scientific writing and presentation, the course gives participants many opportunities to observe and study a diversity of plants, animals and their interactions. Lectures include core topics in ecology and evolution with emphasis on the African animals and ecosystems that students will see in Kenya. This course is part of a semester abroad program in Tropical Biology and Sustainability based in Kenya and cannot be taken separately on campus.

Spring 2022: EEEB OC3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3920 001/11985  
Dustin Rubenstein 4 1/20

EEEB UN3992 Senior Seminar. 3 points.

Open only to seniors.

Guided, independent, indepth research experience culminating in the senior essay. Weekly meetings are held to review work in progress, to share results through oral and written reports, and to consider career options for further work in this field.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN3992
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3992 001/12097 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Matthew Palmer 3 12/20

EEEB UN3998 Independent Study. 1-3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Students conduct research in environmental biology under supervision of a faculty mentor. The topic and scope of the research project must be approved before the student registers for the course.

Spring 2022: EEEB UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3998 001/12131  
Matthew Palmer 1-3 2/10
EEEB 3998 002/12133  
Jill Shapiro 1-3 0/10

EEEB GU4015 ANIMAL COMMUN:PRIMATE PERSP. 3.00 points.

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4015
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4015 001/14117 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Alba Lucia Morales Jimenez 3.00 10/20

EEEB GU4126 Introduction to Conservation Genetics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2022-23 academic year.

In this course, we will use evolutionary genetic principles and population genetic models to describe the extent and distribution of genetic variation in populations and species, and determine ways to conserve it. A basic knowledge of genetics and mathematics is assumed.

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4126
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4126 001/12139 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Rachel Welt 3 13/15

EEEB GU4127 Disease Ecology. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Introduction to the ecology and epidemiology of infectious diseases of humans and wildlife.

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4127
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4127 001/12140 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Maria Diuk-Wasser 3 15/25

EEEB GU4135 Urban Ecology and Design. 3 points.

Prerequisites: One year of introductory biology or permission from the instuctor

Urban Ecology and Design will explore and evaluate the ecological potential of the designed urban environment.  Students will work in interdisciplinary groups to study and evaluate the relationships between urban design and ecological performance through a series of case studies, field explorations, and studio visits.  New York City will be used as a test site for analysis and students will work together to evaluate urban systems with regards to vegetation, wildlife, sediment management, water, energy, and pollution using techniques of visual mapping and the application of quantitative scientific criteria over multiple scales.  The course offers a deeper understanding of the relationships that drive urban ecosystems, a critical evaluation of commonly used urban design techniques, and insights into how to better design functional ecosystems within the urban context.

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4135
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4135 001/12653 F 11:00am - 1:00pm
227 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Matthew Palmer 3 29/40

EEEB GU4200 Introduction to Mammalogy. 3.00 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Biology or Evolution.
This taxon-based course provides students with a basic understanding of the diversity and natural history of the mammals. Broad coverage of mammalian biology includes: morphological adaptations, evolutionary history and biogeography

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4200 001/12602 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Scott Silver 3.00 13/15

EEEB GU4260 Food, Ecology, and Globalization. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 30.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This class examines the social, ecological, and political economic roles of what and how we eat from a global perspective.

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4260
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4260 001/12607 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
1015 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Alexandra Huddell, Sara Kross 3 19/24

EEEB GU4321 Human Nature: DNA, Race & Identity. 4 points.

The course focuses on human identity, beginning with the individual and progressing to communal and global viewpoints using a framework of perspectives from biology, genetics, medicine, psychiatry, religion and the law.

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4321 001/12626 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Robert Pollack, Marya Pollack 4 15/20
Fall 2022: EEEB GU4321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4321 001/12540 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Robert Pollack, Marya Pollack 4 0/20

EEEB GU4340 HUMAN ADAPTATION. 3.00 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: EEEB W1010 Human Species or ANTH V1007 Origins of Human Society or the instructor's permission.
This course explores human adaptation from a biological, ecological and evolutionary perspective. From our earliest hominin ancestors in Africa to our own species' subsequent dispersal throughout the world, our lineage has encountered innumerable environmental pressures. Using morphological, physiological and behavioral/cultural evidence, we will examine the responses to these pressures that helped shape our unique lineage and allowed it to adapt to a diverse array of environments

Spring 2022: EEEB GU4340
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4340 001/13769 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Jessica Manser 3.00 15/15

Of Related Interest

Economics
ECON GU4625Economics of the Environment
Earth and Environmental Sciences
EESC UN2330SCIENCE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVPT
EESC GU4050Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
EESC GU4550Plant Ecophysiology
EESC GU4835Wetlands and Climate Change
Political Science
POLS GU4730Game Theory and Political Theory