History

Departmental Office: 413 Fayerweather; 212-854-4646
http://www.history.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Neslihan Şenocak , 324 Fayerweather; nsenocak@columbia.edu

Undergraduate Administrator: Michael Adan, undergraduate-history@columbia.edu

The history curriculum covers most areas of the world and most periods of history. It encourages students to develop historical understanding in the widest sense of the word: a thorough empirical grasp along with the kind of analytical skills that come with a genuinely historical sensibility. This is done through two types of courses: lectures and seminars. Lectures range from broad surveys of the history of a place or period to more thematically oriented courses. Seminars offer students the opportunity to work more closely with historical sources in smaller groups and to do more sophisticated written work. Because history courses usually have no prerequisites, there are no preordained sequences to follow. It is advisable, however, that students take a relevant lecture course in preparation for a seminar. Majors wishing to follow a more intensive program are advised to enroll in a historiography course and to undertake a senior thesis project. Historically, majors have pursued careers in a very wide range of areas including medicine, law, mass media, Wall Street, and academia.

Advanced Placement

Students may receive 3 credits toward the overall degree requirements for a score of 5 on the AP European History exam or the AP United States History exam. No points count toward or fulfill any requirements of the history major or concentration.

Advising

During their junior and senior years, majors and concentrators are advised by the faculty members of the Undergraduate Education Committee (UNDED). UNDED advisers also review and sign Plan of Study (POS) forms for majors and concentrators at least once per year. POS forms track students’ progress toward completing all major and concentration requirements. New history majors and concentrators may see any member of UNDED. For the most up-to-date information on UNDED members, please see the undergraduate advising page of the departmental website.

Majors and concentrators can also receive pure academic interest advising (non-requirement advising) from any faculty member and affiliated faculty member of the department.

First-years and sophomores considering a history major or concentration can seek advising from UNDED or any other faculty member.

For questions about requirements, courses, or the general program, majors and concentrators can also contact the undergraduate administrator.

Departmental Honors

To be eligible for departmental honors, the student must have a GPA of at least 3.6 in courses for the major, an ambitious curriculum, and an outstanding senior thesis. Honors are awarded on the basis of a truly outstanding senior thesis. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Course Numbering

Courses are numbered by type:
UN 1xxx - Introductory Survey Lectures 
UN 2xxx - Undergraduate Lectures 
UN 3xxx - Undergraduate Seminars 
GU 4xxx - Joint Undergraduate/Graduate Seminars 

and field (with some exceptions):
x000-x059: Ancient
x060-x099: Medieval
x100-x199: Early modern Europe
x200-x299: East Central Europe
x300-x399: Modern Western Europe
x400-x599: United States
x600-x659: Jewish
x660-x699: Latin America
x700-x759: Middle East
x760-x799: Africa
x800-x859: South Asia
x860-x899: East Asia
x900-x999: Research, historiography, and transnational

Seminars

Seminars are integral to the undergraduate major in history. In these courses, students develop research and writing skills under the close supervision of a faculty member. Enrollment is normally limited to approximately 15 students. In order to maintain the small size of the courses, admission to most seminars is by instructor's permission or application.

In conjunction with the Barnard History Department and other departments in the University (particularly East Asian Languages and Cultures), the History Department offers about 25 seminars each semester that majors may use to meet their seminar requirements. While there are sufficient seminars offered to meet the needs of majors seeking to fulfill the two-seminar requirement, given the enrollment limits, students may not always be able to enroll in a particular seminar. Students should discuss with UNDED their various options for completing the seminar requirement.

The History Department has developed an on-line application system for some seminars. The department regularly provides declared majors and concentrators with information on upcoming application periods, which typically occur midway through the preceding semester. Students majoring in other fields, or students who have not yet declared a major, must inform themselves of the application procedures and deadlines by checking the undergraduate seminar page of the departmental website.

Professors

  • Charles Armstrong
  • Volker Berghahn (emeritus)
  • Richard Billows
  • Elizabeth Blackmar
  • Casey Blake
  • Christopher Brown
  • Richard Bulliet (emeritus)
  • Elisheva Carlebach
  • Mark Carnes (Barnard)
  • Zeynep Çelik
  • George Chauncey
  • John Coatsworth (Provost)
  • Matthew Connelly
  • Victoria de Grazia
  • Mamadou Diouf (Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies)
  • Catherine Evtuhov 
  • Barbara Fields
  • Eric Foner (emeritus)
  • Carol Gluck
  • Martha Howell
  • Robert Hymes (East Asian Language and Cultures)
  • Kenneth Jackson
  • Karl Jacoby
  • Matthew Jones
  • Ira Katznelson (Political Science)
  • Joel Kaye (Barnard)
  • Alice Kessler-Harris (emerita)
  • Rashid Khalidi
  • Dorothy Ko (Barnard)
  • Adam Kosto
  • William Leach (emeritus)
  • Gregory Mann
  • Mark Mazower
  • Robert McCaughey (Barnard)
  • Stephanie McCurry
  • Jose Moya (Barnard)
  • Mae Ngai
  • Susan Pedersen
  • Pablo Piccato
  • Rosalind Rosenberg (Barnard)
  • David Rosner (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • David Rothman (Physicians and Surgeons)
  • Simon Schama (University Professor)
  • Seth Schwartz
  • Herbert Sloan (Barnard, emeritus)
  • Pamela Smith 
  • Robert Somerville (Religion)
  • Michael Stanislawski
  • Anders Stephanson
  • Lisa Tiersten (Barnard)
  • Adam Tooze
  • Deborah Valenze (Barnard)
  • Marc Van de Mieroop
  • Richard Wortman (emeritus)
  • Madeleine Zelin (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  •  

Associate Professors

  • Gergely Baics (Barnard)
  • Lisbeth Kim Brandt (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Paul Chamberlin 
  • Amy Chazkel
  • Charly Coleman
  • Marwa Elshakry
  • Frank Guridy
  • Hilary Hallett
  • Natasha Lightfoot
  • Malgorzata Mazurek
  • Nara Milanich
  • Lien-Hang Nguyen
  • Gregory Pflugfelder (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Caterina Pizzigoni
  • Anupama Rao (Barnard)
  • Camille Robcis
  • Samuel Roberts
  • Neslihan Senocak
  • Rhiannon Stephens
  • Gray Tuttle (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Carl Wennerlind (Barnard)
  •  

Assistant Professors

  • Hannah Farber
  • Andrew Lipman (Barnard)
  • Gulnar Kendirbai (Visiting)
  • A. Tunç Şen
  • Alma Steingart
  • Sailakshmi Ramgopal
  •  

Lecturers in Discipline

  • Victoria Phillips 
  •  

On Leave

Fall 2019: Armstrong, Carnes (Barnard), de Grazia, Howell, Piccato, Schwartz, Smith, Stephanson, Stephens, Tooze

Spring 2020: Armstrong, Baics, Gluck, Jackson, Piccato, Pizzigoni, Schwartz, Smith, Stephanson, Stephens, Tooze, Valenze

Guidelines for all History Majors and Concentrators

For detailed information about the history major or concentration, as well as the policies and procedures of the department, please refer to the History at Columbia Undergraduate Handbook, available for download on the departmental website.


Major in History

Students must complete a minimum of nine courses in the department, of which four or more must be in an area of specialization chosen by the student and approved by a member of UNDED. Students must also fulfill a breadth requirement by taking three courses outside of their specialization. Two of the courses taken in the major must be seminars (including one seminar in the chosen specialization).

The requirements of the undergraduate program encourage students to do two things:

  1. Develop a deeper knowledge of the history of a particular time and/or place. Students are required to complete a specialization by taking a number of courses in a single field of history of their own choosing. The field should be defined, in consultation with a member of UNDED, according to geographical, chronological, and/or thematic criteria. For example, a student might choose to specialize in 20th C. U.S. History, Medieval European History, Ancient Greek and Roman History, or Modern East Asian History. The specialization does not appear on the student's transcript, but provides an organizing principle for the program the student assembles in consultation with UNDED.
  2. Gain a sense of the full scope of history as a discipline by taking a broad range of courses. Students must fulfill a breadth requirement by taking courses outside their own specialization -- at least one course removed in time and two removed in space.
    1. Time: majors and concentrators must take at least one course removed in time from their specialization:
      • Students specializing in the modern period must take at least one course in the pre-modern period; students specializing in the pre-modern period must take at least one course in the modern period.

      • If the course proposed is in the same regional field as a student's specialization, special care must be taken to ensure that it is as far removed as possible; please consult with UNDED to make sure a given course counts for the chronological breadth requirement. 

    2. Space: majors must take at least two additional courses in regional fields not their own:

      • These two "removed in space" courses must also cover two different regions.
      • For example, students specializing in some part of Europe must take two courses in Africa, East or South Asia, Latin America/Caribbean, Middle East, and/or the U.S.
      • Some courses cover multiple geographic regions. If a course includes one of the regions within a student's specialization, that course cannot count towards the breadth requirement unless it is specifically approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. For example, if a student is specializing in 20th C. U.S. history and takes the class World War II in Global Perspective, the class is too close to the specialization and may not count as a regional breadth course.

All courses in the Barnard History Department as well as select courses in East Asian Languages and Cultures; Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies; and other departments count toward the major. Eligible inter-departmental courses may include: 

  • African Civilizations (AFCV UN1020) (when taught by Professor Gregory Mann, Professor Rhiannon Stephens, or PhD students in the Columbia University Department of History; the course does NOT count for History when taught by anyone else)
  • Primary Texts of Latin American Civilization (LACV UN1020) (when taught by Professor Pablo Piccato, Professor Caterina Pizzigoni, or PhD students in the Columbia University Department of History; the course does NOT count for History when taught by anyone else)
  • Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China (ASCE UN1359), INTRO EAST ASIAN CIV: JPN (ASCE UN1361)Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea (ASCE UN1363) or other ASCE UN1xxx courses (when taught by Professors Charles Armstrong, Carol Gluck, Robert Hymes, Dorothy Ko, Eugenia Lean, Feng Li, David Lurie, Jungwon Kim, Paul Kreitman, Gregory Pflugfelder, Gray Tuttle, or Madeleine Zelin, and NOT when they are taught by anyone else)
  • Please see the Courses section on the departmental website to see which of these might count in a given semester. Any courses not listed or linked on the departmental website, however historical in approach or content, do not count toward the history major or concentration, except with explicit written approval of the UNDED chair.
  • If you suspect a History course has escaped being listed at the above link and want to confirm whether or not it counts for History students, please contact the Undergraduate Administrator.

Thematic Specializations

Suitably focused thematic and cross-regional specializations are permitted and the breadth requirements for students interested in these topics are set in consultation with a member of UNDED. Classes are offered in fields including, but not limited to:

  • Ancient history
  • Medieval history
  • Early modern European history
  • Modern European history
  • United States history
  • Latin American and Caribbean history
  • Middle Eastern history
  • East Asian history
  • South Asian history

Additionally, classes are offered in thematic and cross-regional fields which include, but are not limited to:

  • Intellectual history
  • Jewish history
  • Women's history
  • International history
  • History of science

These fields are only examples. Students should work with a member of UNDED to craft a suitably focused specialization on the theme or field that interests them.

Thesis Requirements

Majors may elect to write a senior thesis, though this is not a graduation requirement. Only senior thesis writers are eligible to be considered for departmental honors. The senior thesis option is not available to concentrators.

The yearlong HIST UN3838-HIST UN3839 Senior Thesis Seminar carries 8 points, 4 of which typically count as a seminar in the specialization. For the most up-to-date information on the field designations for history courses, please see the Courses section of the departmental website.


Concentration in History

Effective February 2018, students must complete a minimum of six courses in history. At least three of the six courses must be in an area of specialization, one far removed in time, and one on a geographic region far removed in space. There is no seminar requirement for the concentration.

Fall 2020 History Courses

HIST UN1002 Ancient History of Mesopotamia and Asia Minor. 4 points.

A survey of the political and cultural history of Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran from prehistory to the disappearance of the cuneiform documentation, with special emphasis on Mesopotamia. Groups(s): A

Fall 2020: HIST UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1002 001/12864 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 20/300

HIST UN1010 The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.. 4 points.

A review of the history of the Greek world from the beginnings of Greek archaic culture around 800 B.C., through the classical and hellenistic periods to the definitive Roman conquest in 146 B.C., with concentration on political history, but attention also to social and cultural developments.Field(s): ANC

Fall 2020: HIST UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1010 001/10007 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Richard Billows 4 78/300

HIST BC1062 Introduction to Later Middle Ages: 1050-1450. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Social environment, political, and religious institutions, and the main intellectual currents of the Latin West studied through primary sources and modern historical writings.

HIST BC1401 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. 4.00 points.

Themes include Native and colonial cultures and politics, the evolution of American political and economic institutions, relationships between religious and social movements, and connecting ideologies of race and gender with larger processes such as enslavement, dispossession, and industrialization

Spring 2021: HIST BC1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1401 001/00130 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Andrew Lipman 4.00 64/75

HIST BC1101 Introduction to European History: Renaissance to French Revolution. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual history of early modern Europe, including the Renaissance, Reformation and Counter-Reformation, absolutism, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment.

Fall 2020: HIST BC1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1101 001/00044 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Deborah Valenze 4 48/60

HIST UN1768 European Intellectual History. 4 points.

This course provides an introduction to some of the major landmarks in European cultural and intellectual history, from the aftermath of the French Revolution to the 1970s.  We will pay special attention to the relationship between texts (literature, anthropology, political theory, psychoanalysis, art, and film) and the various contexts in which they were produced.  Among other themes, we will discuss the cultural impact of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, industrialism, colonialism, modernism, the Russian Revolution, the two world wars, decolonization, feminism and gay liberation movements, structuralism and poststructuralism.  In conjunction, we will examine how modern ideologies (liberalism, conservatism, Marxism, imperialism, fascism, totalitarianism, neoliberalism) were developed and challenged over the course of the last two centuries. 


Participation in weekly discussion sections staffed by TAs is mandatory.  The discussion sections are 50 minutes per session.  Students must register for the general discussion (“DISC”) section, and will be assigned to a specific time and TA instructor once the course begins.

Fall 2020: HIST UN1768
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1768 001/13776 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 4 57/300

HIST UN1769 DISC - European Intellectual History . 0 points.

Required Discussion Section for HIST 1768 European Intellectual History.  Students must first register for HIST 1768.

Fall 2020: HIST UN1769
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1769 001/13777 Th 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 9/13
HIST 1769 002/13778 Th 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 9/13
HIST 1769 003/13779 F 9:10am - 10:00am
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 11/13
HIST 1769 004/13780 F 10:10am - 11:00am
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 11/13
HIST 1769 005/23071 F 11:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 8/13
HIST 1769 006/23072 F 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 9/13

HIST UN2003 Empire & Nation-Building East Central Europe. 4.00 points.

This lecture course investigates nation-building as a process of decolonization of Europe’s land empires (Ottoman, German, Russian, and Habsburg) from 18th century to present. It was a turbulent historical process: decolonization of European East’s ‘small peoples’ paved the way to anti-imperial and anti-colonial movements outside Europe only to be crushed, in the mid-twentieth-century, by imperial politics of Hitler’s Germany and the Soviet Union. We will study different ways in which culture – local languages, vernacular heritage, religion, and material culture – became politically weaponized to achieve goals of national self-determination and social revolution. Throughout the 19th and 20th century nation-building in the European East produced particular forms of non-Western modernity that found expression in built environments, visual arts, letters, music, public activism, and domestic sphere. We will study how resistance and enforced accommodation to Empire turned into spaces of cultural production, mass movements, economic upheaval, state-building, and last but not least, physical violence. Finally, we will investigate how ordinary Eastern Europeans experienced and gave meaning to the processes of nation-building. The course is intended for students interested in cultural, intellectual, social and gender history, histories of nationalism and communism, as well as local and transnational histories of Eastern European ‘peoples’ (Jewish, Muslim, Christian Slavic; German, Russian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Southern Slavic/Yugo-Slav, Greek, and Roma)

HIST UN2112 The Scientific Revolution in Western Europe: 1500-1750. 4 points.

Introduction to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of the upheavals of astronomy, anatomy, mathematics, alchemy from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Field(s): EME

Fall 2020: HIST UN2112
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2112 001/12046 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Online Only
Matthew Jones 4 17/300

HIST BC2321 Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Culture of Empire. 3 points.

Examines the shaping of European cultural identity through encounters with non-European cultures from 1500 to the post-colonial era. Novels, paintings, and films will be among the sources used to examine such topics as exoticism in the Enlightenment, slavery and European capitalism, Orientalism in art, ethnographic writings on the primitive, and tourism.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2321 001/00042 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 3 61/70

HIST UN2360 TWENTIETH CENTURY BRITAIN. 4.00 points.

This course surveys the main currents of British history from 1900 to the present, with particular attention to the changing place of Britain in the world and the changing shape of society and politics.  Throughout this course, we will ask:  Where is power located in Britain and its empire?  What held Britain and the empire together, and what tore them apart?  What was life like for Britons – young and old, men and women, rich and poor, Black and white – across the course of this century? When and how did social change happen?  How did people respond?

,

We will tackle these questions by looking closely at some key periods of political conflict and resolution, by reading key texts from the time, and – for the latter part of the course – by viewing films and speeches.  The course requirements include section participation, including regular posts (20%), a take-home midterm (20%), two short research assignments (20% each) and a take-home final (20%).  You must complete all assignments and exams to pass the course.  The research assignments are devised to help familiarize you with historians’ practice, so that you can search for answers to historical questions on your own.  The assignments are integrated into section discussion: due dates are (as a result) not flexible and section attendance is required.  The films are an essential part of the course and will be discussed in section.  

,

Readings for this courseare drawn mostly from the rich primary materials available.  They are supplemented by select articles chosen to bring out some of the key issues historians find significant about particular periods or events.  My lectures constitute the main “textbook” for the course, but I am also recommending that you read selected chapters from a textbook that is available online:  Stephanie Barczewski et al, Britain since 1688https://www-taylorfrancis-com.ezproxy.cul.columbia.edu/books/9781315748610.  

,

Most material is available online, but five books (asterisked below) will need to be ordered or bought from Book Culture (or, if you are not in the New York area, online).  A timeline, a list of interesting web links, and a list of great British films can be found on the Courseworks page.

,

Course objectives

,

The course aims to provide students with (a) a good foundational knowledge of the course of British history and culture from 1900 to the present; (b) an understanding of how historians do research and basic research skills; (c) the ability to analyze historical materials (speeches, novels, memoirs, government documents, films), placing them in context and deploying them to make analytical arguments about the past.

Fall 2020: HIST UN2360
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2360 001/12228 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 4.00 56/300

HIST BC2366 Climate & History: Intersecting Science Environment & Society. 3 points.

Climate change poses an imminent threat to the future of humanity and is a crucial feature of the Anthropocene, namely the age of anthropogenic transformations of the Earth’s environments on a global scale. How did we get here? History is fundamental to answer this question. This course examines the relationship between climate, scientific knowledge, and human societies. The class will first survey the role of climate as an historical actor of global history, rather than as the backdrop of political, social and economic events. In the second part of the course, we will examine the history of weather and climate science, as well as climate change denialism. The class offers a wide range of case studies around the world of the tight relationship between climate and history. The instructor encourages all majors to register from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

Spring 2021: HIST BC2366
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2366 001/00113 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
323 Milbank Hall
Angelo Caglioti 3 18/40

HIST BC2401 The Politics of Crime and Policing in the US. 3 points.

This course will examine the historical development of crime and the criminal justice system in the United States since the Civil War. The course will give particular focus to the interactions between conceptions of crime, normalcy and deviance, and the broader social and political context of policy making.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2401 001/00046 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Matthew Vaz 3 53/40

HIST BC2413 The United States, 1940-1975. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Emphasis on foreign policies as they pertain to the Second World War, the atomic bomb, containment, the Cold War, Korea, and Vietnam. Also considers major social and intellectual trends, including the Civil Rights movement, the counterculture, feminism, Watergate, and the recession of the 1970s.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2413
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2413 001/00035 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Mark Carnes 3 52/72

HIST BC2440 Intro to African American History. 3 points.

Major themes in African-American History: slave trade, slavery, resistance, segregation, the "New Negro," Civil Rights, Black Power, challenges and manifestations of the contemporary "Color Line."General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Fall 2020: HIST BC2440
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2440 001/00039 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Celia Naylor 3 29/29

HIST UN2523 History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States. 4 points.

Through assigned readings and a group research project, students will gain familiarity with a range of historical and social science problems at the intersection of ethnic/racial/sexual formations, technological networks, and health politics since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's health organization and care; HIV/AIDS politics, policy, and community response; "benign neglect"; urban renewal and gentrification; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; and environmental justice. There are no required qualifications for enrollment, although students will find the material more accessible if they have had previous coursework experience in United States history, pre-health professional (pre-med, pre-nursing, or pre-public health), African-American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies. 

Fall 2020: HIST UN2523
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2523 001/12189 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 57/300

HIST UN2533 US Lesbian and Gay History. 4 points.

This course explores the social, cultural, and political history of lesbians, gay men, and other socially constituted sexual and gender minorities, primarily in the twentieth century.  Since the production and regulation of queer life has always been intimately linked to the production and policing of “normal” sexuality and gender, we will also pay attention to the shifting boundaries of normative sexuality, especially heterosexuality, as well as other developments in American history that shaped gay life, such as the Second World War, Cold War, urbanization, and the minority rights revolution.  Themes include the emergence of homosexuality and heterosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the changing relationship between homosexuality and transgenderism; the development of diverse lesbian and gay subcultures and their representation in popular culture; the sources of antigay hostility; religion and sexual science; generational change and everyday life; AIDS; and gay, antigay, feminist, and queer movements.      

Fall 2020: HIST UN2533
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2533 001/12062 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
George Chauncey 4 133/300

HIST UN2565 American History at the Movies. 4 points.

This lecture explores major topics in modern American history through an examination of the American film industry and some of its most popular films and stars. It begins with the emergence of “Hollywood” as an industry and a place in the wake of WWI and ends with the rise of the so-called ‘New Hollywood’ in the 1970s and its treatment of the 1960s and the Vietnam War. For much of this period, Hollywood’s films were not protected free speech, making movies and stars peculiarly reflective of, and vulnerable to, changes in broader cultural and political dynamics. Students will become familiar with Hollywood’s institutional history over this half-century in order to understand the forces, both internal and external, that have shaped the presentation of what Americans do and don’t see on screens and to become skilled interpreters of American history at the movies.

Spring 2021: HIST UN2565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2565 001/10090 T 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Online Only
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 49/75
HIST 2565 001/10090 Th 1:10pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 49/75

HIST UN2361 DISC - 20th Century Britain: Between Democracy and Empire. 0 points.

MANDATORY Discussion Section for HIST UN 2360 20th Century Britain: Between Democracy and Empire.  Students must also be registered for HIST 2360.

Fall 2020: HIST UN2361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2361 001/12956 Th 7:10pm - 8:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 10/15
HIST 2361 002/13538 F 10:10am - 11:00am
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 12/15
HIST 2361 003/13539 F 12:10pm - 1:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 10/15
HIST 2361 004/13540 F 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 7/15
HIST 2361 005/22410 M 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 10/15
HIST 2361 006/22786 M 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 5/15

HIST UN2660 Latin American Civilization I. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from pre-Columbian times to 1810. Global Core Approved.

HIST BC2664 Reproducing Inequalities: Families in Latin American History. 3 points.

Explores changing structures and meanings of family in Latin America from colonial period to present. Particular focus on enduring tensions between "prescription" and "reality" in family forms as well as the articulation of family with hierarchies of class, caste, and color in diverse Latin American societies.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2664
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2664 001/00038 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Nara Milanich 3 32/36

HIST UN2478 US INTELLECTUAL HIST 1865-PRES. 4.00 points.

This course examines major themes in U.S. intellectual history since the Civil War. Among other topics, we will examine the public role of intellectuals; the modern liberal-progressive tradition and its radical and conservative critics; the uneasy status of religion ina secular culture; cultural radicalism and feminism; critiques of corporate capitalism and consumer culture; the response of intellectuals to hot and cold wars, the Great Depression, and the upheavals of the 1960s. Fields(s): US

Fall 2020: HIST UN2478
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2478 001/13376 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Casey Blake 4.00 100/300

HIST UN2611 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must also enroll in required discussion section.

  Field(s): ANC

Fall 2020: HIST UN2611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2611 001/12193 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Seth Schwartz 4 11/18

HIST UN2719 History of the Modern Middle East. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6998 version of this course.

This course will cover the history of the Middle East from the 18th century until the present, examining the region ranging from Morocco to Iran and including the Ottoman Empire. It will focus on transformations in the states of the region, external intervention, and the emergence of modern nation-states, as well as aspects of social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the region. Field(s): ME

Fall 2020: HIST UN2719
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2719 001/12185 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Online Only
Rashid Khalidi 4 249/300

HIST UN3017 Sexuality and the City. 4 points.

The city has classically been represented as the site of sexual freedom, but also of sexual immorality and danger.  This course explores the interrelated histories of sexuality and the city in the twentieth-century United States (especially New York) by exploring how urban conditions and processes shaped sexual practices, identities, communities, and ethics, and how sexual matters shaped urban processes, politics, and representation.   

Fall 2020: HIST UN3017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3017 001/12063 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
George Chauncey 4 13/18

HIST UN3234 The Idea of Conspiracy in European Culture. 4 points.

What are conspiracy theories? Do conspiracies exist? How did historians, philosophers and political thinkers consider them? Is there such a thing as a “deep state?” When did conspiracy as a political enterprise give rise to the idea of conspiracy “theory”? What is the relationship, if any, between them? This class will survey past, recent and current thinking about conspiracies. The working premise of the class is that thinking about conspiracies has been a fundamental, if overlooked, driver in the development of Western political theory and the modern state. Recovering this long history is crucial if we want to understand the current role of conspiracy theories in politics and their ideological functions.

HIST BC3327 Consumer Culture in Modern Europe. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The development of the modern culture of consumption, with particular attention to the formation of the woman consumer. Topics include commerce and the urban landscape, changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, feminine fashion and conspicuous consumption, and the birth of advertising. Examination of novels, fashion magazines, and advertising images.

Fall 2020: HIST BC3327
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3327 001/00043 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 4 17/17

HIST BC3368 History of the Senses. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examination of European understandings of human senses through the production and reception of art, literature, music, food, and sensual enjoyments in Britain and France. Readings include changing theories concerning the five senses; efforts to master the passions; the rise of sensibility and feeling for others; concerts and the patronage of art; the professionalization of the senses.

HIST BC3391 Senior Research Seminar. 8 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
4 points each term.

Prerequisites: Open to Barnard College History Senior Majors.

Individual guided research and writing in history and the presentation of results in seminar and in the form of the senior essay.  See Requirements for the Major for details.  

Fall 2020: HIST BC3391
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3391 001/00373 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Andrew Lipman 8 51

HIST UN3490 The Global Cold War. 4 points.

The superpower competition between the US and the USSR dominated international affairs during the second half of the twentieth century. Though this Cold War was born from ideological differences and initially focused on Europe, it soon became entangled with the concurrent global process of decolonization. In this way, the US-Soviet rivalry shaped events on every continent. This course will examine the intersection of the superpower competition and the emergence of the postcolonial world. Through course readings and class discussion, students will examine the global dimensions of the Cold war. Each student will prepare a research paper on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Fall 2020: HIST UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3490 001/12059 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Paul Chamberlin 4 15/18

HIST BC3599 Remembering Slavery: Critiquing Modern Representations of the Peculiar Institution. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The enslavement of people of African descent signifies a crucial historical and cultural marker not only for African-Americans but also for Americans in general. We will interrogate how and why images of slavery continue to be invoked within the American sociocultural landscape (e.g., in films, documentaries, historical novels, and science fiction).

Fall 2020: HIST BC3599
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3599 001/00040 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Celia Naylor 4 15/15

HIST BC3788 GENDER,SEXUALITY,POWER,AFRICA. 4.00 points.

This course deals with the scholarship on gender and sexuality in African history. The central themes of the course will be changes and continuities in gender performance and the politics of gender and sexual difference within African societies, the social, political, and economic processes that have influenced gender and sexual identities, and the connections between gender, sexuality, inequality, and activism at local, national, continental, and global scales

Fall 2020: HIST BC3788
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3788 001/00582 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Abosede George 4.00 10/15

HIST UN3838 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. 

Fall 2020: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/12222 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 12/15
HIST 3838 002/12865 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 9/15
HIST 3838 003/13687 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 14/15
HIST 3838 004/21408 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 11/15
Spring 2021: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/10099 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 11/13
HIST 3838 002/10100 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 14/14
HIST 3838 003/10101 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 8/13
HIST 3838 004/10175 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 9/13

HIST UN3562 The Seven Years’ War (1754-1763), Global Perspective: Europe, Asia, Africa, and Americas. 4 points.

Prerequisites: History Majors Preferred

This research seminar explores the causes, course, and consequences of the Seven Years’ War, arguably the first world war in modern history.  Topics include the origins of the conflict in North America and in Europe, the relationship between imperial rivalry in the American colonies and the contest for supremacy in central Europe, the impact of the war on trade and settlement in South Asia, the West Indies, the Philippines, and West Africa, and the legacies of the conflict for British imperial expansion in India, North America, Senegal, and the southern Caribbean.  During the second half of the semester, members of the seminar will devote the majority of their time to the research and writing of a substantial paper.

Fall 2020: HIST UN3562
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3562 001/13437 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Christopher Brown 4 19/25

HIST BC3870 Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Sophomore Standing.

Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

Fall 2020: HIST BC3870
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3870 001/00433 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jose Moya 4 11/15

HIST UN3914 THE FUTURE AS HISTORY. 3.00 points.

This course explores how people have thought about their future and tried to change it. It examines the philosophical aspects of studying history and the future, and how they are related. It begins with the origins of future thinking in eschatology and millenarian movements, the enlightenment challenge to revelation and religious authority, and utopias and dystopias. Classic texts and scholarly studies will illuminate modern approaches to shaping the future, such as socialism, imperialism, risk analysis, and “modernization” theory, and areas where they have had a particular impact, including urban planning and eugenics

HIST UN3911 Medicine and Western Civilization. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors, but other majors are welcome.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar seeks to analyze the ways by which medicine and culture combine to shape our values and traditions. To this end, it will examine notable literary, medical, and social texts from classical antiquity to the present.

HIST GU4012 HISTORY OF THE CITY IN LATIN AMERICA. 4.00 points.

This course covers the historical development of cities in Latin America. Readings examine the concentration of people in commercial and political centers from the beginnings of European colonization in the sixteenth century to the present day and will introduce contrasting approaches to the study of urban culture, politics, society, and the built environment. Central themes include the reciprocal relationships between growing urban areas and the countryside; cities as sites of imperial power and their post-colonial role in nation-building; changing power dynamics in modern Latin America, especially as they impacted the lives of cities’ nonelite majority populations; the legalities and politics of urban space; the complexity and historical development of urban segregation; the rise of informal economies; and the constant tension between tradition and progress through which urban societies have formed. Reading knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese will be helpful but is not required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students; graduate students will be given additional reading and writing assignments

Spring 2021: HIST GU4012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4012 001/10081 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Amy Chazkel 4.00 16/18

HIST GU4311 European Romanticism. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

“…Romanticism is the largest recent movement to transform the lives and the thought of the Western world. It seems to me to be the greatest single shift in the consciousness of the West that has occurred, and all the other shifts which have occurred in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries appear to me in comparison less important, and at any rate deeply influenced by it.” (Isaiah Berlin, The Roots of Romanticism)

,

This seminar will introduce students to the manifold expressions of Romanticism in Europe from the late eighteenth century to the late nineteenth century. It is geared both at History majors, particularly but not exclusively those specializing in European Intellectual History, and at students interested in the literature and culture of Germany, France, and Great Britain. We will also  take a  brief look at Romantic writers in Eastern Europe. We will read primarily works written by philosophers and social thinkers, but also a good deal of literature, both prose and poetry. We will have two sessions devoted to the plastic arts – including a class trip to the Metropolitan Museum to view paintings and sculptures, and we will have one session devoted to Romantic music (a study of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.)  We will include readings relating to the Romantic fascination with “the East,” and devote one session to the crucial subject of Romanticism and gender.  Most of the readings will be primary sources either originally in or translated into English, as well as a selection of pertinent secondary sources.

Fall 2020: HIST GU4311
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4311 001/12836 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Michael Stanislawski 4 15/25

HIST GU4518 Research Seminar: Columbia and Slavery. 4 points.

In this course, students will write original, independent papers of around 25 pages, based on research in both primary and secondary sources, on an aspect of the relationship between Columbia College and its colonial predecessor King's College, with the institution of slavery.

HIST GU4743 MANUSCRIPTS OF THE MUSLIM WORLD. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of a relevant research language (Arabic, Persian, or Ottoman Turkish) is required to be able to work on a particular manuscript to be chosen by the student. Students who lack the necessary skills of any of these languages but are interested in pre-modern book culture are still encouraged to contact the course instructor.
This course is designed to provide the foundations for exploring the rich and fascinating history of Islamic manuscripts from the 9th through the 19th century. Its structure is shaped mainly by thematic considerations in a notable chronological fashion. The meetings amount to a series of “cuts” through the topic and cover themes such as the paper revolution, authorship, scribal culture, technologies of book production, readers and their notes, libraries and book collections, or textual as well as extra-textual components of manuscripts. Over the semester, we will study key material, textual, and visual elements of Islamic book culture spanning many centuries and continents, and visit major historiographical questions on the millennium-long history of Islamic manuscript tradition before the widespread adoption of print technology

Fall 2020: HIST GU4743
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4743 001/12203 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Tunc Sen 4.00 6/18

HIST GU4904 WRITING LIVES: A SURVEY OF HISTORICAL APPROACHES AND TECHNIQUES. 4 points.

Ranging from ancient chronicles and saints’ lives to the emergence of modern subjectivity, the rise of the diary, the novel and the bureaucratic questionnaire, this course explores how historians across the ages have written about people’s lives. It asks what has happened to the notion of a life as a moral example, the changing value of ‘experience’ and the ‘ordinary person’, and charts how democracy altered the sense of what was worth recording and commemorating. It draws for its sources on a very wide range of cultures and epochs and concludes by asking the student to conduct their own life history research.

HIST GU4923 NARRATIVES OF WWII. 4.00 points.

Spring 2021: HIST GU4923
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4923 001/10088 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Carol Gluck 4.00 15/15

Fall 2020 Cross-listed Courses

PLEASE READ: The passage below lists *all* sections being offered by a Columbia instructor for a given course, including sections which *do not* count for History students. NOT ALL sections of the courses listed below count for History majors and concentrators. Particular sections only count towards the History degree if the section instructor is a History faculty member or an affiliate with the History Department. For additional information, please review the "Requirements" tab or consult Undergraduate Administrator at undergraduate-history@columbia.edu. All courses from the Barnard History Department also count towards the History degree.

ASCE UN1361 INTRO EAST ASIAN CIV: JPN. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371
Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371 A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century

Fall 2020: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10617 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Gregory Pflugfelder 4.00 63/90
Spring 2021: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10282 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Paul Kreitman 4.00 92/90

CSER UN3928 Colonization/Decolonization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 22.

Prerequisites: Open to CSER majors/concentrators only. Others may be allowed to register with the instructor's permission.

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; and European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

Fall 2020: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/12187 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Manan Ahmed 4 19/19
Spring 2021: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/11808 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Claudio Lomnitz 4 26/22

EAAS UN2342 Mythology of East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Through close readings of major myths of China, Japan, and Korea, this course provides a survey of significant themes of East Asian culture. Inclusion of selected comparative readings also leads students to reconsider the nature of ‘world mythology,’ a field often constituted by juxtaposing Greek and Latin classics with oral texts collected during anthropological fieldwork. The core materials for this class are from ancient written traditions, but they speak with force and clarity to modern readers, as is underlined by our attention to latter-day reception and reconceptualization of these narratives. This is an introductory, discussion-based class intended for undergraduates. No prior knowledge of East Asian history or culture is required, and all course readings are in English. Satisfies the Global Core requirement.

Fall 2020: EAAS UN2342
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 2342 001/10659 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
David Lurie 4 19/20

EAAS UN3990 Approaches to East Asian Studies. 4 points.

Enrollment is limited to EALAC and AMEC majors and concentrators only.

This course is intended to provide a focal point for undergraduate majors in East Asian Studies. It introduces students to the analysis of particular objects of East Asian historical, literary, and cultural studies from various disciplinary perspectives. The syllabus is composed of a series of modules, each centered around an object, accompanied by readings that introduce different ways of understanding its meaning.

Fall 2020: EAAS UN3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3990 001/10662 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Robert Hymes 4 24/25

EARL GU4312 Tibetan Sacred Space (in Comparative Context). 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Through interdisciplinary theoretical approaches (mostly in the fields of religion, anthropology, literature, and history), this course engages the genre of writing about sacred space in Tibetan Buddhist culture, addressing the micro (built environment) and macro (natural environment) levels of this important sphere of Tibetan literature. Through Tibetan pilgrimage accounts, place (monasteries, temples, etc) based guidebooks, geographically focused biographies, and pictorial representations of place, the class will consider questions about how place-writing overlaps with religious practice, politics, and history. For comparative purposes, we will read place based writing from Western and other Asian authors, for instance accounts of the guidebooks to and inscriptions at Christian churches, raising questions about the cultural relativity of what makes up sacred space.

Fall 2020: EARL GU4312
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4312 001/10673 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Gray Tuttle 4 15/20

JPNS GU4519 Kanbun. 3 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4007 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the fundamentals of reading Chinese-style Japanese and related forms, using literary and historical texts. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Fall 2020: JPNS GU4519
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4519 001/10699 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
David Lurie 3 12/15

HSEA GU4880 History of Modern China I. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

China’s transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

Fall 2020: HSEA GU4880
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4880 001/10676 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Madeleine Zelin 3 51/60

HSME UN2915 Africa Before Colonialism: From Prehistory to the Birth of the Atlantic World. 4 points.

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the precolonial history of the African continent. It investigates in-depth the political, social, cultural and economic developments of different Africa communities, covering various regions and periods, from prehistory to the formation of the Indian Ocean and Atlantic worlds. Its focus is the intersection of politics, economics, culture and society. Using world history and Africa’s location in the production of history as key analytical frames, it pays special attention to social, political and cultural changes that shaped the various individual and collective experiences of African peoples and states and the historical discourses associated to them.

Fall 2020: HSME UN2915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSME 2915 001/12654 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Mamadou Diouf 4 22/60

Spring 2021 History Courses

HIST UN1020 The Romans and Their World. 4 points.

This course examines the history of the Roman Empire from the formation of the Roman monarchy in 753 BCE to the collapse of the Western Empire in 476 CE. At the heart of the class is a single question: how did the Roman Empire come to be, and why did it last for so long? We will trace the rise and fall of the Republic, the extension of its power beyond Italy, and the spread of Christianity. Epic poetry, annalistic accounts, coins, papyri, inscriptions, and sculpture will illuminate major figures like Cleopatra, and features of daily life like Roman law and religion. The destructive mechanics by which Rome sustained itself--war, slavery, and environmental degradation--will receive attention, too, with the aim of producing a holistic understanding this empire.  Discussion Section Required.

Spring 2021: HIST UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1020 001/11330 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Sailakshmi Ramgopal 4 59/75
HIST 1020 AU1/19865  
Sailakshmi Ramgopal 4 12/10

HIST BC1302 EUROPEAN HISTORY SINCE 1789. 4.00 points.

Emergence of revolutionary and counter-revolutionary mass political movements; European industrialization, nationalism, and imperialism; 20th-century world wars, the Great Depression, and Fascism

Spring 2021: HIST BC1302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1302 001/00106 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 4.00 87/93
HIST 1302 AU1/19866  
Lisa Tiersten 4.00 5/5

HIST BC1401 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. 4.00 points.

Themes include Native and colonial cultures and politics, the evolution of American political and economic institutions, relationships between religious and social movements, and connecting ideologies of race and gender with larger processes such as enslavement, dispossession, and industrialization

Spring 2021: HIST BC1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1401 001/00130 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Andrew Lipman 4.00 64/75

HIST BC1760 Introduction to African History: 1700-Present. 4 points.

Survey of African history from the 18th century to the contemporary period. We will explore six major themes in African History: Africa and the Making of the Atlantic World, Colonialism in Africa, the 1940s, Nationalism and Independence Movements, Post-Colonialism in Africa, and Issues in the Making of Contemporary Africa.

Spring 2021: HIST BC1760
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1760 001/00109 T Th 10:10am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Abosede George 4 29/50
HIST 1760 AU1/19867  
Abosede George 4 5/5

HIST UN2215 MODERN RUSSIAN HISTORY. 4.00 points.

An introductory survey of the history of Russia, the Russian Empire, and the Soviet Union over the last two centuries. Russia’s role on the European continent, intellectual movements, unfree labor and emancipation, economic growth and social change, and finally the great revolutions of 1905 and 1917 define the “long nineteenth century.” The second half of the course turns to the tumultuous twentieth century: cultural experiments of the 1920s, Stalinism, World War II, and the new society of the Khrushchev and Brezhnev years. Finally, a look at very recent history since the East European revolutions of 1989-91. This is primarily a course on the domestic history of Russia and the USSR, but with some attention to foreign policy and Russia’s role in the world

Spring 2021: HIST UN2215
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2215 001/10085 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Northwest Corner
Catherine Evtuhov 4.00 64/75

HIST UN2222 NATURE & POWER: ENV HIST NORTH AMERICA. 4.00 points.

Environmental history seeks to expand the customary framework of historical inquiry, challenging students to construct narratives of the past that incorporate not only human beings but also the natural world with which human life is intimately intertwined. As a result, environmental history places at center stage a wide range of previously overlooked historical actors such as plants, animals, and diseases. Moreover, by locating nature within human history, environmental history encourages its practitioners to rethink some of the fundamental categories through which our understanding of the natural world is expressed: wilderness and civilization, wild and tame, natural and artificial. For those interested in the study of ethnicity, environmental history casts into particularly sharp relief the ways in which the natural world can serve both to undermine and to reinforce the divisions within human societies. Although all human beings share profound biological similarities, they have nonetheless enjoyed unequal access to natural resources and to healthy environments—differences that have all-too-frequently been justified by depicting such conditions as “natural.”

Spring 2021: HIST UN2222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2222 001/10106 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Karl Jacoby 4.00 52/75
HIST 2222 AU1/19218  
Karl Jacoby 4.00 5/5

HIST UN2305 WAR IN GERMANY 1618-2018. 4.00 points.

For much of modern history Germany was Europe’s battlefield. Its soldiers wrote themselves into the annals of military history. But it was also a place where war was discussed, conceptualized and criticized with unparalleled vigor. Nowhere did the extreme violence of the seventeenth century and the early twentieth century leave a deeper mark than on Germany. Today, as we enter the twenty-first century, Germany is the nation that has perhaps come closest to drawing a final, concluding line under its military history. This course will chart the rise and fall of modern militarism in Germany. For those interested in military history per se, this course will not hold back from discussing battles, soldiers and weapons. But it will also offer an introduction to German history more generally. And through the German example we will address questions in political philosophy that haunted modern European history and continue to haunt America today. How is state violence justified? How can it be regulated and controlled? What is its future?

Spring 2021: HIST UN2305
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2305 001/10112 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Adam Tooze 4.00 59/75

HIST BC2366 Climate & History: Intersecting Science Environment & Society. 3 points.

Climate change poses an imminent threat to the future of humanity and is a crucial feature of the Anthropocene, namely the age of anthropogenic transformations of the Earth’s environments on a global scale. How did we get here? History is fundamental to answer this question. This course examines the relationship between climate, scientific knowledge, and human societies. The class will first survey the role of climate as an historical actor of global history, rather than as the backdrop of political, social and economic events. In the second part of the course, we will examine the history of weather and climate science, as well as climate change denialism. The class offers a wide range of case studies around the world of the tight relationship between climate and history. The instructor encourages all majors to register from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

Spring 2021: HIST BC2366
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2366 001/00113 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
323 Milbank Hall
Angelo Caglioti 3 18/40

HIST UN2398 The Politics of Terror: The French Revolution. 4 points.

 This course examines the political culture of eighteenth-century France, from the final decades of the Bourbon monarchy to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. Among our primary aims will be to explore the origins of the Terror and its relationship to the Revolution as a whole. Other topics we will address include the erosion of the king's authority in the years leading up to 1789, the fall of the Bastille, the Constitutions of 1791 and 1793, civil war in the Vendée, the militarization of the Revolution, the dechristianization movement, attempts to establish a new Revolutionary calendar and civil religion, and the sweeping plans for moral regeneration led by Robespierre and his colleagues in 1793-1794.

Spring 2021: HIST UN2398
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2398 001/10082 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Charly Coleman 4 50/75

HIST BC2402 Science and Society: From Galileo to Climate Change. 3.00 points.

This course explores the intersection of scientific ideas and society in three historical contexts: the trial of Galileo by the Roman Inquisition in early 17th-century Europe, which examined the validity and implications of Galileo’s ideas on motion physics and astronomy; 2) the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, which sought an international accord to limit carbon emissions; and 3) the problem of obesity, diet, and cholesterol as debated by the CDC, USDA, and the U.S. Congress during the 1990s. Because this course will be offered in an online format, it uses multiple active-learning strategies to promote student interaction and engagement

Spring 2021: HIST BC2402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2402 001/00120 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Mark Carnes 3.00 17/32
HIST 2402 AU1/19869  
Mark Carnes 3.00 5/5

HIST BC2477 RACE, CLASS, AND POLITICS IN NEW YORK CITY. 3 points.

The objectives of this course are: to gain familiarity with the major themes of New York History since 1898, to learn to think historically, and to learn to think and write critically about arguments that underlie historical interpretation. We will also examine and analyze the systems and structures--of race and class--that have shaped life in New York, while seeking to understand how social groups have pursued change inside and outside of such structures

Spring 2021: HIST BC2477
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2477 001/00114 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Matthew Vaz 3 50/60

HIST UN2491 US FOREIGN RELATIONS 1890-1990. 4.00 points.

This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role and identity of the United States in the world, roughly between the 1890s and the late 20th century; (ii) to provide an empirical grasp of U.S. foreign relations during that period; and (iii) to subject to critical inquiry the historiographical views on the various periods and events which have come to make up that history. The lectures, on the whole, will be supplementary to the readings, not a commentary on them

Spring 2021: HIST UN2491
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2491 001/10109 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Northwest Corner
Anders Stephanson 4.00 27/50

HIST UN2540 History of the South. 4 points.

A survey of the history of the American South from the colonial era to the present day, with two purposes: first, to afford students an understanding of the special historical characteristics of the South and of southerners; and second, to explore what the experience of the South may teach about America as a nation. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN2540
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2540 001/10086 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Barbara Fields 4 51/75

HIST UN2565 American History at the Movies. 4 points.

This lecture explores major topics in modern American history through an examination of the American film industry and some of its most popular films and stars. It begins with the emergence of “Hollywood” as an industry and a place in the wake of WWI and ends with the rise of the so-called ‘New Hollywood’ in the 1970s and its treatment of the 1960s and the Vietnam War. For much of this period, Hollywood’s films were not protected free speech, making movies and stars peculiarly reflective of, and vulnerable to, changes in broader cultural and political dynamics. Students will become familiar with Hollywood’s institutional history over this half-century in order to understand the forces, both internal and external, that have shaped the presentation of what Americans do and don’t see on screens and to become skilled interpreters of American history at the movies.

Spring 2021: HIST UN2565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2565 001/10090 T 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Online Only
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 49/75
HIST 2565 001/10090 Th 1:10pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 49/75

HIST UN2661 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION II. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores major themes in Latin American history from the independence period (ca 1810) to the present. We will hone in on Latin Americas “chronic” problems of social inequality, political polarization, authoritarianism, incomplete democratization, and troubled memory politics. The course covers economic, social, and cultural histories, and gives special weight to the transnational aspects of Latin American ideological struggles – from its dependency on Western capital to its ideological “inner Cold War” – and the way they influenced the subaltern strata of society. The section discussions are a crucial component of the course, and will focus on assigned historiography. While the lecture centers on constructing a cogent meta-narrative for Latin America’s modern era, in the section we will explore not only the historical “facts,” but will instead ask: how do historians know what they know about the past? What sources and analytic methods do they use to write history? And what ethical dilemmas do they confront when narrating politically-sensitive topics?

Spring 2021: HIST UN2661
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2661 001/10188 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
417 International Affairs Bldg
Jose Moya 4.00 123/150

HIST UN2679 Atlantic Slave Trade. 4 points.

The history of human trafficking in the Atlantic world from the first European slaving expeditions in the late fifteenth century down to the final forced crossings in the era of the U.S. Civil War.  Themes include captive taking in West Africa and its impact on West African societies, the commercial organization of the Atlantic slave trade in Europe and the Americas, and the experience of capture, exile, commodification, and survival of those shipped to the Americas. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN2679
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2679 001/11372 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Christopher Brown 4 47/75
HIST 2679 AU1/19871  
Christopher Brown 4 22/15

HIST UN2764 East African History. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of East African history over the past two millennia with a focus on political and social change. Themes include early religious and political ideas, the rise of states on the Swahili coast and between the Great Lakes, slavery, colonialism, and social and cultural developments in the 20th century.  This course fulfills the Global Core requirement. Discussion section required.

HIST UN2701 Ottoman Empire. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will cover the seven-century long history of the Ottoman Empire, which spanned Europe, Asia, and Africa as well as the medieval, early modern, and modern period. The many levels of continuity and change will be the focus, as will issues of identities and mentalities, confessional diversity, cultural and linguistic pluralism, and imperial governance and political belonging of the empire within larger regional and global perspectives over the centuries. The course also seeks to cultivate appreciation of the human experience through the multifarious experiences culled from the Ottoman past. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN2701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2701 001/10102 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Tunc Sen 4 76/100

HIST UN2881 Vietnam in the World. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course examines the history of Vietnam in the World and serves as a follow-up to ASCE UN1367: Introduction to East Asian Civilizations, Vietnam (though it is not a prerequisite). This course will explore Vietnam’s multifaceted relations with the wider world from the late 19th Century to present day as war – ranging from civil, imperial, global, decolonization, and superpower interventions – forged the modern imperial polity to the current nation-state.

Spring 2021: HIST UN2881
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2881 001/10097 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Lien-Hang Nguyen 4 63/75

HIST UN2987 Technology and US Politics. 4 points.

The course investigates the relation between politics and technology in the Unites States during the twentieth century. Following the telegraph, radio, the mainframe computer, the internet, and online platforms, the course asks how have Americans conceptualized the relation between technological developments and democratic ideals starting in the late nineteenth century? Are new technologies forms of control or of liberation? Do they enhance or curtail free speech? Has the public sphere been strengthened or weakened by new communication technologies? What has been the rule of government regulation in the adoption of these technologies? Students will be introduced to basic ideas and methodologies in the history of technology, while focusing on the relation between politics of technology. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN2987
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2987 001/11117 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Alma Steingart 4 44/75
HIST 2987 AU1/19872  
Alma Steingart 4 6/5

HIST UN3269 From Oracles to Mathematics. 4.00 points.

This class looks at how European society tried to tame chance and comprehend its whims before and after the arrival of the mathematics of probability around 1650. How did people move from consulting oracles to developing the insurance business? One simple answer is the discovery of the mathematical calculation of risk. But insurance contracts appear well before the availability of that tool, and insurers continued to do their business without it after it became widely known. This class explores why chance did not become “more” accurate – an object of science and knowledge – with the arrival of the probability calculus. It examines risk as a historically shaped experience in various areas of its manifestations including oracles, gambling, insurance, philosophy, and theology. The semester groups the history of risk into four thematically and chronologically organized units of focus: (1) We will begin with a survey of how we can study risk as historical construct asking what components shape a society’s understanding and handling of risk. In order to gain insight into what risk meant before ca. 1350, we will analyze oracles and curses people used to cope with future events in antiquity. (2) We will then explore the world of gambling to understand how closely related its risks were to those found in business practices. (3) Turning to late medieval and early modern insurance, we will analyze contracts, laws and theories of insurance. Why was it that risk became a commodity – a thing separable from the merchandise it concerned – only by 1350? (4) The next and last unit takes us to theories of risk before and after the development of the mathematical theory of probability to challenge and refine the notion that mathematics “counted away” divine providence. (Note: You do not need any prior mathematical skills for the class.)

Spring 2021: HIST UN3269
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3269 001/16127 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Sarina Kuersteiner 4.00 10/15

HIST UN3384 Brazilian Slavery in its Global Context. 4.00 points.

What does Brazilian slavery have to teach the world? This course examines the history of slavery, as well as resistance to it, its abolition, the way it has been remembered and forgotten, in Latin America’s largest country in its hemispheric, Atlantic, and global context. In Brazil, the practice of enslaving Africans and their descendants lasted longer and involved more people than in any other place in the world. Our readings and in-class discussions broadly survey the entire sweep of Brazilian history from the sixteenth century to the present, demonstrating how the enslavement of people originally brought from Africa and their descendants is an inextricable part of the country’s history, and to the history of the African Diaspora, and is fundamental to understanding Brazil’s relationship to the rest of the world. No prior knowledge of Latin American or Brazilian history is required, and all required readings will be in English

Spring 2021: HIST UN3384
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3384 001/11968 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
B60 Alfred Lerner Hall
Amy Chazkel 4.00 13/15

HIST BC3392 Senior Research Seminar. 4 points.

4 points each term.

Prerequisites: Open to Barnard College History Senior Majors.

Individual guided research and writing in history and the presentation of results in seminar and in the form of the senior essay.  See Requirements for the Major for details.  

Spring 2021: HIST BC3392
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3392 001/00115 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Andrew Lipman 4 49

HIST UN3437 Poisoned Worlds: Corporate Behavior and Public Health. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

In the decades since the publication of Silent Spring and the rise of the environmental movement, public awareness of the impact of industrial products on human health has grown enormously. There is growing concern over BPA, lead, PCBs, asbestos, and synthetic materials that make up the world around us. This course will focus on environmental history, industrial and labor history as well as on how twentieth century consumer culture shapes popular and professional understanding of disease. Throughout the term the class will trace the historical transformation of the origins of disease through primary sources such as documents gathered in lawsuits, and medical and public health literature. Students will be asked to evaluate historical debates about the causes of modern epidemics of cancer, heart disease, lead poisoning, asbestos-related illnesses and other chronic conditions. They will also consider where responsibility for these new concerns lies, particularly as they have emerged in law suits. Together, we will explore the rise of modern environmental movement in the last 75 years. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN3437
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3437 001/12251 W 8:30am - 10:20am
Online Only
David Rosner 4 13/15

HIST BC3495 Representing the Past. 4.00 points.

Examines the renderings of the past as conveyed by historians and by those seeking to "represent" the past, such as novelists, playwrights, filmmakers, ritualists, and artists. Analyzes the theoretical, philosophical, and evidentiary problems and possibilities inherent in various modes of historical narration and representation

Spring 2021: HIST BC3495
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3495 001/00116 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Mark Carnes 4.00 13/15

HIST BC3670 Seeking Asylum: History, Politics, and the Pursuit of Justice at the US-Mexico Border. 4 points.

Note: This course meets as a lecture but it is a seminar.

Prerequisites: NA

This seminar explores the roots of and responses to the contemporary refugee "crisis" at the U.S.-Mexico border. We examine the historical factors that are propelling people, including families and unaccompanied minors, to flee the so-called Northern Triangle of Central America (El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala); the law and politics of asylum that those seeking refuge must negotiate in the U.S.; and the burgeoning system of immigration incarceration that detains ever-greater numbers of non-citizens. The course is organized around a collaboration with the Dilley Pro Bono Project, an organization that provides legal counsel to detainees at the country's largest immigration detention prison, in Dilley, Texas. 

Spring 2021: HIST BC3670
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3670 001/00118 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Nara Milanich 4 14/15

HIST BC3692 ANARCHISM: A GLOBAL HISTORY. 4 points.

Explores the historical development of anarchism as a working-class, youth, and artistic movement in Europe, North and Latin America, the Middle East, India, Japan, and China from the 1850s to the present. Examines anarchism both as an ideology and as a set of cultural and political practices.

Spring 2021: HIST BC3692
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3692 001/00121 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jose Moya 4 12/15

HIST UN3702 Russia’s Silver Age, 1890-1920. 4.00 points.

The end of a century and the beginning of a new one can be a moment of self-consciousness, when people pause in their usual activities to reflect on the direction of their civilization and to wonder what the future might hold. Usually, the 1917 Revolution dominates our consciousness of the first decades of the 20th century in Russia. This course offers a chance to take an in-depth look at a different aspect of Russian life: the turbulent world of ideas and culture, in many ways shared with other European capitals, that we have come to know as the Silver Age. One of the great novels of the age, Andrei Bely’s Petersburg (1913), will be our window into the artistic currents, philosophical discussions, apocalyptic moods and revolutionary stirrings of turn-of-the-century Russia. Since the creators of the Silver Age thought of themselves as drawing on the whole of Russian and world culture for inspiration, I also hope that our focus on these 30 years will propel us both backwards and forwards in time so we can discuss broad themes of Russian history and culture

Spring 2021: HIST UN3702
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3702 001/11921 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
310 Fayerweather
Catherine Evtuhov 4.00 10/12

HIST BC3770 African Communities in New York, 1900 to the Present. 4.00 points.

This class explores the history of voluntary migrations from Africa to the United States over the course of the 20th century. This course is designed as a historical research seminar that is open to students with prior coursework in African Studies, Africana Studies, Race and Ethnic Studies, or History. Thematically the course dwells at a point of intersection between African history, Black History, and Immigration History. As part of the Barnard Engages curriculum, this class is collaboratively designed with the Harlem-based non-profit organization, African Communities Together. The aim of this course is to support the mission of ACT by producing a historically grounded digital advocacy project. The mission of ACT is to empower immigrants from Africa and their families to integrate socially, advance economically, and engage civically. To advance this mission, ACT must confront the reality that in the current political moment new legal, political, and social barriers are being erected to the integration, advancement, and engagement of African immigrants on a daily basis. As immigrants, as Black people, as Africans, and often as women, low-income people, LGBT people, and Muslims, African immigrants experience multiple intersecting forms of marginalization. Now more than ever, it is critical that African immigrants be empowered to tell their own stories—not just of persecution and suffering, but of resilience and resistance

Spring 2021: HIST BC3770
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3770 001/00119 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Abosede George 4.00 11/15

HIST UN3838 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. 

Fall 2020: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/12222 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 12/15
HIST 3838 002/12865 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 9/15
HIST 3838 003/13687 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 14/15
HIST 3838 004/21408 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 11/15
Spring 2021: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/10099 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 11/13
HIST 3838 002/10100 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 14/14
HIST 3838 003/10101 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 8/13
HIST 3838 004/10175 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 9/13

HIST GU4012 HISTORY OF THE CITY IN LATIN AMERICA. 4.00 points.

This course covers the historical development of cities in Latin America. Readings examine the concentration of people in commercial and political centers from the beginnings of European colonization in the sixteenth century to the present day and will introduce contrasting approaches to the study of urban culture, politics, society, and the built environment. Central themes include the reciprocal relationships between growing urban areas and the countryside; cities as sites of imperial power and their post-colonial role in nation-building; changing power dynamics in modern Latin America, especially as they impacted the lives of cities’ nonelite majority populations; the legalities and politics of urban space; the complexity and historical development of urban segregation; the rise of informal economies; and the constant tension between tradition and progress through which urban societies have formed. Reading knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese will be helpful but is not required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students; graduate students will be given additional reading and writing assignments

Spring 2021: HIST GU4012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4012 001/10081 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Amy Chazkel 4.00 16/18

HIST GU4029 Europe’s Commercial Revolution, ca 1100-1800: Economic, Social, and Cultural Change . 4 points.

This course examines the profound changes wrought by the explosive growth of the European market economy during the late medieval and early modern centuries. Readings will be drawn both from theoretical literature examining the market and from studies documenting the practices of commercial people, the institutions that organized trade (guilds, merchant associations, law, and the nascent states of the period), and the cultural responses to commercial wealth.

Spring 2021: HIST GU4029
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4029 001/10091 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Martha Howell 4 11/15

HIST GU4380 THE IDEA OF EUROPE. 4.00 points.

Spring 2021: HIST GU4380
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4380 001/10987 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Hamilton Hall
Victoria De Grazia 4.00 17/15

HIST GU4509 PROBLEMS IN INT'L HISTORY. 4.00 points.

The object of this course is to illuminate how histories of the realm we think of as "international" are structured by means of key concepts, foundational concepts that form semantic fields of politics and policy. The seminar will chiefly be devoted to some ways of this in the empirical context of what is now being called the subfield of ‘the U.S. in the World.’

Spring 2021: HIST GU4509
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4509 002/12468 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
313 Fayerweather
Anders Stephanson 4.00 10/15

HIST GU4588 Substance Abuse Politics in African-American History. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Through a series of secondary- and primary-source readings and research writing assignments, students in this seminar course will explore one of the most politically controversial aspects in the history of public health in the United States as it has affected peoples of color: intoxicating substances. Course readings are primarily historical, but sociologists, anthropologists, and political scientists are also represented on the syllabus. The course's temporal focus - the twentieth century - allows us to explore the historical political and social configurations of opium, alcohol, heroin, cocaine, medical maintenance (methadone), the War on Drugs, the carceral state and hyperpolicing, harm reduction and needle/syringe exchange. This semester's principal focus will be on the origins and evolution of the set of theories, philosophies, and practices which constitute harm reduction. The International Harm Reduction Association/Harm Reduction International offers a basic, though not entirely comprehensive, definition of harm reduction in its statement, "What is Harm Reduction?" (http://www.ihra.net/what-is-harm-reduction): "Harm reduction refers to policies, programmes and practices that aim to reduce the harms associated with the use of psychoactive drugs in people unable or unwilling to stop. The defining features are the focus on the prevention of harm, rather than on the prevention of drug use itself, and the focus on people who continue to use drugs."[1] Harm reduction in many U.S. communities of color, however, has come to connote a much wider range of activity and challenges to the status quo. In this course we will explore the development of harm reduction in the United States and trace its evolution in the political and economic context race, urban neoliberalism, and no-tolerance drug war. The course will feature site visits to harm reduction organizations in New York City, guest lectures, and research/oral history analysis. This course has been approved for inclusion in both the African-American Studies and History undergraduate curricula (majors and concentrators). HIST W4588 will be open to both undergraduate and masters students. To apply, please complete the Google form at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1xaPFhQOzkl1NHnIjQIen9h41iel2hXAdhV59D5wH8AQ/viewform?usp=send_form. Questions may be directed to skroberts@columbia.edu.  

Spring 2021: HIST GU4588
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4588 001/19152 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 6/15

HIST GU4641 HOLOCAUST GENOCIDE-AMER CULTRE. 4.00 points.

When the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. opened in 1993, some people asked why a "European" catastrophe was being memorialized alongside shrines to Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln while there was still no museum documenting the experience of African slaves in the United States or the effort to exterminate the Native Americans on this continent. How American intellectuals have thought about the Nazi regime and the Holocaust in Europe since before the Second World War and in the latter half of the twentieth century is te focus on this course. The course will also compare the ways the United States narrates, conceptualizes and deals with the Holocaust as oppsed to other genocidal events. This course is comparative at its core as it examines how intellectuals and institutions spanning from Hannah Arendt to the United Nations to the US Holocaust Museum have woven this event into American culture

Spring 2021: HIST GU4641
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4641 001/17676 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Rebecca Kobrin 4.00 16/20

HIST GU4699 Medieval Franciscans and their World. 4 points.

This course will offer an examination of the birth and development of the Franciscan Order between 1200-1350. The topics will include Francis of Assisi, the foundation of the three orders of Franciscans, education, poverty, preaching, theology internal strife, antifraternalism, and relations with secular governments and papacy.

Spring 2021: HIST GU4699
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4699 001/10107 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Neslihan Senocak 4 10/15

HIST GU4713 Orientalism and the Historiography of the Other. 4 points.

This course will examine some of the problems inherent in Western historical writing on non-European cultures, as well as broad questions of what itmeans to write history across cultures. The course will touch on therelationship between knowledge and power, given that much of the knowledge we will be considering was produced at a time of the expansion of Western power over the rest of the world. By comparing some of the "others" which European historians constructed in the different non-western societies they depicted, and the ways other societies dealt with alterity and self, we may be able to derive a better sense of how the Western sense of self was constructed. Group(s): C Field(s): ME

Spring 2021: HIST GU4713
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4713 001/10092 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Rashid Khalidi 4 14/15

HIST GU4727 The History of the End of the World. 4.00 points.

For thousands of years people have been getting ready for the end of the world, giving rise to millenarian movements that have sometimes changed history. More than once, large numbers of people have experienced events such as the Black Death, the Little Ice Age, colonial conquest, and “strategic” bombing that seemed very much like the end of their world. And over the last seventy-five years, governments and international organizations have made major investments in predicting and preparing for catastrophic threats. Efforts to manage or mitigate these dangers have had world-changing consequences, including “preventative” wars, and new forms of global governance. The very idea of the end of the world, in other words, has a long history, with a demonstrable impact, which provides instructive lessons as we contemplate things to come. This course will explore this history, beginning with eschatology and millenarian movements. In part two, students will learn how different conceptual frameworks can be applied to assessing and managing risk, and understanding how people perceive or misperceive danger. They will learn how they can be applied to identify the most important challenges, drawing insights from different disciplinary approaches. The third and main part of the course will consist of comparative and connected analyses of the age-old apocalyptic threats -- war, pestilence, and famine -- in their modern forms, i.e. nuclear armageddon, pandemics, and ecological collapse. By examining them together, we can compare the magnitude and probability of each danger, and also explore their interconnections. We will see, for instance, how nuclear testing helped give rise to the environmental movement, and how modeling the aftereffects of nuclear exchanges helped advance understanding of climate change. Similarly, scenario exercises have shaped threat perceptions and disaster-preparedness for pandemics and bio-warfare as much as they did for nuclear war and terrorism. Readings and discussions will explore how planetary threats are interconnected, and not just in the techniques used to predict and plan for them. Applying nuclear power to the problem of global warming, for instance, could undermine longstanding efforts to stop nuclear proliferation. Climate change and mass migration, on the other hand, create new pandemic threats, as a more crowded and interconnected world becomes a single ecosystem. Yet billions spent on building up defenses have created more capacity and opportunity for bio-terrorism. Who would actually use a nuclear or biological weapon? Perhaps a millenarian group hoping to ride death, the fourth horse of the apocalypse, straight to heaven

Spring 2021: HIST GU4727
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4727 001/11954 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Matthew Connelly 4.00 10/15

HIST GU4821 Italy’s Material Culture, 1945-2015. 4.00 points.

Italy’s Material Culture, 1945-2015. The evolution of Made in Italy, drawing on cases from craft industry, fashion design, and consumer and life-style movements

Spring 2021: HIST GU4821
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4821 001/11971 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Victoria De Grazia 4.00 6/15

HIST GU4844 Outlaws in Asian History. 4.00 points.

What kind of historical actors were outlaws? How did they interact with and in turn shape their societies, governments, and politics? In what ways did the outlaws’ transgressions destabilize ideas about national boundary, state sovereignty, political legitimacy, and legality? Over the course of the semester, students will engage with debates over the characterization of outlaws as well as case studies delving into particular places and times. The case studies, which span much of Asia, focus on multiethnic smugglers in island Southeast Asia, bandits on the Sino-Vietnamese border, revolutionary gangsters in Indonesia, nationalist yakuza in Japan, among others. In the process, we will compare and assess the theoretical and methodological approaches scholars have taken to study figures that often reside in the shadows

Spring 2021: HIST GU4844
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4844 001/17126 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Kevin Li 4.00 7/15

HIST GU4923 NARRATIVES OF WWII. 4.00 points.

Spring 2021: HIST GU4923
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4923 001/10088 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Carol Gluck 4.00 15/15

HIST GU4935 Science and Art in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

This course will investigate the relations between science and art in early modern Europe, bringing together scholarly works by historians of science and art historians as well as original sources from the period. We tend to think today of science and art as polarized cultural domains, but in the early modern period the very definitions of the terms, as well as a range of other factors, created conditions for a much different configuration between the two. Organized chronologically, this course will focus on a range of representative moments in that developing configuration, from ca. 1500 to 1800. Topics include the nature of the spaces where artworks and natural specimens met, the circulation of tools, materials and techniques between the laboratory and the artist workshop, common norms and practices of representation, and shared aspirations to objective knowledge. The course is designed as a discussion seminar and is open to undergraduate and graduate students. No prior knowledge of the subject is required, but intense engagement with the material is expected.




 

Spring 2021: HIST GU4935
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4935 001/11735 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Ardeta Gjikola 4 13/15

HIST GU4956 Mesopotamian Culture and Society in the first millennium BCE. 4.00 points.

In this seminar we will investigate various aspects of the cultural and social practices of the ancient Mesopotamian Assyrian and Babylonian empires of the first millennium BCE richly documented in textual sources and elements of material culture

Spring 2021: HIST GU4956
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4956 001/11969 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4.00 9/15

HIST GU4984 HACKING THE ARCHIVE: LAB FOR COMP. HIST. 4.00 points.

This is a hands-on, project-driven, Laboratory Seminar that explores the frontiers of historical analysis in the information age. It harnesses the exponential growth in information resulting from the digitization of older materials and the explosion of “born digital” electronic records. Machine learning and natural language processing make it possible to answer traditional research questions with greater rigor, and tackle new kinds of projects that would once have been deemed impracticable. At the same time, scholars now have many more ways to communicate with one another and the broader public, and it is becoming both easier – and more necessary – to collaborate across disciplines. This course will create a laboratory organized around a common group of databases in 20th century international history. Students will begin by learning about earlier methodological transformations in literary, cultural, and historical analysis, and consider whether and how the “digital turn” might turn out differently. They will then explore new tools and techniques, including named-entity recognition, text classification, topic modeling, geographic information systems, social and citation network analysis, and data visualization. As we turn to specific projects, you will be able to either write a traditional history paper or try an alternative project, either working alone or as part of a team. Papers will entail applying one or more of the digital tools to a specific historical literature/debate or a novel historical topic. Projects might include assembling and “cleaning” a large dataset of documents, prototyping a new tool, launching a web-based exhibit, or drafting a grant application. You will be encouraged to seek out additional training as necessary, conduct experiments, and design ambitious projects that might extend beyond the life of the course. The seminar will meet every week, and start with a discussion of the readings. The second hour will be devoted to training in new tools for historical research, as well as individual and small group work. Students will also be encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings, and that will be a requirement of those undertaking alternative projects. The course is open to students with no training in statistics or computer programming, and no knowledge of international history. But all participants should be open to learning both historical and computational research skills, such as the critical reading of primary source documents and oral history interviewing on the one hand, and scraping websites, querying databases, and using data visualization tools on the other

Spring 2021: HIST GU4984
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4984 001/10083 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Matthew Connelly 4.00 11/15

Spring 2021 Cross-listed Courses

PLEASE READ: The passage below lists *all* sections being offered by a Columbia instructor for a given course, including sections which *do not* count for History students. NOT ALL sections of the courses listed below count for History majors and concentrators. Particular sections only count towards the History degree if the section instructor is a History faculty member or an affiliate with the History Department. For additional information, please review the "Requirements" tab or consult Undergraduate Administrator at undergraduate-history@columbia.edu. All courses from the Barnard History Department also count towards the History degree.


AFAS UN1002 Major Debates in African-American Studies. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must register for discussion section, AFAS UN1003.

This course will focus on the major debates in African-American Studies from the role of education to the political uses of art. The class will follow these debates historically with attention to the ways in which earlier discussions on migration and emigration, for example, were engaged with the specific historical conjuncture in which they took place as well as in the myriad ways in which earlier debates continue to resonate today. There will be a mix of primary documents and secondary sources and commentary.

Spring 2021: AFAS UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFAS 1002 001/12945 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Frank Guridy 4 14/15

AFRS BC3110 THE AFRICANA COLLOQUIUM. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Priority will be given to Africana majors and CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies).
In this colloquium we will examine the complexities of race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and nationality within Caribbean contexts. Some of the themes we will analyze include conceptions of home and nation; the use, creation, and politics of language; intergenerational relationships between women; the rites and rights of girlhood and womanhood; and intersecting identities. We will specifically address how Caribbean women scholars/activists/artists critique racism, sexism, classism, heterosexism, colonialism, neocolonialism, and tourism within Caribbean sociocultural landscapes. In addition, we will analyze how Caribbean women frame and interrogate the politics of slavery, emancipation, freedom, resistance, rebellion, and independence during different historical eras. The required readings for this course reflect a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary methodologies, as well as a range of genres

Spring 2021: AFRS BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3110 001/00068 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Celia Naylor 4.00 8/15

AFRS BC3589 Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s). 4 points.

Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s)

Spring 2021: AFRS BC3589
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3589 001/00067 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Celia Naylor 4 16/15

AMST UN3931 Topics in American Studies. 4 points.

Please refer to the Center for American Studies for section descriptions

Spring 2021: AMST UN3931
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 3931 001/10181 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Casey Blake 4 16/18
AMST 3931 002/10182 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Roosevelt Montas 4 15/18
AMST 3931 004/10183 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
John McWhorter 4 12/18
AMST 3931 005/10185 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Andrew Delbanco, Roger Lehecka 4 15/18
AMST 3931 006/10186 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Cathleen Price 4 14/15
AMST 3931 007/10187 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Michael Hindus 4 14/18
AMST 3931 009/10458 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Ross Posnock 4 7/18

ASCE UN1361 INTRO EAST ASIAN CIV: JPN. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371
Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371 A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century

Fall 2020: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10617 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Gregory Pflugfelder 4.00 63/90
Spring 2021: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10282 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Paul Kreitman 4.00 92/90

CLST UN3030 Beyond City Limits: Considering the Countryside in the Ancient Roman World. 4.00 points.

Through an interdisciplinary study of ancient literary and archaeological evidence, as well as papyri, inscriptions, and artwork housed at Columbia and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, this research-driven seminar considers the cultural, social, and economic histories of rural populations across the empire. Beginning with the foundation of Rome, we will consider how its continued expansion through military conquest led to a crisis in the Italian countryside which helped stoke the flames of civil unrest in the 3rd-2nd centuries BCE. After surveying how the countryside was transformed into a metaphor of peace under the Roman emperors, we will then turn to several of Rome’s provinces (including Egypt, North Africa, and Britain) as case studies for specific issues in rural history. By examining the Roman countryside in this way, we gain a deeper understanding of how its rural inhabitants affected, and were affected by, Roman rule. This course considers how a government, ruling from the decorated buildings of its city centers, used and abused its distant rural territories for economic and political gain, and contemplates the ways in which inhabitants responded and adapted

Spring 2021: CLST UN3030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLST 3030 001/16168 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Online Only
Deborah Sokolowski 4.00 12/15

CLST UN3040 Ethnicity, Power, and Resistance in Ancient Empire. 4.00 points.

In this course we will investigate how, and to what extent, ethnicity can help us understand both the incredible power of ancient empires and also how they were challenged and undermined. We will examine and compare four ancient empires in the Mediterranean and Near East, from the mid-6th cent. BCE to the 2nd cent. CE: The Persian Achaemenid Empire, The Hellenistic Ptolemaic and Seleucid Empires, and the Roman Empire

Spring 2021: CLST UN3040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLST 3040 001/16337 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Tal Ish Shalom 4.00 4/15

CPLS UN3900 INTRO TO ICLS. 3.00 points.

Introduction to concepts and methods of comparative literature in cross-disciplinary and global context. Topics may include: oral, print, and visual culture; epic, novel, and nation; literature of travel, exile, and diaspora; sex and gender transformation; the human/inhuman; writing trauma; urban imaginaries; world literature; medical humanities. Open only to students who have applied for and declared a major in Comparative Literature and Society or Medical Humanities

Spring 2021: CPLS UN3900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CPLS 3900 001/10103 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
David Lurie 3.00 16/17

EAAS UN3338 CULTRL HIST-JAPANESE MONSTERS. 3.00 points.

Priority is given to EALAC and History majors, as well as to those who have done previous coursework on Japan.

From Godzilla to Pokemon (literally, pocket monster) toys, Japanese monsters have become a staple commodity of late-capitalist global pop culture. This course seeks to place this phenomenon within a longer historical, as well as a broader cross-cultural, context. Through an examination of texts and images spanning over thirteen centuries of Japanese history, along with comparable productions from other cultures, students will gain an understanding not only of different conceptions and representations of monsters, ghosts, and other supernatural creatures in Japan, but also of the role of the monstrous in the cultural imagination more generally. The course draws on various media and genres of representation, ranging from written works, both literary and scholarly, to the visual arts, material culture, drama, and cinema. Readings average 100-150 pages per week. Several film and video screenings are scheduled in addition to the regular class meetings. Seating is limited, with final admission based on a written essay and other information to be submitted to the instructor before the beginning of the semester

Spring 2021: EAAS UN3338
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3338 001/10316 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Online Only
Gregory Pflugfelder 3.00 11/15

HSAM UN2901 Data: Past, Present, and Future. 3 points.

Lect: 1.5. Lab: 1.5.

Data-empowered algorithms are reshaping our professional, personal, and political realities, for good--and for bad. "Data: Past, Present, and Future" moves from the birth of statistics in the 18th century to the surveillance capitalism of the present day, covering racist eugenics, World War II cryptography, and creepy personalized advertising along the way. Rather than looking at ethics and history as separate from the science and engineering, the course integrates the teaching of algorithms and data manipulation with the political whirlwinds and ethical controversies from which those techniques emerged. We pair the introduction of technical developments with the shifting political and economic powers that encouraged and benefited from new capabilities. We couple primary and secondary readings on the history and ethics of data with computational work done largely with user-friendly Jupyter notebooks in Python.

Spring 2021: HSAM UN2901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSAM 2901 001/10970 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Chris Wiggins, Matthew Jones 3 56/75

HSEA GU4700 Rise of Modern Tibet: History and Society, 1600-1913. 4 points.

Rise of Modern Tibet

Spring 2021: HSEA GU4700
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4700 001/10326 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Gray Tuttle 4 9/15

HSEA GU4712 Local History in Tibet. 4 points.

Tibetan culture covers an area roughly the size of Western Europe, yet most regions have not been the subject of sustained historical study. This course is designed for students interested in studying approaches to local history that attempt to ask large questions of relatively small places. Historiographic works from Tibetan studies (where they exist) will be examined in comparison with approaches drawn mainly from European and Chinese studies, as well as theories drawn from North/South American and Southeast Asian contexts. Given the centrality of Buddhist monasteries to Tibetan history (as “urban” centers, banks, governments, educational institutions, etc.) much of the course will deal with these.

Spring 2021: HSEA GU4712
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4712 001/10327 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Gray Tuttle 4 9/15

HSEA GU4882 History of Modern China II. 3 points.

China's transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

Spring 2021: HSEA GU4882
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4882 001/10330 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Eugenia Lean 3 24/40

HSPB UN2950 Social History of American Public Health. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical understanding of the role public health has played in American history. The underlying assumptions are that disease, and the ways we define disease, are simultaneously reflections of social and cultural values, as well as important factors in shaping those values. Also, it is maintained that the environments that we build determine the ways we live and die. The dread infectious and acute diseases in the nineteenth century, the chronic, degenerative conditions of the twentieth and the new, vaguely understood conditions rooted in a changing chemical and human-made environment are emblematic of the societies we created. Among the questions that will be addressed are: How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape our history? How do ideas about health reflect broader attitudes and values in American history and culture? How does the American experience with pain, disability, and disease affect our actions and lives? What are the responsibilities of the state and of the individual in preserving health? How have American institutions--from hospitals to unions to insurance companies--been shaped by changing longevity, experience with disability and death?

Spring 2021: HSPB UN2950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSPB 2950 001/11396 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Online Only
James Colgrove 4 156/175

JWST UN3538 Jews in the City in the Islamic Middle East. 4.00 points.

As the vast majority of Jews in the Islamic Middle East and North Africa lived in various urban centers, this seminar takes up the city as a framework with which to study Jewish life and history in that region. Through intensive class discussions and engagement with primary sources of all kinds, we will explore how Jewish communities and their concerns shaped the cities they lived in, and how those cities, in turn, shaped those Jewish communities. We will also consider broader questions about minority-majority relations, social class, gender, modernization, natural disasters, memory, and more. Although we will touch on the High Middle Ages and Early Modern Times, this course will focus on the period post-1800, to this day. We will also focus on social history, but will discuss how basic approaches in anthropology, cultural studies, and especially urban studies, can help us understand the (Jewish) urban experience better. Finally, since Islamic civilization was an umbrella civilization, under which diverse communities lived and interacted, we will consider the comparative study of Jewish life: how does comparative analysis help us think about social groups, such as Jews, or social formations, such as cities? Does a comparative view of Jewish urban life help us understand this phenomenon better?

Spring 2021: JWST UN3538
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JWST 3538 001/11910 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Alon Tam 4.00 19/22

MDES UN3048 Pandemics: A Global History. 3.00 points.

With an interdisciplinary perspective, this course seeks to expand the understanding of past pandemic crises and recent, lived pandemics such as COVID-19. COVID-19 has brought up urgent questions about how we can understand and historicize pandemics and trace the changing relationship between disease and its vectors, humans and their environments. This course seeks to expand the understanding of past and recent pandemics through a historical lens that traces the deep seated racial and class disparities, social and cultural stigma, and political responses and control that they were expressed and deployed during these historical crises. It seeks to understand and analyze pandemics as representing complex, disruptive and devastating crises that effect profound transformations in ideas, social and economic relations and challenge interdependent networks and cultures. Pandemics are balanced in a global-local flux between dramaturgic, proliferating, contagious outbreaks; and endemic, chronic infections that have prolonged periods of latency before again remerging through new transmissions. They also serve as a crucial lens to analyze a range of historical connections, ensions and movements ranging from colonialism and the politics of borders, global capitalism and labor, migration and mobility, decolonization and development, and neoliberalism and global health politics

Spring 2021: MDES UN3048
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3048 001/13828 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Online Only
Kavita Sivaramakrishnan 3.00 15/40

MDES UN3915 A History of African Cities. 3 points.

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the history of African cities. It cuts across disciplinary boundaries of history, geography, anthropology, political and cultural sociology, literature and cultural studies, to explore the vaious trajectories of urbanization on the continent.

Spring 2021: MDES UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3915 001/11139 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Mamadou Diouf 3 26/45