History

Departmental Office: 413 Fayerweather; 212-854-4646
http://www.history.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Neslihan Şenocak , 324 Fayerweather; nsenocak@columbia.edu

Undergraduate Administrator: Michael Adan, undergraduate-history@columbia.edu

The history curriculum covers most areas of the world and most periods of history. It encourages students to develop historical understanding in the widest sense of the word: a thorough empirical grasp along with the kind of analytical skills that come with a genuinely historical sensibility. This is done through two types of courses: lectures and seminars. Lectures range from broad surveys of the history of a place or period to more thematically oriented courses. Seminars offer students the opportunity to work more closely with historical sources in smaller groups and to do more sophisticated written work. Because history courses usually have no prerequisites, there are no preordained sequences to follow. It is advisable, however, that students take a relevant lecture course in preparation for a seminar. Majors wishing to follow a more intensive program are advised to enroll in a historiography course and to undertake a senior thesis project. Historically, majors have pursued careers in a very wide range of areas including medicine, law, mass media, Wall Street, and academia.

Advanced Placement

Students may receive 3 credits toward the overall degree requirements for a score of 5 on the AP European History exam or the AP United States History exam. No points count toward or fulfill any requirements of the history major or concentration.

Advising

During their junior and senior years, majors and concentrators are advised by the faculty members of the Undergraduate Education Committee (UNDED). UNDED advisers also review and sign Plan of Study (POS) forms for majors and concentrators at least once per year. POS forms track students’ progress toward completing all major and concentration requirements. New history majors and concentrators may see any member of UNDED. For the most up-to-date information on UNDED members, please see the undergraduate advising page of the departmental website.

Majors and concentrators can also receive pure academic interest advising (non-requirement advising) from any faculty member and affiliated faculty member of the department.

First-years and sophomores considering a history major or concentration can seek advising from UNDED or any other faculty member.

For questions about requirements, courses, or the general program, majors and concentrators can also contact the undergraduate administrator.

Departmental Honors

To be eligible for departmental honors, the student must have a GPA of at least 3.6 in courses for the major, an ambitious curriculum, and an outstanding senior thesis. Honors are awarded on the basis of a truly outstanding senior thesis. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Course Numbering

Courses are numbered by type:
UN 1xxx - Introductory Survey Lectures 
UN 2xxx - Undergraduate Lectures 
UN 3xxx - Undergraduate Seminars 
GU 4xxx - Joint Undergraduate/Graduate Seminars 

and field (with some exceptions):
x000-x059: Ancient
x060-x099: Medieval
x100-x199: Early modern Europe
x200-x299: East Central Europe
x300-x399: Modern Western Europe
x400-x599: United States
x600-x659: Jewish
x660-x699: Latin America
x700-x759: Middle East
x760-x799: Africa
x800-x859: South Asia
x860-x899: East Asia
x900-x999: Research, historiography, and transnational

Seminars

Seminars are integral to the undergraduate major in history. In these courses, students develop research and writing skills under the close supervision of a faculty member. Enrollment is normally limited to approximately 15 students. In order to maintain the small size of the courses, admission to most seminars is by instructor's permission or application.

In conjunction with the Barnard History Department and other departments in the University (particularly East Asian Languages and Cultures), the History Department offers about 25 seminars each semester that majors may use to meet their seminar requirements. While there are sufficient seminars offered to meet the needs of majors seeking to fulfill the two-seminar requirement, given the enrollment limits, students may not always be able to enroll in a particular seminar. Students should discuss with UNDED their various options for completing the seminar requirement.

The History Department has developed an on-line application system for some seminars. The department regularly provides declared majors and concentrators with information on upcoming application periods, which typically occur midway through the preceding semester. Students majoring in other fields, or students who have not yet declared a major, must inform themselves of the application procedures and deadlines by checking the undergraduate seminar page of the departmental website.

Professors

  • Charles Armstrong
  • Volker Berghahn (emeritus)
  • Richard Billows
  • Elizabeth Blackmar
  • Casey Blake
  • Christopher Brown
  • Richard Bulliet (emeritus)
  • Elisheva Carlebach
  • Mark Carnes (Barnard)
  • Zeynep Çelik
  • George Chauncey
  • John Coatsworth (Provost)
  • Matthew Connelly
  • Victoria de Grazia
  • Mamadou Diouf (Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies)
  • Catherine Evtuhov 
  • Barbara Fields
  • Eric Foner (emeritus)
  • Carol Gluck
  • Martha Howell
  • Robert Hymes (East Asian Language and Cultures)
  • Kenneth Jackson
  • Karl Jacoby
  • Matthew Jones
  • Ira Katznelson (Political Science)
  • Joel Kaye (Barnard)
  • Alice Kessler-Harris (emerita)
  • Rashid Khalidi
  • Dorothy Ko (Barnard)
  • Adam Kosto
  • William Leach (emeritus)
  • Gregory Mann
  • Mark Mazower
  • Robert McCaughey (Barnard)
  • Stephanie McCurry
  • Jose Moya (Barnard)
  • Mae Ngai
  • Susan Pedersen
  • Pablo Piccato
  • Rosalind Rosenberg (Barnard)
  • David Rosner (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • David Rothman (Physicians and Surgeons)
  • Simon Schama (University Professor)
  • Seth Schwartz
  • Herbert Sloan (Barnard, emeritus)
  • Pamela Smith 
  • Robert Somerville (Religion)
  • Michael Stanislawski
  • Anders Stephanson
  • Lisa Tiersten (Barnard)
  • Adam Tooze
  • Deborah Valenze (Barnard)
  • Marc Van de Mieroop
  • Richard Wortman (emeritus)
  • Madeleine Zelin (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  •  

Associate Professors

  • Gergely Baics (Barnard)
  • Lisbeth Kim Brandt (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Paul Chamberlin 
  • Amy Chazkel
  • Charly Coleman
  • Marwa Elshakry
  • Frank Guridy
  • Hilary Hallett
  • Natasha Lightfoot
  • Malgorzata Mazurek
  • Nara Milanich
  • Lien-Hang Nguyen
  • Gregory Pflugfelder (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Caterina Pizzigoni
  • Anupama Rao (Barnard)
  • Camille Robcis
  • Samuel Roberts
  • Neslihan Senocak
  • Rhiannon Stephens
  • Gray Tuttle (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Carl Wennerlind (Barnard)
  •  

Assistant Professors

  • Hannah Farber
  • Andrew Lipman (Barnard)
  • Gulnar Kendirbai (Visiting)
  • A. Tunç Şen
  • Alma Steingart
  • Sailakshmi Ramgopal
  •  

Lecturers in Discipline

  • Victoria Phillips 
  •  

On Leave

Fall 2019: Armstrong, Carnes (Barnard), de Grazia, Howell, Piccato, Schwartz, Smith, Stephanson, Stephens, Tooze

Spring 2020: Armstrong, Baics, Gluck, Jackson, Piccato, Pizzigoni, Schwartz, Smith, Stephanson, Stephens, Tooze, Valenze

Guidelines for all History Majors and Concentrators

For detailed information about the history major or concentration, as well as the policies and procedures of the department, please refer to the History at Columbia Undergraduate Handbook, available for download on the departmental website.


Major in History

Students must complete a minimum of nine courses in the department, of which four or more must be in an area of specialization chosen by the student and approved by a member of UNDED. Students must also fulfill a breadth requirement by taking three courses outside of their specialization. Two of the courses taken in the major must be seminars (including one seminar in the chosen specialization).

The requirements of the undergraduate program encourage students to do two things:

  1. Develop a deeper knowledge of the history of a particular time and/or place. Students are required to complete a specialization by taking a number of courses in a single field of history of their own choosing. The field should be defined, in consultation with a member of UNDED, according to geographical, chronological, and/or thematic criteria. For example, a student might choose to specialize in 20th C. U.S. History, Medieval European History, Ancient Greek and Roman History, or Modern East Asian History. The specialization does not appear on the student's transcript, but provides an organizing principle for the program the student assembles in consultation with UNDED.
  2. Gain a sense of the full scope of history as a discipline by taking a broad range of courses. Students must fulfill a breadth requirement by taking courses outside their own specialization -- at least one course removed in time and two removed in space.
    1. Time: majors and concentrators must take at least one course removed in time from their specialization:
      • Students specializing in the modern period must take at least one course in the pre-modern period; students specializing in the pre-modern period must take at least one course in the modern period.

      • If the course proposed is in the same regional field as a student's specialization, special care must be taken to ensure that it is as far removed as possible; please consult with UNDED to make sure a given course counts for the chronological breadth requirement. 

    2. Space: majors must take at least two additional courses in regional fields not their own:

      • These two "removed in space" courses must also cover two different regions.
      • For example, students specializing in some part of Europe must take two courses in Africa, East or South Asia, Latin America/Caribbean, Middle East, and/or the U.S.
      • Some courses cover multiple geographic regions. If a course includes one of the regions within a student's specialization, that course cannot count towards the breadth requirement unless it is specifically approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. For example, if a student is specializing in 20th C. U.S. history and takes the class World War II in Global Perspective, the class is too close to the specialization and may not count as a regional breadth course.

All courses in the Barnard History Department as well as select courses in East Asian Languages and Cultures; Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies; and other departments count toward the major. Eligible inter-departmental courses may include: 

  • African Civilizations (AFCV UN1020) (when taught by Professor Gregory Mann, Professor Rhiannon Stephens, or PhD students in the Columbia University Department of History; the course does NOT count for History when taught by anyone else)
  • Primary Texts of Latin American Civilization (LACV UN1020) (when taught by Professor Pablo Piccato, Professor Caterina Pizzigoni, or PhD students in the Columbia University Department of History; the course does NOT count for History when taught by anyone else)
  • Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China (ASCE UN1359), Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan (ASCE UN1361)Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea (ASCE UN1363) or other ASCE UN1xxx courses (when taught by Professors Charles Armstrong, Carol Gluck, Robert Hymes, Dorothy Ko, Eugenia Lean, Feng Li, David Lurie, Jungwon Kim, Paul Kreitman, Gregory Pflugfelder, Gray Tuttle, or Madeleine Zelin, and NOT when they are taught by anyone else)
  • Please see the Courses section on the departmental website to see which of these might count in a given semester. Any courses not listed or linked on the departmental website, however historical in approach or content, do not count toward the history major or concentration, except with explicit written approval of the UNDED chair.
  • If you suspect a History course has escaped being listed at the above link and want to confirm whether or not it counts for History students, please contact the Undergraduate Administrator.

Thematic Specializations

Suitably focused thematic and cross-regional specializations are permitted and the breadth requirements for students interested in these topics are set in consultation with a member of UNDED. Classes are offered in fields including, but not limited to:

  • Ancient history
  • Medieval history
  • Early modern European history
  • Modern European history
  • United States history
  • Latin American and Caribbean history
  • Middle Eastern history
  • East Asian history
  • South Asian history

Additionally, classes are offered in thematic and cross-regional fields which include, but are not limited to:

  • Intellectual history
  • Jewish history
  • Women's history
  • International history
  • History of science

These fields are only examples. Students should work with a member of UNDED to craft a suitably focused specialization on the theme or field that interests them.

Thesis Requirements

Majors may elect to write a senior thesis, though this is not a graduation requirement. Only senior thesis writers are eligible to be considered for departmental honors. The senior thesis option is not available to concentrators.

The yearlong HIST UN3838-HIST UN3839 Senior Thesis Seminar carries 8 points, 4 of which typically count as a seminar in the specialization. For the most up-to-date information on the field designations for history courses, please see the Courses section of the departmental website.


Concentration in History

Effective February 2018, students must complete a minimum of six courses in history. At least three of the six courses must be in an area of specialization, one far removed in time, and one on a geographic region far removed in space. There is no seminar requirement for the concentration.

Fall 2020 History Courses

HIST UN1002 Ancient History of Mesopotamia and Asia Minor. 4 points.

A survey of the political and cultural history of Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran from prehistory to the disappearance of the cuneiform documentation, with special emphasis on Mesopotamia. Groups(s): A

Fall 2020: HIST UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1002 001/12864 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 20/300

HIST UN1010 The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.. 4 points.

A review of the history of the Greek world from the beginnings of Greek archaic culture around 800 B.C., through the classical and hellenistic periods to the definitive Roman conquest in 146 B.C., with concentration on political history, but attention also to social and cultural developments.Field(s): ANC

Fall 2020: HIST UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1010 001/10007 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Richard Billows 4 78/300

HIST BC1062 Introduction to Later Middle Ages: 1050-1450. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Social environment, political, and religious institutions, and the main intellectual currents of the Latin West studied through primary sources and modern historical writings.

HIST BC1401 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. 4.00 points.

Themes include Native and colonial cultures and politics, the evolution of American political and economic institutions, relationships between religious and social movements, and connecting ideologies of race and gender with larger processes such as enslavement, dispossession, and industrialization

Spring 2021: HIST BC1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1401 001/00130 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Andrew Lipman 4.00 0/75

HIST BC1101 Introduction to European History: Renaissance to French Revolution. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual history of early modern Europe, including the Renaissance, Reformation and Counter-Reformation, absolutism, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment.

Fall 2020: HIST BC1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1101 001/00044 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Deborah Valenze 4 48/60

HIST UN1768 European Intellectual History. 4 points.

This course provides an introduction to some of the major landmarks in European cultural and intellectual history, from the aftermath of the French Revolution to the 1970s.  We will pay special attention to the relationship between texts (literature, anthropology, political theory, psychoanalysis, art, and film) and the various contexts in which they were produced.  Among other themes, we will discuss the cultural impact of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, industrialism, colonialism, modernism, the Russian Revolution, the two world wars, decolonization, feminism and gay liberation movements, structuralism and poststructuralism.  In conjunction, we will examine how modern ideologies (liberalism, conservatism, Marxism, imperialism, fascism, totalitarianism, neoliberalism) were developed and challenged over the course of the last two centuries. 


Participation in weekly discussion sections staffed by TAs is mandatory.  The discussion sections are 50 minutes per session.  Students must register for the general discussion (“DISC”) section, and will be assigned to a specific time and TA instructor once the course begins.

Fall 2020: HIST UN1768
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1768 001/13776 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 4 58/300

HIST UN1769 DISC - European Intellectual History . 0 points.

Required Discussion Section for HIST 1768 European Intellectual History.  Students must first register for HIST 1768.

Fall 2020: HIST UN1769
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1769 001/13777 Th 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 9/13
HIST 1769 002/13778 Th 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 8/13
HIST 1769 003/13779 F 9:10am - 10:00am
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 11/13
HIST 1769 004/13780 F 10:10am - 11:00am
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 11/13
HIST 1769 005/23071 F 11:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 8/13
HIST 1769 006/23072 F 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Online Only
Camille Robcis 0 11/13

HIST UN2003 Empire & Nation-Building East Central Europe. 4.00 points.

This lecture course investigates nation-building as a process of decolonization of Europe’s land empires (Ottoman, German, Russian, and Habsburg) from 18th century to present. It was a turbulent historical process: decolonization of European East’s ‘small peoples’ paved the way to anti-imperial and anti-colonial movements outside Europe only to be crushed, in the mid-twentieth-century, by imperial politics of Hitler’s Germany and the Soviet Union. We will study different ways in which culture – local languages, vernacular heritage, religion, and material culture – became politically weaponized to achieve goals of national self-determination and social revolution. Throughout the 19th and 20th century nation-building in the European East produced particular forms of non-Western modernity that found expression in built environments, visual arts, letters, music, public activism, and domestic sphere. We will study how resistance and enforced accommodation to Empire turned into spaces of cultural production, mass movements, economic upheaval, state-building, and last but not least, physical violence. Finally, we will investigate how ordinary Eastern Europeans experienced and gave meaning to the processes of nation-building. The course is intended for students interested in cultural, intellectual, social and gender history, histories of nationalism and communism, as well as local and transnational histories of Eastern European ‘peoples’ (Jewish, Muslim, Christian Slavic; German, Russian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Southern Slavic/Yugo-Slav, Greek, and Roma)

HIST UN2112 The Scientific Revolution in Western Europe: 1500-1750. 4 points.

Introduction to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of the upheavals of astronomy, anatomy, mathematics, alchemy from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Field(s): EME

Fall 2020: HIST UN2112
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2112 001/12046 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Online Only
Matthew Jones 4 17/300

HIST BC2321 Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Culture of Empire. 3 points.

Examines the shaping of European cultural identity through encounters with non-European cultures from 1500 to the post-colonial era. Novels, paintings, and films will be among the sources used to examine such topics as exoticism in the Enlightenment, slavery and European capitalism, Orientalism in art, ethnographic writings on the primitive, and tourism.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2321 001/00042 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 3 61/70

HIST UN2360 TWENTIETH CENTURY BRITAIN. 4.00 points.

This course surveys the main currents of British history from 1900 to the present, with particular attention to the changing place of Britain in the world and the changing shape of society and politics.  Throughout this course, we will ask:  Where is power located in Britain and its empire?  What held Britain and the empire together, and what tore them apart?  What was life like for Britons – young and old, men and women, rich and poor, Black and white – across the course of this century? When and how did social change happen?  How did people respond?

,

We will tackle these questions by looking closely at some key periods of political conflict and resolution, by reading key texts from the time, and – for the latter part of the course – by viewing films and speeches.  The course requirements include section participation, including regular posts (20%), a take-home midterm (20%), two short research assignments (20% each) and a take-home final (20%).  You must complete all assignments and exams to pass the course.  The research assignments are devised to help familiarize you with historians’ practice, so that you can search for answers to historical questions on your own.  The assignments are integrated into section discussion: due dates are (as a result) not flexible and section attendance is required.  The films are an essential part of the course and will be discussed in section.  

,

Readings for this courseare drawn mostly from the rich primary materials available.  They are supplemented by select articles chosen to bring out some of the key issues historians find significant about particular periods or events.  My lectures constitute the main “textbook” for the course, but I am also recommending that you read selected chapters from a textbook that is available online:  Stephanie Barczewski et al, Britain since 1688https://www-taylorfrancis-com.ezproxy.cul.columbia.edu/books/9781315748610.  

,

Most material is available online, but five books (asterisked below) will need to be ordered or bought from Book Culture (or, if you are not in the New York area, online).  A timeline, a list of interesting web links, and a list of great British films can be found on the Courseworks page.

,

Course objectives

,

The course aims to provide students with (a) a good foundational knowledge of the course of British history and culture from 1900 to the present; (b) an understanding of how historians do research and basic research skills; (c) the ability to analyze historical materials (speeches, novels, memoirs, government documents, films), placing them in context and deploying them to make analytical arguments about the past.

Fall 2020: HIST UN2360
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2360 001/12228 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 4.00 56/300

HIST BC2366 Climate & History: Intersecting Science Environment & Society. 3 points.

Climate change poses an imminent threat to the future of humanity and is a crucial feature of the Anthropocene, namely the age of anthropogenic transformations of the Earth’s environments on a global scale. How did we get here? History is fundamental to answer this question. This course examines the relationship between climate, scientific knowledge, and human societies. The class will first survey the role of climate as an historical actor of global history, rather than as the backdrop of political, social and economic events. In the second part of the course, we will examine the history of weather and climate science, as well as climate change denialism. The class offers a wide range of case studies around the world of the tight relationship between climate and history. The instructor encourages all majors to register from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

Spring 2021: HIST BC2366
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2366 001/00113 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Angelo Caglioti 3 0/40

HIST BC2401 The Politics of Crime and Policing in the US. 3 points.

This course will examine the historical development of crime and the criminal justice system in the United States since the Civil War. The course will give particular focus to the interactions between conceptions of crime, normalcy and deviance, and the broader social and political context of policy making.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2401 001/00046 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Matthew Vaz 3 53/40

HIST BC2413 The United States, 1940-1975. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Emphasis on foreign policies as they pertain to the Second World War, the atomic bomb, containment, the Cold War, Korea, and Vietnam. Also considers major social and intellectual trends, including the Civil Rights movement, the counterculture, feminism, Watergate, and the recession of the 1970s.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2413
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2413 001/00035 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Mark Carnes 3 52/72

HIST BC2440 Intro to African American History. 3 points.

Major themes in African-American History: slave trade, slavery, resistance, segregation, the "New Negro," Civil Rights, Black Power, challenges and manifestations of the contemporary "Color Line."General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Fall 2020: HIST BC2440
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2440 001/00039 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Celia Naylor 3 29/29

HIST UN2523 History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States. 4 points.

Through assigned readings and a group research project, students will gain familiarity with a range of historical and social science problems at the intersection of ethnic/racial/sexual formations, technological networks, and health politics since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's health organization and care; HIV/AIDS politics, policy, and community response; "benign neglect"; urban renewal and gentrification; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; and environmental justice. There are no required qualifications for enrollment, although students will find the material more accessible if they have had previous coursework experience in United States history, pre-health professional (pre-med, pre-nursing, or pre-public health), African-American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies. 

Fall 2020: HIST UN2523
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2523 001/12189 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 58/300

HIST UN2533 US Lesbian and Gay History. 4 points.

This course explores the social, cultural, and political history of lesbians, gay men, and other socially constituted sexual and gender minorities, primarily in the twentieth century.  Since the production and regulation of queer life has always been intimately linked to the production and policing of “normal” sexuality and gender, we will also pay attention to the shifting boundaries of normative sexuality, especially heterosexuality, as well as other developments in American history that shaped gay life, such as the Second World War, Cold War, urbanization, and the minority rights revolution.  Themes include the emergence of homosexuality and heterosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the changing relationship between homosexuality and transgenderism; the development of diverse lesbian and gay subcultures and their representation in popular culture; the sources of antigay hostility; religion and sexual science; generational change and everyday life; AIDS; and gay, antigay, feminist, and queer movements.      

Fall 2020: HIST UN2533
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2533 001/12062 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
George Chauncey 4 137/300

HIST UN2565 American History at the Movies. 4 points.

This lecture explores major topics in modern American history through an examination of the American film industry and some of its most popular films and stars. It begins with the emergence of “Hollywood” as an industry and a place in the wake of WWI and ends with the rise of the so-called ‘New Hollywood’ in the 1970s and its treatment of the 1960s and the Vietnam War. For much of this period, Hollywood’s films were not protected free speech, making movies and stars peculiarly reflective of, and vulnerable to, changes in broader cultural and political dynamics. Students will become familiar with Hollywood’s institutional history over this half-century in order to understand the forces, both internal and external, that have shaped the presentation of what Americans do and don’t see on screens and to become skilled interpreters of American history at the movies.

Spring 2021: HIST UN2565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2565 001/10090 T 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Online Only
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 0/75
HIST 2565 001/10090 Th 1:10pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 0/75

HIST UN2361 DISC - 20th Century Britain: Between Democracy and Empire. 0 points.

MANDATORY Discussion Section for HIST UN 2360 20th Century Britain: Between Democracy and Empire.  Students must also be registered for HIST 2360.

Fall 2020: HIST UN2361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2361 001/12956 Th 7:10pm - 8:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 10/15
HIST 2361 002/13538 F 10:10am - 11:00am
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 12/15
HIST 2361 003/13539 F 12:10pm - 1:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 10/15
HIST 2361 004/13540 F 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 7/15
HIST 2361 005/22410 M 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 10/15
HIST 2361 006/22786 M 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Online Only
Susan Pedersen 0 5/15

HIST UN2660 Latin American Civilization I. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from pre-Columbian times to 1810. Global Core Approved.

HIST BC2664 Reproducing Inequalities: Families in Latin American History. 3 points.

Explores changing structures and meanings of family in Latin America from colonial period to present. Particular focus on enduring tensions between "prescription" and "reality" in family forms as well as the articulation of family with hierarchies of class, caste, and color in diverse Latin American societies.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2664
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2664 001/00038 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Nara Milanich 3 32/36

HIST UN2478 US INTELLECTUAL HIST 1865-PRES. 4.00 points.

This course examines major themes in U.S. intellectual history since the Civil War. Among other topics, we will examine the public role of intellectuals; the modern liberal-progressive tradition and its radical and conservative critics; the uneasy status of religion ina secular culture; cultural radicalism and feminism; critiques of corporate capitalism and consumer culture; the response of intellectuals to hot and cold wars, the Great Depression, and the upheavals of the 1960s. Fields(s): US

Fall 2020: HIST UN2478
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2478 001/13376 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Casey Blake 4.00 100/300

HIST UN2611 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must also enroll in required discussion section.

  Field(s): ANC

Fall 2020: HIST UN2611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2611 001/12193 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Seth Schwartz 4 11/18

HIST UN2719 History of the Modern Middle East. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6998 version of this course.

This course will cover the history of the Middle East from the 18th century until the present, examining the region ranging from Morocco to Iran and including the Ottoman Empire. It will focus on transformations in the states of the region, external intervention, and the emergence of modern nation-states, as well as aspects of social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the region. Field(s): ME

Fall 2020: HIST UN2719
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2719 001/12185 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Online Only
Rashid Khalidi 4 252/300

HIST UN3017 Sexuality and the City. 4 points.

The city has classically been represented as the site of sexual freedom, but also of sexual immorality and danger.  This course explores the interrelated histories of sexuality and the city in the twentieth-century United States (especially New York) by exploring how urban conditions and processes shaped sexual practices, identities, communities, and ethics, and how sexual matters shaped urban processes, politics, and representation.   

Fall 2020: HIST UN3017
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3017 001/12063 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
George Chauncey 4 13/18

HIST UN3234 The Idea of Conspiracy in European Culture. 4 points.

What are conspiracy theories? Do conspiracies exist? How did historians, philosophers and political thinkers consider them? Is there such a thing as a “deep state?” When did conspiracy as a political enterprise give rise to the idea of conspiracy “theory”? What is the relationship, if any, between them? This class will survey past, recent and current thinking about conspiracies. The working premise of the class is that thinking about conspiracies has been a fundamental, if overlooked, driver in the development of Western political theory and the modern state. Recovering this long history is crucial if we want to understand the current role of conspiracy theories in politics and their ideological functions.

HIST BC3327 Consumer Culture in Modern Europe. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The development of the modern culture of consumption, with particular attention to the formation of the woman consumer. Topics include commerce and the urban landscape, changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, feminine fashion and conspicuous consumption, and the birth of advertising. Examination of novels, fashion magazines, and advertising images.

Fall 2020: HIST BC3327
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3327 001/00043 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 4 17/17

HIST BC3368 History of the Senses. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examination of European understandings of human senses through the production and reception of art, literature, music, food, and sensual enjoyments in Britain and France. Readings include changing theories concerning the five senses; efforts to master the passions; the rise of sensibility and feeling for others; concerts and the patronage of art; the professionalization of the senses.

HIST BC3391 Senior Research Seminar. 8 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
4 points each term.

Prerequisites: Open to Barnard College History Senior Majors.

Individual guided research and writing in history and the presentation of results in seminar and in the form of the senior essay.  See Requirements for the Major for details.  

Fall 2020: HIST BC3391
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3391 001/00373 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Andrew Lipman 8 51

HIST UN3490 The Global Cold War. 4 points.

The superpower competition between the US and the USSR dominated international affairs during the second half of the twentieth century. Though this Cold War was born from ideological differences and initially focused on Europe, it soon became entangled with the concurrent global process of decolonization. In this way, the US-Soviet rivalry shaped events on every continent. This course will examine the intersection of the superpower competition and the emergence of the postcolonial world. Through course readings and class discussion, students will examine the global dimensions of the Cold war. Each student will prepare a research paper on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Fall 2020: HIST UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3490 001/12059 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Paul Chamberlin 4 15/18

HIST BC3599 Remembering Slavery: Critiquing Modern Representations of the Peculiar Institution. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The enslavement of people of African descent signifies a crucial historical and cultural marker not only for African-Americans but also for Americans in general. We will interrogate how and why images of slavery continue to be invoked within the American sociocultural landscape (e.g., in films, documentaries, historical novels, and science fiction).

Fall 2020: HIST BC3599
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3599 001/00040 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Celia Naylor 4 15/15

HIST BC3788 GENDER,SEXUALITY,POWER,AFRICA. 4.00 points.

This course deals with the scholarship on gender and sexuality in African history. The central themes of the course will be changes and continuities in gender performance and the politics of gender and sexual difference within African societies, the social, political, and economic processes that have influenced gender and sexual identities, and the connections between gender, sexuality, inequality, and activism at local, national, continental, and global scales

Fall 2020: HIST BC3788
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3788 001/00582 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Abosede George 4.00 11/15

HIST UN3838 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. 

Fall 2020: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/12222 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 12/15
HIST 3838 002/12865 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 9/15
HIST 3838 003/13687 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 14/15
HIST 3838 004/21408 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 11/15
Spring 2021: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/10099 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 0/13
HIST 3838 002/10100 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 0/14
HIST 3838 003/10101 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 0/13
HIST 3838 004/10175 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 0/13

HIST UN3562 The Seven Years’ War (1754-1763), Global Perspective: Europe, Asia, Africa, and Americas. 4 points.

Prerequisites: History Majors Preferred

This research seminar explores the causes, course, and consequences of the Seven Years’ War, arguably the first world war in modern history.  Topics include the origins of the conflict in North America and in Europe, the relationship between imperial rivalry in the American colonies and the contest for supremacy in central Europe, the impact of the war on trade and settlement in South Asia, the West Indies, the Philippines, and West Africa, and the legacies of the conflict for British imperial expansion in India, North America, Senegal, and the southern Caribbean.  During the second half of the semester, members of the seminar will devote the majority of their time to the research and writing of a substantial paper.

Fall 2020: HIST UN3562
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3562 001/13437 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Christopher Brown 4 19/25

HIST BC3870 Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Sophomore Standing.

Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

Fall 2020: HIST BC3870
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3870 001/00433 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jose Moya 4 11/15

HIST UN3911 Medicine and Western Civilization. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors, but other majors are welcome.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar seeks to analyze the ways by which medicine and culture combine to shape our values and traditions. To this end, it will examine notable literary, medical, and social texts from classical antiquity to the present.

HIST GU4012 HISTORY OF THE CITY IN LATIN AMERICA. 4.00 points.

This course covers the historical development of cities in Latin America. Readings examine the concentration of people in commercial and political centers from the beginnings of European colonization in the sixteenth century to the present day and will introduce contrasting approaches to the study of urban culture, politics, society, and the built environment. Central themes include the reciprocal relationships between growing urban areas and the countryside; cities as sites of imperial power and their post-colonial role in nation-building; changing power dynamics in modern Latin America, especially as they impacted the lives of cities’ nonelite majority populations; the legalities and politics of urban space; the complexity and historical development of urban segregation; the rise of informal economies; and the constant tension between tradition and progress through which urban societies have formed. Reading knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese will be helpful but is not required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students; graduate students will be given additional reading and writing assignments

Spring 2021: HIST GU4012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4012 001/10081 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Amy Chazkel 4.00 0/15

HIST GU4311 European Romanticism. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

“…Romanticism is the largest recent movement to transform the lives and the thought of the Western world. It seems to me to be the greatest single shift in the consciousness of the West that has occurred, and all the other shifts which have occurred in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries appear to me in comparison less important, and at any rate deeply influenced by it.” (Isaiah Berlin, The Roots of Romanticism)

,

This seminar will introduce students to the manifold expressions of Romanticism in Europe from the late eighteenth century to the late nineteenth century. It is geared both at History majors, particularly but not exclusively those specializing in European Intellectual History, and at students interested in the literature and culture of Germany, France, and Great Britain. We will also  take a  brief look at Romantic writers in Eastern Europe. We will read primarily works written by philosophers and social thinkers, but also a good deal of literature, both prose and poetry. We will have two sessions devoted to the plastic arts – including a class trip to the Metropolitan Museum to view paintings and sculptures, and we will have one session devoted to Romantic music (a study of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.)  We will include readings relating to the Romantic fascination with “the East,” and devote one session to the crucial subject of Romanticism and gender.  Most of the readings will be primary sources either originally in or translated into English, as well as a selection of pertinent secondary sources.

Fall 2020: HIST GU4311
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4311 001/12836 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Michael Stanislawski 4 16/25

HIST GU4518 Research Seminar: Columbia and Slavery. 4 points.

In this course, students will write original, independent papers of around 25 pages, based on research in both primary and secondary sources, on an aspect of the relationship between Columbia College and its colonial predecessor King's College, with the institution of slavery.

HIST GU4743 MANUSCRIPTS OF THE MUSLIM WORLD. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of a relevant research language (Arabic, Persian, or Ottoman Turkish) is required to be able to work on a particular manuscript to be chosen by the student. Students who lack the necessary skills of any of these languages but are interested in pre-modern book culture are still encouraged to contact the course instructor.
This course is designed to provide the foundations for exploring the rich and fascinating history of Islamic manuscripts from the 9th through the 19th century. Its structure is shaped mainly by thematic considerations in a notable chronological fashion. The meetings amount to a series of “cuts” through the topic and cover themes such as the paper revolution, authorship, scribal culture, technologies of book production, readers and their notes, libraries and book collections, or textual as well as extra-textual components of manuscripts. Over the semester, we will study key material, textual, and visual elements of Islamic book culture spanning many centuries and continents, and visit major historiographical questions on the millennium-long history of Islamic manuscript tradition before the widespread adoption of print technology

Fall 2020: HIST GU4743
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4743 001/12203 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Tunc Sen 4.00 6/18

HIST GU4904 WRITING LIVES: A SURVEY OF HISTORICAL APPROACHES AND TECHNIQUES. 4 points.

Ranging from ancient chronicles and saints’ lives to the emergence of modern subjectivity, the rise of the diary, the novel and the bureaucratic questionnaire, this course explores how historians across the ages have written about people’s lives. It asks what has happened to the notion of a life as a moral example, the changing value of ‘experience’ and the ‘ordinary person’, and charts how democracy altered the sense of what was worth recording and commemorating. It draws for its sources on a very wide range of cultures and epochs and concludes by asking the student to conduct their own life history research.

HIST GU4923 Narratives of World War II. 4 points.

An examination of literary and cinematic narratives of the Second World War produced in the decades since 1940 in Europe, America, and Asia. The analytic approach centers both on the historicity of, and the history in, the texts, with the goal of questioning the nature of narrative in different forms through a blend of literary and historical approaches.

Spring 2021: HIST GU4923
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4923 001/10088 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Carol Gluck 4 0/15

Fall 2020 Cross-listed Courses

PLEASE READ: The passage below lists *all* sections being offered by a Columbia instructor for a given course, including sections which *do not* count for History students. NOT ALL sections of the courses listed below count for History majors and concentrators. Particular sections only count towards the History degree if the section instructor is a History faculty member or an affiliate with the History Department. For additional information, please review the "Requirements" tab or consult Undergraduate Administrator at undergraduate-history@columbia.edu. All courses from the Barnard History Department also count towards the History degree.

ASCE UN1361 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE UN1371

A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century.

Fall 2020: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10617 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Gregory Pflugfelder 4 63/90
Spring 2021: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10282 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Paul Kreitman 4 0/90

CSER UN3928 Colonization/Decolonization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 22.

Prerequisites: Open to CSER majors/concentrators only. Others may be allowed to register with the instructor's permission.

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; and European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

Fall 2020: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/12187 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Manan Ahmed 4 19/19
Spring 2021: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/11808 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Claudio Lomnitz 4 0/22

EAAS UN2342 Mythology of East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Through close readings of major myths of China, Japan, and Korea, this course provides a survey of significant themes of East Asian culture. Inclusion of selected comparative readings also leads students to reconsider the nature of ‘world mythology,’ a field often constituted by juxtaposing Greek and Latin classics with oral texts collected during anthropological fieldwork. The core materials for this class are from ancient written traditions, but they speak with force and clarity to modern readers, as is underlined by our attention to latter-day reception and reconceptualization of these narratives. This is an introductory, discussion-based class intended for undergraduates. No prior knowledge of East Asian history or culture is required, and all course readings are in English. Satisfies the Global Core requirement.

Fall 2020: EAAS UN2342
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 2342 001/10659 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
David Lurie 4 19/20

EAAS UN3990 Approaches to East Asian Studies. 4 points.

Enrollment is limited to EALAC and AMEC majors and concentrators only.

This course is intended to provide a focal point for undergraduate majors in East Asian Studies. It introduces students to the analysis of particular objects of East Asian historical, literary, and cultural studies from various disciplinary perspectives. The syllabus is composed of a series of modules, each centered around an object, accompanied by readings that introduce different ways of understanding its meaning.

Fall 2020: EAAS UN3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EAAS 3990 001/10662 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Robert Hymes 4 24/25

EARL GU4312 Tibetan Sacred Space (in Comparative Context). 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Through interdisciplinary theoretical approaches (mostly in the fields of religion, anthropology, literature, and history), this course engages the genre of writing about sacred space in Tibetan Buddhist culture, addressing the micro (built environment) and macro (natural environment) levels of this important sphere of Tibetan literature. Through Tibetan pilgrimage accounts, place (monasteries, temples, etc) based guidebooks, geographically focused biographies, and pictorial representations of place, the class will consider questions about how place-writing overlaps with religious practice, politics, and history. For comparative purposes, we will read place based writing from Western and other Asian authors, for instance accounts of the guidebooks to and inscriptions at Christian churches, raising questions about the cultural relativity of what makes up sacred space.

Fall 2020: EARL GU4312
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EARL 4312 001/10673 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Gray Tuttle 4 16/20

JPNS GU4519 Kanbun. 3 points.

Prerequisites: JPNS W4007 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the fundamentals of reading Chinese-style Japanese and related forms, using literary and historical texts. CC GS EN CE GSAS

Fall 2020: JPNS GU4519
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JPNS 4519 001/10699 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
David Lurie 3 12/15

HSEA GU4880 History of Modern China I. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

China’s transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

Fall 2020: HSEA GU4880
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4880 001/10676 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Madeleine Zelin 3 51/60

HSME UN2915 Africa Before Colonialism: From Prehistory to the Birth of the Atlantic World. 4 points.

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the precolonial history of the African continent. It investigates in-depth the political, social, cultural and economic developments of different Africa communities, covering various regions and periods, from prehistory to the formation of the Indian Ocean and Atlantic worlds. Its focus is the intersection of politics, economics, culture and society. Using world history and Africa’s location in the production of history as key analytical frames, it pays special attention to social, political and cultural changes that shaped the various individual and collective experiences of African peoples and states and the historical discourses associated to them.

Fall 2020: HSME UN2915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSME 2915 001/12654 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Mamadou Diouf 4 23/60

Spring 2020 History Courses

HIST UN1004 Ancient History of Egypt. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of the history of ancient Egypt from the first appearance of the state to the conquest of the country by Alexander of Macedon, with emphasis of the political history, but also with attention to the cultural, social, and economic developments. 

HIST UN1008 DISC - Ancient History of Egypt. 0 points.

MANDATORY Discussion Section for HIST UN 1004 Ancient History of Egypt.  Students must also be registered for HIST UN 1004.

HIST UN1020 The Romans and Their World. 4 points.

This course examines the history of the Roman Empire from the formation of the Roman monarchy in 753 BCE to the collapse of the Western Empire in 476 CE. At the heart of the class is a single question: how did the Roman Empire come to be, and why did it last for so long? We will trace the rise and fall of the Republic, the extension of its power beyond Italy, and the spread of Christianity. Epic poetry, annalistic accounts, coins, papyri, inscriptions, and sculpture will illuminate major figures like Cleopatra, and features of daily life like Roman law and religion. The destructive mechanics by which Rome sustained itself--war, slavery, and environmental degradation--will receive attention, too, with the aim of producing a holistic understanding this empire.  Discussion Section Required.

Spring 2021: HIST UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1020 001/11330 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Sailakshmi Ramgopal 4 0/75

HIST UN1021 DISC - The Romans and Their Empire, 754 BCE to 641 CE. 0 points.

DISCUSSION SECTION for HIST UN 1020 The Romans and their World. 

HIST BC1302 Introduction to European History: French Revolution to the Present. 4 points.

Emergence of revolutionary and counter-revolutionary mass political movements; European industrialization, nationalism, and imperialism; 20th-century world wars, the Great Depression, and Fascism.

Spring 2021: HIST BC1302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1302 001/00106 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 4 0/120

HIST BC1402 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865. 4.00 points.

Examines the major social, political, economic, and intellectual transformations from the 1860s until the present, including industrialization and urbanization, federal and state power, immigration, the welfare state, global relations, and social movements

HIST BC1760 Introduction to African History: 1700-Present. 4 points.

Survey of African history from the 18th century to the contemporary period. We will explore six major themes in African History: Africa and the Making of the Atlantic World, Colonialism in Africa, the 1940s, Nationalism and Independence Movements, Post-Colonialism in Africa, and Issues in the Making of Contemporary Africa.

Spring 2021: HIST BC1760
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1760 001/00109 T Th 10:10am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Abosede George 4 0/50

HIST UN2051 Europe in the Age of Total War - 1900-1950. 4 points.

This course explores the experience of men and women in Europe during the two world wars using written sources, films, memoirs, and popular cultural artifacts. This course covers the major transformations in European politics, technology, culture, philosophy, economy, art, and music in the first half of the century. Topics include the rush to arms in 1914; treatment of shell shock; the war poets; life on the home front; women's roles; pacifism between the wars; Nazi "blitzkrieg" and total war; terror in everyday life; civilian reactions to aerial bombing and psychology in war; the Holocaust, and postwar reconstruction and the treatment of refugees.

HIST UN2052 DISC - Europe in the Age of Total War - 1900-1950. 0 points.

Required Discussion Section for HIST UN 2051 Europe in the Age of Total War 1900-1950.  Students must first register for main course.

HIST BC2101 History of Capitalism . 3 points.

The aim of this course is to provide students with analytical tools to think critically and historically about the concept of capitalism. By studying how philosophers, economists, and political theorists have defined and described the concept of capitalism throughout its history, students will be provided with a set of terminologies and analytical frameworks that enable them to interrogate the various dimensions of capitalism. 

HIST BC2110 HISTORY OF CAPITALISM. 0 points.

Discussion section for HIST BC2101 History of Capitalism

HIST UN2222 Nature and Power: Environmental History of North America. 4 points.

Environmental history seeks to expand the customary framework of historical inquiry, challenging students to construct narratives of the past that incorporate not only human beings but also the natural world with which human life is intimately intertwined.  As a result, environmental history places at center stage a wide range of previously overlooked historical actors such as plants, animals, and diseases.  Moreover, by locating nature within human history, environmental history encourages its practitioners to rethink some of the fundamental categories through which our understanding of the natural world is expressed: wilderness and civilization, wild and tame, natural and artificial.


For those interested in the study of ethnicity, environmental history casts into particularly sharp relief the ways in which the natural world can serve both to undermine and to reinforce the divisions within human societies.  Although all human beings share profound biological similarities, they have nonetheless enjoyed unequal access to natural resources and to healthy environments—differences that have all-too-frequently been justified by depicting such conditions as “natural.”

Spring 2021: HIST UN2222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2222 001/10106 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Karl Jacoby 4 0/75

HIST UN2235 The First American Gilded Age, 1870-1919. 4 points.

Pundits and scholars have in recent years dubbed our current era of heightened inequality “the second American Gilded Age.”  This course examines the first Gilded Age,  named by Mark Twain and Charles Warner Dudley  in 1873,  with a focus on issues that continue to resonate today: the structures of social inequality, technological innovation and the changing conditions of work, immigration, the power of corporations and banks, the origins of the Jim Crow regime, American polices toward Indian Country, international interventions, ecological degradation, the structure of government (from separation of powers to states’ rights and municipal initiatives),  political corruption, and grassroots political mobilizations. By comparing and contrasting both institutional change and the experiences of ordinary people in the two eras,  the course aims to sharpen our analysis of how debates over political economy and Constitutional rights at the turn of the twentieth century structured possibilities of democracy in the decades that followed.  Readings include novels, memoirs, diaries, and legislative hearings as well as  historical scholarship.

HIST UN2236 DISC - The First American Gilded Age, 1870-1919. 0 points.

Required Discussion Section for HIST UN 2235 The First American Gilded Age, 1870-1919

HIST UN2298 The Soviet Century: Russia and Eurasia 1917-present. 4 points.

The Soviet Union in many ways defined the previous century. An experiment in social engineering that took place in the largest country in the world (1/6th of the globe) from 1917-1991, the world’s first socialist state inspired and terrified people around the world. We will explore how the Bolsheviks tried to turn Marxist ideology into social policy, providing education and social mobility on an unprecedented scale while also building one of the most repressive states in world history. This lecture course follows attempts to create a new type of state, a new type of person and how both of these projects evolved over time. We will also see how this system defeated fascism in the largest war in world history, only to crumble after a period of relative stability. We will watch a number of films, as well as read novels, memoirs and major government publications. In the course of the semester you will take two exams and write one research paper on a topic of your choice. In addition to lectures, there will be a recitation section to discuss these texts and films.




 

HIST UN2299 DISC - The Soviet Century: Russia and Eurasia 1917-present. 0 points.

DISCUSSION SECTION for HIST UN 2298 "The Soviet Century Russia and Eurasia: 1917-present"

HIST BC2321 Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Culture of Empire. 3 points.

Examines the shaping of European cultural identity through encounters with non-European cultures from 1500 to the post-colonial era. Novels, paintings, and films will be among the sources used to examine such topics as exoticism in the Enlightenment, slavery and European capitalism, Orientalism in art, ethnographic writings on the primitive, and tourism.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2321 001/00042 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 3 61/70

HIST UN2323 Nineteenth-Century Britain. 3 points.

This course covers all aspects of British history – political, imperial, economic, social and cultural – during the century of Britain’s greatest global power.  Particular attention will be paid to the emergence of liberalism as a political and economic system and as a means of governing personal and social life.  Students will read materials from the time, as well as scholarly articles, and will learn to work with some of the rich primary materials available on this period.

HIST UN2337 DISC - Everyday Communism. 0 points.

DISCUSSION SECTION for HIST UN 2336 Everyday Communism

HIST UN2336 Everyday Communism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Coreq discussion section HIST UN2237

This lecture course comparatively and transnationally investigates the twentieth-century communism as a modern civilization with global outreach. It looks at the world spread of communism as an ideology, everyday experience, and form of statehood in the Soviet Union, Europe, Asia (Mao’s China), and post-colonial Africa. With the exception of North America and Australia, communist regimes were established on all continents of the world. The course will study this historical process from the October Revolution (1917) to the Chernobyl nuclear disaster (1986), which marked the demise of communist state. The stress is not just on state-building processes or Cold War politics, but primarily on social, gender, cultural and economic policies that shaped lived experiences of communism. We will closely investigate what was particular about communism as civilization: sexuality, materiality, faith, selfhood, cultural identity, collective, or class and property politics. We will explore the ways in which “ordinary people” experienced communism through violence (anti-imperial and anti-fascist warfare; forced industrialization) and as subjects of social policies (gender equality, family programs, employment, urban planning). By close investigation of visual, material and political representations of life under communism, the course demonstrates the variety of human experience outside the “West” and capitalist modernity in an era of  anti-imperial politics, Cold War, and decolonization, as well as current environmental crisis.

HIST BC2413 The United States, 1940-1975. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Emphasis on foreign policies as they pertain to the Second World War, the atomic bomb, containment, the Cold War, Korea, and Vietnam. Also considers major social and intellectual trends, including the Civil Rights movement, the counterculture, feminism, Watergate, and the recession of the 1970s.

Fall 2020: HIST BC2413
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2413 001/00035 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Mark Carnes 3 52/72

HIST BC2477 RACE, CLASS, AND POLITICS IN NEW YORK CITY. 3 points.

The objectives of this course are: to gain familiarity with the major themes of New York History since 1898, to learn to think historically, and to learn to think and write critically about arguments that underlie historical interpretation. We will also examine and analyze the systems and structures--of race and class--that have shaped life in New York, while seeking to understand how social groups have pursued change inside and outside of such structures

Spring 2021: HIST BC2477
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2477 001/00114 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Matthew Vaz 3 0/60

HIST UN2540 History of the South. 4 points.

A survey of the history of the American South from the colonial era to the present day, with two purposes: first, to afford students an understanding of the special historical characteristics of the South and of southerners; and second, to explore what the experience of the South may teach about America as a nation. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN2540
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2540 001/10086  
Barbara Fields 4 0/75

HIST UN2541 DISC - History of the South. 0 points.

Required Discussion Section for HIST UN 2540 History of the South.  Students must also register for HIST UN 2540.

HIST BC2549 Early America to 1763. 3 points.

This course examines the three critical centuries from 1492 to 1763 that transformed North America from a diverse landscape teeming with hundreds of farming and hunting societies into a partly-colonized land where just three systems empires held sway. Major themes include contrasting faiths, power relationships, and cultural exchanges among various Native, European, and African peoples.

HIST UN2659 DISC - Modern Latin American History (Latin American Civilization II). 0 points.

MANDATORY Discussion Section for HIST UN 2661 Modern Latin American History (Latin American Civilization II).  Students must also be registered for HIST UN 2661.

HIST UN2661 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION II. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores major themes in Latin American history from the independence period (ca 1810) to the present. We will hone in on Latin Americas “chronic” problems of social inequality, political polarization, authoritarianism, incomplete democratization, and troubled memory politics. The course covers economic, social, and cultural histories, and gives special weight to the transnational aspects of Latin American ideological struggles – from its dependency on Western capital to its ideological “inner Cold War” – and the way they influenced the subaltern strata of society. The section discussions are a crucial component of the course, and will focus on assigned historiography. While the lecture centers on constructing a cogent meta-narrative for Latin America’s modern era, in the section we will explore not only the historical “facts,” but will instead ask: how do historians know what they know about the past? What sources and analytic methods do they use to write history? And what ethical dilemmas do they confront when narrating politically-sensitive topics?

Spring 2021: HIST UN2661
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2661 001/10188 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Jose Moya 4.00 0/150

HIST BC2676 Latin America: Migration, Race, and Ethnicity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2020-21 academic year.

Examines immigrations to Latin America from Europe, Africa, and Asia and the resulting multiracial societies; and emigration from Latin America and the formation of Latino communities in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Analyzes the socioeconomic and discursive-cognitive construction of ethno-racial identities and hierarchies, and current debates about immigration and citizenship.

HIST UN2679 Atlantic Slave Trade. 4 points.

The history of human trafficking in the Atlantic world from the first European slaving expeditions in the late fifteenth century down to the final forced crossings in the era of the U.S. Civil War.  Themes include captive taking in West Africa and its impact on West African societies, the commercial organization of the Atlantic slave trade in Europe and the Americas, and the experience of capture, exile, commodification, and survival of those shipped to the Americas. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN2679
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2679 001/11372 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Christopher Brown 4 0/75

HIST UN2764 East African History. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of East African history over the past two millennia with a focus on political and social change. Themes include early religious and political ideas, the rise of states on the Swahili coast and between the Great Lakes, slavery, colonialism, and social and cultural developments in the 20th century.  This course fulfills the Global Core requirement. Discussion section required.

HIST BC2681 Women and Gender in Latin America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2020-21 academic year.

Examines the gendered roles of women and men in Latin American society from the colonial period to the present. Explores a number of themes, including the intersection of social class, race, ethnicity, and gender; the nature of patriarchy; masculinity; gender and the state; and the gendered nature of political mobilization.

HIST UN2881 Vietnam in the World. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course examines the history of Vietnam in the World and serves as a follow-up to ASCE UN1367: Introduction to East Asian Civilizations, Vietnam (though it is not a prerequisite). This course will explore Vietnam’s multifaceted relations with the wider world from the late 19th Century to present day as war – ranging from civil, imperial, global, decolonization, and superpower interventions – forged the modern imperial polity to the current nation-state.

Spring 2021: HIST UN2881
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2881 001/10097 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Lien-Hang Nguyen 4 0/75

HIST UN2882 DISC - Vietnam in the World. 0 points.

Required Discussion Section for HIST 2881 Vietnam in the World. Students must also register for HIST 2881.

HIST UN2897 Topics in Modern Ukrainian History. 4 points.



Ukraine has had a tumultuous twenty-first century—an ongoing war, two revolutions, economic crises, and political intrigue. The origins of these events are rooted in the country’s recent past. This lecture course focuses on Ukrainian history from the early nineteenth century to the present day. Questions to be examined include: What factors influenced the construction and transformation of Ukrainian national identity(ies)? How did an independent Ukrainian state emerge and why are its borders contested today? How does historical memory influence Ukraine’s contemporary political and social life? What role does Ukraine play in the broader histories of Central and Eastern Europe?

HIST UN2953 War and Society since 1945. 4 points.

This course surveys the second half of the most violent century in human history. It examines the intersection of war and human society in the years after 1945 by focusing on two monumental and intertwined historical processes: Decolonization and the Cold War. While the conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union would fail to produce any general wars between two belligerents, this superpower rivalry would help to make the global process of decolonization in the developing a particularly violent affair.

HIST UN2987 Technology and US Politics. 4 points.

The course investigates the relation between politics and technology in the Unites States during the twentieth century. Following the telegraph, radio, the mainframe computer, the internet, and online platforms, the course asks how have Americans conceptualized the relation between technological developments and democratic ideals starting in the late nineteenth century? Are new technologies forms of control or of liberation? Do they enhance or curtail free speech? Has the public sphere been strengthened or weakened by new communication technologies? What has been the rule of government regulation in the adoption of these technologies? Students will be introduced to basic ideas and methodologies in the history of technology, while focusing on the relation between politics of technology. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN2987
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2987 001/11117 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Alma Steingart 4 0/75

HIST UN3012 Uganda in the mission archive: African voices and colonial documents. 4 points.

This course introduces students to researching and writing African colonial history with a specific focus on Uganda. Students will be guided through the missionary sources available at Columbia and we will discuss how African voices can and cannot be found in these archives. At the end of the semester students will have produced an original primary source paper on Ugandan history.

HIST UN3027 The History of Philanthropy in the United States from the Gilded Age to Present. 4 points.

This seminar introduces students to readings in the history of philanthropy in the United States from 1890s to the early 21st century. The course examines the role of philanthropy in the development of American society and politics while entering debates about philanthropy's relationship to democracy and inequality. A familiarity with 20th century United States history is recommended.

HIST UN3030 Immigration and Citizenship in American History. 4 points.

This course explores the meaning of American citizenship in connection with the country’s immigration history. Topics include historic pathways to citizenship for migrants; barriers to citizenship including wealth, race, gender, beliefs and documentation; and critical issues such as colonialism, statelessness, dual nationality, and birthright citizenship. We will ask how have people become citizens and under what authority has that citizenship been granted? What are the historic barriers to citizenship and how have they shifted over time? What major questions remain unanswered by Congress and the Supreme Court regarding the rights of migrants to attain and retain American citizenship?

HIST UN3061 ISLAM AND EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES. 4 points.

This course explores the encounter between Europe, broadly conceived, and the Islamic world in the period from the seventh to the thirteenth centuries.  While the Latin Christian military expeditions that began in the late eleventh century known as the Crusades are part of this story, they are not the focus.  The course stresses instead the range of diplomatic, commercial, intellectual, artistic, religious, and military interactions established well before the Crusades across a wide geographical expanse, with focal points in Iberia and Southern Italy.  Substantial readings in primary sources in translation are supplemented with recent scholarship.  [Students will be assigned on average 150-200 pages of reading per week, depending on the difficulty of the primary sources; we will read primary sources every week.]

HIST BC3064 Medieval Science and Society. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

                The evolution of scientific thinking from the 12th to the 16th centuries, considering subjects such as cosmology, natural history, quantification, experimentation, the physics of motion, and Renaissance perspective.  At every point we link proto-scientific developments to social and technological developments in the society beyond the schools.

HIST UN3113 Popular Culture in the Late Medieval Low Countries. 4 points.

One cannot grasp Latin American politics without understanding the role of the Church and Christianity in the continent’s societies. Indeed, there are those who argue that “as the demographic center of Christianity has shifted to the global South, Latin America has become one of the most important regions in the world for both Catholicism and Protestantism.” Still, contrary to the conventional wisdom that Latin America has always been the scene of reactionary zeal, in this course, we will aim to produce a more nuanced narrative of this phenomenon. By exploring the history, self-identity, and social theories of various Christian groups, we will explore this belief system as a source of inspiration for various contradictory ideological projects. Moving in chronological order we will ask: Can Christianity be defined as a unified ideological entity? Does religiosity overlap squarely with social and political categories, and is it anti-modern by definition? How did the Latin American Church react to shift in the Catholic world as well as to the rise of Latin America’s Revolutionary Left during the Cold War era? And how did it perceive human rights violations and did it support transitions from dictatorship to democracy? 

HIST UN3171 Who Counts?: U.S. Census and Politics. 4 points.

The 2020 census is upon us and controversy abounds! On the face of it nothing seems simpler (or, perhaps, duller) than counting the number of inhabitants in the United States. However, if the history of the US census tells us anything, it is that the project is both technically complex and politically salient. This seminar interrogates the history of the US census through a series of controversies that erupted around the census in the twentieth century. We will ask: What can the census tell us about the meaning of democracy in the United States? How has the uses of the census been transformed over time? How has the information asked on the census increased and how does it reflect changing political agendas? How have the categories on the census changed over time? How have activists mobilized around the census to gain political representation?

 

HIST BC3177 SCARCITY: ECONOMY AND NATURE. 4 points.

Current patterns of economic growth are no longer environmentally sustainable. Global industrialization and the associated transference of carbon from the ground to the air are leading to a rapid exhaustion of resources and a warming of the planet. These changes have triggered a set of dangerous climactic transformations that are likely to cause massive ecological disruptions and disturbances of food production systems. These changes, in turn, might have a profound impact on poverty, migration, and geopolitics. To better understand how we have arrived at the present predicament, this seminar explores the history of how social and economic theorists have conceptualized the interaction between the economy and nature. The focus will be on the concept of scarcity as a way of understanding the relationship between economic growth and environmental sustainability. The course begins in the Renaissance and traces the evolution of the nature/economy nexus to the present.

HIST UN3225 ASIATIC RUS:EMPIRE & STATE. 4 points.

The aim of this course is to provide students with a fresh perspective on the concept of Eurasia originating in imperial Russian intellectual history. The course sets out to highlight the impact of nomadic political cultures on shaping the operation of Russian imperial policies and practices and their legacies, a perspective that is typically not represented in Eurasian and Russian history courses as a major idea of analysis. The course’s focus therefore will be on the spread of Russian rule over Eurasia’s steppe regions and Turkestan. Among other things, the course explores how the interplay of the nomadic concepts of sovereignty and territoriality enabled the rise of the Russian empire. Beyond ethnic and cultural history special attention will be devoted to economic and military history, as well as political institutions and diplomacy. We will also look at the ways in which the concept of Eurasia continued to inspire Soviet and post-Soviet politicians and other related groups to construct and reconstruct boundaries between East and West. 

HIST UN3268 The Critique of Curiosity. 4 points.

“All persons desire to know,” Aristotle declared in his Metaphysics.  But given that not all desires are good ones, the question naturally arises whether curiosity is.  In the era of modern science and education, we tend to take this for granted.  But for centuries – also well before Aristotle – people have concluded just the opposite. Their reasons have been various: religious, psychological, philosophical, pragmatic.  In this junior seminar we will examine select thinkers in the stream of Western thought that has questioned the value of curiosity and, more fundamentally, of knowledge itself.

HIST BC3392 Senior Research Seminar. 4 points.

4 points each term.

Prerequisites: Open to Barnard College History Senior Majors.

Individual guided research and writing in history and the presentation of results in seminar and in the form of the senior essay.  See Requirements for the Major for details.  

Spring 2021: HIST BC3392
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3392 001/00115 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Andrew Lipman 4 0

HIST BC3670 Seeking Asylum: History, Politics, and the Pursuit of Justice at the US-Mexico Border. 4 points.

Note: This course meets as a lecture but it is a seminar.

Prerequisites: NA

This seminar explores the roots of and responses to the contemporary refugee "crisis" at the U.S.-Mexico border. We examine the historical factors that are propelling people, including families and unaccompanied minors, to flee the so-called Northern Triangle of Central America (El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala); the law and politics of asylum that those seeking refuge must negotiate in the U.S.; and the burgeoning system of immigration incarceration that detains ever-greater numbers of non-citizens. The course is organized around a collaboration with the Dilley Pro Bono Project, an organization that provides legal counsel to detainees at the country's largest immigration detention prison, in Dilley, Texas. 

Spring 2021: HIST BC3670
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3670 001/00118 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Nara Milanich 4 0/15

HIST BC3692 ANARCHISM: A GLOBAL HISTORY. 4 points.

Explores the historical development of anarchism as a working-class, youth, and artistic movement in Europe, North and Latin America, the Middle East, India, Japan, and China from the 1850s to the present. Examines anarchism both as an ideology and as a set of cultural and political practices.

Spring 2021: HIST BC3692
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3692 001/00121 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jose Moya 4 0/15

HIST BC3761 CHILDHOOD AND YOUTH IN AFRICAN HISTORY. 4 points.

This course focuses on the history of childhood and youth in African societies and how young people as historical agents have impacted the social histories of their communities. How did young Africans live in past times? What forces shaped understanding of their status as children or youth? How have major historical processes such as colonialism, industrialization, apartheid, and liberation, neocolonialism, and neoliberalism impacted and been impacted by children and youth in Africa? What roles have young people themselves played in the making of African histories? These questions will be explored in course readings, discussions, and students' original research projects.

HIST UN3277 History of Urban Crime and Policing in Latin America in Global Perspective. 4 points.

This seminar will examine the social construction of criminality and the institutions that developed to impose and enforce the criminal law as reflections of Latin American society throughout the region’s history, with a particular emphasis on the rise of police forces as the principal means of day-to-day urban governance. Topics include policing and urban slavery; policing the urban “underworld”; the changing cultural importance of police in urban popular culture; the growth of scientific policing methods, along with modern criminology and eugenics; policing and the enforcement of gender norms in urban public spaces; the role of urban policing in the rise of military governments in the twentieth century; organized crime; transitional justice and the contemporary question of the rule of law; and the transnational movement of ideas about and innovations in policing practice. In our readings and class discussions over the course of the semester, we will trace how professionalized, modern police forces took shape in cities across the region over time. This course actually begins, however, in the colonial period before there was anything that we would recognize as a modern, uniformed, state-run police force. We will thus have a broad perspective from which to analyze critically the role of police in the development of Latin American urban societies—in other words, to see the police in the contemporary era as contingent on complex historical processes, which we will seek to understand.

HIST UN3429 Telling About the South. 4 points.

A remarkable array of Southern historians, novelists, and essayists have done what Shreve McCannon urges Quentin Compson to do in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!--tell about the South--producing recognized masterpieces of American literature.  Taking as examples certain writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, this course explores the issues they confronted, the relationship between time during which and about they wrote, and the art of the written word as exemplified in their work. Group(s): D Field(s): US  Limited enrollment. Priority given to senior history majors. After obtaining permission from the professor, please add yourself to the course wait list so the department can register you in the course.

HIST UN3437 Poisoned Worlds: Corporate Behavior and Public Health. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

In the decades since the publication of Silent Spring and the rise of the environmental movement, public awareness of the impact of industrial products on human health has grown enormously. There is growing concern over BPA, lead, PCBs, asbestos, and synthetic materials that make up the world around us. This course will focus on environmental history, industrial and labor history as well as on how twentieth century consumer culture shapes popular and professional understanding of disease. Throughout the term the class will trace the historical transformation of the origins of disease through primary sources such as documents gathered in lawsuits, and medical and public health literature. Students will be asked to evaluate historical debates about the causes of modern epidemics of cancer, heart disease, lead poisoning, asbestos-related illnesses and other chronic conditions. They will also consider where responsibility for these new concerns lies, particularly as they have emerged in law suits. Together, we will explore the rise of modern environmental movement in the last 75 years. 

Spring 2021: HIST UN3437
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3437 001/12251 W 8:30am - 10:20am
Online Only
David Rosner 4 0/15

HIST UN3604 Jews and the City. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Over the course of the nineteenth century, millions of Jews uprooted themselves from their places of birth and moved to cities scattered throughout the world.  This mass urbanization not only created new demographic centers of world Jewry, but also fundamentally transformed Jewish political and cultural life.  In this course, we shall analyze primary source material, literary accounts as well as secondary sources as we examine the Jewish encounter with the city, and see how Jewish culture was shaped by and helped to shape urban culture.  We shall compare Jewish life in six cities spanning from Eastern Europe to the United States and consider how Jews’ concerns molded the urban economy, urban politics, and cosmopolitan culture.  We shall also consider the ways in which urbanization changed everyday Jewish life.  What impact did it have on Jewish economic and religious life?  What role did gender and class play in molding the experiences of Jews in different cities scattered throughout the world?

HIST UN3622 Islam and the Modern World. 4 points.

PART ONE of SPRING-SUMMER PROGRAM.  Students must also be admitted to the Summer Research Program in Tunisia and Morocco.  Please see the Columbia University Center for Undergraduate Global Engagement for further details: https://global.undergrad.columbia.edu/.


In this course, we will survey historical texts that emerge in and around Europe’s engagement with Muslim societies and the creation of a “modern world.” How do we understand Islam(s), colonialism and anti-colonialism in light of texts and practices from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries. We will explore key issues surrounding the history of the Enlightenment, the rise of historicism and the growing interest in universal histories through the engagement with Arabic texts and North African histories from the mid-eighteenth century to the mid twentieth century.

HIST UN3838 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. 

Fall 2020: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/12222 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 12/15
HIST 3838 002/12865 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 9/15
HIST 3838 003/13687 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 14/15
HIST 3838 004/21408 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 11/15
Spring 2021: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/10099 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Pablo Piccato 4 0/13
HIST 3838 002/10100 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Samuel Roberts 4 0/14
HIST 3838 003/10101 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 0/13
HIST 3838 004/10175 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Jude Webre 4 0/13

HIST UN3645 Spinoza to Sabbatai: Jews in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

A seminar on the historical, political, and cultural developments in the Jewish communities of early-modern Western Europe (1492-1789) with particular emphasis on the transition from medieval to modern patterns. We will study the resettlement of Jews in Western Europe, Jews in the Reformation-era German lands, Italian Jews during the late Renaissance, the rise of Kabbalah, and the beginnings of the quest for civil Emancipation. Field(s): JWS/EME

HIST UN3779 Africa and France. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: reading knowledge of French is highly encouraged.

This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current ‘memory wars’ in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa. Group(s): B, C Field(s): AFR, MEU

HIST UN3931 The Golden Age of Athens. 4 points.

The 5th century BCE, beginning with the Persian Wars, when the Athenians fought off the might of the Persian Empire, and ending with the conclusion of the Peloponnesian War in 404, is generally considered the "Golden Age" of ancient Athens. This is the century when Athenian drama, both tragedy and comedy, throve; when the Greeks began to develop philosophy at Athens, centered around the so-called "Sophistic movement" and Sokrates; when classical Greek art and architecture approached perfection in the monuments and sculptures of the great Athenian building programs on and around the Akropolis. This seminar will cover the political, military, economic, social, and cultural history of Athens' "Golden Age". Much of the course reading will be drawn from the ancient Athenian writing themselves, in translation. Everyone will be required to read enough to participate in weekly discussions; and all students will prepare two oral reports on topics to be determined. The course grade will be based on a ca. 20-25 page research paper to be written on an agreed upon topic. Group(s): A Field(s): *ANC

HIST UN3942 Constitutions and Democracy in the Middle East. 4 points.

Prerequisites: application requirements: SEE UNDERGRAD SEMINAR SECTION OF DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

Where the establishment of sustainable democracies is concerned, the Middle East has perhaps the poorest record of all regions of the world since World War II. This is in spite of the fact that two of the first constitutions in the non-Western world were established in this region, in the Ottoman Empire in 1876 and in Iran in 1906. Notwithstanding these and other subsequent democratic and constitutional experiments, Middle Eastern countries have been ruled over the past century by some of the world's last absolute monarchies, as well as a variety of other autocratic, military-dominated and dictatorial regimes. This course, intended primarily for advanced undergraduates, explores this paradox. It will examine the evolution of constitutional thought and practice, and how it was embodied in parliamentary and other democratic systems in the Middle East. It will examine not only the two Ottoman constitutional periods of 1876-78 and 1908-18, and that of Iran from 1905 onwards, but also the various precursors to these experiments, and some of their 20th century sequels in the Arab countries, Turkey and Iran. This will involve detailed study of the actual course of several Middle Eastern countries' democratic experiments, of the obstacles they faced, and of their outcomes. Students are expected to take away a sense of the complexities of the problems faced by would-be Middle Eastern democrats and constitutionalists, and of some of the reasons why the Middle East has appeared to be an exception to a global trend towards democratization in the post-Cold War era.

HIST GU4075 Fascism’s Global Trajectory, 1935-1945. 4 points.

This course aims to familiarize students with the history of fascism, viewed from an international and global perspective.  Students read and discuss classic accounts, together with the recent rich historiography. Many of these are dedicated to understanding fascism within the framework of clashing nationalist and imperial projects, the popularity of Darwinian and ‘declinist’ ideas about the struggle of nations to survive, the challenge of new hegemons, the U.S. and USSR, and the pretentions of the leading European fascisms, Italy and Germany, to ally with one another and  with far-flung movements globally to challenge the Western liberal international order established after World War I.

HIST GU4223 Personality and Society in 19th-Century Russia. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A seminar reviewing some of the major works of Russian thought, literature, and memoir literature that trace the emergence of intelligentsia ideologies in 19th- and 20th-century Russia. Focuses on discussion of specific texts and traces the adoption and influence of certain western doctrines in Russia, such as idealism, positivism, utopian socialism, Marxism, and various 20th-century currents of thought. Field(s): MEU

HIST GU4236 Monuments and Memories in 20th Century Europe. 4 points.

In this course we will revisit the history of Europe in the 20th Century as it was remembered. We will also uncover some stories that have been mostly forgotten. We will explore the consequences of remembering and forgetting as they played themselves out in the European continent over the past few generations focusing particular attention on events and approaches in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Units will cover World War I, the Spanish Civil War, Stalinism, the Nazi occupation, World War II, the Holocaust, and the rise and fall of European state socialism. We will look at efforts in the cultural, legal, and political realms to answer the question: why do societies work to remember the past, and what reasons may many have to forget? Throughout the semester students will develop the skills necessary to research and write a proposal for memorial creation (or removal) and each will author a proposal in consultation with the class and with professionals who have done similar work locally.

HIST GU4278 Men in Crisis: Europe, 1890-1945. 4 points.

Through readings of gender theory, historical monographs, novels, and visual media, this seminar unfolds a new historical problematic, namely, the “crisis” models of manhood emerging from late European imperialism. Against the background of the crisis of imperial Europe, the war-mongering, militarism, and total and civil wars, the seminar contextualizes the complex gender ideals behind the Nietzchean “Superman,” fallen Warrior of World War I, the Fascist New Man, Fordist Worker, Soviet New Man, Judeo-Bolshevik, the Anti-Fascist Partisan.




 

HIST GU4518 Research Seminar: Columbia and Slavery. 4 points.

In this course, students will write original, independent papers of around 25 pages, based on research in both primary and secondary sources, on an aspect of the relationship between Columbia College and its colonial predecessor King's College, with the institution of slavery.

HIST GU4522 Jews, Magic, and Science in Premodern Europe. 4 points.

This seminar explores the historical relationship between Jews, magic, and science in premodern Europe. We will consider magical and scientific beliefs as both separate and intersecting endeavors that provide a window into understanding how Jews viewed, made sense of, and tried to manipulate the world around them. Through close reading of secondary and primary sources on the subject, we will discuss the boundaries between conceptions of natural and supernatural, science and magic, reason and faith.

HIST GU4532 The American Civil War. 4 points.

.

HIST GU4699 Medieval Franciscans and their World. 4 points.

This course will offer an examination of the birth and development of the Franciscan Order between 1200-1350. The topics will include Francis of Assisi, the foundation of the three orders of Franciscans, education, poverty, preaching, theology internal strife, antifraternalism, and relations with secular governments and papacy.

Spring 2021: HIST GU4699
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4699 001/10107 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Neslihan Senocak 4 0/15

HIST GU4773 American Women’s History; Society, Politics, & the State, 1968-2008. 4 points.

This course explores the history of women in the United States post 1968. This chronological beginning locates the history of women at the moment of the so-called birth of second wave feminism. But this beginning it seeks to provide of an overview of the broad contours of change effecting women at work, in the family, and as a subject of interest by the American state. Three themes will be of particular interest in this admittedly idiosyncratic survey.  The first involves interrogating the era’s competing definition of what women’s liberation meant and how the idea was used for a variety of political purposes in the ongoing culture wars of the period. The second theme involves exploring instances in which women came together—as during the civil rights movement or the anti-ERA drive—in grassroots political organizing to influence society and the state.  And finally, the course examines how core issues defining women’s experiences over this half century—issues involving the role and value in the family, workplace justice, and reproductive rights—became fault lines that repeatedly split American society.

HIST GU4811 Encounters with Nature: The History of Environment and Health in South Asia and Beyond. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course offers an understanding of the interdisciplinary field of environmental, health and population history and will discuss historical and policy debates with a cross cutting, comparative relevance: such as the making and subjugation of colonized peoples and natural and disease landscapes under British colonial rule; modernizing states and their interest in development and knowledge and technology building, the movement and migration of populations, and changing place of public health and healing in south Asia. The key aim of the course will be to introduce students to reading and analyzing a range of historical scholarship, and interdisciplinary research on environment, health, medicine and populations in South Asia and to introduce them to an exploration of primary sources for research; and also to probe the challenges posed by archives and sources in these fields. Some of the overarching questions that shape this course are as follows: How have environmental pasts and medical histories been interpreted, debated and what is their contemporary resonance? What have been the encounters (political, intellectual, legal, social and cultural) between the environment, its changing landscapes and state? How have citizens, indigenous communities, and vernacular healers mediated and shaped these encounters and inserted their claims for sustainability, subsistence or survival? How have these changing landscapes shaped norms about bodies, care and beliefs? The course focuses on South Asia but also urges students to think and make linkages beyond regional geographies in examining interconnected ideas and practices in histories of the environment, medicine and health. Topics will therefore include (and students are invited to add to these perspectives and suggest additional discussion themes): colonial and globalized circuits of medical knowledge, with comparative case studies from Africa and East Asia; and the travel and translation of environmental ideas and of medical practices through growing global networks.

HIST GU4935 Science and Art in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

This course will investigate the relations between science and art in early modern Europe, bringing together scholarly works by historians of science and art historians as well as original sources from the period. We tend to think today of science and art as polarized cultural domains, but in the early modern period the very definitions of the terms, as well as a range of other factors, created conditions for a much different configuration between the two. Organized chronologically, this course will focus on a range of representative moments in that developing configuration, from ca. 1500 to 1800. Topics include the nature of the spaces where artworks and natural specimens met, the circulation of tools, materials and techniques between the laboratory and the artist workshop, common norms and practices of representation, and shared aspirations to objective knowledge. The course is designed as a discussion seminar and is open to undergraduate and graduate students. No prior knowledge of the subject is required, but intense engagement with the material is expected.




 

Spring 2021: HIST GU4935
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4935 001/11735 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Ardeta Gjikola 4 0/15

HIST GU4984 Hacking the Archive. 4 points.

This is a hands-on, project-driven, Laboratory Seminar that explores the frontiers of historical analysis in the information age.  it harnesses the exponential growth in information resulting from the digitization of older materials and the explosion of "born digital" electronic records........

Spring 2021: HIST GU4984
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4984 001/10083 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Matthew Connelly 4 0/15

Spring 2020 Cross-listed Courses

PLEASE READ: The passage below lists *all* sections being offered by a Columbia instructor for a given course, including sections which *do not* count for History students. NOT ALL sections of the courses listed below count for History majors and concentrators. Particular sections only count towards the History degree if the section instructor is a History faculty member or an affiliate with the History Department. For additional information, please review the "Requirements" tab or consult Undergraduate Administrator at undergraduate-history@columbia.edu. All courses from the Barnard History Department also count towards the History degree.


AFAS UN1002 Major Debates in African-American Studies. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must register for discussion section, AFAS UN1003.

This course will focus on the major debates in African-American Studies from the role of education to the political uses of art. The class will follow these debates historically with attention to the ways in which earlier discussions on migration and emigration, for example, were engaged with the specific historical conjuncture in which they took place as well as in the myriad ways in which earlier debates continue to resonate today. There will be a mix of primary documents and secondary sources and commentary.

Spring 2021: AFAS UN1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFAS 1002 001/12945 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Frank Guridy 4 0/12

AMST UN3931 Topics in American Studies. 4 points.

Please refer to the Center for American Studies for section descriptions

Spring 2021: AMST UN3931
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 3931 001/10181 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Casey Blake 4 0/18
AMST 3931 002/10182 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Roosevelt Montas 4 0/18
AMST 3931 004/10183 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
John McWhorter 4 0/18
AMST 3931 005/10185 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Andrew Delbanco, Roger Lehecka 4 0/18
AMST 3931 006/10186  
Cathleen Price 4 0/15
AMST 3931 007/10187 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Michael Hindus 4 0/18
AMST 3931 009/10458 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Ross Posnock 4 0/18

CLFR GU4720 History & Literature: Going Micro. 3 points.

This course explores overlaps and interconnections between history and literature. It introduces students to the ways in which literary scholars examine the historical dimension of texts and, conversely, historians grapple with the literary qualities of their narratives. In spring 2020 the course will focus on the methodological challenges and epistemological effects of working at small scales of analysis: in psychoanalytic case studies; ethnographic fieldwork; microhistorical research; and genre-defying narratives that weave together biography, sociological study, and the author’s implication (ethical, political) in the object of study. Course open to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students. All classes and readings in English.

CPLS GU4320 Marginalization in Medicine: A Practical Understanding of the Social Implications of Race . 4 points.

There is a significant correlation between race and health in the United States.  People of color and those from underserved populations have higher mortality rates and a greater burden of chronic disease than their white counterparts.  Differences in health outcomes have been attributed to biological factors as race has been naturalized.  In this class we will explore the history of the idea of “race” in the context of changing biomedical knowledge formations.  We will then focus on the impact that social determinants like poverty, structural violence, racism and geography have on health.  Ultimately, this course will address the social implications of race on health both within the classroom and beyond. In addition to the seminar, there will also be a significant service component. Students will be expected to volunteer at a community organization for a minimum of 3 hours a week. This volunteer work will open an avenue for students to go beyond the walls of their classrooms while learning from and positively impacting their community.

CPLS GU4892 Subaltern Urbanism. 4 points.

This seminar asks how spatial politics intersect with economic inequality and social difference (race, gender, caste, and ethnicity) to produce marginalized and stigmatized spaces such as “favelas,” “slum,” and “ghettos.”


The seminar draws on the convergent yet distinct urban trajectories of Bombay/Mumbai and Rio de Janeiro as a place from which to explore questions of comparative and global urbanism from an explicitly South-South perspective. That is, we ask how Bombay and Rio’s distinct yet connected urbanity might force us to alter our approaches to the city; approaches that are largely drawn from modular Euro-American paradigms for understanding urbanization as coeval with modernity, as well as industrialization. We do so in this seminar by focusing on people and practices—subaltern urbanity (and on those whose labor produced the modern city), as well as on spatial orders—the informal or unintended city—to ask the question: “what makes and unmakes a city?”


How might questions about built form, industrialization, capital flows, and social life and inhabitation that takes the perspective of “city theory from the Global South” shed new understanding on the history of the city, the extranational frames of colonial modernity, and the ongoing impact of neoliberalism? How can we rethink critical concepts in urban studies (precarity, spatial segregation, subalternity, economies of eviction, urban dispossession) through embedded studies of locality and lifemaking?

CSER UN1010 Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Students MUST register for a Discussion Section.

Introduction to the field of comparative ethnic studies.

Fall 2020: CSER UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 1010 001/20893 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Frances Negron-Muntaner 4 75/90

EARL GU4310 Life-Writing in Tibetan Buddhist Literature. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course engages the genre of life writing in Tibetan Buddhist culture, addressing the permeable and fluid nature of this important sphere of Tibetan literature. Through Tibetan biographies, hagiographies, and autobiographies, the class will consider questions about how life-writing overlaps with religious doctrine, philosophy, and history. For comparative purposes, we will read life writing from Western (and Japanese or Chinese) authors, for instance accounts of the lives of Christian saints, raising questions about the cultural relativity of what makes up a life's story.

ECON BC3013 Economic History of the United States. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor.

Economic transformation of the United States from a small, open agrarian society in the late colonial era to the leading industrial economy of the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the quantitative, institutional, and spatial dimensions of economic growth, and the relationship between the changing structures of the economy and state.

Spring 2021: ECON BC3013
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3013 001/00181 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
David Weiman 3 0/50

HSAM UN2901 Data: Past, Present, and Future. 3 points.

Lect: 1.5. Lab: 1.5.

Data-empowered algorithms are reshaping our professional, personal, and political realities, for good--and for bad. "Data: Past, Present, and Future" moves from the birth of statistics in the 18th century to the surveillance capitalism of the present day, covering racist eugenics, World War II cryptography, and creepy personalized advertising along the way. Rather than looking at ethics and history as separate from the science and engineering, the course integrates the teaching of algorithms and data manipulation with the political whirlwinds and ethical controversies from which those techniques emerged. We pair the introduction of technical developments with the shifting political and economic powers that encouraged and benefited from new capabilities. We couple primary and secondary readings on the history and ethics of data with computational work done largely with user-friendly Jupyter notebooks in Python.

Spring 2021: HSAM UN2901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSAM 2901 001/10970 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Matthew Jones 3 0/75

HSCL UN3000 The Persian Empire . 4 points.

This seminar studies the ancient Persian (Achaemenid) Empire which ruled the entire Middle East from the late 6th to the late 4th centuries BCE and was the first multi-ethnic empire in western Asian and Mediterranean history. We will investigate the empire using diverse sources, both textual and material, from the various constituent parts of the empire and study the different ways in which it interacted with its subject populations. This course is a seminar and students will be asked to submit a research paper at the end of the semester. Moreover, in each class meeting one student will present part of the readings.


Grading: participation (25%), class presentation (25%), paper (50%).

HSEA GR6300 Vietnam Studies Historiography and Methodology. 4 points.

This course brings graduate students interested in Vietnam Studies together across field lines and period focus to discuss some foundational questions of historiography and methods within the field.  We have striven to combine key conceptual or theoretical work with examples drawn from the specific context of the study of Vietnam.  The course is intended to provide a common vocabulary for the discussion of Vietnam Studies.

HSEA GU4231 Transpacific Empires. 4 points.

This course examines the "transpacific" as a site and a theoretical frame for understanding the role that migration and imperialism have played in the making of the modern world.  We will study how different national and imperial formations, their institutions, and their ideologies shaped networks of migration that crossed the Pacific and vice versa.  Readings will draw from fields as diverse as North American history, East Asian history, indigenous studies, and ethnic and cultural studies to explore themes including indigeneity, public health and science, borderlands, settler colonialism, diaspora, militarism, and cross-cultural intimacies.

HSEA GU4882 History of Modern China II. 3 points.

China's transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

Spring 2021: HSEA GU4882
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4882 001/10330 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Eugenia Lean 3 0/40

HSEA GU4888 WOMEN & GENDER IN KOREAN. 4 points.

While the rise of women's history and feminist theory in the 1960s and 1970s fostered more general reevaluations of social and cultural history in the West, such progressions have been far more modest in Korean history. To introduce one of the larger challenges in current Korean historiography, this course explores the experiences, consciousness and representations of women Korea at home and abroad from premodern times to the present. Historical studies of women and gender in Korea will be analyzed in conjunction with theories of Western women's history to encourage new methods of rethinking "patriarchy" within the Korean context. By tracing the lives of women from various socio-cultural aspects and examining the multiple interactions between the state, local community, family and individual, women's places in the family and in society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender and sexuality throughout Korea's complicated past will be reexamined through concrete topics with historical specificity and as many primary sources as possible. With understanding dynamics of women's lives in Korean society, this class will build an important bridge to understand the construction of New Women in early twentieth-century Korea, when women from all walks of life had to accommodate their "old-style" predecessors and transform themselves to new women, as well as the lives of contemporary Korean women. This will be very much a reading-and-discussion course. Lectures will review the readings in historical perspective and supplement them. The period to be studied ranges from the pre-modern time up to the turn of twentieth century, with special attention to the early modern period.

Spring 2021: HSEA GU4888
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 4888 001/10331 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Online Only
Jungwon Kim 4 0/15

HSEA UN3898 The Mongols in History. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Study of the role of the Mongols in Eurasian history, focusing on the era of the Great Mongol Empire. The roles of Chinggis and Khubilai Khan and the modern fate of the Mongols to be considered.

Spring 2021: HSEA UN3898
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSEA 3898 001/11141 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Morris Rossabi 3 0/25

HSME UN2811 South Asia: Empire and Its Aftermath. 4 points.

Prerequisites: None.

(No prerequisite.) We begin with the rise and fall of the Mughal Empire, and examine why and how the East India Company came to rule India in the eighteenth century. As the term progresses, we will investigate the objectives of British colonial rule in India and we will explore the nature of colonial modernity. The course then turns to a discussion of anti-colonial sentiment, both in the form of outright revolt, and critiques by early nationalists. This is followed by a discussion of Gandhi, his thought and his leadership of the nationalist movement. Finally, the course explores the partition of British India in 1947, examining the long-term consequences of the process of partition for the states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. We will focus in particular on the flowing themes: non-Western state formation; debates about whether British rule impoverished India; the structure and ideology of anti-colonial thought; identity formation and its connection to political, economic and cultural structures. The class relies extensively on primary texts, and aims to expose students to multiple historiographical perspectives for understanding South Asia's past.

HSME UN2812 DISC - South Asia: Empire and Its Aftermath. 0 points.

MANDATORY Discussion Section for HSME 2811 South Asia: Empire and Aftermath.  Students must also be registered for HSME 2811.

HSPB UN2950 Social History of American Public Health. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical understanding of the role public health has played in American history. The underlying assumptions are that disease, and the ways we define disease, are simultaneously reflections of social and cultural values, as well as important factors in shaping those values. Also, it is maintained that the environments that we build determine the ways we live and die. The dread infectious and acute diseases in the nineteenth century, the chronic, degenerative conditions of the twentieth and the new, vaguely understood conditions rooted in a changing chemical and human-made environment are emblematic of the societies we created. Among the questions that will be addressed are: How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape our history? How do ideas about health reflect broader attitudes and values in American history and culture? How does the American experience with pain, disability, and disease affect our actions and lives? What are the responsibilities of the state and of the individual in preserving health? How have American institutions--from hospitals to unions to insurance companies--been shaped by changing longevity, experience with disability and death?

Spring 2021: HSPB UN2950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSPB 2950 001/11396 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Online Only
James Colgrove 4 0/175

HSPB UN2951 DISC - Social History of American Public Health. 0 points.

Required Discussion Section for HSPB 2950 Social History of American Public Health.  Students must also register for HSPB 2950.