Management

Management Curriculum

The Management Specialization offers SIPA students the opportunity to develop strong managerial and leadership skills applicable to virtually any public policy arena. The objective of this specialization is to prepare students to be the next generation of leaders of major international, national, state, or local public and nonprofit institutions.

View or print the Management Audit Form

Sarah Holloway, Lecturer in Discipline of International and Public Affairs; Director of the Management Specialization


Emary Aronson, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Dorian Benkoil, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Robert Boccio, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Andrew Ditton, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

John Eley, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Seth Freeman, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Hilary Gosher, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Stefan Heeke, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Karine Jean-Pierre, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Christopher J. Loso, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Sameer Maskey, Adjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Valerio Melandri, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Julie Poncelet, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs (part-time)

Thomas Quaranta, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Christopher Reim, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Lucius Riccio, Lecturer in the Discipline of International and Public Affairs

Harry Silver, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Richard Steele, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Kristine Sudano, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Jan Svejnar, James T. Shotwell Professor of Global Political Economy

Lynn Thoman, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Richard Thoman, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Eva Weissman, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

The Management Specialization requires 9 points, consisting of 3 three-point courses. Students may choose any three (3) courses from the lists below, regardless of their category. Courses to fulfill the Core Management and Core Financial Management requirements may not be double-counted towards the Specialization.

Note: There may be Management courses at SIPA or, in particular, other schools not currently listed below. Please speak with Management Specialization Director for approval of these courses.

Leadership, Strategy & Decision Making

Points
SIPA Courses
EMPA U6036Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility3
INAF U6041Corporations and Human Rights3
INAF U6186Community Economic Development: Origins, Policy and Practice3
INAF U6226Leadership and Innovative Policy Making3
INAF U6370Women Global Leadership1.5
INAF U6374Mainstreaming Gender in Global Affairs3
INAF U6515Technology and the Future of Governance and Public Policy1.5
INAF U6894Dimensions of Leadership for an Interconnected World: Ready to Lead?3
INAF U8380Managing the Global Corporation3
INAF U8559Building Peace After Conflict1.5
INAF U8560Managing The UN System3
PUAF U6026Public/Private Sector Collaboration: Achieving Rapid Transformational Change3
PUAF U6032Leading and Sustaining Change: Frameworks, Tools and Skills1.5
PUAF U6801Negotiation Conflict Resolution3
PUAF U8207Creating and Managing Effective Nonprofits3
PUAF U8510Women and Power1.5
SIPA U6013Strategy, Law and Competitiveness3
Non-SIPA Courses
HPMN P8558Strategic Management3
HPMN P8561Managing Public Health Non-Profits1.5
LAW L6352Deals: Public-Sector Problem Solving3
LAW L8016Public Sector Structural Reform in K-12 Ed3
LAW L9132Nonprofit Institutions.2
SUMA PS5700Ethics and Values for Sustainability Management3

Control & Evaluation

Points
SIPA Courses
ENVP U6224Environmental Data Analysis3
INAF U6016Cost-Benefit Analysis3
INAF U6115Cost Benefit Analysis for Developing Economies3
INAF U6116Infrastructure Cost Benefit Analysis3
INAF U6604Applied Econometrics3
INAF U6898Program Evaluation and Design3
PUAF U6460Benchmarking Skills for Process Organizational Improvement1.5
SIPA U6501Quantitative Analysis II for International Public Affairs3
SIPA U8500Quantitative Methods in Program Evaluation and Policy Research3
SIPA U8510Program Evaluation: Principles and Applications3
Non-SIPA Courses
SOSC P8705Evaluation of Health Programs3

Financial & Resource Management

Points
SIPA Courses
INAF U6040International Energy Project Finance3
INAF U6042Energy Business Economic Development3
INAF U6058Public Finance Debt Management3
INAF U6085The Economic Development of Latin America3
INAF U6135Renewable Energy Markets and Policy3
INAF U6301Corporate Finance3
INAF U6907Principles and Techniques of Fundraising1.5
INAF U8350Finance for the World's Poorest3
INAF U8354Micro Small Enterprise Development3
PUAF U6251Urban Economics3
PUAF U8244Municipal Finance in the U.S.3
Non-SIPA Courses
BUSI B9777Private Equity and Entrepreneurship in Africa3
FUND K4370Fund-raising Management: Foundations3
FUND K4360Fund-raising Management: Grants3
HPMN P6529Health Care Finance3
HPMN P8533Health Care Finance II3
HPMN P8541Economic Evaluation of Health Care Technology1.5
LAW L6233Corporate Reorganization and Bankruptcy3
LAW L6205Financial Statement Analysis and Interpretation3
ORLA Y4876School Finance: Resource Allocation Non-Profit Organizations3
PLAN A4620Public Financing of Urban Development3
SUMA K4197Financing the Green Economy: Markets, Business, and Politics3
SUMA PS5197Financing the Green Economy3
SUMA K4320Sustainable Investing & Economic Growth3
SUMA PS5175Global Environmental Markets3
SUMA K4195Green Accounting3

Management Innovation & New Models

Points
SIPA Courses
INAF U6004Programming for Entrepreneurs1.5
INAF U6053Creating a Social Enterprise3
INAF U6131Impact Investing: Venture Capital Strategies3
INAF U6132Aiming for Social Impact: Managing, Measuring, and Investing to Achieve Results3
INAF U6133Raising Capital Growing Social Ventures3
INAF U6138Investment in Social Change3
INAF U6211Technology Solutions for Development Social Change3
INAF U6256Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development3
PUAF U6028Public-Private Partnerships to Foster Effective, Sustainable and Scalable Nonprofits1.5
PUAF U8260Generating Financial Support to Grow Social Enterprises1.5
Non-SIPA Courses
MGMT B8519Launching New Ventures3
MGMT B8527Social Venture Incubator1.5

Operations, Human Resources, & Program Management

Points
SIPA Courses
INAF U6003Coding for Development and Social Change1
INAF U8217Tools and Principles for Managing in the Information Economy and the Media3
INAF U8690Managing Humanitarian Emergencies3
PUAF U4400Campaign Management in the United States3
PUAF U6033Decision Models Management3
PUAF U6132Politics and Policies of Community Planning and Participation3
PUAF U6217Operations Management3
PUAF U6260Management Training for Development Professionals3
PUAF U8203Project Management3
Non-SIPA Courses
BUSI K4010Managing Human Behavior In the Organization3
HPMN P6530Issues and Approaches in Health Policy and Management3
HPMN P8517Management Challenges in Evolving Health Care Insurance Systems3
HPMN P8557Managerial and Organizational Behavior3
HPMN P8569Seminar: Studies in Hospital Management3
ORLJ Y4002Functions of Organizations3
ORLJ Y5003Human Resources Management3
ORLD Y5055Staff Development & Training3
ORLD Y5062Human Resources Development in Organizations3
ORLJ Y5148Managing Conflict in Organizations3
ORLJ Y5340Basic Practicum Conflict Resolution3
ORLD Y5362Group Dynamics: A Systems Perspective3
ORLJ Y6040Fundamentals of Conflict Resolution - Institutional Context3
POPF P8614Management of Health Care Organizations3
SUMA PS4100Sustainability Management3

Management Courses

EMPA U6036 Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility. 3 Points.

Category: EMPA, EMPA: Advanced Management & Finance, EMPA: International Economic Policy & Management, HRHP, Management, EPD, EPD:Sustainable

This course will introduce students to the global context of CSR through comparative business perspectives. After considering the theoretical frameworks for undertaking CSR activities the course will addresses a number of public policy issues facing globalizing companies through a series of case studies. Under examination is the manner in which business and ethical considerations have impacted upon different social, labor, and environmental challenges. We will be asking students to consider: to what extent such factors have been, and will be, part of the corporate strategy decision-making process; why companies are having to adapt (or not) to different pressures; and whether they might sometimes be going above and beyond the standards required by regulation.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 83096 Todd Jacobson M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

ENVP U6224 Environmental Data Analysis. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-ESP, Management, EPD, EPD:Sustainable

This course introduces students to statistical data analysis in the context of environmental issues. The is taught through a combination of lectures and laboratory exercises. The course encourages a rigorous examination of the many applications of statistical analysis in climate change assessment, environmental justice, land use, land cover change and measuring the impacts of natural hazards on populations.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 77146 Valentina Mara, Xue Liu T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
510a International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6003 Coding for Development and Social Change. 1 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management, USP, USP:Urban
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this 3-day workshop, students will learn design thinking and basic coding. This course is an introduction to technology and analytics for social good. At the end of the workshop, students will have the resources and knowledge to build/develop a framework.

INAF U6004 Programming for Entrepreneurs. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Feb 3, 4, 5 & 17

In this course, you will learn the fundamentals of programming so you can start writing web applications that can potentially be used in non-profit or public sectors. The course will be very hands-on and you are expected to code during the class. The topics will include - fundamentals of computer science, programming basics, data structures, client-server architecture, javascript, application programming interface, LAMP stack and web frameworks, design tools, scalability issues and infrastructure for application deployment. We will discuss some of these topics in the context of agile development methodology for startups. If you are interested in building a startup as a social entrepreneur, the tools and methods you learn in this course should help you in coding the first prototype of your application. As part of the final project, you are expected to build a fully functional web application. No programming background is required. Students are expected to complete all the reading assignments before the first day of class.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 80529 Sameer Maskey F Sa S 10:00am - 5:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6016 Cost-Benefit Analysis. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, USP, USP:Urban, APEA, Management

Prerequisites: SIPA U4200 or SIPA U6400 or SIPA U6401

This course aims to provide an introduction to cost-benefit analysis and the economic evaluation of government or development programs, projects and policies. The course consists of two parts: theory/methodology in the first half of the semester and application of the learned concepts through an analysis of various case studies in the second half. Case studies will cover the full range of possible applications of CBA -from early education, social policy, health, urban planning, transportation and energy to environmental regulations. Case studies will cover both the US and developing country contexts. In the second half of the semester students will be expected to apply what they have learned by carrying out a cost-benefit analysis on a topic of their choice. The project is expected to include all components of a professional CBA - description of policy or program scenarios to be evaluated, compilation and monetization of the main costs and benefits, development of an Excel model including discounting and sensitivity analysis.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 88029 Eva Weissman M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 93631 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 93631 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
411 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6040 International Energy Project Finance. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-DP, EPD, EPD:Sustainable, EE, EE: GEMP, EE: ERM, Management

Prerequisites: INAF U6072 or SUMA K4155

Project finance is frequently employed in energy investment to allocate risk between major energy companies, entrepreneurs, equity and debt providers, government agencies, and other industry participants. The course will explain how this risk allocation is accomplished through a survey of projects in the various energy sectors: international oil & gas production, LNG export, electric generation both fossil-fueled and renewables, price-hedged and merchant. The objective of the course is to provide participants with a practical grasp of which types of energy projects are suitable for project finance. The following areas will be addressed: business risk analysis, cashflow analysis, and sources of equity and debt capital.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 60820 James Guidera M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6041 Corporations and Human Rights. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, EPD:Social, HRHP

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to learn about the growing importance of human rights and their impact in the world today. Through an in-depth examination of the field of business and human rights students will gain an understanding of the existing and emerging international human rights framework relevant to business, learn ways in which business and human rights intersect, and be exposed to the range of methods and tactics being employed by human rights advocates and businesses to address their human rights impacts. By the end of the course, the student will have a firm grasp of the current business and human rights debates, and be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of applying human rights standards to corporations and the effect of corporate practices on human rights. Classroom discussion will include a review of trends in human rights; the development of human rights principles or standards relevant to corporations; human rights issues facing business operations abroad; the growing public demand for greater accountability; strategies of civil society advocacy around business and human rights; collaborative efforts between business and non-profit organizations; and other issues managers must deal with. Through guest lectures, students will have the opportunity to engage first hand with business managers and advocacy professionals dealing with these issues. Attendance is mandatory in the first class session.

INAF U6042 Energy Business & Economic Development. 3 Points.

Category: EE, EE: GEMP, EE: ERM, Management, EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Sustainable

Energy is a key input and a key business in economic development. The course first develops the current understanding of the economic development process, with a focus on the role of energy, and energy businesses and markets. Then we examine development problems and policies in resource dependent economies, middle income reforming economies, low income economies and conclude with a look at the interface between economic development and environmental protection. 

INAF U6053 Creating a Social Enterprise. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Social, Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social

The course will focus primarily on the knowledge and skills required to launch a social enterprise.  The class will include an overview of Social Enterprises around the globe and will look at various enterprise models (for profit, non-profit) and their role in the broader market economy.  Class time will focus on the analysis of Case Studies and the vetting of real social enterprise business plans.  The course will center on a Group Project where teams of three (3) will work together to build a plan for launching their own, new Social Enterprise. In the process, students will learn how to define, design, market, sustain and scale their concept.  At the end of the course, students will submit a formal business plan and budget and will present their plan to a panel of experts in the field.

INAF U6058 Public Finance & Debt Management. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP, USP, USP:Urban, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Students should have a working knowledge of Excel and basic quantitative concepts such as present and future value calculations.

The course is intended to enable students to understand the history and functioning of the capital and debt markets that facilitate financing on behalf of governmental units. The syllabus will cover all facets of public sector financing including the legal and financial construct and also examine at length the role of independent rating agencies in the marketplace.

INAF U6085 The Economic Development of Latin America. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, Regional, Management

This course aims at familiarizing students with contemporary debates on Latin American economic development and its social effects. The focus of the course is comparative in perspective. Most of the readings deal, therefore, with Latin America as a region, not with individual countries. After a first lecture, which overviews long-term historical trends and debates on institutional development, it looks at market reforms as a whole. It then focuses on specific contemporary issues: macroeconomic management, trade policies, production sector trends and policies, income distribution and social policy.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 13004 Jose Ocampo M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
402b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6115 Cost Benefit Analysis for Developing Economies. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: SIPA U6400 & Experience with Excel

Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is about the economic evaluation of public sector projects or policies. The course includes theory and methodology as well as hands-on practical exercises. After successfully completing this course students should have the skills and confidence to conduct CBAs on actual public sector projects and policies.

INAF U6116 Infrastructure Cost Benefit Analysis. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, Management
Pre-reqs: SIPA U4200 or SIPA U6400

This course aims to provide students with the analytical tools to assess and evaluate infrastructure projects in the United States and worldwide. In particular, students will explore the methodologies and techniques as they relate to cost-benefit analysis with a special focus on hands-on problems and experiences.  Each lecture is structured in two parts: theory/methodology in the first half of each class and application of the learned concepts through an analysis of case studies in the second half. Case studies will cover various applications of CBA as it relates to infrastructure (not general public policy issues as those are addressed in other courses).  Examples of such case studies are transit investments in the US, water and wastewater infrastructure improvements, electricity grid upgrades or airport expansions. Case studies will cover both the US and developing country contexts.


Throughout the semester students will be expected to complete a cost-benefit analysis in the form of a group project.  The project will consist of all important components of such an analysis such as a literature review, methodology section, description of project scenarios to be evaluated, compilation and monetization of the main costs and benefits, development of an Excel model including discounting and sensitivity analyses.  The quantitative analysis and estimation of benefits and costs will be critical and require students to be familiar with spreadsheet applications and formulas in Microsoft Excel.  Working with actual project and performance data will be required as much as is feasible in each case.

INAF U6131 Impact Investing: Venture Capital Strategies. 3 Points.

Category: Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the emerging investment category of impact investing: investments intended to generate both financial returns and positive social or environmental impact. Unlike some other courses on impact investing, this course will focus on equity-based venture capital impact investments (and not private equity, social impact bonds, lending, or concessionary strategies of any kind).  Venture capitalists tend to focus on early-stage, high-growth businesses that have the potential to transform their industries.  Impact-oriented venture capitalists are targeting and in many cases achieving market-rate returns.  The course will examine the history and structure of the venture capital industry, the impact investing eco-system, the measurement of impact, and areas of opportunity including civic engagement, K-12 and higher education, sustainability, and the needs of the bottom billion.    Students in the course will make a meaningful pragmatic contribution to the field of impact investing.  Each student will work on a start-up associated with an accelerator program (we have tentative commitments from Kaplan Techstars, Echoing Green, Learnlaunch, and 1776), will produce a full-fledged Investment Memorandum detailing the strengths and weaknesses of the start-up, and then share and discuss this Memorandum with investors who have expressed interest in the start-up.  It is my hope that students will deepen the understanding of potential impact investors, stimulate the flow of capital to the start-ups that deserve it, and offer useful insights to those start-ups.

INAF U6132 Aiming for Social Impact: Managing, Measuring, and Investing to Achieve Results. 3 Points.

Category: Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Social

This course is designed to give students the skills to translate an ambitious mission statement into a set of results that have the potential to constitute real impact; recognize and work through common trade-offs (financial, organizational and strategic) that decision makers confront when they align their organizations around impact; understand the difference between performance management and impact measurement; why social enterprises need both of these systems and the organizational prerequisites for implementing them; how to identify measures that can truly inform critical decisions; and analyze and assess the strengths and weaknesses of prominent approaches to achieving and scaling impact across all three sectors: social/philanthropic, public, and private/for-profit

INAF U6133 Raising Capital & Growing Social Ventures. 3 Points.

Category: Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: 2nd year students only; Accounting and Finance

This course provides students with key knowledge and skills on raising capital for social ventures both the entrepreneurs‘ and investors‘ perspectives. It is designed to appeal to students who are considering entrepreneurial opportunities or those who are considering careers in impact investing. Finding the resources to launch and grow a social purpose venture is the first, and perpetual, challenge faced by social entrepreneurs. How they find that money often creates tension between social outcomes, donor expectation, financial sustainability, and profitability. This course will start with the question of "What is the Real Cost of Capital?" and reflect on how all investors - whether foundation, social investor, or investment bank - impact operations and business and program decisions. 

INAF U6135 Renewable Energy Markets and Policy. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-DP, EE, EE: ERM, EE: GEMP, Management

Prerequisites: INAF U6072 or SUMA K4155

Renewable energy is the fastest growing segment of the energy sector. While wildly popular in polling across the political spectrum, it is increasingly a point of political partisan divide among elected leaders. To combat global warming, many argue that renewables will need to provide most if not all of our energy, but getting there requires overcoming many technical, economic, and political challenges. This course explores not only what renewable energy is, but also what tools are available to expand access to it in the years to come. This course will introduce students to the full range of renewable energy technologies and the fault lines that make some technologies "real" renewables and others not. We will cover the status of each major family of renewable energy technology including the strengths and limitations, costs and forecasts for long-term deployment. We will focus on renewables in the context of the two largest markets - electricity generation and transportation energy. The course will rely heavily on the examples from the US experience, but will compare and contrast lessons from international and developing markets as well. Our goal will be to understand the full range of policy tools currently in use and under debate. In particular we will look at tax credit policy, mandates, utility regulatory policies and EPA's proposed carbon regulations.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 21796 Nathanael Greene T 11:00am - 12:50pm
324 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6138 Investment in Social Change. 3 Points.

Category: Management, EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Social

The concept of social impact has gained global attention, though it remains limited in scale within the capital markets. The potential exists to better integrate market forces with broader public outcomes, but new thinking is needed. To effectively contribute to the global dialogue on impact investment, students must be interdisciplinary in their approach - part entrepreneur, part social advocate, and part policy specialist, all within a keen grasp of the dynamics of innovation. This course is intended to accelerate the evolution of Investment in Social Change by looking at the ways these disciplines must work together to craft social innovation. Students will apply formal reasoning to an inherently subjective field, and should leave the course better prepared to (a) balance the dual mandate of return and social change within their own endeavors; (b) understand the economic principles of technology-led innovation as a key catalyst linking public and private efforts for social change; and (c) contribute to public policy frameworks that encourage private investment in the public good.

INAF U6186 Community Economic Development: Origins, Policy and Practice. 3 Points.

Category: Management, USP, USP:Urban

This course will provide an overview of the community development industry. Tracing the evolution from a nascent movement to organize blighted inner-city neighborhoods to today's multi-billion dollar industry, the course will examine how community development happens, the way communities set development priorities, the financial tools used to accomplish projects, and how key partners interact. The course will explore how affordable housing, health care, schools, childcare, and retail development projects interact to turn neglected neighborhoods into communities of choice. The level of financial and underwriting analysis will not require previous real estate finance experience. Particular attention will be paid to the role of community development corporations, community development financial institutions, direct public subsidies, and the role of banks and the Community Reinvestment Act.

INAF U6211 Technology Solutions for Development & Social Change. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-DP, EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Social, TMAC, Management

The aim of this course is to provide a theoretical and practical framework for students to understand participatory approaches to new media and information and communication technologies to address the advancement of the Millennium Development Goals and social change, with a special focus on low and middle income countries. Each session will include an introduction to basic theories that provide a critical lens through which mobile phone and computer-based applications and tools can be designed to solve problems in health, education, agriculture, small business development, and environmental sustainability.  Cross-cutting themes that will be explored include gender, public-private partnerships, and policy dimensions of information and communication for development (ICTD) as well as the newly emerging fields of mHealth, mLearning, mBanking, etc. Through the use of case studies and a term-long project, the technology project life-cycle will be explored in an applied setting.  Specifically students will be guided through the process of conducting needs assessments; applying ethnographic research methods to understanding work, communication, and information flows; participatory program and application design; systems development and local adaptation; testing and usability assessments; implementation; and evaluation. Applications that will be reviewed in more detail during the course include: RapidSMS (Project Mwana and others) and ChildCount+, Mangrove, Ushahidi, EpiSurveyor, FrontlinSMS, Open Data Kit and many others. This course requires instructor permission in order to register. Please add yourself to the waitlist in SSOL and submit the proper documents in order to be considered.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 82348 Adam Nelson, Eric Cantor T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
409 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6226 Leadership and Innovative Policy Making. 3 Points.

Category: Management

In this course the students will (a) master key themes in leadership development and policy making, (b) increase their own leadership and policy making capacities through reflection and discussion and (c) evaluate the leadership record of an "extraordinary" policy leader. The goal of the three-pronged approach is to prepare students for understanding and exercising leadership-executive ability in government, non-governmental organizations, and business. Leadership is the ability to influence people towards achieving a goal. An important part of the SIPA mission is to prepare students for leadership and innovative policy making. In this course we will examine leadership and policy making "out of the box" as well as "inside the box" by having students tackle several key themes and some specific questions. The themes include issues such as, are leaders born or made? What kind of leaders design and implement "good" versus "bad" policies? Can "nudging" and "innovative policy making" substitute for forceful policy intervention? To what extent are economic and political outcomes products of leadership as opposed to external environment?

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 13029 Jan Svejnar W 11:00am - 12:50pm
402 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6256 Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Social, EPD:Sustainable, Management, USP, USP:Social
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The purpose of this course is to introduce, critically analyze and experiment with cutting-edge ideas in social entrepreneurship from the "North" (US, Europe) and the "South" (Africa and Asia) with a special focus on initiatives and enterprises focused on sustainable development and poverty reduction. Making markets work for the poor requires an understanding of social entrepreneurship and social enterprises in the developing world as strategies and untapped opportunities to add value to society by harnessing market forces that blend human, financial and social capital resources to achieve replicability and scale in every development domain, such as mobile health technologies, microfinance, renewable energy, water, education, fair trade, and agriculture. This course adopts both theoretical and applied cases, team-based field experiments and distinguished guest speakers in the teaching process to ensure that students gain an understanding of their roles as change makers and social entrepreneurs, and feel equipped to handle the complexities involved in designing hybrid models for efficient service delivery to the world's poor (i.e., through public spending, development assistance, philanthropy and private or social sector "impact" investments).

INAF U6301 Corporate Finance. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, EE, EE: GEMP, IFEP, IFEP: International Finance Track, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, Management

Prerequisites: SIPA U6200 or PEPM U6223 or EMPA U6010

Corporate finance is an introductory finance course; it is a core course for students taking the International Finance and Policy (IFP) concentration. The course is designed to cover those areas of business finance which are important for all managers, whether they specialize in finance or not.  

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 76297 Gailen Hite T Th 4:15pm - 5:45pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 002 77948 Deborah McLean T Th 9:15am - 10:45am
404 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 003 86746 Deborah McLean T Th 2:15pm - 3:45pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 11146 F 11:00am - 12:50pm
411 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R02 12446 F 11:00am - 12:50pm
403 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R03 13348 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
403 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6370 Women & Global Leadership. 1.5 Point.

Category: EPD, USP, USP:Urban, GPP, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This practicum will explore the progress of women's leadership on a global scale. We will look at women's leadership in both the public and the private sphere. In addition to understanding the current status of women's leadership around the globe, we will examine the competitive advantages successful integration of women brings about for a country or a company. Finally, we will look to understand the obstacles which have inhibited women's further progress in both of these arenas. The course will be taught in an interactive seminar format.

INAF U6374 Mainstreaming Gender in Global Affairs. 3 Points.

Category: HRHP, GPP, Management, USP, USP:Social, EPD, EPD:Social

This course introduces students to gender mainstreaming, gender analysis and intersectionality as theory and method, as well as the associated set of strategies, tools and skills applicable to international and public policy contexts. Through a combination of empirical research, structural theorizing, social critique, and case studies, students will become acquainted with the global dimensions of feminist organizing and policy-making necessary for working in a variety of specialty policy fields such as education, public health, international finance, sustainable development, peace and security, organizational management and economic development.

INAF U6515 Technology and the Future of Governance and Public Policy. 1.5 Point.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, Management, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 23 - Mar. 6

The purpose of the course is to help future policy makers, computer scientists, technologists and entrepreneurs think about how to benefit the public sector in an era in which burgeoning access to digital technology holds great potential to change governance and policy-making. Students will receive a general introduction to how decisions get made, including how policy is developed and implemented in the public sector, and opportunities to apply new technology to this process.  Students will leave as more effective problem solvers. Students will learn multiple modes of problem solving that use technology (online platforms etc.) as well as new models for problem solving (design thinking, rapid prototyping, Lean, Open Space, etc.) to develop a "faux" product to be created in order to meet the goals of finding new ways to address public policy challenges. Projects might vary from eTown Hall forums to maximize participation in democratic governance to leveraging innovation to address one of the 21st century’s most wicked public policy problems.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 11096 Hollie Gilman, Ari Wallach M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6604 Applied Econometrics. 3 Points.

Category: APEA, Management, EPD, EPD:Economic

Prerequisites: SIPA U6501

The goal of this course is to enable students to evaluate the policy relevance of academic research. While academic research frequently considers treatments that approximate a potential public policy, such prima facie relevance alone does not inform policy. In particular, public policy is predicated on the credible estimation of causal treatment effects. For example, although researchers frequently document the strong correlation between years of schooling and better health, this tells us surprisingly little (and arguably nothing) about the health effects of public tuition assistance, compulsory school laws, or any other program that raises educational attainment. Policies guided by statistical correlations - even the regression-adjusted estimates that dominate the academic literature - will frequently have unintended and even perverse real-world effects. Policymakers must distinguish between causal estimates that should inform policy design and statistical correlations that should not. The catch is that distinguishing correlation from causation in empirical studies is surprisingly difficult. Econometric technique alone does not provide a reliable path to causal inference. Applications of instrumental variables (IV) techniques, while wildly popular, arguably obscure sources of identification more often than isolating exogenous variation. Similar concerns apply to popular panel data and fixed effects (FE) models, which can eliminate certain unobservable sources of bias. Furthermore, causal claims by a study's author should be regarded with skepticism - frequently this is merely the marketing of a non-transparent statistical correlation. Put differently, when has a researcher portrayed his empirical result as a mere correlation when in fact he/she had identified a credible causal impact? A basic theme of the course is that identification strategy - the manner in which a researcher uses observational [real-world] data to approximate a controlled/randomized trial (Angrist & Pischke, 2009) - is the bedrock of causal inference. Econometric technique cannot rescue a fundamentally flawed identification strategy. In other words, econometrics and identifications strategies are complements in the production of causal estimates, not substitutes. Examples of appropriate econometric technique applied to compelling identification strategies will be described to illustrate this approach (most often from health economics), along with their implications for public policy.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 10279 Doru Cojoc Th 9:00am - 10:50am
402b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U6894 Dimensions of Leadership for an Interconnected World: Ready to Lead?. 3 Points.

Category: Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Dimensions of Leadership will give students a 4-part framework and practical tools for developing their leadership capacity to solve the kind of interconnected global problems that must be addressed over the next generation. The framework addresses 4 of these dimensions: thought leadership, executive leadership, inter-personal leadership and moral leadership. Students will develop self awareness of their readiness to lead and the implications for their careers in and across the government, business or the social sectors over time

INAF U6898 Program Evaluation and Design. 3 Points.

Category: Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, EPD, EPD:Economic, EPD:Political, EPD:Social, EPD:Sustainable

In this course, students will: (1) become familiar with the concepts, methods, and applications of evaluation research; (2) learn how to assess the context for evaluation; (3) learn how to read evaluation research critically; and (4) be able to propose an appropriate evaluation plan.  The course will center on a Group Project where teams of students (no more than 5 students) will work together to develop an evaluation plan for a program. In the process, students will learn to assess evaluation needs, how to map a program theory, link outcomes to metrics, and plan to ‘conduct' an evaluation. At the end of the course, students will be required to present their group evaluation plan in class and to submit an individual final paper, based on your group's proposal for the program evaluation plan.

INAF U6907 Principles and Techniques of Fundraising. 1.5 Point.

Category: Management
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Sept. 12 - Oct. 10

The course is structured to provide students with a thorough grounding in the principles and practices of fundraising. This course will provide students with an introduction to development, an overview of fundraising processes and systems, and the framework through which managers can determine the efficiency and effectiveness of various tactics within a nonprofit organization's private revenue stream. Students will understand the role of the staff and board in a development program, and donor development strategies.

INAF U8217 Tools and Principles for Managing in the Information Economy and the Media. 3 Points.

Category: Management
Cross-listed course with Columbia Business School

The course takes an innovative approach to media and high tech -- bringing together many of the strands of the entire MBA program and applying them to one of the most dynamic of industry sectors--media, information and communications. It identifies the particular tools and principles for management in an economy that is based on the production and use of information and knowledge, and that is globally internetworked.  The course is useful for: • Students with interest in media, information, and technology, including for marketing and advertising • students who do not aim for a career in  this sector but want to understand and function in the information economy • non-business students who seek an overview of management more generally    The course covers an IMCT (information, media, communication, and technology) company's major functions (and by extension, of most companies): 1. The Producing function, including financing, HRM, technology management, and production management. 2. The Harvesting function, including demand analysis, marketing, distribution, pricing, and intellectual asset management. 3. The Control Function, including accounting and strategy. For each of these functions we assemble: • A set of MBA tools and analyses for managers, investors, and users • A set of societal perspectives on drivers, impacts, and issues.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 11748 Eli Noam Th 2:15pm - 5:30pm
Room TBA

INAF U8350 Finance for the World's Poorest. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, Management

This is a class for those who want to learn about the challenges of delivering financial services in settings that are impoverished, often corrupt and prone to violence. The question addressed in this class how the poorest can improve the ways that they save and borrow and manage their money. Students working in small groups will grapple with the issues of creating large-scale, effective and self-replicating initiatives for the world’s poorest as they design projects from feasibility study, to staffing to budgets and evaluation.

INAF U8354 Micro & Small Enterprise Development. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Economic, Management

The objective of this course is to understand the role of micro- and small-enterprises (SMEs) in developing economies and to identify and assess a range of policies and programs to promote their development. By tracing the evolution of development thinking in finance and SME development, students will be exposed to the intellectual underpinnings of -and practical tools used in- a wide variety of approaches to SME development. Students will also become familiar with the strengths and weaknesses of the most common private sector development approaches currently being used by donor organizations and committed private sector actors.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 67191 Zaki Raheem, Lief Doerring F 1:00pm - 4:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8380 Managing the Global Corporation. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, Management

The course will provide an overview of managing global companies from CEO and/or senior manager's perspective. The focus will be on the key decisions and trade-offs that the CEO must make. The course is built around two main themes: developing a framework for integrated decision-making and managing change in a global corporation.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 67546 Richard Thoman T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8559 Building Peace After Conflict. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, Management
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Oct. 24 - Dec. 12

This short course traces the outlines of the international community's steep learning curve in addressing the challenges of post-conflict peace building. It will examine some of the early UN and World Bank experiments in restoring nation states, follow the institutional changes meant to build capacity in the field of post-conflict recovery, look at the methodological and funding tools developed to strengthen field operations, and review some case studies illustrating the impact of this evolution. 

INAF U8560 Managing The UN System. 3 Points.

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, EPD:Political, IO, Management

In this course, the participants will examine the governance structure and decision-making processes in the UN organizations. They will review the rules and regulations whereby the organizations handle people, money and tangible assets, and see how they manage their human and financial resources. Special attention will be paid to the way in which cultural and political factors influence management practices. Key issues such as decentralization, coordination and the management of change will recur throughout the course. The interaction of the UN system with donors, the private sector and with civil society as partners in the provision of services will be closely studied.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 60821 Bruce Jenks M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
409 International Affairs Bldg

INAF U8690 Managing Humanitarian Emergencies. 3 Points.

Category: EPD, EPD:Political, HRHP, Management

This course focuses on the actual management problems of humanitarian interventions and helps students obtain the professional skills and insight needed to work in complex humanitarian emergencies, and to provide oversight and guidance to humanitarian operations from a policy perspective. It is a follow-up to the fall course that studied the broader context, root causes, actors, policy issues, and debates in humanitarian emergencies.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 93096 Susannah Friedman Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
402b International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U4400 Campaign Management in the United States. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management

Together we are going to learn how to plan, manage, and execute the major elements of a modern American campaign using skills that can be applied to all levels of the electoral process. Although this is a course focusing on practical competence, empirical political theory and relevant political science will be applied to our work. Guest lecturers, simulations, and additional materials such as videos and handouts will augment the course. When we are done, you will know what you need to do, and where you need to turn, in order to effectively organize an election campaign. The curriculum is ambitious, specialized, and task-specific. This is not a course in political science, but rather a hands-on, intensive training seminar in campaign skills. By May, you will be able to write a campaign plan, structure a fundraising effort, hire and work with consultants, plan a media campaign (both paid and unpaid), research and target a district, structure individual voter contact, use polling data, understand the utility of focus groups, write press releases, conduct advance work on behalf of your candidate, manage crises, hire and fire your staff, and tell your candidate when he or she is wrong. My aim is to make you competent and eminently employable in the modern era of advanced campaign technology. For the purposes of this class, you will design a campaign plan for the 2005 NYC Mayoral race. To make this more interesting (and realistic), you will be provided with information and situations throughout the semester that will require you to plan, anticipate, and adapt your campaign plan to the changing realities inherent to every campaign.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 62192 Karine Jean-Pierre Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
407 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6026 Public/Private Sector Collaboration: Achieving Rapid Transformational Change. 3 Points.

Category: Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The objective of this course is to equip students with practical knowledge and skills on how to effectively plan for and be better enabled to drive complex, transformational change efforts. Through case discussions and the integrated (via individual and team preparation assignments) application of effective management practice, students will develop skills to anticipate resistance to change and lead stakeholders around obstacles, especially those that emerge from the complex nature of Public/Private Sector collaboration efforts. Students will develop and sharpen tangible skills to identify, design and propose the options, next actions and communications that can influence stakeholders and stay the course toward targeted outcomes.

PUAF U6028 Public-Private Partnerships to Foster Effective, Sustainable and Scalable Nonprofits. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Sept. 6 - Oct. 18; Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 17 - Feb. 28

This course is designed for students interested in establishing, working in or leading non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or creating social value through partnerships between NGOs, business and government. The course will deepen students' understanding of: (1) the nonprofit sector in general, and (2) partnerships between nonprofits, business and government. Students will learn through cases involving a variety of NGOs, businesses, and governments. The cases include a range of industries (e.g. housing, sports, transportation and drugs); NGOs (e.g. Habitat for Humanity International, the Red Cross and Homeless World Cup); companies (e.g. Nike and GlaxoSmithKline); and countries (e.g. France, Brazil, Mexico and the US).

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 19256 Lynn Thoman T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6032 Leading and Sustaining Change: Frameworks, Tools and Skills. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management
Spring 2017 Course Dates: Jan. 18 - Mar. 1; Instructor permission required for registration

Please note: This is an ‘instructor managed registration’ course. Students interested in the course should join the waitlist in Student Services Online (SSOL).  Priority will be given to those students 1. in their first year (or second year of a three-year, dual degree program), 2. having less than three years of full-time job experience and / or 3. without significant business coursework at the undergraduate level.

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All organizations must adapt to shifting circumstances in order to succeed.  How (and how fast!) an organization changes...can be more critical to sustaining change than getting to the targeted change initially.​ ​This course is about the ‘how​. It ​aims to equip students with tools and skills to lead and sustain change initiatives, either directly or in support of a more senior manager.  The specific focus will be on change that is t​ransformational, in that it impacts every person in the organization to some degree; globally-scaled, in that​ it requires collaboration among diverse and dispersed teams; time-sensitive, in that a lag in communications and a ‘business as usual’ pace can often threaten a successful change outcome.

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​The course will be case-based​,​ and ​students can expect that their week-to-week engagement within the class, with other students and with the professor will instill a realistic appreciation for applying a range of tools and driving change. An overarching theme is to illustrate the rationale for change, the tool application process and the outcomes using actual change management case vignettes (among global and dispersed stakeholders). The vantage point for learning will be the role of the Senior Level Manager (SLM) driving the change process, a position that students may achieve within a two to three-year period following graduation. If not directly​ in that role​, most students are likely to support a SLM driving change or to serve on a designated, ‘core’ change team. Virtual team leadership and engagement are critical to ‘moving quickly’ around obstacles, and so there is early class focus on the ‘how’ of ​crafting persuasive messages, ​organizing team roles, orchestrating team decisions and communicating using effective virtual team tools and practices.  

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 61446 Harry Silver W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501b International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6033 Decision Models & Management. 3 Points.

Category: IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, Management

This course provides an introduction to computer-based models for decision-making. The emphasis is on models that are widely used in diverse industries and functional areas, including finance, accounting, operations, and marketing. Applications will include advertising planning, revenue management, asset-liability management, environmental policy modeling, portfolio optimization, and corporate risk management, among others. The aim of the course is to help students become intelligent consumers of these methods. To this end, the course will cover the basic elements of modeling -- how to formulate a model and how to use and interpret the information a model produces. The course will attempt to instill a critical viewpoint towards decision models, recognizing that they are powerful but limited tools.The applicability and usage of computer-based models have increased dramatically in recent years, due to the extraordinary improvements in computer, information and communication technologies, including not just hardware but also model-solution techniques and user interfaces. Thirty years ago working with a model meant using an expensive mainframe computer, learning a complex programming language, and struggling to compile data by hand; the entire process was clearly marked "experts only." The rise of personal computers, friendly interfaces (such as spreadsheets), and large databases has made modeling far more accessible to managers. Information has come to be recognized as a critical resource, and models play a key role in deploying this resource, in organizing and structuring information so that it can be used productively.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 65946 Lucius Riccio Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 12298 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6132 Politics and Policies of Community Planning and Participation. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management

This course will examine the intersections of policy, planning and participation at the community and local level in the United States. The belief in widespread community participation and active civic engagement is basic to the effective operation of the American political democracy.   In the planning profession, neighborhood planning has often been viewed as an essential mechanism for citizen involvement, for balanced physical development and beyond to the resolution of economic, political, social and environmental issues. In many ways, neighborhood planning is more important than ever, whether it focuses on urban design and livability or on the local effects of climate change and disaster prevention and sustainability.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 83097 Ethel Sheffer W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6217 Operations Management. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management

This course provides a foundation for understanding the operations of an organization. The objective is to provide the basic skills necessary to critically analyze an organization's operating performance and practices. Such knowledge is important for careers in a variety of areas, including general management and consulting. Unlike other courses which tend to treat operations as a "black box", this course will be concerned with 'opening up the inner workings of an organization's operations to see how they work or don't work, learning the fundamental laws of behavior of producing a product or services, and lastly to learn how to design operations that perform at maximum levels. Its focus will be on the technical and mathematical analysis of operations rather than a human factors approach, although there are obvious connections between the two that will be explored. Concern is given to understanding which elements of an organization's operations enable it to produce quality outputs at a reasonable cost. The course will accomplish this by grouping the material under two major headings. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding the "physics" of how material, paper work, and information flow through an organization to produce a product or service and how its design encourages or impedes good performance. The second half will focus on excellence in operations, learning techniques and approaches that increase overall performance in production, quality, variety, or speed of service.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 94254 Lucius Riccio W 11:00am - 12:50pm
411 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6251 Urban Economics. 3 Points.

Pre-req: SIPA U4200 or SIPA U6400

Urban economics explain the forces that make people want to live in close proximity to each other and the complex economic and social dynamics that ensue. First, urban economics explains the distribution of economic activity and population over space (typical question are: why do cities exists? What drives the location decisions of people and firms? What makes cities grow?). Second, it interprets how production activities and housing are distributed within a city, the value of land, and how it is allocated to what use. Third, it addresses questions of governance, political economy, and public finance: scope and limitations of local government intervention, provision of services, regulation, and governmental funding sources. Fourth, it confronts many fundamental economic and policy problems: transportation, crime, housing, education, homelessness, public health, income distribution, racial segregation, environmental sustainability, fiscal federalism, municipal finance, and others. This course covers the first three aspects of urban economics and a selection of topics from the fourth category.


By the end of the course you will be able to: Have an understanding of introductory theoretical and empirical models of urban economics to interpret location decisions of people and firms (between and within cities); Evaluate local policy using efficiency and equity arguments; Apply your knowledge to a specific policy issue.

PUAF U6260 Management Training for Development Professionals. 3 Points.

Category: MPA-DP, Management
Open to 2nd year MPA-DP students only

This course focuses on practical skills relevant to the roles and job responsibilities of development practitioners - whether they work for multilateral organizations, government agencies, private sector firms, NGOs, or social ventures - that will be useful whether they are based in the head office or in field locations.   The course is designed to build knowledge and skills that match the complex, interdisciplinary reality of development management.  Successful development practice depends on the capacity of program and project managers to integrate different disciplines and interact effectively with numerous stakeholders, both inside and outside their own organization.  This capacity is likely to become more important, and more highly valued, as the global development ecosystem continues to evolve.    The course blends training in both “hard skills” and “soft skills” that are relevant to the demands of project management in complex, dynamic environments. The course is divided into three modules, and features practice with relevant planning and management tools, problem-solving exercises, and presentations by student teams. 

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 12192 Lawrence Birch, Stephen Carpenter T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
409 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 002 66096 Lawrence Birch, Stephen Carpenter W 11:00am - 12:50pm
409 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6460 Benchmarking Skills for Process & Organizational Improvement. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, EPD, EPD:Social, Management
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Oct. 21 & 22; Spring 2017 Course Dates: March 3 & 4

The successful execution and evaluation of programs within a sector of government, or a private company, depend heavily on the ability of an organization to continually improve performance.  It follows that effective (in both the private and public sectors) hinges on an understanding of best practices within organizations. Benchmarking is the process of continually comparing and measuring against other organizations anywhere in the world to gain information on philosophies, practices and measures which will help an organization take action to improve its performance. This course provides an introduction to the structural basis of benchmarking, which consists of 5 primary phases - 1) Plan, 2) Baseline, 3) Collect Information, 4) Analyze Information, 5) Make Recommendations.  Using a public sector-based case study with "hands-on" group activities, as well as other real-world examples offered by the instructors, this course will also teach students how to use various tools and techniques when conducting activities within each benchmarking phase to help them implement successfully.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 76346 Christopher Loso, Robert Boccio F Sa 9:00am - 5:00pm
801 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U6801 Negotiation & Conflict Resolution. 3 Points.

Category: ISP, ICR, Management, IO

There are two purposes to this course: 1. to develop your ability to negotiate in a purposeful, principled and effective way; and 2. to teach you how to build consensus and broker wise agreements with others. Negotiation is a social skill, and like all social skills you have to practice it if you want to get better at it. To give you the chance to practice, we'll do a number of simulated negotiations in and out of class. We'll also use lectures, case studies, exercises, games, videos, and demonstrations to help you develop your understanding. As we advance in the course, our focus will shift from simple one-on-one negotiations to more complex ones involving many parties, agents, coalitions, and organizations.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 82647 Seth Freeman Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
324 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U8203 Project Management. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, Management

While it is generally thought of to be related to construction, the truth is that Project Management can be applied to any field. It is defined as the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to a broad range of activities in order to meet the requirements of the particular project. A project is an endeavor undertaken to achieve a particular aim. Project management knowledge and practices are best described in terms of their component processes. These processes are: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling and Closing. Knowledge Areas include Scope Management, Time Management, Cost Management, Quality Management, Risk Management, and Change Management. We will discuss all of these elements in the course.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 76946 Thomas Quaranta M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
410 International Affairs Bldg

PUAF U8207 Creating and Managing Effective Nonprofits. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is designed for students interested in leading nonprofits, managing them under government contract, or supporting them through corporate philanthropy departments. The goal is to provide concepts and practical tools to manage or assess, launch or re-design nonprofits/NGOs.

PUAF U8244 Municipal Finance in the U.S.. 3 Points.

Category: USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, IFEP, Management

This course examines key municipal finance and fiscal policy issues for government, focusing on New York City as a real-life case study.  Students will dive deeply into several aspects of municipal finance, including bread and butter topics of accounting, auditing, capital funding, and investment management.  We will also analyze current issues of economic development policy, labor relations, and pension and healthcare cost impact.  The class will be joined by guest speakers among the ranks of elected officials, top city appointees, labor leaders, and private sector professionals who will share firsthand their experience and perspectives.  The coursework will entail analysis of current news, participation in public meetings, and formulation and presentation of policy initiatives in view of projected billion-dollar budget deficits.

PUAF U8260 Generating Financial Support to Grow Social Enterprises. 1.5 Point.

Category: MIA/MPA: Short Course, Management, USP, USP:Social, USP:Urban
Fall 2016 Course Dates: Sept. 7 - Oct. 19

This workshop is designed for students interested in securing financial support for public/private partnerships, traditional or innovative philanthropies, well established cultural or educational institutions. It will focus on a variety of fundraising strategies such as direct solicitation via print mail, online appeals and digital approaches such as crowd funding as well as more traditional methods like writing grants to secure foundation funding and identifying and cultivating high net worth potential donors. There will be sessions dealing with creating donor data bases, segmenting appeals, deciding on when or whether to hold special events, and assessing corporate and government entities as potential philanthropic partners. At the conclusion, each student will have an opportunity to present a philanthropic proposal before a panel of outside judges.

PUAF U8510 Women and Power. 1.5 Point.

Category: EPD, USP, USP:Urban, USP:Social, APEA, GPP, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This practicum takes a hard look at the gains of the "women's revolution." A group of prominent individuals (business leaders, scholars, policymakers) will assess how far women have come in a variety of fields - ranging from politics to corporations to academia - and describe what they see as the unfinished agenda. In addition, the format will allow for a thorough exploration into the implications of history, culture, politics and policies on individuals' ability to gain, sustain and proactively use power effectively.  Particular attention will be paid to exploring how each student can take more control over their individual claim on ambition and leverage both public and private sector initiatives and personal strategies to construct a Power Plan for success.

SIPA U6013 Strategy, Law and Competitiveness. 3 Points.

Category: MIA, MIA/MPA Core: Management, MPA, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course seeks to prepare students for the interconnectedness of global organizations, industries, and internal and external legal environments. It will provide an introduction to business strategy with a focus on law and policy as a basic framework. Analysis of strategic decisions facing organizations will be rendered by looking outward to the environment and inward to the enterprise's resources, capabilities, and operating policies. The course will provide students with the fundamental knowledge of strategic and legal competitiveness for enterprises and will introduce students to a broad range of issues encountered by managers and business professionals.

SIPA U6501 Quantitative Analysis II for International & Public Affairs. 3 Points.

Category: MIA, MPA, MIA/MPA Core: Quantitative Analysis, IFEP, IFEP: Economic Policy Track, APEA, Management

This course is the second semester in the SIPA statistics sequence. Students conduct a major research project, which will serve as an important vehicle for learning about the process and challenges of doing applied empirical research, over the course of the semester. The project requires formulating a research question, developing testable hypotheses, gathering quantitative data, exploring and analyzing data using appropriate quantitative techniques, writing an empirical research paper, proposing policy recommendations, and presenting findings and analyses.

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 22146 Alan Yang T 11:00am - 12:50pm
405 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 002 26496 Alan Yang T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 003 24779 Harold Stolper M 11:00am - 12:50pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 004 81754 Harold Stolper M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 85941 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
510a International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R01 85941 W 8:10pm - 10:00pm
510a International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R02 13281 Th F 11:00am - 12:50pm
510a International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R03 11848 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
510a International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R03 11848 Th 9:00am - 10:50am
510a International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R04 13446 T 11:00am - 12:50pm
510a International Affairs Bldg
Spring 2017 R04 13446 F 9:00am - 10:50am
510a International Affairs Bldg

SIPA U8500 Quantitative Methods in Program Evaluation and Policy Research. 3 Points.

Category: APEA, Management

Prerequisites: SIPA U6501

The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of how to perform some more advanced statistical methods useful in answering policy questions using observational or experimental data. It will also allow them to more critically review research published that claims to answer causal policy questions. The primary focus is on the challenge of answering causal questions that take the form "Did A cause B?" using data that do not conform to a perfectly controlled randomized study. Examples from real policy studies and quantitative program evaluations will be used throughout the course to illustrate key ideas and methods. First, we will explore how best to design a study to answer causal questions given the logistical and ethical constraints that exist. We will consider both experimental and quasi- experimental (observational studies) research designs, and then discuss several approaches to drawing causal inferences from observational studies including propensity score matching, interrupted time series designs, instrumental variables, difference in differences, fixed effects models, and regression discontinuity designs. As this course will focus on quantitative methods, a strong understanding of multivariate regression analysis is a prerequisite for the material covered. Students must have taken two semesters of statistics (U6500 & U6501 or the equivalent) and have a good working knowledge of STATA

Term Section Call Number Instructor Times/Location
Spring 2017 001 60029 Alan Yang W 11:00am - 12:50pm
501a International Affairs Bldg

SIPA U8510 Program Evaluation: Principles and Applications. 3 Points.

Category: APEA, Management
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: SIPA U6501

Quantitative program evaluation has become an important tool for evaluating the effectiveness of social service interventions. This course is designed to provide students with the information to be able to develop a strong program evaluation plan and to be a critical consumer of evaluation research. The course will have three primary foci. First, we will develop and apply a framework for critiquing program evaluations. Second, we will individually discuss some of the major methods used by evaluation researchers, discussing both their advantages and limitations. Finally, we will develop an understanding of exactly how to develop a program evaluation through a detailed review of the key components and a hands-on group project involving developing a program evaluation proposal. The key outcome of this course is to arm you with the understanding of the elements in a program evaluation and practice in how to develop a program evaluation. We will discuss frameworks, key questions, some "best practices", and explore in detail important program evaluation steps such as logic models and measurement frameworks as it related to evaluating policies and programs. While we will cover some more advanced statistical and experimental design techniques, this course will not require hands-on statistical analysis and/or computation.