AMHS W3462 Immigrant New York. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

For the past century and a half, New York City has been the first home of millions of immigrants to the United States.  This course will compare immigrants' encounter with New York at the dawn of the twentieth century with contemporary issues, organizations, and debates shaping immigrant life in New York City.  As a service learning course, each student will be required to work 2-4 hours/week in the Riverside Language Center or programs for immigrants run by Community Impact. Field(s): US

AMHS W3574 America Through Sight and Sound to 1877. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course uses audio and visual evidence to explore major themes in American history from early colonization through Reconstruction.  Major themes include visual perceptions of the early American landscape and its transformation; contested representations of African Americans, Native Americans, and Mexicans as expressed through visual imagery; shifting attitudes toward childhood, death, the family, and gender as revealed through art and material artifacts;  the visual history of slavery, the sectional crisis, the Civil War, and Reconstruction; the evolution of African American, Irish, and Mexican American musical traditions to 1877 and what their songs reveal about these peoples’ lives and values; and the construction, transmission, and contestation of historical memory in popular audio and visual media. Field(s): US

AMHS W3576 Investigating Childhood. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the history of childhood and how it can refine contemporary psychological and legal thinking about children and inform current debates about the young. The class's approach will be highly interdisciplinary, drawing upon the insights and methods of anthropology, art history, biology, demography, developmental psychology, law, literature, philosophy, and sociology. We will examine childhood both as lived experience-shaped by such factors as class, ethnicity, gender, geographical region, and historical era-and as a cultural category that adults impose upon children. The class will also place a special emphasis on public policy, covering topics such as adoption, child abuse and neglect, children's rights, disability, juvenile delinquency, schooling, and social welfare policies. Field(s): US

AMHS W3580 American Cultural Criticism. 4 points.

A seminar on the history of American cultural criticism since the late nineteenth century.  Themes include the search for forms of artistic expression appropriate to a democratic society; the consequences of urbanism and corporate industrialization for American culture and values; the implications of ethno-racial diversity for American culture and national identity; tensions between “popular” or “mass” culture, the avant-garde, and “high” culture; selfhood and the moral life; the shift from a modernist to a postmodernist sensibility; and the public role of the critic in the United States.   Field(s): US

AMHS W4462 Immigrant New York. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

For the past century and a half, New York City has been the first home of millions of immigrants to the United States.  This course will compare immigrants' encounter with New York at the dawn of the twentieth century with contemporary issues, organizations, and debates shaping immigrant life in New York City.  As a service learning course, each student will be required to work 2-4 hours/week in the Riverside Language Center or programs for immigrants run by Community Impact. Field(s): US

AMHS W4574 America Through Sight and Sound to 1877. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course uses audio and visual evidence to explore major themes in American history from early colonization through Reconstruction.  Major themes include visual perceptions of the early American landscape and its transformation; contested representations of African Americans, Native Americans, and Mexicans as expressed through visual imagery; shifting attitudes toward childhood, death, the family, and gender as revealed through art and material artifacts;  the visual history of slavery, the sectional crisis, the Civil War, and Reconstruction; the evolution of African American, Irish, and Mexican American musical traditions to 1877 and what their songs reveal about these peoples’ lives and values; and the construction, transmission, and contestation of historical memory in popular audio and visual media. Field(s): US

AMHS W4576 Investigating Childhood. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the history of childhood and how it can refine contemporary psychological and legal thinking about children and inform current debates about the young. The class's approach will be highly interdisciplinary, drawing upon the insights and methods of anthropology, art history, biology, demography, developmental psychology, law, literature, philosophy, and sociology. We will examine childhood both as lived experience-shaped by such factors as class, ethnicity, gender, geographical region, and historical era-and as a cultural category that adults impose upon children. The class will also place a special emphasis on public policy, covering topics such as adoption, child abuse and neglect, children's rights, disability, juvenile delinquency, schooling, and social welfare policies. Field(s): US

AMHS W4580 American Cultural Criticism. 4 points.

A seminar on the history of American cultural criticism since the late nineteenth century.  Themes include the search for forms of artistic expression appropriate to a democratic society; the consequences of urbanism and corporate industrialization for American culture and values; the implications of ethno-racial diversity for American culture and national identity; tensions between “popular” or “mass” culture, the avant-garde, and “high” culture; selfhood and the moral life; the shift from a modernist to a postmodernist sensibility; and the public role of the critic in the United States.   Field(s): US

ANHS W4177 Caste, Religion and Tradition in Indian Society: An Anthropological History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How did Western scholars/missionaries/anthropologists/colonial officials understand the strange world of India they found themselves in?  The religion was unrecognizable by the terms of a Western understanding: it was not congregational, confessional, or recognizably scriptural.  Culturally, Indian society was deeply hierarchical, divided by a system called “caste” which was both scriptural and not.   Furthermore, religion and caste contributed centrally to the understanding of “culture” a term invoked interchangeably with “tradition.”  The divide between caste, religion, and culture, at the same time the difficulty of implementing that divide baffled Western scholars and missionaries of the late medieval period, but also later (19th century) colonial officials and anthropologists.  Knowledge about India was centrally produced by these various gatherers and compilers of information on India, and in this course we begin with early accounts of missionary activities, and will work our way through the writings of political theorists, sociologists, anthropologists, in order to arrive at an understanding of the interdisciplinary and anthropological history of India. Field(s): SA

ANHS W4855 Gender and Feminism in South Asia: An Anthropological History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

“Feminist history” is a concept that encompasses a wide and rich range of histories of ideas, issues, movements, and contemporary controversies.  In this seminar we will examine the history of feminist movements, anthropological descriptions of South Asian women’s lives and cultures, political tracts on contemporary issues with older genealogies, and historical/anthropological monographs dealing with specific scandals associated with women’s bodies, such as dowry murders, or honor killings.  The seminar will progress thematically rather than geographically, and will address issues specific to the lives of women in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.  Beginning with the British colonial period in South Asia (1757-1947/8) it will address the impact of missionary and colonial policies associated with reform on the lives of women, moving onto the nationalist period, partition, and the post-nationalist milieu.   The course is divided into four sections: Colonialism and law/property/education and reform; Nationalism, religion and identity ; Violence/Conflict and Minority Struggles; Globalization and its discontents. Field(s): SA

HIST BC3243 The Constitution in Historical Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The develoment of constitutional doctrine, 1787 to the present.  The Constitution as an experiement in republicanism; states' rights and the Civil War amendments; freedom of contract and its opponents; the emergence of civil liberties; New Deal intervention and the crisis of the Court; the challenge of civil rights. Field(s): US

HIST BC3403 Mexican Migration in the US. 3 points.

Examines the history of Mexican migration in the United States since the end of the XIX century. The course will analyze the role played by U.S. immigration policy, the labor demands of U.S. employers, the social and economic conditions of Mexico, and the formation of Mexican immigrant communities.

HIST BC3866 Fashion in China. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course challenges the long-standing association of fashion with the West. We will trace the transformation of China's sartorial landscape from the premodern era into the present. Using textual, visual, and material sources, we will explore: historical representations of dress in China; the politics of dress; fashion and the body; women's labor; consumption and modernity; industry and the world-market. We will also read key texts in fashion studies to reflect critically on how we define fashion in different historical and cultural contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, embracing history, anthropology, art, and literature. Field(s): EA

HIST BC4117 Ritual, Revel and Riot: Popular Culture In Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine several of the seminal works that explore the nature of popular culture in early modern Europe.  There are several themes we will explore in this course

HIST C3840 Independent Senior Thesis In History I. 4 points.

Open to highly qualified senior history majors.

Instructor to be arranged by the student. A sophisticated research paper, of at least 25 to 30 pages, is written under the supervision of a faculty sponsor and then defended at a formal oral examination before the sponsor and a second faculty member. A research plan must be prepared prior to the term in which the course is taken and must be approved by both the sponsor and the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST C3841 Independent Senior Thesis In History II. 4 points.

Open to highly qualified senior history majors.

Instructor to be arranged by the student. A sophisticated research paper, of at least 25 to 30 pages, is written under the supervision of a faculty sponsor and then defended at a formal oral examination before the sponsor and a second faculty member. A research plan must be prepared prior to the term in which the course is taken and must be approved by both the sponsor and the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST C4398 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. Field(s): ALL

HIST C4399 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. Field(s): ALL

HIST C4951 Supervised Individual Research I. 4 points.

For students who want to do independent study of topics not covered by normal departmental offerings. The student must find a faculty sponsor and work out a plan of study; a copy should be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST C4952 Supervised Individual Research II. 4 points.

For students who want to do independent study of topics not covered by normal departmental offerings. The student must find a faculty sponsor and work out a plan of study; a copy should be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST C4997 Independent Senior Thesis In History I. 4 points.

Open to highly qualified senior history majors.

Instructor to be arranged by the student. A sophisticated research paper, of at least 25 to 30 pages, is written under the supervision of a faculty sponsor and then defended at a formal oral examination before the sponsor and a second faculty member. A research plan must be prepared prior to the term in which the course is taken and must be approved by both the sponsor and the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST C4998 Independent Senior Thesis In History II. 4 points.

Open to highly qualified senior history majors.

Instructor to be arranged by the student. A sophisticated research paper, of at least 25 to 30 pages, is written under the supervision of a faculty sponsor and then defended at a formal oral examination before the sponsor and a second faculty member. A research plan must be prepared prior to the term in which the course is taken and must be approved by both the sponsor and the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST G8000 US Higher Education: History and Prospects. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

HIST G8001 Archaic Rome. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In addressing issues of general and acknowledged relevance for the study of archaic Rome-from institutions and their interpretation to comparative religious history, from archaeological evidence and its uses to comparative linguistics-the colloquium will invite students to connect them in new and original ways. The colloquium will provide students with the opportunity to work on ancient languages other than Latin and Greek; some time over the semester will be devoted to familiarizing students with Archaic Etruscan Inscriptions and the Umbrian language. Field(s): ANC*

HIST G8063 Captivity. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

            A thematic graduate colloquium that examines the phenomenon of captivity in Western history, from the Biblical Near East to the present day and across Europe and the Mediterranean, Africa, and the Americas. Students will read primary sources (“captivity narratives” and others) alongside secondary scholarship, and produce either an essay based on original research or another suitable final project.

HIST G8117 Knowledge Networks and Information Economies in the Early Modern Period. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

              This course is designed to introduce students to major topics in the developing historical literature on the relationships between intellectual and economic history, centered on Europe’s global reach in the first two centuries after Columbus and Da Gama.

HIST GU4040 Biohistory of the Ancient Mediterranean. 4 points.

We will study the biological standard of living in the ancient Mediterranean with particular reference to the factors that most influenced population growth in the pre-modern world. The class is divided into three parts. To begin, students will explore the human body as historical evidence, learning how to identify evidence of violence and disease in the archaeological and historical records. Next, we will explore the epidemic diseases of antiquity in more detail with special attention given to the three great plagues of the period. Finally, we will consider formal demography and the integration of historical evidence into parametric models of ancient populations.  

Spring 2017: HIST GU4040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4040 001/16150 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
513 Fayerweather
Nathan Pilkington 4 12/15

HIST GU4211 The Sixties Generation in Ukraine and Eastern Europe. 4 points.

Through the analysis of the works and actions of the non-conformist Ukrainian intellectuals of the 1960s, this course aims to assess the importance of the phenomenon of dissent in Eastern Europe for the history of human rights, for the evolution of state socialism, and the for formation of national identities. The Ukrainian case will be discussed in a transnational perspective, underlining cross-border contaminations and international influences in the attempt to uncover the meaning of dissent in the Socialist countries int he second half of the 20th century.

HIST GU4217 Women as Cold War Weapons . 4 points.

Cold War ideological campaigns for the “hearts and minds” abutted “hot war” confrontations between 1945 and 1991, and women engaged with both. This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role of women in the United States as a reflection and enactment of Cold War politics; (ii) to provide an understanding of cultural forces in building ideas in foreign markets; (iii) to reframe the understanding of power as a strategy of United States Cold War battles. To this end, the class will open with a history and examination of women and the traditional narratives of the nation at “wars,” and then continue to explore the political power of women, cultural diplomacy, military operations, and conclude with two case studies. This seminar examines the history of government and private sector mechanisms used to export national ideals by and about women in order to enact American foreign policy agendas in the Cold War. To build their knowledge, students will be asked to parse primary materials in the context of secondary readings. They will do class presentations and present at a conference, and will have the opportunity to discuss their interests with leading scholars of the Cold War. The requirements include significant weekly readings, postings, attendance at discussions, a class presentation, and participation in the class conference at the conclusion of the semester.

Fall 2017: HIST GU4217
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4217 001/27279 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Victoria Phillips 4 17/25

HIST GU4223 Personality and Society in 19th-Century Russia. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A seminar reviewing some of the major works of Russian thought, literature, and memoir literature that trace the emergence of intelligentsia ideologies in 19th- and 20th-century Russia. Focuses on discussion of specific texts and traces the adoption and influence of certain western doctrines in Russia, such as idealism, positivism, utopian socialism, Marxism, and various 20th-century currents of thought. Field(s): MEU

Spring 2017: HIST GU4223
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4223 001/11379 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg
Richard Wortman 4 7/15

HIST GU4233 Reforming Communism - Crafting Capitalism: History of Collectivist Economic Thought and Pr. 4 points.

The course takes an uncommon approach to the history of Eastern Europe and China in the 20th century. Collectivist economic concepts played a crucial role at many stages of communist history, ranging from the utopia of war communism, through Stalinist political economy, all the way down to the doctrines of workers’ self-management and market socialism. They not only aimed at establishing and justifying the planned economy but were also instrumental in reforming it and, ironically, in designing even the capitalist regimes that rose from the ruins of communism. Despite the collapse of the planned economy in Eastern Europe and its radical liberalization in China, the attraction of collectivism did not ebb, and the local varieties of emerging capitalism proved unable to resist illiberal temptations. Applying the notion of the “long 20th century”, the course will start back in the 19th century by discussing the fin de siècle components of collectivist economic thought, and end up with the analysis of hybrid capitalist regimes in the early 21st century. 

Fall 2017: HIST GU4233
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4233 001/13281 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Janos Kovacs 4 11/15

HIST GU4234 Genocides and Holocaust. 4 points.

What were the historical roots of the Holocaust, from early Christian Anti-Judaism to the development of "modern", nationalistic, Social-Darwinist, racist Anti-Semitism?  In this course we will examine the victims (mentally ill persons, homosexuals, Roma, etc.) of the Nazi's eugenic policy........

Spring 2017: HIST GU4234
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4234 001/16699 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Laszlo Karsai 4 4/15

HIST GU4235 Central Asia: Imperial Legacies, New Images. 4 points.

This course is designed to give an overview of the politics and history of the five Central Asian states, including Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan starting from Russian imperial expansion to the present. We will examine the imperial tsarist and Soviet legacies that have profoundly reshaped the regional societies’ and governments’ practices and policies of Islam, gender, nation-state building, democratization, and economic development. Field(s): ME/EA

Fall 2017: HIST GU4235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4235 001/91998 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Gulnar Kendirbai 4 4/15

HIST GU4240 The Cold War in Culture, Cultures of the Cold War. 4 points.

In this course we will read and discuss key contributions to a young and growing field, the history of culture in the Cold War, which includes the cultural history of the Cold War and the history of the cultural Cold War, closely related but analytically distinct categories.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4240
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4240 001/21746 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Tarik Amar 4 13/15

HIST GU4250 The Other Global Village: Cinema under State Socialism. 4 points.

The rise, decline, and fall of the Soviet Union, the first Communist state (and great power), and its postwar sphere of hegemony in Central and Eastern Europe largely coincided with the development and pervasive spread of a defining technology of twentieth-century modernity: film and cinema. Moreover, while Communism in power was always authoritarian, massively violent over substantial periods, and consistently hostile to individual freedom and self-expression for masses as well as cultural elites, many of the classic masterpieces of cinema were produced by artists working under Communist regimes. These regimes were modern and modernizing but illiberal and societies under Communist rule were not open. Yet their film-makers and audiences were never entirely cut off from the rest of the world, quite the opposite: film was an area of human activity and experience in which global interaction, influence, and emulation was woven into as well as constantly tearing at the texture of ideological divides and geopolitical rivalries that shaped the last century. In sum, film offers us a way to learn about the true complexity of a paradoxical century that witnessed two World Wars, one Cold War, and the somehow apparently inexorable shrinking of global imaginary space. In this course, we will not be able to explore all the possibilities offered by film as a quintessential cultural artifact of modernity and we will also not be able to cover films, schools, or countries comprehensively. But we will be able to use film selectively to reflect about the history of Communism (as realized in the former Soviet Union and it client states) and we will use Communism to think about the place of film in modernity. We will watch and discuss select movies and read a sample of texts. Field(s):MEU

Fall 2017: HIST GU4250
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4250 001/19348 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Tarik Amar 4 13/20

HIST GU4253 Ukraine in New York. 4 points.

Ukraine in New York is a multidisciplinary exploration of the Ukrainian-American community in New York City from its beginning in the late 19th century to the present.  The course focuses on the history, demographics, economics, politics, religion, education, and culture of the community, devoting particular attention to the impact thereon of the New York setting, shifting attitudes towards American politics and culture and homeland politics and culture, the tensions encountered in navigating between American, Soviet Ukraine, and independent Ukraine...

Spring 2017: HIST GU4253
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4253 001/24706 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Alexander Motyl 4 2/25

HIST GU4269 Justice after War and Conflict in 20th Century Europe. 4 points.

The so-called 'Second Thirty Years War' in Europe (1914-1945) unleashed an unprecedented amount of brutality and deeply shook the pre-existing social and political hierarchies, transmuting war into a gigantic and diversified set of civil conflicts. If during the war the legal prosecution of enemies was a means of retribution and dissuasion, the post-war period witnessed a number of international and domestic legal purges implemented in order to rehabilitate state authority and to lay the foundations of a new political order. This course examines the forms of both demonstrate and international justice as components of a vast process of nation and state re-building that took place in Europe in the aftermath of the two World wars and as a key point in the formation of anew community of law until the fall of the Mediterranean dictatorships, the post-communist transitions and the dissolution of Yugoslavia. How did the experience of war generate the quest for justice? And how, in turn, did the judicial dramas performed in the trials following the war shape the official memories and foundation myths of post-war regimes? With special emphasis on the long-lasting effects of these procedures upon contemporary political culture and collective memory, we will use a selection of the vast secondary literature on the subject as well as primary sources including legal texts, press releases, essays, fiction, and films.

HIST GU4285 Post-Stalinism: The Soviet Union and Its Successor Societies, 1953-2012. 4 points.

This class focuses on the history of the Soviet Union and Russia between the death of Stalin/the end of totalitarianism and the present. It spans the turning-point date of 1991 when the Soviet Union abolished itself and was replaced by successor states, the most important of which is Russia. Not ending Soviet history with 1991 and not beginning Russian history with it either, we will seek to understand continuities as well as change. We will also draw on a diverse set of texts (and movies), including history, political science, journalism, fiction, and memoirs, feature and documentary movies. Geographically weighted toward Russia (and not the other also important successor states), in terms of content, this class concentrates on politics and society, including, crucially, the economy. These concepts, however, will be understood broadly. To come to grips with key issues in Soviet and Russian history in the historically short period after Stalinist totalitarianism, we will have to pay close attention to not only our analytical categories, but also to the way in which the political and the social have been understood by Soviet and Russian contemporaries. The class will introduce students to crucial questions of Russia's recent past, present, and future: authoritarianism and democratization, the role of the state and that of society, reform and retrenchment, communism and capitalism, and, last but not least, the nature of authority and legitimacy. 

Fall 2017: HIST GU4285
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4285 001/22307 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Tarik Amar 4 17/20

HIST GU4331 Modern Germany, 1900-2000. 4 points.

The development of Germany in the last century has influenced the history of Europe and, indeed, of the world in major and dramatic ways. Most historians agree that the country and its leaders played a crucial role in the outbreak of two world wars which cost some 80 million lives. Germany experienced a revolution in 1918, hyperinflation in 1923, the Great Depression after 1929, and the Nazi dictatorship in 1933. Between 1933 and 1945 there followed the brutal military conquest of most of Continental Europe and, finally, the Holocaust. After 1945, Germany was divided into two halves in which there emerged a communist dictatorship and a Western-style parliamentary-democratic system, respectively. The division of the country ended in 1989 with the collapse of the Honecker regime and the reunification of East and West Germany. No doubt, Germany’s history is confused and confusing and has therefore generated plenty of debate among historians. This course offers a comprehensive analysis of the country’s development in the 20th century. It is not just concerned with political events and military campaigns, but will also examine in considerable detail German society and its changing structures, relations between women and men, trends in both high and popular culture, and the ups and downs of an industrial economy in its global setting. The weekly seminars are designed to introduce you to the country’s conflicted history and the controversies it unleashed in international scholarship. Both M.A. students and advanced undergraduates are welcome.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4331 001/14583 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Volker Berghahn 4 16/18
Fall 2017: HIST GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4331 001/15398 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Volker Berghahn 4 21/22

HIST GU4367 Cities in Britain, its Empire and the World. 4 points.

This seminar provides a history of Britain and its empire from the mid nineteenth century  to the present from the perspective of its cities.  By 1880 London was the largest city in the world, larger than Paris, New York, Tokyo, Beijing and Mexico City combined.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4367
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4367 001/97191 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
602 Northwest Corner
Sam Wetherell 4 17/18

HIST GU4470 Cold War Power. 4 points.

Cold War “soft power” ideological campaigns for the “hearts and minds of men” abutted “hot war” confrontations between 1945 and 1991 and beyond. This seminar examines the history of government and private sector mechanisms used to export national ideals and ideas about America in order to enact foreign policy agendas in contested regions. The class will open with an examination of power - hard and soft - propaganda, "truth," and "informational" practices - and then continue to explore cultural diplomacy. Primary sources including radio broadcasts, music, agriculture, and architecture are examined in the context of secondary readings about the Cold War. Because New York City became postwar “cultural capital of the world,” student trips include the Rockefeller Archives Center, the Museum of Radio and Television, Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts archives, and the Oral History Research Center, Rare Book and Manuscript Library.   This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role of culture as a reflection and enactment of Cold War politics; (ii) to provide an understanding of cultural forces in building ideas in foreign markets; (iii) to reframe the understanding of “soft” and “hard” power as a strategy of Cold War battles.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4470
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4470 001/62097 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Victoria Phillips 4 14/15

HIST GU4531 Nature, Labor, and Capital in the Archives. 4 points.

This course explores the connections between workers, capitalists, and the natural environment.  Individual sessions will examine factory labor and the industrial revolution; slavery, farming, and transportation technologies; the rise of the city, and the growth of labor and environmental movements.  Working with Columbia's Rare Book and Manuscript Library.....

Spring 2017: HIST GU4531
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4531 001/04995 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
657 Butler Library
Thai Jones 4 13/15

HIST GU4532 The American Civil War. 4 points.

Few events in American history can match the significance of the American Civil War and few left a better cache of records for scholars seeking to understand its signal events, actors, and processes. Indeed, between 1861 and 1865, as the war assumed a massive scope it drove a process of state building and state-sponsored slave emancipation in the United States that ultimately reconfigured the nation and remade the terms of political membership in it. This is a research seminar. The course introduces students to key issues and contributions to the literature, and provides an opportunity to undertake independent research on any topic related to the history of the American Civil War. Pedagogically the course pursues a parallel process of reading in the relevant literature and guided research on a topic of the student's choice. The course is designed to model the research and writing process professional historians use, beginning with a paper proposal and bibliography of primary and secondary. sources. It proceeds through the various stages of the research process to produce drafts of the essay and finally the finished essay. All major written work is for peer review. The course fulfills the research requirement for the history major.

Fall 2017: HIST GU4532
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4532 001/73711 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Stephanie McCurry 4 11/15

HIST GU4547 Telling LGBT History. 4 points.

LGBT history is a story that has just begun to be told. By focusing on LGBT history, this course will explore how history gets told to a popular audience. Students will learn the process of telling popular history from gathering archival material, to writing a good story, to presenting it in
books, film/television and museum exhibits. Working directly with artifacts in the archives students will learn how to view artifacts with an eye to raising new questions. Students will meet curators, authors, tour guides and filmmakers who tell LGBT history for a living. Outside of the classroom, students will take a walking tour of LGBT New York and visit the NYPL, the LGBT Community Center National History Archive and the Museum of Sex.
This course will explore the issue of protecting historical landmarks by examining the current battle to preserve the Stonewall Inn. Students will acquire skills in public history and digital history and apply them by contributing to an upcoming exhibit on LGBT history at Columbia. By exploring and telling the history of LGBT at Columbia, students will learn how to tell history in general. And by learning the process of telling history, students will learn how to read history in a whole new way.

HIST GU4584 Drug Policy and Race. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: previous coursework in African-American history or social science; United States social history; or sociomedical sciences required.

Students will gain a solid knowledge and understanding of the health issues facing African Americans since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's heath organization and care; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; sickle cell anemia; and substance abuse. 

HIST GU4696 The Social Question and State Building in Latin America. 4 points.

The social question emerged in Latin America at the end of the nineteenth century as a consequence of the process of modernization and economic expansion of the region, coinciding with processes of state consolidation in the new nations.  In his study of the Chilean system of industrial relations, James Morris defined the social question as "all the social, labor and ideological consequences of emerging industrialization and urbanization...

Spring 2017: HIST GU4696
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4696 001/22696 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Eduardo Zimmermann 4 6/15

HIST GU4704 Sunnis, Shias, and Others. 4 points.

This seminar explores historical formations of religiously-defined identities in Islam. The most commonly known religiously-defined identities in Islamic history are those of Sunnis and Shias (for the sake of convenience, the word Shia is used consistently throughout this course instead of Shi'i or Shiite, etc.). Besides Sunni and Shia, many other religiously-defined identity labels have been and continue to be used in the history of Muslim societies. Sufis, for instance, may identify themselves as either Sunni or Shia: sometimes they are shunned by both Sunnis and Shias. Tens of different Sufi group affiliations, also known as Sufi Brotherhoods are known. Still, there have existed so many other such identity labels that mostly now are forgotten, deemed irrelevant or sometimes subsumed other labels: Salafis, Ismailis, Qadiyanis or Ahmedis, Azalis, Panjpris, Nusayris, Alewis, and ghulat are but few examples of such religiously-defined identities. The notion of "sect" is often used, but the applicability of this term which has strong roots in Christian history to Islamic identities needs clarification. This seminar also examines the modes in which religiously-defined identities may become obsolete or otherwise be rendered insignificant. The historical process of making and unmaking "orthodoxy" is linked with the ways in which various religiously-defined identities may come under a unifying rubric. The notion of Schools of law (maz'habs) and Schools of theology (Mu'tazili, Ash'ari, Maturidi, etc.) is linked with local dynasties, patrician families, community & neighborhood dynamics, etc. The effect of ritual practice, rites of passage, geographical localization, etc is discussed, drawing on primary sources and contemporary studies mostly in history and anthropology. Examples are drawn from the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, Europe, the Americas and elsewhere. The course is divided into three chronologically defined parts: classical (7th-16th centuries), post-classical (17th-19th centuries) and modern (20th century).

Spring 2017: HIST GU4704
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4704 001/07229 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Barnard Hall
Hossein Kamaly 4 6

HIST GU4769 Health and Healing in African History. 4 points.

This course charts the history of health and healing from, as far as is possible, a perspective interior to Africa. It explores changing practices and understandings of disease, etiology, healing and well-being from pre-colonial times through into the post-colonial. A major theme running throughout the course is the relationship between medicine, the body, power and social groups. This is balanced by an examination of the creative ways in which Africans have struggled to compose healthy communities, albeit with varied success, whether in the fifteenth century or the twenty-first. Field(s): AFR

Spring 2017: HIST GU4769
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4769 001/78779 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Rhiannon Stephens 4 12/15

HIST GU4800 Global History of Science. 4 points.

The course is organized around a series of select conceptual and historical topics and themes. We begin with a discussion of how to define “global history” itself, including the genealogy of this and allied terms, and their value as heuristic categories. We then move on to a series of topics, including: the international politics of infrastructure and of development; curing and caring, the environment and the politics of the body in comparative perspective; and finally, debates over international intellectual property rights and questions of secrecy and transparency in scientific research. Through these examples we aim to investigate the ways in which STM were variously adopted, reconfigured or resisted around the world and how they, in turn, might shape our understanding of the different norms and paradigms in STM studies itself. 

Fall 2017: HIST GU4800
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4800 001/13148 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
513 Fayerweather
Marwa Elshakry, Kavita Sivaramakrishnan 4 10/15

HIST GU4811 Encounters with Nature: The History of Environment and Health in South Asia and Beyond. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course offers an understanding of the interdisciplinary field of environmental, health and population history and will discuss historical and policy debates with a cross cutting, comparative relevance: such as the making and subjugation of colonized peoples and natural and disease landscapes under British colonial rule; modernizing states and their interest in development and knowledge and technology building, the movement and migration of populations, and changing place of public health and healing in south Asia. The key aim of the course will be to introduce students to reading and analyzing a range of historical scholarship, and interdisciplinary research on environment, health, medicine and populations in South Asia and to introduce them to an exploration of primary sources for research; and also to probe the challenges posed by archives and sources in these fields. Some of the overarching questions that shape this course are as follows: How have environmental pasts and medical histories been interpreted, debated and what is their contemporary resonance? What have been the encounters (political, intellectual, legal, social and cultural) between the environment, its changing landscapes and state? How have citizens, indigenous communities, and vernacular healers mediated and shaped these encounters and inserted their claims for sustainability, subsistence or survival? How have these changing landscapes shaped norms about bodies, care and beliefs? The course focuses on South Asia but also urges students to think and make linkages beyond regional geographies in examining interconnected ideas and practices in histories of the environment, medicine and health. Topics will therefore include (and students are invited to add to these perspectives and suggest additional discussion themes): colonial and globalized circuits of medical knowledge, with comparative case studies from Africa and East Asia; and the travel and translation of environmental ideas and of medical practices through growing global networks.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4811
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4811 001/77248 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
201a Philosophy Hall
Kavita Sivaramakrishnan 4 9/15

HIST GU4904 WRITING LIVES: A SURVEY OF HISTORICAL APPROACHES AND TECHNIQUES. 4 points.

Ranging from ancient chronicles and saints’ lives to the emergence of modern subjectivity, the rise of the diary, the novel and the bureaucratic questionnaire, this course explores how historians across the ages have written about people’s lives. It asks what has happened to the notion of a life as a moral example, the changing value of ‘experience’ and the ‘ordinary person’, and charts how democracy altered the sense of what was worth recording and commemorating. It draws for its sources on a very wide range of cultures and epochs and concludes by asking the student to conduct their own life history research.

Fall 2017: HIST GU4904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4904 001/88548 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Mark Mazower 4 16/15

HIST GU4984 Hacking the Archive. 4 points.

This is a hands-on, project-driven, Laboratory Seminar that explores the frontiers of historical analysis in the information age.  it harnesses the exponential growth in information resulting from the digitization of older materials and the explosion of "born digital" electronic records........

Spring 2017: HIST GU4984
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4984 001/71999 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Matthew Connelly 4 16/15

HIST OC3152 Byzantine Encounters in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course examines western Europeans' encounters with Constantinople and Byzantine culture after the separation of the "Latin" from the "Greek." We will follow merchants, pilgrims and merchants as they visit, trade with, or march into Constantinople, study the sources they have left recording their impressions and their encounters, and consider what westerners took from Byzantium in the way of art forms, learning, sociopolitical practices, and material artifacts.

HIST Q2900 History of the World to 1450 CE. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement, Discussion Section Required

This course presents and at the same time critiques a narrative world history from prehistoric times to 1500. The purpose of the course is to convey an understanding of how this rapidly growing field of history is being approached at three different levels: the narrative textbook level, the theoretical-conceptual level, and through discussion sections, the research level. All students are required to enroll in a weekly discussion section. Graded work for the course consists of two brief (5 page) papers based on activities in discussion sections as well as a take-home midterm and a final examination. Field(s): *ANC/ME 

HIST Q3008 Wealth and Poverty in the Classical World. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

The seminar will combine cultural with economic history, but with more stress on the former. The aim is to investigate the meaning of being rich and being poor among the Greeks and Romans, that is to say in a pre-industrial society, with special attention to methods of research. We shall discuss among other topics ways of getting rich, contempt for wealth, safety nets, ostentation, consumption choices, bribery, markers of well-being - and money. The time period will extend from Homer to about 250 CE. Field(s): *ANC

HIST Q3010 The Roman World in Late Antiquity. 4 points.

This course explores the social history, cultural and economic history of the Roman Empire in late antiquity.  This period, from 284 to 642 AD, begins with the accession of Diocletian and ends with the Islamic conquest of Egypt.  The course focuses primarily on the eastern half of the Roman Empire, which presents a political unity absent from the western half of the Roman Empire and its successor states in the same period.  It will explore the decline of traditional (pagan) religions and the role of Christianity in this period.  The rise of monasticism; the role of Christian holy men; and the doctrinal disputes that caused internal rifts throughout the Christian world will require special attention.  The course will approach the social history of the city and the countryside through specific case studies: riots in Alexandria and peasant agency in Syria and Egypt.  The course will explore the poetry, rhetoric and philosophy that comprised an important part of elite culture in this period, and also attempt to use chariot racing and the circus factions to access the culture of the masses.  Exploration of economic history will focus on an emerging gap in the field’s historiography between materialists who see the period as one of rising oppression of the peasantry by a profit-driven elite on the one hand and papyrologists who see a risk-averse elite working alongside an entrepreneurial and growing middle class on the other hand.  The semester will close with a study in micro-history, the Roman Egyptian village of Aphrodito, its leading families and its agricultural working classes whose lives are recorded in the documentary papyri.

HIST Q3101 The World We Have Lost: Daily Life in Pre-Modern Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What was daily life like for the "average" European in pre-industrial society? This course will examine the material circumstances of life in Europe from 1400-1800, and will investigate how historians are able to enter into the inner life and mental world of people who lived in past. How did people respond intellectually and emotionally to their material circumstances? The readings and discussions in the course aim to examine such questions, with an eye both to learning about the material conditions of life in pre-modern Europe, and to understanding the techniques by which historians are able to make the imaginative leap back into the mental world of the past. Field(s): *EME

HIST Q3115 Culture, Politics, and the Economy in the Low Countries in the Later Middle Ages. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will examine the relation between a rich and urban elite and artistic creativity during The Low Countries' several and successive ‘Golden Ages'. Therefore, the course will address the Dutch Republic in the seventeenth century, Antwerp and Brabant from c. 1480 to c. 1580, and the southern Low Countries as a whole from c. 1380 to c. 1480. The following questions will be considered: Who were the sponsors, and why did they invest in specific artistic genres? Why did the gravity centers regularly shift to a neighboring region, from south to north? What were the reasons for the dynamics in the system as a whole, which surely also have political dimensions? All these questions will be discussed for the period from the 13th to the 16th-early 17th century, keeping in mind that these patterns may have a more general character. Field(s): EME

HIST Q3223 Personality and Society in 19th-Century Russia. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A seminar reviewing some of the major works of Russian thought, literature, and memoir literature that trace the emergence of intelligentsia ideologies in 19th- and 20th-century Russia. Focuses on discussion of specific texts and traces the adoption and influence of certain western doctrines in Russia, such as idealism, positivism, utopian socialism, Marxism, and various 20th-century currents of thought. Field(s): MEU

HIST Q3227 Empire and Nation: Nationality Issues in the Russian Empire. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This senior seminar deals with nationalist challenges and nationality policies in imperial Russia. Particular emphasis will be placed on the imperial policies vis-à-vis national peripheries (primarily Poland, Ukraine, the Baltic, and Volga region) as well as religious minorities (particularly Jews, Roman Catholics, and Muslims). We will also analyze the relationship between the imperial government and Russian nationalism. The gap between nation and empire in Russia will be considered. The main chronological focus of the seminar is the long nineteenth century, the late eighteenth-the early twentieth centuries. Field(s): MEU

HIST Q3300 Modern Greece. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This is an undergraduate research seminar which will allow students with an interest in the Balkans, eastern Europe and the Ottoman empire to trace in detail the emergence of the independent Greek nation-state in the early 19th century and to draw on contemporary literature and the secondary historiography to evaluate theories of ethnicity, nationalism and state formation. It is open to all students with a background in modern European or Middle Eastern history and covers the period from the mid-18th to the mid-19th centuries.

HIST Q3303 HISTORY OF SOFT POWER IN EUROPE AND THE U.S. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar examines the history of the ambiguous concept "Soft Power," by bringing together literatures in European and U.S. history, international relations, and communications studies that are normally treated in isolation. After thoroughly familiarizing seminar participants with the recent U.S. evolution of the concept and comparing its usage to related terms, such as "normative power," "hegemony," "propaganda," "strategic communication," and "public diplomacy," weekly classes focus on several case studies. These span the period from the 19th to 21st centuries and include Napoleon's Propaganda Wars, France's "Civilizing Mission" in Africa, Germany's Kultur Empire, Wilson versus Lenin, The Nazi-Fascist Effort to coopt Muslim peoples, Vatican Diplomacy and the Holocaust, The Marshall Plan, Soviet Soft Power in Eastern Europe, and U.S. Public Diplomacy in the wake of 9/11. Class requirements include weekly reading, organizing class discussion, and a 15-page research paper to be presented at a final student-organized workshop.

HIST Q3311 European Romanticism. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will introduce students to the manifold expressions of Romanticism in Europe from the late eighteenth century to the late nineteenth century. It is geared both at History majors, particularly but not exclusively those specializing in European Intellectual History and at students interested in the literature and culture of Germany, France, and Graet Britain, as well as brief looks at Romantic writers in Eastern Europe.

HIST Q3371 Europe in International Thought, 1815-1914. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar explores the changing meaning of the term 'Europe" from its emergence as an organizing principle of international life after Napoleon's defeat in 1815 until the end of the First World War.  It aims to combine an exploration of the term's conceptual and intellectual history with a study of its deployment in practice in the realms of diplomacy, international law, and radical politics.  Topics to be covered include: the establishment and transformation of the Concert of Europe; the idea of European civilization, its rise and fall; the international thought of Mazzini, Mill, Marx, Cobden, Burckhardt and Nietzsche among others.

HIST Q3400 Native American History. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to the forces that transformed the aboriginal inhabitants of the Americas into "Indians." The class takes a very broad approach, moving chronologically and thematically from the dawn of time to the present. The course aims to expose students to the diversity of the Native American experience by including all of the inhabitants of the Americas, from Greenland to Tierra del Fuego, within its purview. Group(s): A, D Field(s): *US 

HIST Q3412 Americans and the Good Life, 1750-1910. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Americans have not always agreed about the nature of the good life or about how to achieve it. In this course we focus on a range of compelling writers, among the best in American history, each with a different perspective on what matters and each articulated within a different context. Among the paths to good life examined will be religion, nature, aesthetics or beautify, farming or country life, urban living, untrammeled individual expression, and money and consumption. We begin with the sermons of Jonathan Edwards and end with Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser. In between are works by Benjamin Franklin, Henry Thoreau, Walt Whitman, George Santayana, Liberty Hyde Bailey, Anna Comstock, Charles Cooley, and William James.   Field(s): US

HIST Q3413 Archives and Knowledge. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will examine interdisciplinary approaches to the writing of history using archival material. We will look at how knowledge is organized, stored, described, accessed, and replicated through the use of digital and material objects held in archives. The seminar takes as its point of departure the University of Michigan Sawyer Seminar's conception of archives "not simply as historical repositories but as a complex of structures, processes, and epistemologies situated at a critical point of the intersection between scholarship, cultural practices, politics, and technologies." Among the topics we will explore are how archives and archiving intersect with the production of knowledge, with social memory, and with politics. This is a U.S. history course. While the theoretical approaches we will study are, of necessity, interdisciplinary, the application of them will be to archival material related to U.S. history. This seminar requires participants to commit substantial time outside of class working with unpublished materials in Columbia's Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML) both for reading assignments and as part of a final project. Field(s): US

HIST Q3431 Making the Modern: Bohemia from Paris to Los Angeles. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course interrogates the function of art and artists within modern capitalist societies. We will trace the cultural productions, internal dynamics, and social significance of bohemian communities from their origins in 1840s Paris to turn of the century London and New York to interwar Los Angeles to present day Chicago. Students will conduct research exploring the significance of some aspect of a bohemian community. Field(s): US

HIST Q3434 The Atlantic Slave Trade. 4 points.

This seminar provides an intensive introduction to the history of the Atlantic slave trade. The course will consider the impact of the traffic on Western Europe and the Americas, as well as on Africa, and will give special attention to the experiences of both captives and captors. Assignments include three short papers and a longer research paper of 20 to 25 pages. Field(s): INTL 

HIST Q3485 Politics and Culture in Cold War America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

An examination of the years from the end of World War II to the beginning of the 1960s, focusing on three areas:  the Cold War, the “Affluent Society,” and the “Haunted Fifties,” It includes both works of history and works of literature. Field(s): US

HIST Q3568 The American Landscape to 1877. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Field(s): US

HIST Q3594 American Society, 1776-1861. 0 points.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar examines the transformation of American society from national independence to the Civil War, paying particular attention to changes in agriculture, war, and treaty-making with Indian nations, the rise of waged labor, religious movements, contests over slavery, and the ways print culture revealed and commented on the tensions of the era. The readings include writings of de Tocqueville, Catherine Beecher, and Frederick Douglass, as well as family correspondence, diaries, and fiction. Students will write a 20 page research paper on primary sources. Field(s): US

HIST Q3604 Jews and the City. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Over the course of the nineteenth century, millions of Jews uprooted themselves from their places of birth and moved to cities scattered throughout the world.  This mass urbanization not only created new demographic centers of world Jewry, but also fundamentally transformed Jewish political and cultural life.  In this course, we shall analyze primary source material, literary accounts as well as secondary sources as we examine the Jewish encounter with the city, and see how Jewish culture was shaped by and helped to shape urban culture.  We shall compare Jewish life in six cities spanning from Eastern Europe to the United States and consider how Jews’ concerns molded the urban economy, urban politics, and cosmopolitan culture.  We shall also consider the ways in which urbanization changed everyday Jewish life.  What impact did it have on Jewish economic and religious life?  What role did gender and class play in molding the experiences of Jews in different cities scattered throughout the world?

HIST Q3644 Modern Jewish Intellectual History. 4 points.

This course analyzes Jewish intellectual history from Spinoza to 1939. It tracks the radical transformation that modernity yielded in Jewish life, both in the development of new, self-consciously modern, iterations of Judaism and Jewishness and in the more elusive but equally foundational changes in "traditional" Judaisms. Questions to be addressed include:  the development of the modern concept of "religion" and its effect on the Jews; the origin of the notion of "Judaism" parallel to Christianity, Islam, etc.; the rise of Jewish secularism and of secular Jewish ideologies, especially the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), modern Jewish nationalism, Zionism, Jewish socialism, and Autonomism; the rise of Reform, Modern Orthodox, and Conservative Judaisms; Jewish neo-Romanticism and neo-Kantianism, and Ultra-Orthodoxy. 

HIST Q3645 Spinoza to Sabbatai: Jews in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

A seminar on the historical, political, and cultural developments in the Jewish communities of early-modern Western Europe (1492-1789) with particular emphasis on the transition from medieval to modern patterns. We will study the resettlement of Jews in Western Europe, Jews in the Reformation-era German lands, Italian Jews during the late Renaissance, the rise of Kabbalah, and the beginnings of the quest for civil Emancipation. Field(s): JWS/EME

HIST Q3669 The Dictatorship that Changed Brazil, 1964-1985. 0 points.

This course seeks to analyze the period of military dictatorship in Brazil (1964-1985), supported by many civilians as well. Different conjunctures will be studied, since the years before the coup of 1964 until the process of democratization. The course aims to understand a paradox: the dictatorship was established in the name of democracy, allegedly threatened. The main hypothesis is that the paradox was due to the character of the conservative modernization of society imposed by the military regime and its civilian allies. The dictatorship had ambiguities and distinct phases, involving a complex set of political and military forces. The involvement with the modernization also implied the use of illegitimate brute force against its enemies, which allows to characterize the regime as a dictatorship, in spite of its democratic façade. Special attention will be given to the opponents of the order. The relationship between the dominant and the dominated, even in authoritarian regimes, must be understood not only based on confrontation and repression, but also on negotiation and concessions to the opponents, without which it is impossible to build a base of legitimacy. The topics will be examined in the light of concepts such as conservative modernization (Barrington Moore Jr.), legitimate domination (Weber), hegemony (Gramsci), among others. The course also introduces students to critical interpretations of society and politics produced by Brazilian and Brazilianist historians and social scientists. Field(s): LA

HIST Q3670 Culture and Politics in Brazil, 1960-1989. 4 points.

This course seeks to elucidate the elective affinities between culture and politics in the activities of artists and intellectuals, especially those who opposed the military dictatorship in Brazil. The problem of the identity of the Brazilian people was essential for them. They sought alleged popular roots and wanted to overcome underdevelopment. At the time there was a revolutionary romanticism which involved the utopia of integrating intellectuals with the common man of the people, which could give life to an alternative project of society that was eventually defeated by the military dictatorship (1964-1985). Many artists and intellectuals engaged in the opposition to the regime, in spite of its efforts of modernization, which gave them good job opportunities, in a complex process that involved both dissent and integration to the established order. The lectures will analyze different conjunctures, from the years before the coup of 1964 until the end of the democratization process that was completed with the free elections of 1989. Particularly the decades of 1960 and 1970 were some of the most creative periods of Brazilian culture, including the Cinema Novo, the Teatro de Arena, the Bossa Nova and the Tropicalism. The topics will be examined in the light of concepts such as structures of feeling (Raymond Williams), field (Bourdieu), engagement (Sartre), commodity fetishism and reification (Karl Marx, G. Lukacs, Walter Benjamin, F. Jameson), society of the spectacle (Guy Debord), culture industry (Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer), revolutionary romanticism (Michael Löwy and Robert Sayre), among others. The course also introduces students to critical interpretations of society and culture produced by Brazilian and Brazilianist historians and social scientists.

HIST Q3700 Utopia. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The idea of utopia can be traced across many different periods and places. This seminar explores (imagined or reasoned) conceptions of the perfect society in literary, intellectual, and political texts. The ambiguous character of the utopian ideal holds out the promise of human perfection but also encodes a precariousness that speaks to some inevitable future disorder. Reading across a variety of genres and times, examining this interplay between visions of collective redemption and human suffering allows us to consider the ways in which authors have recorded the ideals and fears of their own political or social orders. It thus examines the very idea, whether historical or "mythical", of human progression or retrogression (understood as the "fall") to examine conceptions of time, history and humanity across numerous discursive traditions. The course will pay special attention to a number of themes and ideals. Among these are: the idea of a "golden age," as exemplified in some of the earliest cosmological and other writings and found in number of "visions of paradise"; the rise of millenarianist movements, ideas of eschatology and apocalypse; the ideal republic, whether as a proper political order or as exemplified through a new epistemic community, or "republic of letters"; the "perfect state," ranging from revolutionary, democratic, anarchist and socialist ones; and, finally, ending finally with modernist visions of dystopia which many of these same ideals would come to inspire. We will read a selection of texts ranging from Hesiod's Works and Days, Plato's Republic, works by Augustine and Farabi, and Thomas More's Utopia to Voltaire's Candide and Marx and Engels's The Communist Manifesto.

HIST Q3714 Modern Arabic History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate seminar course will introduce students to major trends in modern Arabic intellectual history. Drawing on a range of intellectual movements from the 18th century to the present, we will cover such themes as: the history of readers and the role of publics and 'counter-publics' in the Middle east; encounters with Europe, Orientalism and its critics; the impact of liberalism, positivism and colonialism, and, finally, the rise of new discourses around law, science, socialism and religious reform.  We will end by paying special attention to contemporary religious movements, from the Salafiyya reformers to the Muslim Brotherhood and contemporary expressions of the new 'global Islam'. This is a general introductory course: no knowledge of Arabic or previous experience in modern Middle East history is necessary. Students who can work with Arabic of other language sources, however, are encouraged to do so, particularly for their final assignment. Field(s): ME

HIST Q3718 Theories of Islamic History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Unlike European history, which divides into generally agreed upon eras and is structured around a clear narrative of religious and political events from Roman times down to the present, the broad sweep of Islamic and Middle Eastern history appears in quite different lights depending on who is wielding the broom. Theories of Islamic history can embody or conceal political, ethnic, or religious agendas; and no consensus has gained headway among the many writers who have given thought to the issue. The study of theories of Islamic history, therefore, provides a good opportunity for history majors to explore and critique broad conceptual approaches. A seminar devoted to such explorations should be a valuable capstone experience for studnets with a special interest in Islam and the Middle East. One or two works will be read by the entire class each week, and two students will be assigned to lead the discussions of the week's readings. Grades for the course will be based half on class participation and half on a 15-page term paper devoted to a topic approved by the instructor. Field(s): ME

HIST Q3768 Writing Contemporary African History. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

An exploration of the historiography of contemporary (post-1960) Africa, this course asks what African history is, what is unique about it, and what is at stake in its production. Field(s): AFR

HIST Q3858 Islam in India since 1526: Coexistence and Conflict, Gender and Personhood. 4 points.

This course explores five hundred years of the history of Islam and Muslims in India. It is concerned with understanding the many faces of Islam and the many ways of being Muslim in India and how these have changed over time. On one level we will study the connection between Islam and political power in South Asia: the course explores the ruling ideologies of the Mughal Emperors, the different ways in which Muslims responded to the rise of British power on the subcontinent, and the various responses Muslims articulated in response to the introduction of democracy in India. These questions naturally ensure that the course is also concerned the question of how different Muslims interacted with members of other religious groups in India. We will interrogate moments of coexistence and conflict between religious communities to try to understand their origins and nature. At another level, the course is concerned with the changing shape of Muslim lives over the same period. It explores everyday practices of Muslim belief as well as notions of gender, family and personhood, and explores the interplay of these with political, economic and cultural changes over five centuries of history.

HIST Q3865 Vietnam War: History, Media, Memory. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The wars in Vietnam and Indochina as seen in historical scholarship, contemporary media, popular culture and personal recollection. The seminar will consider American, Vietnamese, and international perspectives on the war, paying particular attention to Vietnam as the "first television war" and the importance of media images in shaping popular opinion about the conflict. Group(s): B, C, D

HIST Q3900 Historian's Craft. 4 points.

Intended for history majors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This course raises the issues of the theory and practice of history as a discipline.  Considers different approaches to the study of history and offers an introduction to research and the use of archival collections. Special emphasis on conceptualization of research topics, situating projects historiographically, locating and assessing published and archival sources. Field(s): METHODS

HIST Q3914 The Future as History. 4 points.

An introduction to the historical origins of forecasting, projections, long-range planning, and future scenarios. Topics include apocalyptic ideas and movements, utopias and dystopias, and changing conceptions of time, progress, and decline. A key theme is how relations of power, including understandings of history, have been shaped by expectations of the future. Group(s): ABCD

HIST Q3915 History of Domestic Animals. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will consider the evolution of human-animal relations on a global basis over the entire course of human history.  Student papers will engage specific topics from different times and places. Field(s): INTL

HIST Q3917 Children of the Revolution. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In 1972 the British rock band Tyrannosaurus Rex sang "no, you won't fool the children of the revolution" implying the commitment of the 1968ers to the revolutionary cause; in 1987 David Horowitz, one of the most prominent figures of 1960s radicalism, publicized his regret for belonging to the "destructive generation". What happens to revolutionary movements when the "great steam engine of history" seems not to be heading to the desired destination? Main goal of this course is to explore the transformation of revolutionary generations and the connection between disillusioned radicals and the shaping of political and intellectual trends of the 20th century.

HIST Q3919 History of Public Policy: Diplomacy from the Cold War to the War on Terrorism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

History of changes in the concept and practice of public diplomacy, mainly American. The course focuses on state-coordinated efforts to influence foreign public opinion, examining these against the background of major shifts in U.S. hegemonic strategies since the 1930s. Class topics and readings, drawing on histories, political science, communications theory, are mainly devoted to comparing two periods, the Cold War and the Global War on Terrorism. Class work includes analysis of military-strategic and other primary sources and a research paper to be presented at end-of-the semester workshop. Field(s): INTL

HIST Q3928 Comparative Slavery and Abolition in the Atlantic World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar investigates the experiences of slavery and freedom among African-descended people living and laboring in the various parts of the Atlantic World. The course will trace critical aspects of these two major, interconnected historical phenomena with an eye to how specific cases either manifested or troubled broader trends across various slaveholding societies. The first half of the course addresses the history of slavery and the second half pertains to experiences in emancipation. However, since the abolition of slavery occurs at different moments in various areas of the Atlantic World, the course will adhere to a thematic rather than a chronological structure, in its examination of the multiple avenues to freedom available in various regions. Weekly units will approach major themes relevant to both slavery and emancipation, such as racial epistemologies among slaveowners/employers, labor regimes in slave and free societies, cultural innovations among slave and freed communities, gendered discourses and sexual relations within slave and free communities, and slaves’ and freepeople’s resistance to domination. The goal of this course is to broaden students’ comprehension of the history of slavery and freedom, and to promote an understanding of the transition from slavery to freedom in the Americas as creating both continuities and ruptures in the structure and practices of the various societies concerned. Group(s): ABCD Field(s): US/LA 

HIST Q3931 The Golden Age of Athens. 4 points.

The 5th century BCE, beginning with the Persian Wars, when the Athenians fought off the might of the Persian Empire, and ending with the conclusion of the Peloponnesian War in 404, is generally considered the "Golden Age" of ancient Athens. This is the century when Athenian drama, both tragedy and comedy, throve; when the Greeks began to develop philosophy at Athens, centered around the so-called "Sophistic movement" and Sokrates; when classical Greek art and architecture approached perfection in the monuments and sculptures of the great Athenian building programs on and around the Akropolis. This seminar will cover the political, military, economic, social, and cultural history of Athens' "Golden Age". Much of the course reading will be drawn from the ancient Athenian writing themselves, in translation. Everyone will be required to read enough to participate in weekly discussions; and all students will prepare two oral reports on topics to be determined. The course grade will be based on a ca. 20-25 page research paper to be written on an agreed upon topic. Group(s): A Field(s): *ANC

HIST Q3932 Medieval Society, Politics, and Ethics: Major Texts. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar examines major texts in social and political theory and ethics written in Europe and the Mediterranean region between the fifth and the fifteenth centuries CE.  Students will be assigned background readings to establish historical context, but class discussion will be grounded in close reading and analysis of the medieval sources themselves. Field(s): MED

HIST Q3933 Empires and Cultures of the Early Modern Atlantic World. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course follows historical developments in the Atlantic World-across Western Europe, the Americas, West Africa, and-from the late fifteenth through early nineteenth century. It highlights both the comparative, structural evolutions of European colonial empires and the cultural experiences and perspectives of Atlantic World inhabitants-including soldiers, merchants, slaves, missionaries, and revolutionaries. 

HIST Q3936 Wars within a War: A History of the Second World War in Eastern Europe. 4 points.

Traditionally, the Second World War on the Eastern Front has been analyzed as a military conflict between two behemoths, the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, as well as a battle driven by two personalities, Stalin and Hitler (due to the “Great Man” theory of history). However, since the fall of the Soviet Union and opening up of eastern European archives, a reevaluation of this conflict through the lenses of local populations and local conflicts has begun. Scholars have begun to tackle the complex issues of collaboration/resistance, nationalist uprisings, inter-ethnic conflict, and local internecine struggles that are shot through this larger war. Nowhere are these struggles more apparent than in the lands that make up current-day Ukraine. This seminar will analyze new scholarship on these controversial topics in the Eastern European borderland region, with a focus on Ukraine as the centerpiece. Students will become acquainted with the literature on these topics and learn to think critically not only about how these topics relate to the larger history of the Second World War, but how they influence politics and society in contemporary Eastern Europe.

HIST Q3939 Colonial American History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This reading seminar will examine the history of colonial North America from the sixteenth through mid-eighteenth centuries.  Employing a comparative Atlantic framework to study Spanish, French, Dutch, and English settlements in North America, this course will explore key themes of conflict and community in the societies that developed during this era.  Readings will include some of the most important recent literature in the field and cover topics such as European-indigenous relations, race and slavery, religious culture, and gender construction. This seminar requires two response papers, a final historiographical essay, and class participation, including an oral presentation. Field(s): US

HIST Q3940 The U.S. and Latin America in the Cold War and Beyond: Revolution, Globalization and Power. 4 points.

This course seeks to understand the Cold War and what it meant for the United States, inter-American relations and Latin America during the second half of the twentieth century. The course encourages students to consider to what extent the Cold War is helpful as a way of understanding Latin American nations and people, and their relationships with their Northern neighbor.

HIST Q3941 Jews and Muslims in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines aspects of the history of the Jews in the medieval Islamic world, beginning with the historiographical debate about this contentious subject. The seminar will move from discussion of the early encounter between Islam and the Jews at the time of the Prophet Muhammad, discussing the Qur'an and other foundational texts, to the legal and actual status of the Jews. We will examine how the famous Cairo Geniza documents illuminate Jewish economic life, and how the realities of economic life affected commercial autonomy, with its foundations in the Geonic period. Through a discussion of the problem of adjudication we will address the large problem of how much autonomy the Jews actually had. Comparisons will be drawn with the situation of the Jews in medieval Latin Europe, as well as with Christian communities under Islam. In addition to discussion of secondary readings, classes will focus on the close reading of seminar primary resources in English translation.   Field(s): MED/JEW

HIST Q3942 Constitutions and Democracy in the Middle East. 4 points.

Prerequisites: application requirements: SEE UNDERGRAD SEMINAR SECTION OF DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

Where the establishment of sustainable democracies is concerned, the Middle East has perhaps the poorest record of all regions of the world since World War II. This is in spite of the fact that two of the first constitutions in the non-Western world were established in this region, in the Ottoman Empire in 1876 and in Iran in 1906. Notwithstanding these and other subsequent democratic and constitutional experiments, Middle Eastern countries have been ruled over the past century by some of the world's last absolute monarchies, as well as a variety of other autocratic, military-dominated and dictatorial regimes. This course, intended primarily for advanced undergraduates, explores this paradox. It will examine the evolution of constitutional thought and practice, and how it was embodied in parliamentary and other democratic systems in the Middle East. It will examine not only the two Ottoman constitutional periods of 1876-78 and 1908-18, and that of Iran from 1905 onwards, but also the various precursors to these experiments, and some of their 20th century sequels in the Arab countries, Turkey and Iran. This will involve detailed study of the actual course of several Middle Eastern countries' democratic experiments, of the obstacles they faced, and of their outcomes. Students are expected to take away a sense of the complexities of the problems faced by would-be Middle Eastern democrats and constitutionalists, and of some of the reasons why the Middle East has appeared to be an exception to a global trend towards democratization in the post-Cold War era.

HIST Q3944 Subaltern Studies and Beyond: History and the Archive. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This is an advanced undergraduate seminar course that will retrace the history of the making of the Subaltern Studies problematic, considered a major intervention in both Indian nationalist history and the wider discipline of history itself, with a focus on the relationship between method, archives, and the craft of history writing. Group(s): A, C Fields: *SA

HIST Q3945 World War II. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A global examination of the coming, course, and consequences of World War II from the differing viewpoints of the major belligerents and those affected by them.  Emphasis is not only on critical analysis but also on the craft of history-writing. Group(s): B, C, D Field(s): INTL

HIST Q3946 International Criminal Law: History and Theory. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Many people in our time think some of the highest ethical purposes today were achieved in the struggle to establish the International Criminal Court in 2002, and continue to be at stake in the institution's first steps. Why do people think so, and of what use are the tools of history (assisted by theory) to put this belief in perspective? Answering this question is the main purpose of this course, which presupposes covering the court's origins and several dimensions of its doctrines and workings during its short existence. A main theme is the politics of law, and whether Judith Shklar's brilliant account of legalism is defensible. Field(s): INTL

HIST Q3947 History of the Wheel in Transport. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will address critical turning points in the world history of wheeled transport, starting with the time, place, and rationale for the first appearance of wheels; moving onto the diffusion of wheeled transport to other parts of the world; and thence to the emergence of modern wheeled transport out of technological innovations that became evident in eastern Europe in late medieval times. Student papers may be devoted either to these early historical developments, or to episodes in motor-driven vehicular history from more recent times. Field(s): INTL

HIST Q3949 The Passions: Introduction to the History of Emotions. 4 points.

This course is designed to introduce students to the history of emotions. We look at classical and contemporary philosophy and history as well as art and poetry on “the passions” – defined variously as emotions, feelings, physical or non-rational sensations or states of consciousness or affects. We begin by asking what is an emotion, and by considering the various historical and philosophical responses to that question. We then look at a number of key emotions from a similarly eclectic, episodic historical perspective. Among those we look at are such classic affective states as love, pleasure, pain, compassion, anger, and fear and terror, and the rise of later more contemporary ones like stress and anxiety, paranoia and trauma.

HIST Q3951 Supervised Individual Research I. 4 points.

For students who want to do independent study of topics not covered by normal departmental offerings. The student must find a faculty sponsor and work out a plan of study; a copy should be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST Q3952 Supervised Individual Research II. 4 points.

For students who want to do independent study of topics not covered by normal departmental offerings. The student must find a faculty sponsor and work out a plan of study; a copy should be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.

HIST Q3960 Global Justice in Historical Perspective. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In Anglo-American political philosophy today, "global justice" is a booming field. How did this happen? Where did it come from? This course offers an alternative introduction to the field, assuming that history helps place it in a different perspective. In 1971, John Rawls published his Theory of Justice, which arrived at social principles through abstraction - from the constraints and particularities of body, class, and culture, but taking extant national spaces as fixed architecture. Within a few years, however, some of his own followers challenged this constraint. After 1989, a long-term canon emerged, casting "cosmopolitanism" as long-brewing since the time of the Greeks, running through Immanuel Kant, into our own day. We will revisit this canon as intellectual historians, attempting to reconcile it with the sudden turn to global justice in our own age of globalization.

HIST Q3976 Symbolic Geography: East and West in Modern European Political Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar discusses how frequent changes in European political borders during the 19th and 20th centuries have been reflected in the political thought of the continent. It focuses on 20th century Eastern and Central European interpretations of the regions. Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST Q3977 History, Big and Deep. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will engage in close readings of recent works that attempt to understand human history within broader contexts of natural history, evolution and complexity theory. In addition to looking carefully at the kinds of logic and evidence used in each work, we will also follow these works into broader discussions of the relationship of human history to the natural world, the development and significance of consciousness and human culture, and the relevance of huge scales of time and space to understanding human life.   Field(s): INTL

HIST Q3985 Citizenship, Race, Gender and the Politics of Exclusion. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the surge of increasingly radical political revolutions that crisscrossed the Atlantic beginning with Britain's Glorious Revolution, extending through the US and French Revolutions to the Haitian Revolution and efforts to establish an Irish Republic in the 1790s. These successive revolutions created the first modern republics and the first modern republican citizens. In the process, they raised a host of questions: What rights could the modern citizen claim? Who could claim those rights? Do the rights of citizens war with human rights? As one revolution led to another, the answers to these questions became progressively democratized and radicalized - until Caribbean slaves' bloody assertion of their freedom and independence (the Haitian Revolution) sent a shudder through Europe and the Americas leading to a retreat from the radical inclusionary vision initially espoused by both the American and the French Revolutions. Field(s): INTL 

HIST Q4006 Ancient Political Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is a review of Greek and Roman political theory as it developed through historical events from the Homeric age of Greece to the Augustan principate at Rome. One of the principal contributions of the ancient Greco-Roman civilization to the western tradition is the rich and varied legacy of political theory developed over many centuries. It is the aim of this course to place ancient political theories in their historical contexts. Much ancient political theory can only be recovered from a close analysis of actual practice, since a good deal of ancient writing on the subject is lost. Even in the cases where great works of political theory survive, however, the historical context must always be emphasized. To take an obvious and well known example, much of the difference between Plato?s ideal state in the Republic and that of Aristotle in his Politics is due to the fact that Sparta, the admired and successful model for many of Plato?s ideas in the Republic, had declined into defeat and obscurity by the time Aristotle wrote, and hence was no longer an attractive model for political theorists. It is a truism, no doubt, that political theory can only be fully grasped and understood within a historical context: this course will apply that truism, and also the reverse notion that theory influences practice and hence history.

HIST Q4020 Roman Imperialism. 3 points.

How did the Roman Empire grow so large and last so long? This course will examine the origins of the Romans' drive to expand, the theory of "defensive" imperialism, economic aspects, Roman techniques of control, questions about acculturation and resistance, and the reasons why the empire eventually collapsed.   Field(s): ANC

HIST Q4026 Roman Social History. 3 points.

Social structure, class, slavery and manumission, social mobility, life expectation, status and behavior of women, Romanization, town and country, social organizations, education and literacy, philanthropy, amusements in the Roman Empire, 70 B.C. - 250 A.D. Field(s): *ANC

HIST Q4488 Warfare in the Modern World. 3 points.

This course is a survey of the transformation of warfare between the American Civil War and 1945. Emphasis will be placed on military strategy, weaponry, and leadership.

HIST Q4923 Narratives of World War II. 4 points.

An examination of literary and cinematic narratives of the Second World War produced in the decades since 1940 in Europe, America, and Asia. The analytic approach centers both on the historicity of, and the history in, the texts, with the goal of questioning the nature of narrative in different forms through a blend of literary and historical approaches.

HIST UN1002 Ancient History of Mesopotamia and Asia Minor. 3 points.

A survey of the political and cultural history of Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran from prehistory to the disappearance of the cuneiform documentation, with special emphasis on Mesopotamia. Groups(s): A

HIST UN1010 The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.. 4 points.

A review of the history of the Greek world from the beginnings of Greek archaic culture around 800 B.C., through the classical and hellenistic periods to the definitive Roman conquest in 146 B.C., with concentration on political history, but attention also to social and cultural developments.Field(s): ANC

Fall 2017: HIST UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1010 001/27406 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
417 Mathematics Building
Richard Billows 4 52/60

HIST UN1020 The Romans, 754 BC to 565 AD. 3 points.

Rome and its empire, from the beginning to late antiquity. Field(s): ANC

Spring 2017: HIST UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1020 001/68000 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
207 Mathematics Building
Nathan Pilkington 3 90/150

HIST UN2004 The Mediterranean World After Alexander the Great. 4 points.

The conquests of Alexander the Great spread Greek Civilization all around the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East. This course will examine the Hellenised (greek-based) urban society of the empires of the Hellenistic era (ca. 330-30BCE).

Spring 2017: HIST UN2004
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2004 001/29005 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Fayerweather
Richard Billows 4 28/60

HIST UN2026 Roman Social History. 3 points.

Social structure, class, slavery and manumission, social mobility, life expectation, status and behavior of women, Romanization, town and country, social organizations, education and literacy, philanthropy, amusements in the Roman Empire, 70 B.C. - 250 A.D. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2026
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2026 001/61896 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
703 Hamilton Hall
William Harris 3 24/40

HIST UN2049 Colonizers & Colonized: Violence, Resistance, and Cooperation. 4 points.

The course is a general introduction to colonization and its consequences in the Ancient Mediterranean. Special attention will be given to the populations who experiences and often resisted Phoenician, Greek, and Roman colonization.

HIST UN2072 Daily Life in Medieval Europe. 4 points.

This course is designed as traveller’s guide to medieval Europe. Its purpose is to provide a window to a long-lost world that provided the foundation of modern institutions and that continues to inspire the modern collective artistic and literary imagination with its own particularities. This course will not be a conventional history course concentrating on the grand narratives in the economic, social and political domains but rather intend to explore the day-to-day lives of the inhabitants, and attempts to have a glimpse of their mindset, their emotional spectrum, their convictions, prejudices, fears and hopes. It will be at once a historical, sociological and anthropological study of one of the most inspiring ages of European civilization. Subjects to be covered will include the birth and childhood, domestic life, sex and marriage, craftsmen and artisans, agricultural work, food and diet, the religious devotion, sickness and its cures, death, after death (purgatory and the apparitions), travelling, merchants and trades, inside the nobles’ castle, the Christian cosmos, and medieval technology. The lectures will be accompanied by maps, images of illuminated manuscripts and of medieval objects. Students will be required to attend a weekly discussion section to discuss the medieval texts bearing on that week’s subject. The written course assignment will be a midterm, final and two short papers, one an analysis of a medieval text and a second an analysis of a modern text on the Middle Ages. 

HIST UN2100 Early Modern Europe: Print and Society. 4 points.

Standing at the intersection of the religious, cultural, and scientific upheavals within early modern Europe, the study of print and its intersection with culture allows students to learn how shifts in technology (much like those we are witnessing today) affect every aspect of society. This course will examine the signal cultural, political, and religious developments in early modern Western Europe, using the introduction and dissemination of printed materials as a fulcrum and entry point. From the sixteenth century Europeans were confronted with a technological revolution whose cultural consequences were incalculable and whose closest parallel might be the age of electronic information technology in our own day. From the Reformation of Luther, to the libelles of pre-revolutionary France, from unlocking the mysteries of the human body to those of the heavens, from humanist culture to the arrival of the novel, no important aspect of European culture in the sixteen- through eighteenth centuries can be understood without factoring in the role of print: its technology, its marketing and distribution channels, and its creation of new readers and new "republics." This course will examine key political, religious, and cultural movements in early modern western European history through the prism of print culture.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2100 001/23268 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
834 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Elisheva Carlebach 4 18/30

HIST UN2112 The Scientific Revolution in Western Europe: 1500-1750. 4 points.

Introduction to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of the upheavals of astronomy, anatomy, mathematics, alchemy from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Field(s): EME

HIST UN2133 Britain and the World Since World War II. 4 points.

This course is a history of Britain and its relationship with the wider world since World War II. We will be discussing the chaotic and violent end of Britain’s empire, the transformation of international politics through institutions such as the UN and Britain’s fraught relationship with Europe. Along the way we will cover the rise and fall of Britain’s welfare state, the transformation of its cities, the new communities and political allegiances formed by mass migration and the new ideas about gender, race, sexuality and youth culture that were formed during these decades. We will also study some of the music, film, literature and architecture produced during this turbulent period. 

HIST UN2211 Introduction to Ukrainian History: Nation and Identity. 4 points.

This course will offer an introduction to Ukrainian history from 1800 to contemporaneity. The course will analyze how different political actors conceived the Ukrainian nation and imagined a Ukrainian state. The lectures will emphasize the importance of transnational contamination in the emergence of Ukrainian national culture in the last two centuries and will encourage students to think of national belonging in a more critical way.

HIST UN2213 Early Russian History (to 1800). 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must register for corequisite discussion section HIST UN2214

Early Russian History is the first semester of a full-year survey of Russian history; the second semester, Modern Russian History (Since 1800), will be offered in 2017-18. (Each may also be taken independently.) During this semester, we will first look at societies in the Black Sea region and Eurasian plain – their formation, evolution, and sometimes demise – until the emergence of an early modern empire centered in Moscow. The history of the Russian Empire proper begins with the conquest of the Khanate of Kazan in 1552, and culminates in the modern European empire of Peter I and Catherine II. We will examine, in turn, the Black Sea civilizations of antiquity and the medieval age; the Mongol Empire and its westernmost projection, the Golden Horde; the city of Moscow and the Muscovite Empire (15th –17th centuries) over which it presided; and, finally, the new imperial capital of St. Petersburg and the monarchs, the empire, the foreign policy and society of the eighteenth century. We will pay special attention to religion, cultural interaction, myth, monarchy, empire – all themes essential to current historical scholarship.

Spring 2017: HIST UN2213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2213 001/17298 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
301m Fayerweather
Catherine Evtuhov 4 12/35

HIST UN2215 MODERN RUSSIAN HISTORY (SINCE 1800). 4 points.

An introductory survey of the history of Russia, the Russian Empire, and the Soviet Union over the last two centuries. Russia’s role on the European continent, intellectual movements, unfree labor and emancipation, economic growth and social change, and finally the great revolutions of 1905 and 1917 define the “long nineteenth century.” The second half of the course turns to the tumultuous twentieth century: cultural experiments of the 1920s, Stalinism, World War II, and the new society of the Khrushchev and Brezhnev years. Finally, a look at very recent history since the East European revolutions of 1989-91. This is primarily a course on the domestic history of Russia and the USSR, but with some attention to foreign policy and Russia’s role in the world.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2215
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2215 001/25281 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
415 Schapiro Cepser
Catherine Evtuhov 4 29/35

HIST UN2234 Dictators and Dictatorships in 20th Century Europe, 1900-1946. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Corequisite discussion HIST UN2335

In this course we focus on the origins and causes of dictatorship, beginning with the consequences of the Great War.  How do dictatorships and authoritarian regimes compare and contrast in the East and West of Europe?  To what extent can we trace the origins of leftist, Marxist-Leninist-Stalinist dictatorship and those of the right-wing (fascist and Nazi) dictatorships back to the 19th century philosophical and ideological antecedents?

HIST UN2314 Modern France and its Empire: 1789-present. 3 points.

This lecture course surveys the main currents of French history from the Revolution to the present, with particular attention to the interaction between continental France and the rest of the empire. Throughout this course, the main questions will be: to what extent has the French Revolution served as point of political and cultural reference throughout the 19th and 20th centuries? Who is a citizen? And how has the response to this question been impacted by imperial developments? What is French Republicanism? And how to understand it in the imperial context? What have been the relations between political, social, economic and cultural developments? How have continental conflicts and World Wars impacted French history? How have the post WWII interrelated processes of decolonization, immigration and building of Europe deeply impacted contemporary France? We will tackle these questions by reading primary sources: works of political philosophy; literature; film; legal documents; and memoirs from the time, and by watching films.

HIST UN2336 Everyday Communism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Coreq discussion section HIST UN2237

This course surveys communism as an idea, political regime, and everyday experience in territories of today's Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, east Germany, Rumania and Balkan countries.  The stress is on social, gender, and economic politics that shaped lived experiences of central and eastern Europeans since the Eurasian revolution of 1905 until the waning of the socialist project in the 1970s and 1980s........

Spring 2017: HIST UN2336
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2336 001/78246 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Malgorzata Mazurek 4 19/50

HIST UN2360 Twentieth Century Britain: Between Democracy and Empire. 4 points.

This course surveys the main currents of British history from 1900 to the present, with particular attention to the changing place of Britain in the world and the changing shape of politics. Throughout this course will will ask:Where is power located in Britain and its empire? What held Britain and the empire together and what tore them apart? What was life like for Britons young and old, men and women, rich and poor, white and black - across the course of this century? When and how did social change happen? How did people respond?

Spring 2017: HIST UN2360
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2360 001/92396 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
633 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Susan Pedersen 4 44/75

HIST UN2377 INTERNATIONAL & GLOBAL HISTORY SINCE WWII. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

In this course students will explore contemporary international and global history, focusing on how states have cooperated and competed in the Cold War, decolonization, and regional crises. But lectures will also analyze how non-governmental organizations, cross-border migration, new means of communication, and global markets are transforming the international system as a whole. Group(s): B, C, D Field(s): INTL

Spring 2017: HIST UN2377
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2377 001/65295 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Matthew Connelly 4 70/120

HIST UN2444 The Vietnam War. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: Register for discussion section HIST UN2445

This lecture course examines the origins, evolution, and conclusion of the Vietnam War, a war whose history and legacy continues to be debated today. Rather than view the war as an event in American history, this course will examine the war from a multitude of perspectives by analyzing primary documents, dissecting novels and memoirs, screening war films, and drawing from the rich historiography of that war. Throughout this course, we will ask questions that continue to elicit fierce debate: What brought the United States and Vietnam to war? What impact did the war have on North Vietnamese, South Vietnamese, and American politics? How did decisions made in the corridors of power on both sides of the Pacific affect every day people on the battlefronts and homefronts? Why did it end the way it did? What lessons can we draw from the Vietnam War? Participation in weekly discussion sections, which will begin no later than the third week of classes, staffed by TAs or by the instructor, is mandatory. In addition, we will have course-wide screenings for the films, but they are also on reserve in Butler Media Reserves. You can view them in the library provided you do so before the section discussion. 

Spring 2017: HIST UN2444
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2444 001/81547 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
227 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Lien-Hang Nguyen 4 31/48

HIST UN2447 America, 1918-1945: Prosperity, Depression, and War. 4 points.

This course examines one of the most turbulent periods in modern American history: an era that began with the Great War, saw the nation in both its greatest economic boom and its worst economic collapse, led to another, even more catastrophic world war, and ended with the United States as the most powerful nation in the world. This course will provide students an understanding of how Americans navigated these major events and shaped the following developments that created the American experience as we might know it: the rise of the modern federal state in the New Deal; the transformation of work and business from the Roaring Twenties to the Great Depression and beyond; the crisis of democracy at home and abroad; the rise of the civil rights movement; and the foreign policy struggle between isolationism and internationalism. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2447
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2447 001/13279 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
428 Pupin Laboratories
Jarod Roll 4 33/90

HIST UN2478 U.S. Intellectual History, 1865 To the Present. 3 points.

This course examines major themes in U.S. intellectual history since the Civil War. Among other topics, we will examine the public role of intellectuals; the modern liberal-progressive tradition and its radical and conservative critics; the uneasy status of religion ina secular culture; cultural radicalism and feminism; critiques of corporate capitalism and consumer culture; the response of intellectuals to hot and cold wars, the Great Depression, and the upheavals of the 1960s. Fields(s): US

Fall 2017: HIST UN2478
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2478 001/76474 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
301 Pupin Laboratories
Casey Blake 3 84/120

HIST UN2488 Warfare in the Modern World. 4 points.

This course is a survey of the transformation of warfare between the American Civil War and 1945. Emphasis will be placed on military strategy, weaponry, and leadership.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2488
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2488 001/73441 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Kenneth Jackson 4 70/90

HIST UN2490 US FOREIGN RELATIONS 1775-1920. 4 points.

Between 1775 and 1920 the US grew from a disparate set of colonies nestled along the eastern seaboard of North America to a sprawling empire that stretched across the continent and projected its influence into the wider world. In this course we will examine this transformation and evaluate the major trends in US foreign relations that drove it. We will comparatively analyze the competing visions for expansion advocated by various groups inside the US and the impact of expansion on peoples outside the growing nation. We will explore the domestic, economic, intellectual, and political origins of expansionism, survey the methods used to extend the nation's borders and influence, and evaluate the impact of these changes on the nation's values, institutions and history. Lectures and readings will introduce a variety of historical controversies and conflicting interpretations, which students will be expected to analyze critically in writing and discussions.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2490 001/70616 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Paul Chamberlin 4 38/49

HIST UN2491 U.S. Foreign Relations, 1890-1990. 3 points.

The aim is to provide an empirical grasp of U.S. foreign relations and to put in question the historiographical views of the periods and critical events that have come up to make that history. Emphasis will be put on determining how "the United States" has been grasped in relation to the world and how historiography has in turn grasped that retrospectively. Group(s): D Field(s): US

Spring 2017: HIST UN2491
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2491 001/27312 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
310 Fayerweather
Paul Chamberlin 3 59/70

HIST UN2523 History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Through assigned readings and a group research project, students will gain familiarity with a range of historical and social science problems at the intersection of ethnic/racial/sexual formations, technological networks, and health politics since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's health organization and care; HIV/AIDS politics, policy, and community response; "benign neglect"; urban renewal and gentrification; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; and environmental justice. There are no required qualifications for enrollment, although students will find the material more accessible if they have had previous coursework experience in United States history, pre-health professional (pre-med, pre-nursing, or pre-public health), African-American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies. 

HIST UN2533 US Lesbian and Gay History. 4 points.

This course explores the social, cultural, and political history of lesbians, gay men, and other socially constituted sexual and gender minorities, primarily in the twentieth century.  Since the production and regulation of queer life has always been intimately linked to the production and policing of “normal” sexuality and gender, we will also pay attention to the shifting boundaries of normative sexuality, especially heterosexuality, as well as other developments in American history that shaped gay life, such as the Second World War, Cold War, urbanization, and the minority rights revolution.  Themes include the emergence of homosexuality and heterosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the changing relationship between homosexuality and transgenderism; the development of diverse lesbian and gay subcultures and their representation in popular culture; the sources of antigay hostility; religion and sexual science; generational change and everyday life; AIDS; and gay, antigay, feminist, and queer movements.      

Fall 2017: HIST UN2533
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2533 001/67191 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
702 Hamilton Hall
George Chauncey 4 47/70

HIST UN2555 America in Depression and War. 4 points.

This lecture examines the transforming effect of two cataclysmic events in the twentieth century.  We will study the ways in which both the Great Depression and World War II led to a major reordering of American politics and society.  By focusing on how the government and the country dealt with these national crises, we will explore a significant moment in the evolution of American political culture. Throughout the semester, we will examine how ordinary people experienced depression and war and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them. Topics include unemployment and economic decline, the rise of organized labor, New Deal politics, women in the war effort, the Japanese internment, the development of atomic science, and America as a world superpower.

Spring 2017: HIST UN2555
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2555 001/10941 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Meg Jacobs 4 94/150

HIST UN2580 THE HISTORY OF UNITED STATES RELATIONS WITH EAST ASIA. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This lecture course examines the history of the relationship between the United States and the countries of East Asia in the 19th and 20th centuries. The first half of the course will examine the factors drove the United States to acquire territorial possessions in Asia, to vie for a seat at the imperial table at China’s expense, and to eventual confrontation with Japan over mastery in the Pacific from the turn of the century leading to the Second World War. The second half of the course will explore the impact of U.S. policy toward East Asia during the Cold War when Washington’s policy of containment, which included nation-building, development schemes, and waging war, came up against East Asia’s struggles for decolonization, revolution, and modernization.  Not only will this course focus on state-to-state relations, it will also address a multitude of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese perspectives on the United States and American culture through translated text, oral history, fiction, and memoir.


Participation in weekly discussion sections, which will begin no later than the third week of classes, is mandatory. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2580
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2580 001/67348 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
633 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Lien-Hang Nguyen 4 55/60

HIST UN2587 Sport & Society in the Americas. 4 points.

This course explores the ways organized sport constitutes and disrupts dominant understandings of nation, race, gender, and sexuality throughout the Americas. Working from the notion that sport is “more than a game,” the class will examine the social, cultural and political impact of sports in a variety of American contexts in the past and present. While our primary geographic focus will be the United States, Brazil, and the Caribbean, the thrust of the course encourages students to consider sports in local, national, and transnational contexts.  The guiding questions of the course are: What is the relationship between sport and society? How does sport inform political struggles within and across national borders? How does sport reinforce and/or challenge social hierarchies? Can sport provide visions of alternative conceptions of the self and community? Throughout the semester, we will examine such topics as: the continuing political struggles surrounding mega-events such as the Olympics and World Cup, the role of professional baseball in the rise and fall of Jim Crow segregation, the contradictory impact of high school football in Texas, the centrality of tennis to the women’s movement in the United States, and the role of sports in the growth of the city of Los Angeles. Course materials include works by historians, sociologists, social theorists, and journalists who have also been key contributors to the burgeoning field of sports studies. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2587
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2587 001/28082 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Frank Guridy 4 52/70

HIST UN2611 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity. 4 points.

  Field(s): ANC

Fall 2017: HIST UN2611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2611 001/16806 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
302 Fayerweather
Seth Schwartz 4 9/30

HIST UN2618 The Modern Caribbean. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This lecture course examines the social, cultural, and political history of the islands of the Caribbean Sea and the coastal regions of Central and South America that collectively form the Caribbean region, from Amerindian settlement, through the era of European imperialism and African enslavement, to the period of socialist revolution and independence. The course will examine historical trajectories of colonialism, slavery, and labor regimes; post-emancipation experiences and migration; radical insurgencies and anti-colonial movements; and intersections of race, culture, and neocolonialism. It will also investigate the production of national, creole, and transborder indentities. Formerly listed as "The Caribbean in the 19th and 20th centuries". Field(s): LAC 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2618
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2618 001/73027 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
310 Fayerweather
Natasha Lightfoot 4 69/90

HIST UN2657 Medieval Jewish Cultures. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will survey some of the major historical, cultural, intellectual and social developments among Jews from the fourth century CE through the fifteenth. We will study Jewish cultures from the Christianization of the Roman Empire, the age of the Talmuds, the rise of Islam, the world of the Geniza, medieval Spain, to the early modern period. We will look at a rich variety of primary texts and images, including mosaics, poems, prayers, polemics, and personal letters. Field(s): JEW/MED 

HIST UN2660 Latin American Civilization I. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from pre-Columbian times to 1810. Global Core Approved.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2660
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2660 001/20976 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
209 Havemeyer Hall
Caterina Pizzigoni 4 81/90

HIST UN2661 Modern Latin American History (Latin American Civilization II). 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Explores major themes in Latin American history from the independence period to the present. It will trace economic, political, intellectual, and cultural trends. Particular attention will be given to the enduring issue of social and racial inequality and the ways that the interactions of dominant and subordinate groups have helped shape the course of Latin American history.

HIST UN2663 Mexico From Revolution To Democracy. 4 points.

Twentieth-Century Mexican History from the revolution to transition  to democracy. The Course review politics, society, culture, foreign relations, and urbanization. Group(s): D Field(s): LA

Spring 2017: HIST UN2663
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2663 001/28004 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Pablo Piccato 4 29/60

HIST UN2711 African History since 1800. 4 points.

This class examines the history of the African continent from the Atlantic Slave trade (c. 1800) to the present, focusing in particular on the social, political, and religious changes and continuities that have shaped the continent over the course of the past three centuries.....

Spring 2017: HIST UN2711
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2711 001/87896 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
301m Fayerweather
John Straussberger 4 17/30

HIST UN2719 History of the Modern Middle East. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6998 version of this course.

This course will cover the history of the Middle East from the 18th century until the present, examining the region ranging from Morocco to Iran and including the Ottoman Empire. It will focus on transformations in the states of the region, external intervention, and the emergence of modern nation-states, as well as aspects of social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the region. Field(s): ME

Fall 2017: HIST UN2719
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2719 001/63433 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
417 International Affairs Bldg
Rashid Khalidi 4 175/210

HIST UN2764 History of East Africa: Early Time to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of East African history over the past two millennia with a focus on political and social change. Themes include early religious and political ideas, the rise of states on the Swahili coast and between the Great Lakes, slavery, colonialism, and social and cultural developments in the 20th century.  This course fulfills the Global Core requirement. Field(s): AFR  

Fall 2017: HIST UN2764
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2764 001/26645 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
633 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Rhiannon Stephens 3 36/60

HIST UN2811 South Asia: Empire and Its Aftermath. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: None.

(No prerequisite.) We begin with the rise and fall of the Mughal Empire, and examine why and how the East India Company came to rule India in the eighteenth century. As the term progresses, we will investigate the objectives of British colonial rule in India and we will explore the nature of colonial modernity. The course then turns to a discussion of anti-colonial sentiment, both in the form of outright revolt, and critiques by early nationalists. This is followed by a discussion of Gandhi, his thought and his leadership of the nationalist movement. Finally, the course explores the partition of British India in 1947, examining the long-term consequences of the process of partition for the states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. We will focus in particular on the flowing themes: non-Western state formation; debates about whether British rule impoverished India; the structure and ideology of anti-colonial thought; identity formation and its connection to political, economic and cultural structures. The class relies extensively on primary texts, and aims to expose students to multiple historiographical perspectives for understanding South Asia's past.

Spring 2017: HIST UN2811
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2811 001/08898 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
405 Milbank Hall
Anupama Rao 4 58/103

HIST UN2905 Transport History by Land and Sea. 4 points.

The social, economic, and technological history of transportation by land and water from the invention of the wheel and the sail down to the invention of the hoverboard.
This course explores the ways in which surface transport systems, for both goods and people, have affected political, social, and economic organization from prehistoric times until
today

HIST UN2909 World War I as Global Crucible. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The First World War has often been thought of as a European War, but it was fought on four continents and reverberated around the world.  This course examines the global nature and impact of the war, paying particular attention to the way it destabilized or affected imperial, national, and ethnic/racial solidarities and hierarchies, and ushered in new transnational norms, hazards, movements and practices.  Students will read selected recent historical work and analyze a wide array of primary materials:  diplomatic treaties and records; collective petitions or claims; combatants’ diaries; observers’ accounts; recruitment posters; war poetry and memorials.  

HIST UN2948 Capitalism in Crisis: A Global History of the Great Recession. 4 points.

The Financial Crisis that struck the United States and Europe in 2007 is the most severe in history. We are still living with its fall out. This course will explore the history of the crisis and the political reaction to it. We will explore how the crisis radiated out from the Atlantic economy where it originated to the rest of the world economy.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2948
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2948 001/86546 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
209 Havemeyer Hall
Adam Tooze 4 68/90

HIST UN3020 Roman Imperialism. 3 points.

How did the Roman Empire grow so large and last so long? This course will examine the origins of the Romans' drive to expand, the theory of "defensive" imperialism, economic aspects, Roman techniques of control, questions about acculturation and resistance, and the reasons why the empire eventually collapsed.   Field(s): ANC

HIST UN3061 ISLAM AND EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES. 4 points.

This course explores the encounter between Europe, broadly conceived, and the Islamic world in the period from the seventh to the thirteenth centuries.  While the Latin Christian military expeditions that began in the late eleventh century known as the Crusades are part of this story, they are not the focus.  The course stresses instead the range of diplomatic, commercial, intellectual, artistic, religious, and military interactions established well before the Crusades across a wide geographical expanse, with focal points in Iberia and Southern Italy.  Substantial readings in primary sources in translation are supplemented with recent scholarship.  [Students will be assigned on average 150-200 pages of reading per week, depending on the difficulty of the primary sources; we will read primary sources every week.]

Fall 2017: HIST UN3061
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3061 001/11346 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Adam Kosto 4 11/15

HIST UN3104 Family, Sexuality & Marriage in Pre-Modern Europe. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This course examines the meaning of marriage in European culture from the early Middle Ages until the eighteenth century, concentrating on the period from 1200 to 1800. It begins with a study of Jewish and Christian teachings about marriage – the nature of the conjugal bond, the roles of men and women within marriage, and marital sexuality. It traces changes in that narrative over the centuries, analyzes its relationship to actual practice among various social groups, and ends in the eighteenth century with an examination of the ideology of the companionate marriage of modern western culture and its relation to class formation. Group(s): A Field(s): EME

Spring 2017: HIST UN3104
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3104 001/21399 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Martha Howell 4 5/15

HIST UN3111 The Environmental History of the Ancient Mediterranean, 800 BC to 700 AD. 4 points.

The study of the ancient Mediterranean environment – the material world in which the Greeks and Romans and their neighbors lived – has been making rapid strides in recent years.  The aim of this course is to offer an overview of the impact of a flourishing pre-modern society on its natural environment, and of the ways in which people reacted to environmental challenges. We shall talk about natural resources – water, wood, land, minerals -- and about the sea and the mountains, also about diet, health and pollution, and of course about the climate. We will consider the profound problems of combining historical and scientific methods in the study of a past environment. 

HIST UN3120 Censorship and Freedom of Expression in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

In this course we will examine theoretical and historical developments that framed the notions of censorship and free expression in early modern Europe. In the last two decades, the role of censorship has become one of the significant elements in discussions of early modern culture. The history of printing and of the book, of the rise national-political cultures and their projections of control, religious wars and denominational schisms are some of the factors that intensified debate over the free circulation of ideas and speech. Indexes, Inquisition, Star Chamber, book burnings and beheadings have been the subjects of an ever growing body of scholarship. Field(s): EME

Spring 2017: HIST UN3120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3120 001/29583 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Elisheva Carlebach 4 12/15

HIST UN3152 Byzantine Encounters in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This seminar examines Middle Eastern and Latin Western encounters with Byzantine society and culture, focusing on the 6th-15th centuries. When merchants, pilgrims, scholars, diplomats, and soldiers visited the lands of the Greek-Christian-Roman empire of the Eastern Mediterranean (today called Byzantium), what did they see? And what did the rest of the world look like to the Byzantines? We will study primary sources left by medieval Greeks, Arabs, Latins, and others, critically examining the hermeneutical acts involved in each cultural encounter, in order to probe the meaning and significance of these encounters in western Eurasian society and culture. Interested students can apply to take the seminar here:  https://goo.gl/forms/ECk3ISsoghel2Enf2

Spring 2017: HIST UN3152
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3152 001/61999 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
306 Hamilton Hall
Alexandre Roberts 4 15/15

HIST UN3189 Composing the Self in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

This course explores manners of conceiving and being a self in early modern Europe (ca. 1400-1800). Through the analysis of a range of sources, from autobiographical writings to a selection of theological, philosophical, artistic, and literary works, we will address the concept of personhood as a lens through which to analyze topics such as the valorization of interiority, the formation of mechanist and sensationalist philosophies of selfhood, and, more generally, the human person's relationship with material and existential goods. This approach is intended to deepen and complicate our understanding of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and other movements around which histories of the early modern period have typically been narrated. 

Spring 2017: HIST UN3189
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3189 001/23661 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Charly Coleman 4 11/12

HIST UN3213 The Russian revolution: 100 years later. 4 points.

An in-depth reading of the revolutionary year, February 1917-January 1918. While the two Russian revolutions of 1917 unquestionably form part of a broader “continuum of crisis,” from World War I through the Civil War and possibly even beyond, our class in this centenary year will focus on the details of these critical twelve months. What happened in 1917? How do decisions and actions in a certain specific short period of time bring about monumental transformations in one society and eventually the world? Beginning with a reconstruction and analysis of revolutionary events in February and October, we will then branch out to examine crucial themes and interconnections, revolutionary antecedents, and current and past interpretations of Russian society in revolution. The class will include a fresh look at classic works on revolutions more generally, and will also incorporate new methodologies such as the history of emotions, with special attention to memoir literature and other primary sources. The dispersal of the Constituent Assembly in January 1918 marks the end of this particular story.   

Spring 2017: HIST UN3213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3213 001/65957 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Catherine Evtuhov 4 11/15

HIST UN3233 From Liberalism to Illiberalism? Economic Ideas and Institutions in Central and Eastern Eu. 4 points.

In Central and Eastern Europe liberalism was just one of the major streams of thought in the 19th century, and illiberalism is only one of the doctrines yearning for dominance today. What happened between the two cannot be squeezed into a –  Spenglerian – story of the “decline of the East” because liberal ideas had a triumphant comeback in the Western half of the region in the middle of the 20th century and in its Eastern half before and after 1989. Following the rise of liberal economic thought and practice in the region throughout the 19th century, Central and Eastern Europe chose blatantly anti-liberal (totalitarian) roads of development, national socialism and/or communism for many decades. After World War II, countries that found themselves on the Western side of the Iron Curtain managed to leave these roads, and develop a variety of models relying on the doctrine of Soziale Marktwirtschaft. When in 1989, countries on its Eastern side followed suit, they started flirting with more radical sorts of liberalism than most of their Western neighbors, to return to the concept of social market economy, or to slide back to soft varieties of illiberalism recently.


The course will present some of the leading economic ideas and institutions in the context of cultural encounters between the East and the West. A special emphasis will be laid on frictions between the dominant discourses of the two parties. In Central and Eastern Europe both liberalism and socialism had their powerful national(ist) versions, socialism was offset by communism, conservativism fraternized with state collectivism, and the takeover of Western concepts was often simulated rather than real.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3233
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3233 001/79279 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Janos Kovacs 4 11/15

HIST UN3305 The European Enlightenment. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will include an in-depth examination of some major tinkers and texts of the French, Germans, and Scottish Enlightenments. By reading works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Lessing, Mendelssohn, and Hume, we will examine their radically divergent responses to the central intellectual quandries of their day, and in many ways our own: the realtionship between rationalism, science, and faith; religion and the state; the individual and the polity; cosmopolitanism and particularism; pluralism and relativism; and the meaning of liberty. Group(s): A, B

Spring 2017: HIST UN3305
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3305 001/18908 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Charly Coleman 4 10/12

HIST UN3306 The Women's Suffrage Movement in Britain: Politics, Performance, Personhood. 4 points.

The British women’s suffrage movement was one of the significant and dramatic social movements of modern times.  Tens of thousands of women joined suffrage organizations and took part in suffrage activism in the decade before World War I, some of them adopting what were known as “militant” tactics of public disturbance and property damage, and of the hunger-strike in prison.  The suffrage question and the spectacle of militancy preoccupied politicians, divided parties, friends and families, mesmerized the public and the press, and utterly transformed the lives of the women who became caught up in it.  The movement spawned novels, plays, and artistic works of all kinds; it fostered new political theories and practices; it created new identities and new psychological orientations.  Historians to this day argue over its meanings and legacies.

HIST UN3308 Living the British Empire: Texts and Contexts. 4 points.

This course is part of a project to build a new lecture course for the global core on the history of the British Empire, with particular attention to the way that empire shaped and continues to shape our world.

HIST UN3326 History of Ireland, 1700-2000. 4 points.

This seminar provides an introduction to key debates and historical writing in Irish history from 1700.  Topics include:  the character of Ascendancy Ireland; the 1798 rising and the Act of Union; the causes and consequences of the famine; emigration and Fenianism; the Home Rule movement; the Gaelic revival; the Easter Rising and the civil war; politics and culture in the Free State; the Northern Ireland problem; Ireland, the European Union, and the birth of the “celtic tiger”.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3326
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3326 001/23582 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Susan Pedersen 4 11/15

HIST UN3335 20th Century New York City History. 4 points.

This course explores critical areas of New York's economic development in the 20th century, with a view to understanding the rise, fall and resurgence of this world capital. Discussions also focus on the social and political significance of these shifts. Assignments include primary sources, secondary readings, film viewings, trips, and archival research. Students use original sources as part of their investigation of New York City industries for a 20-page research paper. An annotated bibliography is also required. Students are asked to give a weekly update on research progress, and share information regarding useful archives and websites.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3335
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3335 001/17439 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
406 International Affairs Bldg
Kenneth Jackson 4 20/20

HIST UN3357 History of the Self. 4 points.

This course is one of a series on the history of the modern self. The works of Montaigne, Pascal, Rousseau, Tocqueville, or another Enlightenment thinker are critically examined in a seminar setting.


Fall 2017 the topic is Tocqueville.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3357
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3357 001/21646 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Mark Lilla 4 14/15

HIST UN3401 Does American Poverty Have a History?. 4 points.

In most societies, some are rich and many more are poor.  So it has been through most recorded history – and so it remains in the United States, where an estimated 43 million Americans are living in poverty as you read this.  The project of our seminar will be to construct a history of America’s poor as vivid and precise as the histories that have long been written of the wealthy and the powerful.  We will look at the experiences of being poor and at changes in the processes of falling into and climbing out of poverty.  We will look at changes in the population of the poor, changes in the economic organization of cities and the countryside, and changes in the general distribution of wealth.  We will look at ideas of poverty and their impact on history.  And we will look, finally, at changes in the treatment of the poor: from charity to modern welfare policies.  At semester’s end, students will be able to interrogate the enduring presence of American poverty in light of its history and transformations.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3401 001/77996 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Christopher Florio 4 19/20

HIST UN3410 Food and Inequality in the Twentieth-Century U.S.. 4 points.

This seminar examines the social, cultural, and political history of inequality in the food system of the twentieth- century United States, from field to table. We trace the rise and expansion of industrial farming and food processing, and the commercialization of food preparation, looking at the ways racism, gender, class, immigration, empire, and globalization have shaped the political economy of American food. This course also investigates the intersection of agriculture, migration, and U.S. capitalism in the food system, and asks why modern food work has been marked by precarious working and living conditions. It provides a detailed knowledge of U.S. labor, immigration, agricultural, and political history in the twentieth century, with a focus on gender and racial disparity. Upon completion of the course, students will have a complex understanding of the history of the U.S. food system, which will allow them to engage broadly with different areas of American history, including the emergent history of capitalism, labor and immigration history, and environmental history. The course will also enable critical engagement with contemporary food movement issues, food planning, farm policy, and activist initiatives against the inequalities that continue to haunt our fields, packinghouses, and kitchens. The semester will culminate in a final paper that concentrates on one of the course themes and develops historical writing skills across the course of the semester. A strong base of knowledge about the history of the U.S. in the twentieth century is useful, but not prerequisite for the course.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3410
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3410 001/67498 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Lindsey Dayton 4 13/15

HIST UN3418 American Futures in the Progressive Era . 4 points.

Seminar covers ideas about “progress” in the United States, 1880-1917, and explores different visions for the American future, concerning race, immigration, wealth distribution, gender, and state power. We will read a different thinker each week and, throughout the semester, consider if and how these visions of the American future came to be. 

HIST UN3437 Poisoned Worlds: Corporate Behavior and Public Health. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

In the decades since the publication of Silent Spring and the rise of the environmental movement, public awareness of the impact of industrial products on human health has grown enormously. There is growing concern over BPA, lead, PCBs, asbestos, and synthetic materials that make up the world around us. This course will focus on environmental history, industrial and labor history as well as on how twentieth century consumer culture shapes popular and professional understanding of disease. Throughout the term the class will trace the historical transformation of the origins of disease through primary sources such as documents gathered in lawsuits, and medical and public health literature. Students will be asked to evaluate historical debates about the causes of modern epidemics of cancer, heart disease, lead poisoning, asbestos-related illnesses and other chronic conditions. They will also consider where responsibility for these new concerns lies, particularly as they have emerged in law suits. Together, we will explore the rise of modern environmental movement in the last 75 years. 

Spring 2017: HIST UN3437
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3437 001/15313 T 8:10am - 10:00am
311 Fayerweather
David Rosner 4 13/12

HIST UN3490 The Global Cold War. 4 points.

The superpower competition between the US and the USSR dominated international affairs during the second half of the twentieth century. Though this Cold War was born from ideological differences and initially focused on Europe, it soon became entangled with the concurrent global process of decolonization. In this way, the US-Soviet rivalry shaped events on every continent. This course will examine the intersection of the superpower competition and the emergence of the postcolonial world. Through course readings and class discussion, students will examine the global dimensions of the Cold war. Each student will prepare a research paper on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3490 001/77292 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Paul Chamberlin 4 15/15

HIST UN3500 John Jay & the American Revolution. 4 points.

This seminar explores themes from the American Revolution that pertain to the career of John Jay (King’s College class of 1764 and first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court). Themes will include: law and diplomacy, the American Enlightenment, slavery and abolition, women in the Revolution, Spain and the American West, the Constitution and the Supreme Court, early-national politics, and the “Jay Treaty” of 1795. Each student will write a research paper on a related topic over the course of the semester.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3500 001/23752 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
502 Northwest Corner
Benjamin Lyons 4 7/15

HIST UN3516 US Labor History. 4 points.

This course examines American labor and working-class history from the early Republic to the 1990s, with a particular focus on how worker responses to economic change have shaped American social, political, and cultural history more broadly. Our discussions will cover a range of topics, including a comparison of free and unfree labor in the antebellum period, the rise of factory work and wage labor, the emergence of labor unions and radical political parties, the relationship between organized labor and the state, the impact of globalization, the disruptive role of technology, and the persistence of working-class conservatism. Throughout we will pay close attention to how differences of gender, race, and region have shaped the ideas and actions of American workers, both in cooperation and competition with one another, as those workers influenced the history of the United States. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN3516
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3516 001/11032 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Jarod Roll 4 11/15

HIST UN3518 Columbia and Slavery. 4 points.

In this course, students will write original, independent papers of around 25 pages, based on research in both primary and secondary sources, on an aspect of the relationship between Columbia College and its colonial predecessor King's College, with the institution of slavery.

Spring 2017: HIST UN3518
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3518 001/72198 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Karl Jacoby 4 12/18

HIST UN3553 Slavery and Finance in Nineteenth Century America. 4 points.

This research seminar exposes students to selected readings in the history of slavery and finance in the United States, from the American Revolution to the end of the nineteenth century.  The course explores the crucial roles of slavery and finance for the economic growth of the United States.......

Spring 2017: HIST UN3553
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3553 001/28779 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Manuel Bautista Gonzalez 4 9/15

HIST UN3577 Culture and Politics in the Progressive Era, 1890-1945. 4 points.

This class begins during the fabled "Gilded Age," when the nation's capitalist expansion created the world's largest economy but splintered Americans' ideals. From the fin-de-siècle through the cataclysms of World War II, we will explore how Americans defined, contested, and performed different meanings of American civilization through social reform movements, artistic expressions, and the everyday habits and customs of individuals and groups. The class will pay particular attention to how gender, race, and location--regional, international, and along the class ladder--shaped perspectives about what constituted American civilization and the national discourse about what it should become. Field(s): US

Fall 2017: HIST UN3577
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3577 001/16526 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 8/15

HIST UN3595 American Consumer Culture. 4 points.

This seminar examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the “good life” through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Spring 2017: HIST UN3595
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3595 001/72043 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Meg Jacobs 4 16/15

HIST UN3603 An International and Global History of Jewish Migration Across the Long Twentieth Century,. 4 points.

Over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, millions of Jews in Eastern Europe – home to the largest Jewish community in the nineteenth century -- uprooted themselves from their places of birth and settled in new homes around the world.  This mass migration not only transformed the cultural and demographic centers of world Jewry, but also fundamentally changed the way in which Jews defined their communities and expressed their interests.  At the same time, as the Ottoman empire In this course, we shall analyze primary source material, literary accounts as well as secondary sources as we try to make sense of the different factors shaping East European Jewish immigrants’ experiences in the Americas.  We begin by looking at Jewish life in nineteenth-century Eastern Europe.  During the nineteenth century, numerous factors – such as economic modernization, secularization, repressive tsarist legislations, and the rise of new Jewish ideologies – transformed Jewish life in Eastern Europe and prompted thousands of Jews to leave their homes and seek their fortunes elsewhere.  As East European Jews spread throughout the world, they formed new communities in the Europe, the United States, Argentina and Asia, which we shall examine from the perspective of social, political, and cultural history.  In what ways did migration change East European Jews’ daily life?  What impact did the divergent socio-economic contexts have on Jewish immigrant economic and religious life?  What role did gender, class and ideology play in molding the experiences of East European Jewish immigrants in different parts of the world? The objective of this course, however, is not just to learn the history of immigrant Jews in these regions. Rather, we will aim to ask questions about what it means to be a Jew living in the United States – the mythic “promised land” -- and Latin America -- an area with an often unsettled modern history that for centuries served as a European colonial outpost and a Catholic stronghold.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3603
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3603 001/73250 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Rebecca Kobrin 4 6/8

HIST UN3645 Spinoza to Sabbatai: Jews in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

A seminar on the historical, political, and cultural developments in the Jewish communities of early-modern Western Europe (1492-1789) with particular emphasis on the transition from medieval to modern patterns. We will study the resettlement of Jews in Western Europe, Jews in the Reformation-era German lands, Italian Jews during the late Renaissance, the rise of Kabbalah, and the beginnings of the quest for civil Emancipation. Field(s): JWS/EME

HIST UN3687 LAT AMER RIGHT IN THE COLD WAR. 4 points.

The historical literature on the nature of international fascism and the transition of fascist ideologies into the Cold War era has been expanding rapidly in recent years, spanning over multiple intellectual debates...


This course sets out to provide the analytic tools for debating the rise of Latin America's post-fascism during the 1960s and 1970s....

Spring 2017: HIST UN3687
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3687 001/81496 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Daniel Kressel 4 15/15

HIST UN3708 TOPICS IN OTTOMAN HISTORY, 1300-1700. 4 points.

This seminar is designed to familiarize students with key issues and debates regarding the historiography of the early modern Ottoman world. Given the wide scope of topics, regions, and chronology that may fall under the study of the early modern Ottoman world, the thematic and temporal outlook of this seminar will be highly selective and greater precedence will be given to the burgeoning field of Ottoman cultural, intellectual, and environmental history. Each week we will discuss a particular theme, revise the current state of scholarship on the relevant topic, and reflect upon a type of primary source for the study of concerning issues. Topics to be covered include the history and historiography of Ottoman foundations, politics of religion and confessionalization, legal culture and pluralism, changing patterns in sociability and cultural life, the relationship between environment and imperial expansion, production and circulation of scientific knowledge, institutions and mechanisms of learning, readers and reading practices in manuscript culture.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3708
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3708 001/67249 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
308a Lewisohn Hall
Tunc Sen 4 0/15

HIST UN3739 The Islamic City. 4 points.

The seminar will examine several “Islamic” cities in depth, focusing on critical moments in their histories. The approach will help us acquire a good knowledge of these centers and enable us to highlight their dynamic histories, thereby demystifying their images frozen in a particular period. More specifically, Damascus will not be constrained to the early medieval period, but will be investigated for its Greco-Roman history, the Ottoman interventions in the pre-modern period, the nineteenth-century transformations, and the French planning experiments under the Mandate. Istanbul will not be presented only as a sixteenth-century capital, but will be scrutinized in terms of its transformation from a Byzantine fabric into an Ottoman one, as well as a pioneering experiment in nineteenth-century modernization reforms. Situating urban forms, “the tangible substance, the stuff” of cities, at the center of our discussions, we will investigate political, social, cultural, and economic factors that framed their formation, as well as the subsequent effects the cities made on these webs—both waves working in a continuous dynamic. The seminar will begin by a critical reading of the theories on the “Islamic” city, developed as a rigid formula during the colonial era, and their deconstruction by recent scholarship.

HIST UN3753 Istanbul: Places, People, and Everyday Life. 4 points.

The Seminar will open several perspectives into the Ottoman capital Istanbul, following a cross-disciplinary approach. The premise is that Istanbul’s multi-layered, socially complicated, and culturally rich historic fabric can be understood well in focused episodes. Selected episodes will hence constitute the weekly discussion topics. Ranging from the representation of the city in artistic productions to the construction of the skyline, the impact of modernizing reforms on urban forms, everyday life in public and private spaces, and the decisive role played by new educational and cultural institutions, these fragments will complement each other, coalescing into a complex overall picture. While the chronological frame is defined by the long nineteenth century, critical earlier phases will be covered as well and parallels will be drawn to present-day. The nineteenth century marks a dynamic and radical era of urban transformations, intertwined with key political, economic, social, and cultural turns that redefined the Ottoman Empire in many ways. It also corresponds to an intense period of international communication and transaction, resulting in a “connected world of empires.” Istanbul served as a major stage for these developments. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN3753
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3753 001/23320 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Zeynep Celik 4 13/15

HIST UN3766 African Futures. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The premise of the course is that Africa's collective past - that which has emerged since the ending of the Atlantic slave trade - might usefully be thought of as a sequence of futures that were imperfectly realized.  Those "futures past" represent once-fixed points on the temporal horizon, points toward which African political leaders and intellectuals sought to move, or towards which they were compelled by the external actors who have historically played an outsized role in the continent's affairs.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3766
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3766 001/88529 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Gregory Mann 4 3/15

HIST UN3767 African Migration Since 1900. 4 points.

Recent representations of African migration have focused on refugees and “third world” migrants coming to the “first world.” This course argues that more recent manifestation of migration to, from, and within Africa draw from previous forms and networks of mobility. The First half of the course focuses on forms of pre-colonial, colonial, and imperial migration, considering the Atlantic and Indian Ocean networks before 1800 as well as the relationship between the colonial economy, labor, and migration up to independence in the 1960s. In its second half, we will focus on the history of African migration since independence, and in particular the history of African communities in the United States. Assigned readings emphasize approaching African migration from the perspective of Africans themselves, using life histories and first-hand accounts to chart the paths African migrants have taken over the past century. In doing so, it emphasizes internal African migration and its connection to global forms of migration, as well as the social and cultural effects of mobility and diaspora. Students will be evaluated by series of written and oral assignments, culminating in a research project on African migrants living in the United States.

HIST UN3779 Africa and France. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: reading knowledge of French is highly encouraged.

This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current ‘memory wars’ in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa. Group(s): B, C Field(s): AFR, MEU

Spring 2017: HIST UN3779
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3779 001/63448 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Gregory Mann 4 21/15

HIST UN3789 Histories of Poverty in Africa. 4 points.

In this course we will explore in a critical manner the concept of poverty in Africa. The emphasis is on historicizing categories such as poverty and wealth, debt and charity and on the ways in which people in Africa have understood such categories. As such the course takes a longue durée approach spanning over a millennium of history, ending with contemporary understandings of poverty. 

HIST UN3796 Global Health in Africa. 4 points.

This course will examine changing ideas of health and disease in Africa as a subject of transnational concern, debate, and cause for action in the 20th century.  We will study how global health campaigns and institutions translated in specific African contexts and simultaneously how experiences of disease and medicine in African contexts shaped global concerns.  This course will take both a chronological and thematic approach, providing students with an overview of changing social, political and economic conditions that have impacted understandings of disease burden and health interventions in Africa over time. Topics of study will include colonial medical campaigns, disease eradication programs, international medical research, and postcolonial health systems.  We will use specific regional and national examples, while also connecting these examples to broader developments in African history.  At the same time, students in this course will interrogate how ‘Africa’ has functioned as a category within global health.  The final weeks of the course will consider contemporary health issues in Africa and ask how historical perspectives can inform our analysis.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3796
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3796 001/72195 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Sarah Runcie 4 9/15

HIST UN3807 Walking In and Out of the Archive. 4 points.

The seminar seeks to engage with a set of methodological concerns about the practices and probabilities of archives and history writing. It does so via close readings of key historical texts which engage and rearrange the documentary furniture of the archives, from both within and without. The concerns can be broadly articulated as: How statist is the mainstream archives, and how have historians attempted to mine and undermine it? With what apertures and techniques and disciplinary practices to capture the lives and deaths of those who produce goods and services, not documents? What is meant by ‘Historical Fieldwork’, and what are some of the ways in which historians have practiced it, whether writing about well-archived events, or the longue duree of a single village. What transpires when oral tales are written up from within the same cultural milieu as literary stories? What are the peculiarities of Oral History? And what have some of the best Oral Historians been able to accomplish? These questions will guide us through a set of important historiographic works, writings on archives, community histories. The students will develop a close appreciation of the challenges of doing and thinking historically from the margins and listening to the small voices in history.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3807
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3807 001/78441 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Shahid Amin 4 6/15

HIST UN3838 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/27001 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Elizabeth Blackmar 4 13/15
HIST 3838 002/26289 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Matthew Connelly 4 12/15
HIST 3838 003/14755 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Marwa Elshakry 4 13/15

HIST UN3839 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. Field(s): ALL

Spring 2017: HIST UN3839
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3839 001/18822 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Elisheva Carlebach 4 10/10
HIST 3839 002/67187 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 Fayerweather
Adam Kosto 4 11/10
HIST 3839 003/73607 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
208 Casa Hispanica
Natasha Lightfoot 4 10/10

HIST UN3911 Medicine and Western Civilization. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors, but other majors are welcome.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar seeks to analyze the ways by which medicine and culture combine to shape our values and traditions. To this end, it will examine notable literary, medical, and social texts from classical antiquity to the present.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3911
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3911 001/76278 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
David Rothman, Rose Bailey 4 17/22

HIST UN3930 The Eastern Mediterranean in the Late Bronze Age. 4 points.

This course presents a comparative study of the histories of Egypt, the Near East, Anatolia and the Aegean world in the period from c. 1500-1100 BC, when several of the states provide a rich set of textual and archaeological data. It will focus on the region as a system with numerous participants whose histories will be studied in an international context. The course is a seminar: students are asked to investigate a topic (e.g., diplomacy, kingship, aspects of the economy, etc.) in several of the states involved and present their research in class and as a paper.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3930 001/24974 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 1/15

HIST UN3938 Americans and the Natural World, 1800 to the Present. 4 points.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar deals with how Americans have treated and understood the natural world, connected or failed to connect to it, since 1800. It focuses on changing context over time, from the agrarian period to industrialization, followed by the rise of the suburban and hyper-technological landscape. We will trace the shift from natural history to evolutionary biology, give special attention to the American interest in entomology, ornithology, and botany, examine the quest to save pristine spaces, and read from the works of Buffon, Humboldt, Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Darwin, Aldo Leopold, Nabokov, among others. Perspectives on naming, classifying, ordering, and most especially, collecting, will come under scrutiny.  Throughout the semester we will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the environmentalist movement, confront those who thought they could defy nature, transcend it, and even live without it. Field(s): US

Spring 2017: HIST UN3938
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3938 001/61050 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
William Leach 4 2/12
Fall 2017: HIST UN3938
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3938 001/25669 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
William Leach 4 3/15

HIST UN3942 Constitutions and Democracy in the Middle East. 4 points.

Prerequisites: application requirements: SEE UNDERGRAD SEMINAR SECTION OF DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

Where the establishment of sustainable democracies is concerned, the Middle East has perhaps the poorest record of all regions of the world since World War II. This is in spite of the fact that two of the first constitutions in the non-Western world were established in this region, in the Ottoman Empire in 1876 and in Iran in 1906. Notwithstanding these and other subsequent democratic and constitutional experiments, Middle Eastern countries have been ruled over the past century by some of the world's last absolute monarchies, as well as a variety of other autocratic, military-dominated and dictatorial regimes. This course, intended primarily for advanced undergraduates, explores this paradox. It will examine the evolution of constitutional thought and practice, and how it was embodied in parliamentary and other democratic systems in the Middle East. It will examine not only the two Ottoman constitutional periods of 1876-78 and 1908-18, and that of Iran from 1905 onwards, but also the various precursors to these experiments, and some of their 20th century sequels in the Arab countries, Turkey and Iran. This will involve detailed study of the actual course of several Middle Eastern countries' democratic experiments, of the obstacles they faced, and of their outcomes. Students are expected to take away a sense of the complexities of the problems faced by would-be Middle Eastern democrats and constitutionalists, and of some of the reasons why the Middle East has appeared to be an exception to a global trend towards democratization in the post-Cold War era.

HIST UN3962 Technology, Work, and Capitalism: A History. 4 points.

In recent years, public conversations about the relationship between technology and work seem to have been conducted with particular fervor: claims of revolutionary ease and freedom sit side-by-side with dystopian visions of exploitation, surveillance, and growing alienation.  Will technological development lead to widespread deskilling or a new "sharing economy"?  Will it enrich the few at the expense of the many or bring general prosperity?  Are Uber, Etsy, and Amazon vanguards of an ideal future or harbingers of doom?

Spring 2017: HIST UN3962
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3962 001/66300 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Whitney Laemmli 4 16/15

HIST W1002 Ancient History of Mesopotamia and Asia Minor. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of the political and cultural history of Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran from prehistory to the disappearance of the cuneiform documentation, with special emphasis on Mesopotamia. Groups(s): A

HIST W1004 Ancient History of Egypt. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of the history of ancient Egypt from the first appearance of the state to the conquest of the country by Alexander of Macedon, with emphasis of the political history, but also with attention to the cultural, social, and economic developments. Group(s): A Field(s): *ANC

HIST W1054 Introduction to Byzantine History. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course is an introduction to one of the great medieval empires of western Eurasia, the Eastern Roman or ‘Byzantine’ Empire, from the 4th to the 15th century. Lectures will provide (1) an overview of Byzantine political, social, economic, and cultural history; and (2) exposure to the types of primary sources and approaches which historians use to reconstruct that history. Discussion sections will focus on readings in primary sources in order to provide a hands-on understanding of aspects of the material covered in lectures, but also to problematize it. The mid-term and final examinations will test students’ familiarity with and ability to think critically about Byzantine historical sources and history. The two papers will each develop an original thesis about Byzantine history based on a primary source. [Two lectures and one discussion section per week.]

HIST W1061 Introduction to the Early Middle Ages: 250-1050. 3 points.

This course surveys the history of the Mediterranean world and northern Europe from the Late Roman Empire to the eleventh century. We will begin (Part 1) by considering the interconnected Roman world of Late Antiquity, focusing on the changes brought about by Christianity. The second half (Part 2) will trace the emergence of new religious and political communities around the Mediterranean and in Northern Europe. Special attention will be given to the circulation of people, products and ideas across Europe and the Mediterranean and the changes that this brought about.   This course emphasizes the diverse but fragmentary textual and material evidence that survives from the period and the problems of interpreting this evidence. Students will begin acquiring the skills of a historian and learn why and how other historians have studied the period. No previous background in medieval history is required.

HIST W1600 The Jews, from Babylonia to Bloomberg. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

This undergraduate lecture course will introduce students to the broad sweep of Jewish history, from 600 BCE to the present. The focus will be on politics, society and culture, with particular attention to the interplay and tension between integration and separation, and such metahistorical questions as whether it is valid to posit a continuous Jewish history at all.

HIST W2024 Decline and Fall of the Roman Republic 133-23 BCE. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An investigation of the political, economic and cultural development in Rome that resulted in its political transformation from an oligarchy (the so-called "Republic") to a monarchy (the so-called "Empire"). Field(s): *ANC

HIST W2060 Laws of War in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

The perception and regulation of war and wartime practices in Europe and the Mediterranean World in the period 300-1500, from the standpoint of legal and institutional history rather than of military history. Topics include: the Just War tradition, Holy War and Crusade, the Peace and Truce of God, prisoners and ransom, the law of siege, non-combatants, chivalry, and ambassadors and diplomacy. Readings are principally primary sources in translation.

HIST W2072 Once Upon a Time: Daily Life in Medieval Europe. 4 points.

This course is designed as traveller’s guide to medieval Europe. Its purpose is to provide a window to a long-lost world that provided the foundation of modern institutions and that continues to inspire the modern collective artistic and literary imagination with its own particularities. This course will not be a conventional history course concentrating on the grand narratives in the economic, social and political domains but rather intend to explore the day-to-day lives of the inhabitants, and attempts to have a glimpse of their mindset, their emotional spectrum, their convictions, prejudices, fears and hopes. It will be at once a historical, sociological and anthropological study of one of the most inspiring ages of European civilization. Subjects to be covered will include the birth and childhood, domestic life, sex and marriage, craftsmen and artisans, agricultural work, food and diet, the religious devotion, sickness and its cures, death, after death (purgatory and the apparitions), travelling, merchants and trades, inside the nobles’ castle, the Christian cosmos, and medieval technology. The lectures will be accompanied by maps, images of illuminated manuscripts and of medieval objects. Students will be required to attend a weekly discussion section to discuss the medieval texts bearing on that week’s subject. The written course assignment will be a midterm, final and two short papers, one an analysis of a medieval text and a second an analysis of a modern text on the Middle Ages. 

HIST W2103 Alchemy, Magic & Science. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Astrology, alchemy, and magic were central components of an educated person's view of the world in early modern Europe. How did these activities become marginalized, while a new philosophy (what we would now call empirical science) came to dominate the discourse of rationality? Through primary and secondary readings, this course examines these "occult" disciplines in relation to the rise of modern science. Group(s): A Field(s): *EME

HIST W2112 The Scientific Revolution in Western Europe: 1500-1750. 4 points.

Introduction to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of the upheavals of astronomy, anatomy, mathematics, alchemy from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Field(s): EME

HIST W2160 Empires and Cultures of the Atlantic World. 3 points.

This course follows interconnected historical developments in Western Europe, the Americas, and West Africa from the late fifteenth through early nineteenth century. It highlights both the comparative, structural evolutions of European colonial empires and the cultural experiences and perspectives of Atlantic World inhabitants, including soldiers, merchants, slaves, missionaries, and revolutionaries.

HIST W2190 England and the Wider World. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course traces the history of English overseas expansion, and its consequences for the history of the British Isles, from early Atlantic exploration in the sixteenth century through the era of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars. Themes include the relationship between empire and state formation, the place of international rivalry in the formation of imperial ambitions, the character and dimensions of transoceanic trading networks, and the place of empire in the construction of British national identity. Group(s): B Field(s): EME

HIST W2200 Mass Violence in the Borderlands, 1914-1991. 3 points.

During the twentieth century, Eastern European borderland populations were devastated by episodes of mass violence during wars, revolutions, and even peacetime. The course focuses on this violence in four phases: the First World War and revolutions; the inter-war period; the Second World War; and the post-war period. Some of these episodes include pogroms, the Famine, deportations, terrorism, ethnic cleansing, and genocide. After the First World War, as imperial empires dissolved and new nation-states emerged, a conflagration of violence swept through the borderlands causing further instability and civil war. While some of these interwar states provided a modicum of stability, the growth of nationalism, as well as support for fascism and communism, brought new volatility to the region. The most dramatic and violent changes during the inter-war period and Second World War were a result of Nazi and Soviet projects, both of which sought to engineer these borderland societies socially as well as economically to fit their respective visions. This course examines not only how states carried out mass violence against various populations in this explosive region, but also how local movements and Eastern European civilians contributed to these events or participated in violence on their own accord.

HIST W2201 Culture and Society in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, 1867-1918. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course offers a critical examination of the history of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, once one of Europe's largest military powers which disappeared from the map after World War I. A restructured version of the Habsburg Empire, the Monarchy was a lasting, authoritarian framework of Central European ethnic groups which, however, gave rise to modernism in the field of arts and sciences.The juxtaposition of authority and modernity provides the focus of this survey which includes the study of the Monarchy as the birthplace of both Zionism and modern anti-Semitism. Nurturing a pioneering culture and a pre-modern society, Austria-Hungary is an exciting case of pioneering spirit and decadence, experimentation and dissolution, novelty and decay. The "disintegration of Austrian political culture" is particularly relevant today when presented as the "seedtime for fascism" (George V. Strong). Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W2220 Imperial Russia, 1682-1918. 3 points.

A survey of Russian political, social, and intellectual developments from Peter the Great through the Revolution of 1917. Group(s): B

HIST W2231 Russia and the Soviet Union in the 20th Century. 3 points.

The course offers an introduction into the history of Russia and the Sovient Union in the twentieth century. It combines lectures and discussion sections as well as survey texts and a selection of sources, including documents generated by state/party bodies, various documents produced by individual authors (especially diaries, letters, and memoirs), and some film materials. Putting the Soviet phenomenon into its wider intellectual, cultural, and geographical contexts, we will also address questions of modernity and modernization, socialism and communism, and authoritarian practices in politics, culture, and society.   Field(s): MEU

HIST W2246 Patterns of Soviet/Russian Interventions in Eastern Europe, 1939-2015. 3 points.

Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

The lecture course by Csaba BÉKÉS, a leading scholar on the Cold War, will analyze the patterns of Soviet interventions from the invasion of Poland at the onset of the Second World War and the Winter War against Finland up to the recent military conflict between Russia and Georgia in 2008 as well as the present crisis in Ukraine. The evolution of Soviet crisis management and conflict resolution will be analyzed by presenting the numerous internal crises of the Soviet Bloc: the uprising in East Germany in 1953, the Polish October in 1956, the 1956 Hungarian revolution, the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, the invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, the Solidarity crisis in Poland in 1980-81 as well as the peaceful dissolution of the Soviet Bloc and the end of the Cold War.

HIST W2267 The Politics of Hatred and Fear: Key Issues in the History of Eastern Central Europe 1878-1956. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course gives a short survey of the major turning points in the political, social and intellectual history of Eastern and Central Europe, focusing on the political manifestations of powerful hatreds and fears. The main question to be addressed is the origins and regional peculiarities of authoritarian political regimes and ideologies: fascism and communism. Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W2302 The European Catastrophe, 1914-1945. 3 points.

The history of Europe's second Thirty Years War marked by economic crises, political turmoil, totalitarian ideologies, massive population transfers, and genocide; but also by extraordinary economic, scientific, and cultural developments. Group(s): B Field(s): MWE

HIST W2304 Modern Germany, 1900-2000. 3 points.

The development of Germany has influenced the history of Europe and, indeed, the world in the 20th century in major and dramatic ways. Most historians agree that the country and its leaders played a crucial role in the outbreak of two world wars which cost at least 70 million lives. Germany experienced a revolution in 1918, hyperinflation in 1923, the Great Depression after 1929, and the Nazi seizure of power in 1933. Between 1939 and 1945 there followed the brutal conquest of most of its neighbors and the Holocaust. Subsequently, the country became divided into two halves in which emerged a communist dictotorship, on the one hand, and a Western-style parliamentary-representative system, on the other. The division ended in 1989 with the collapse of the Honecker regime and the unification of East and West Germany. No doubt, Germany's history is confused and confusing and has therefore generated plenty of debate among historians. This course offers a comprehensive survey of the country's development from around 1900 to 2000. It is not just concerned with political events and military campaigns, but will also examine in considerable detail German society and its structures, relations between women and men, trends in both high and popular culture, and the ups and downs of an industrial economy in its global setting. The weekly lectures and section discussions are designed to introduce you to the country's conflicted history and to the controversies it unleashed in international scholarship. Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W2307 Italy in the Wider World. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Studies the swings between global and local in this particularly elastic European nation-state. Lectures, discussion, reading, and media highlight the Italian peninsula's changing situation depending on the global economy. The course starts with a look back to the legacy of maritime city states, why the Italians didn't discover America, and the "dark centuries" as trade moved from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic. But the main focus are 19th and 20th century topics including the Italian emigrant diaspora, fascist imperialism, post-colonialism in Africa, living with the Papacy, the Third Italy, Italy in the European Union, the Mafia connection, the new immigrants, the China threat.

HIST W2309 Victorian Worlds: British Society. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The Victorian period (1837-1901) and the nineteenth century in general seem to present a number of paradoxes. Britain came to embrace ideas of free trade and liberty (J.S. Mill was the most famous intellectual of his age), yet ran a coercive empire on a global scale. Britons were suspicious of government intervention in the lives of private citizens, yet British society was in many ways highly conformist. We tend to associate ‘Victorian morality' and Queen Victoria herself with prudishness and restriction, yet Victorians were fascinated by sex, and the birth rate in Britain was higher than it had ever been, before or since. This course will explore the ways in which Victorians lived, thought, worked and played, as well as how their experiences shaped a set of key social, artistic and political movements.

HIST W2312 British History, 1760-1867. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The history of Britain at the height of its global power. Particular attention will be paid to contestations over political power, and to the emergence of liberal economic and political institutions and ideas. Field(s):MWE

HIST W2314 Modern France and its Empire: 1789-present. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This lecture course surveys the main currents of French history from the Revolution to the present, with particular attention to the interaction between continental France and the rest of the empire. Throughout this course, the main questions will be: to what extent has the French Revolution served as point of political and cultural reference throughout the 19th and 20th centuries? Who is a citizen? And how has the response to this question been impacted by imperial developments? What is French Republicanism? And how to understand it in the imperial context? What have been the relations between political, social, economic and cultural developments? How have continental conflicts and World Wars impacted French history? How have the post WWII interrelated processes of decolonization, immigration and building of Europe deeply impacted contemporary France? We will tackle these questions by reading primary sources: works of political philosophy; literature; film; legal documents; and memoirs from the time, and by watching films.

HIST W2315 Reformation Europe in Global Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course follows developments in Christian communities and cultures across Europe and the globe in the era of the Protestant, Catholic, and Radical Reformations (c. 1500-1700). It covers the rise of Lutheranism, Calvinism, Anabaptist communities, Catholic reform efforts, and events such as the Wars of Religion alongside diverse Western Christian interactions with religious and cultural "others" within and beyond Europe.

HIST W2323 Nineteenth-Century Britain. 4 points.

This course surveys the main political, economic, cultural, and social currents in nineteenth- century Great Britain, beginning in the 1780s and ending in 1900. The course will provide insight into Britain at both the domestic and international level. Topics include, but are not limited to: class, war and conflict, gender, religion, industrialization, political reform, economic change, liberalism, Victorian culture and ideologies, and the expansion of empire.

HIST W2330 Europe: from the Nazi New Order to the European Union. 4 points.

The history of Europe in the wider world from the Allies' victorious war against the Nazi New Order to the triumph of the European Union after the collapse of Soviet Empire. Lectures bring Eastern and Western Europe into one focus, to study the impact of the Cold War, the exit from colonial empire, Europe's "Economic Miracle, the sexual revolution, Europe's slowdown after the 1970s Oil Shock, Euro-Reaganism, and the impact of globalization from the 1990s to the 2008 crisis.  

HIST W2333 British Empire. 4 points.

This course surveys the history of the British Empire from its early modern origins to decolonization in the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on the "long nineteenth century"-the heyday of British imperial ideology and colonial expansion. The geographical reach of the course, like the empire itself, is broad, covering parts of Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, South Asia and Australasia. While the course will often emphasize the ideological and material motivations for expansion, conquest, and colonization, close attention will be paid to the experience of, and resistance to, the Empire as well, on the part of both settler colonists and indigenous peoples throughout the "new worlds.

HIST W2353 Early Modern France. 3 points.

This course will offer a survey of French history from the Wars of Religion to the outbreak of the Revolution in 1789. This formative period witnessed the rise of the Bourbon monarchy, the crystallization of absolutism as a political theology, the spectacular rise and collapse of John Law's financial system, the emergence of the philosophe movement during the Enlightenment, and the gradual de-legitimation of royal power through its association with despotism. Thematically, the course will focus on shifting logics of representation-that is, the means by which political, economic and religious power was not only reflected, but also generated and projected, through a range of interrelated practices that include Catholic liturgy, courtly protocols, aristocratic codes of honor, fiscal experimentation, and the critical styles of thinking and reading inculcated by the nascent public sphere.

HIST W2398 The Politics of Terror: The French Revolution. 4 points.

 This course examines the political culture of eighteenth-century France, from the final decades of the Bourbon monarchy to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. Among our primary aims will be to explore the origins of the Terror and its relationship to the Revolution as a whole. Other topics we will address include the erosion of the king's authority in the years leading up to 1789, the fall of the Bastille, the Constitutions of 1791 and 1793, civil war in the Vendée, the militarization of the Revolution, the dechristianization movement, attempts to establish a new Revolutionary calendar and civil religion, and the sweeping plans for moral regeneration led by Robespierre and his colleagues in 1793-1794.

HIST W2400 The American Presidency from George Washington to Barak Obama. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course looks at the American Presidency in historical perspective. It examines the powers of the office, its place in the American imagination, and the achievements of the most significant presidents. Structured chronologically, it emphasizes the growth and transformation of the office and how it has come to assume its dominant place in the political landscape. Individual presidents are studied to understand not only their own times but also salient issues with which they are associated (Jefferson and Adams with the rise of parties; Andrew Johnson with impeachment; etc.) Intermittent thematic lectures break from the chronological thrust of the course to explore aspects of the presidency in greater depth across time.

HIST W2406 American Beginnings. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of the economic and social history of British North America (with excursions into French, Dutch, and Native American communities) from 1607 to 1763. Major themes will include immigration, community structures, the household economy, slavery and other labor systems, and the cultural transformation of the colonies in the eighteenth century. Group(s): A, D

HIST W2411 The Rise of American Capitalism. 3 points.

E-Commerce & Internet Technologies Track, Managing Emerging Technologies Track, Project Management Track, Discussion Section Required, Lab Required

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people. Readings include major secondary works and primary documents. Formerly: American Society in the age of Capital, 1819-1897. Field(s): US

HIST W2412 Revolutionary America, 1750-1815. 3 points.

This course examines the cultural, political, and constitutional origins of the United States. It covers the series of revolutionary changes in politics and society between the mid-18th and early 19th centuries that took thirteen colonies out of the British Empire and turned them into an independent and expanding nation. Starting with the cultural and political glue that held the British Empire together, the course follows the political and ideological processes that broke apart and ends with the series of political struggles that shaped the identity of the US. Using a combination of primary and secondary materials relating to various walks of life and experience from shopping to constitutional debates, students will be expected to craft their own interpretations of this fundamental period of American history. Lectures will introduce students to important developments and provide a framework from them to develop their own analytical skills. Group(s): D Field(s): US

HIST W2415 Immigrant New York. 3 points.

This seminar explores the intersection of immigration, race, and politics in New York City, both from the perspective of history and in relation to contemporary realities. In this course we will discuss the ways in which immigration has reshaped the cultural, economic, and political life of New York City both in the past as well as the present. Readings will focus on the divergent groups who have settled in New York City, paying close attention to issues of gender, class, race, the role of labor markets, the law, and urban development.

HIST W2432 The United States In the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The coming of the Civil War and its impact on the organization of American society afterwards. Group(s): D

HIST W2441 Making of the Modern American Landscape. 3 points.

Social history of the built environment since 1870, looking at urban and rural landscapes, vernacular architecture of industry, housing, recreation, and public space. Considers government policies, real estate investment, and public debates over land use and the natural environment. Group(s): D

HIST W2448 US History Since 1945. 3 points.

Topics include the cold War, McCarthyism, the postwar economy, suburbanization, consumer culture, Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, and Watergate. Field(s): US

HIST W2449 American Urban History. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Although images of the frontier and of the west have long dominated the popular imagination of American history, in fact the United States urbanized rapidly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and 80 percent of the national population now lives in metropolitan areas of more than a million people.  How did big cities respond to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, transportation, housing, open space, and recreation?  The course will feature frequent field trips via ferry, foot, and bus. Field(s): US

HIST W2460 Topics in the History of Women and Gender. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Since the emergence of a field called "women's history" in the early 1970s, the amount of information we have gathered about women has mounted astronomically. Historians have discovered the presence of women in every aspect of American life and culture. In more recent years they have begun to ask a different kind of question. Does it matter?  If so, how?  What is a gender analysis and how, if at all, does it alter the way we look at our past? How does the new knowledge we have acquired change our understanding of America's past? Or does it? This course is intended to introduce you to some of the newest questions now being asked by historians of women and gender and to some of the intriguing information we have uncovered about women in the American past.  Along the way, we will explore how this material shapes our interpretations of U.S. history and examine the relationship between the history of women and the history of gender. Readings are organized roughly chronologically, moving through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and rotating around encounters with some of the most salient ideas in American life, including: Liberty, Democracy, Equality, Individualism, and Nationalism. At each juncture we will ask how introducing a gendered perspective changes our perceptions of the past. Field(s): US

HIST W2503 Workers in Industrial and Post-Industrial America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The history of work, workers, and unions during the 20th century.  Topics include scientific management, automation, immigrant workers, the rise of industrial unionism, labor politics, occupational discrimination, and working-class community life. Field(s): US

HIST W2514 Immigrants in American History and Life. 3 points.

The course surveys patterns of migration and immigrant experience from colonial time to the present. Migration to the US is considered as part of the evolving global labor market and colonial expansion in the modern world. The class considers migration in different historical periods, the relationship of immigration to nation-building, national expansion, war, and the production and reproduction of national identity; the history of the legal regulation of immigration; the experience of immigrants in settling and negotiating life in a new society, and political debates surrounding the role of immigration in American society. Course materials include recent historical literature, fiction, primary-source documents, and film. Group(s): D

HIST W2523 History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States. 3 points.

Through assigned readings and a group research project, students will gain familiarity with a range of historical and social science problems at the intersection of ethnic/racial/sexual formations, technological networks, and health politics since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's health organization and care; HIV/AIDS politics, policy, and community response; "benign neglect"; urban renewal and gentrification; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; and environmental justice. There are no required qualifications for enrollment, although students will find the material more accessible if they have had previous coursework experience in United States history, pre-health professional (pre-med, pre-nursing, or pre-public health), African-American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies. 

HIST W2528 The Radical Tradition in America. 3 points.

Major expressions of American radicalism, ranging from early labor and communitarian movements to the origins of feminism, the abolitionist movement, and on to Populism, Socialism, and the "Old" and "New" lefts. Field(s): US

HIST W2535 History of the City of New York. 4 points.

The social, cultural, economic, political, and demographic development of America's metropolis from colonial days to present. Slides and walking tours supplement the readings (novels and historical works).Field(s): US

HIST W2540 History of the South. 3 points.

A survey of the history of the American South from the colonial era to the present day, with two purposes: first, to afford students an understanding of the special historical characteristics of the South and of southerners; and second, to explore what the experience of the South may teach about America as a nation. Group(s): D Field(s): US 

HIST W2544 Science and Technology in the United States: From Franklin to Facebook. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

HIST W2566 History of American Popular Culture Through Music. 3 points.

This course examines the history of American popular culture through music and radio, beginning in the 1830s with minstrelsy, the first distinctively "American" popular culture, and ending in the 1960s with Motown.  The course acquaints students with key concepts that aim to "read" cultural production and to explore what's unique about culture primarily experienced through the ears.  It examines debates over culture's qualifiers, from popular to mass, high to low. Field(s): US

HIST W2575 Power and Place: Black Urban Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of African-American history since the Civil War. An emphasis is placed on the black quest for equality and community. Group(s): D Formerly listed as "Explorations of Themes in African-American History, 1865-1945". 

HIST W2616 Jews in the Christian World in the High Middle Ages. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Medieval Jews and Christians defined themselves in contrast to one another. This course will examine the conditions and contradictions that emerged from competing visions and neighborly relations. It is arranged to comprehend broad themes rather than strict chronology and to engage both older and very recent scholarship on the perennial themes of tolerance and hate. Field(d): JWS/MED

HIST W2628 History of the State of Israel, 1948-Present. 3 points.

The political, cultural, and social history of the State of Israel from its founding in 1948 to the present. Group(s): C Field(s): ME

HIST W2630 American Jewish History. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the interaction between the changing makeup of Jewish immigration, the changing social and aconomic conditions in the United States, and the religious, communal, cultural, and political group life of American Jews. Group(s): D

HIST W2657 Medieval Jewish Cultures. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will survey some of the major historical, cultural, intellectual and social developments among Jews from the fourth century CE through the fifteenth. We will study Jewish cultures from the Christianization of the Roman Empire, the age of the Talmuds, the rise of Islam, the world of the Geniza, medieval Spain, to the early modern period. We will look at a rich variety of primary texts and images, including mosaics, poems, prayers, polemics, and personal letters. Field(s): JEW/MED 

HIST W2662 Slave Memory in Brazil: Public History and Audiovisual Narratives in Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The research on the making of racial identities in Brazil and on the history of Brazilian black culture and black social movements have increased significantly in the last twenty years, dialoguing directly with the idea of being part of the African diaspora at the Atlantic. The discussion of the content of audiovisual resources related with this process allows connecting the contemporary discussion about public memory of slavery in Brazil with the globalized perspective of politics of identity in the Atlantic World.

HIST W2673 Latin American Popular Culture. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course we will study the popular culture of Latin America from a historical perspective. The primary sources, secondary texts, audiovisual materials, and lectures will give students a solid basis to understand the importance of popular culture in the formation of Latin American nationalisms, political processes, economic transformations, and demographic changes. Starting from the time of first contact with the Europeans and going up to the mid-twentieth century, we will focus on art, music, literature, and dance, as well as sports, film, and food. We will explore the role that institutions played in attempting to regulate the daily experiences and interactions among various socioeconomic groups, but we will also study how the "popular classes" contributed to shape the cultural practices of the elites across the continent.

HIST W2701 Ottoman Empire. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will cover the seven-century long history of the Ottoman Empire, which spanned Europe, Asia, and Africa as well as the medieval, early modern, and modern periods. The many levels of continuity and change will be the focus, as will issues of confessional diversity, imperial governance, and political belonging within the empire and of the empire within larger regional and global phenomena over the centuries. 

HIST W2705 History of Modern Egypt. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate lecture course explores the events and currents that shaped the course of modern Egyptian history over the last two centuries. It ranges from the mid-18th century to present and covers such themes as Egypt under Ottoman, French and British rule; Egypt's dynastic rule, and its relation to neighbouring states in the 19th century; nationalism, modernism and feminism, and the role of cinema, literature and the politics of ideas in the 20th; and, finally, the regimes of Nasser, Sadat and Mubarak and their relation to the region and the wider world. Field(s): ME

HIST W2716 History of Islamic Societies. 0 points.

Focus on religions, conversion, ethnic relations, development of social institutions, and the relationship between government and religion. Field(d): ME

HIST W2722 America and the Muslim World. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Taking the events of September 11, 2001, and their aftermath as a point of departure, this course will begin by investigating in parallel histories of two sibling religious societies: Islam and western Christendom.  It will outline the European antecedents of American understandings and misunderstandings of the Muslim world down to World War I in comparison with Muslim experiences with, and selective efforts to appropriate, aspects of European society and thought over the same period. Field(s): INTL

HIST W2772 West African History. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course offers a survey of main themes in West African history over the last millenium, with particular emphasis on the period from the mid-15th through the 20th century. Themes include the age of West African empires (Ghana, Mali, Songhay); re-alignments of economic and political energies towards the Atlantic coast; the rise and decline of the trans-Atlantic trade in slaves; the advent and demise of colonial rule; and internal displacement, migrations, and revolutions. In the latter part of the course, we will appraise the continuities and ruptures of the colonial and post-colonial eras. Group(s): C Field(s): AFR 

HIST W2803 The Worlds of Mughal India. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course provides a political and social history of India from the 16th-19th century, focusing on the Mughal empire. Two central concerns: first, the Mughal regnal politics towards their rival imperial concerns within India and West Asia (the Maratha, the Rajput, the Safavid, the Ottoman); and second, the foreign gaze onto the Mughals (via the presence of Portuguese, English, and French travelers, merchants, and diplomats in India). These interlocked practices (how Mughals saw the world and how the world saw the Mughals) will allow us develop a nuanced knowledge of universally acknowledged power of the early modern world. 

HIST W2880 Gandhi's India. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focus on the history of modern India, using the life and times of Mohandas Gandhi as the basis for not only an engagement with an extraordinary historical figure, but also for a consideration of a great variety of historical issues, including the relationship between nationalism and religion, caste politics in India and affirmative action policies in the United States today, and racism as encountered by Gandhi in relation to colonialism and the Civil Rights movement in the U.S. Field(s): SA 

HIST W2901 Historical Theories and Methods. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Designed to replace the History Lab and Historian's Craft, HIST W2901 "Historical Theories and Methods" (formerly titled "Introduction to History") offers a new approach to undergraduate introductory courses on historical practice and the history of history. The course combines an overarching lecture component consisting of one lecture per week of 75 minutes with a two-hour "laboratory" component that will meet weekly at first, then less often as the semester progresses. The course aims to introduce students to broad theoretical and historiographical themes while drawing on those themes in providing them skills in actual historical practice, in preparation for the writing of a senior thesis or extended research paper.  It is required that juniors planning to write a senior thesis take this course in the spring semester in preparation for their projects. Students who plan on studying abroad during the spring term must take HIST W4900 The Historian's Craft in the fall term as a replacement. Field(s): METHODS

HIST W2903 History of the World from 1450 CE to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course presents and at the same time critiques a narrative world history from 1500 to the present. The purpose of the course is to convey an understanding of how this rapidly growing field of history is being approahced at three different levels: the narrative textbook level, the theoretical-conceptual level, and, through discussion sections, the research level. All students are required to enroll in a weekly discussion section. Graded work for the courses consists of two brief (5 page) papers based on activities in discussion sections as well as a take-home midterm and final examination. Graduate students who enroll in the course must take a discussion section conducted by the instructor and can expect heavier reading assignments. Field(s): INTL 

HIST W2904 History of Finance. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course surveys the history of modern finance, from the origin of novel banking institutions in early-modern Italy (like the Medici Bank, founded 1397) to the financial crisis of 2008. "Finance," broadly understood as the activity of allocating capital (in particular, money) within communities, will be examined from a variety of historical perspectives-economic, political, intellectual, cultural. While the course often emphasizes "high" finance in centers of Western financial power (Florence in the 1400s, London in the 1800s, New York in the 2000s), careful attention is paid to how financial activities in such global centers have impacted people across different socioeconomic and geographic locations, from "Wall St." to "Main St." and from Illinois to Argentina.

HIST W2906 Quantifying People: A History of Social Science. 3 points.

This course examines the history of the quest to understand human society scientifically. The focus will be on one specific approach to social investigation-quantification-which has been central to the historical development of "social science" and which has become especially esteemed in the 21st-century "data" age. Built around careful reading of primary social-scientific texts, the course will span from the "political arithmetic" of the 17th century through the late 20th century, touching upon the historical aspects of several modern social-science disciplines (economics, sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science). We will explore past attempts to count, calculate, measure, and model many dimensions of human social life: population, wealth, health, happiness, intelligence, crime, deviance, race. We will pay particular attention to how social-scientific numbers have not only reflected, but transformed, the individuals and communities they sought to measure. Readings will include Condorcet, Thomas Malthus, W. S. Jevons, Emile Durkheim, Francis Galton, Franz Boas, Richard Herrnstein & Charles Murray, and Ian Hacking.

HIST W2919 Modernity and Nation in the Twentieth Century. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course compares and contrasts the paths to modernity of four societies: China, Germany, Japan, and Italy. By adopting a comparative approach, and looking closely at the way that international contexts influenced domestic developments, this course will give students the chance to view history from outside the nation-state focus that tended to dominate history in the past. In this sense, while students are expected to expand their familiarity with the basic history of these countries, more important will be the capacity to think about the world from multiple perspectives. Key topics include national consolidation, the growth of nationalist sentiment, imperialism and fascism, the impact of World War II and the Cold War, and historical memory. Based largely on primary sources, the course presents modernity both as understood by each of these societies and also in its global interconnectedness, an interconnectedness that shapes our world today. Field(s): MEU/EA

HIST W2926 Historical Origins of Human Rights. 3 points.

Provides an introduction to the post-1945 regime of humanitarian reform and law

HIST W2943 Cultures of Empire. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Empires have been consistent - but ever changing - forms of rule in the modern world. This course explores how empires and imperialism have connected the world by forging new forms of politics and culture from 1850 to 2011. It examines key dimensions of imperialism such as nationalism, capitalism, racism, and fascism in Asia, Europe, Africa, and America. Based largely on primary sources - novels, memoirs, official documents, and visual arts, including photographs and film - the course presents imperialism both as experienced in different societies and also in its global interconnectedness. Field(s): INTL 

HIST W2997 World War II in History and Memory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An exploration of the changes in public memory of World War Two in different countries in Asia, Europe, and North America over the past sixty-five years, with particular attention to the heightened interest in the war in recent decades and the relation of this surge of memory to what we used to call history. Field: INTL

HIST W3004 The Mediterranean World After Alexander the Great. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The conquests of Alexander the Great spread Greek Civilization all around the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East. This course will examine the Hellenised (greek-based) urban society of the empires of the Hellenistic era (ca. 330-30BCE) Field(s): ANC*

HIST W3006 Ancient Political Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is a review of Greek and Roman political theory as it developed through historical events from the Homeric age of Greece to the Augustan principate at Rome. One of the principal contributions of the ancient Greco-Roman civilization to the western tradition is the rich and varied legacy of political theory developed over many centuries. It is the aim of this course to place ancient political theories in their historical contexts. Much ancient political theory can only be recovered from a close analysis of actual practice, since a good deal of ancient writing on the subject is lost. Even in the cases where great works of political theory survive, however, the historical context must always be emphasized. To take an obvious and well known example, much of the difference between Plato?s ideal state in the Republic and that of Aristotle in his Politics is due to the fact that Sparta, the admired and successful model for many of Plato?s ideas in the Republic, had declined into defeat and obscurity by the time Aristotle wrote, and hence was no longer an attractive model for political theorists. It is a truism, no doubt, that political theory can only be fully grasped and understood within a historical context: this course will apply that truism, and also the reverse notion that theory influences practice and hence history.

HIST W3007 Development of the Greek City-State. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will trace the development of the polis or city-state as the dominant socio-political unit in ancient Greece, looking at how and why this development took place and what effect it had on Greek society and culture. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W3020 Roman Imperialism. 3 points.

How did the Roman Empire grow so large and last so long? This course will examine the origins of the Romans' drive to expand, the theory of "defensive" imperialism, economic aspects, Roman techniques of control, questions about acculturation and resistance, and the reasons why the empire eventually collapsed.   Field(s): ANC

HIST W3024 Decline and Fall of the Roman Republic 133-23 BCE. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An investigation of the political, economic and cultural development in Rome that resulted in its political transformation from an oligarchy (the so-called "Republic") to a monarchy (the so-called "Empire"). Field(s): *ANC

HIST W3026 Roman Social History. 3 points.

Social structure, class, slavery and manumission, social mobility, life expectation, status and behavior of women, Romanization, town and country, social organizations, education and literacy, philanthropy, amusements in the Roman Empire, 70 B.C. - 250 A.D. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W3045 Rome: A Preindustrial Metropolis. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Ancient Rome from the 1st century BCE to the beginning of the 5th Century  AD had about one million inhabitants. This demographic density is an exceptional feature among all preindustrial societies, equalled by London only at the beginning of the nineteenth century.. After a short theoretical introduction to the subject of urbanism in pre-industrial societies and in particular in the classical period, the seminar will focus on  three issues: the demographic trend of the city, the grain and water supply and the actual organization of water and grain distribution, and  the role of the imperial court and government in building activities, feeding the people and assuring basic administrative services. Special attention will be paid to quantitative aspects of the social and economic history of the city. A wide range of sources will be examined: literary and juridical texts, inscriptions, archaeological and topographic evidence. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W3046 Egypt, Ethiopia and Nubia in Late Antiquity. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This is a fifteen-week undergraduate seminar.  It is designed to provide an introduction to the late antique period of the three great civilizations of the ancient Nile Valley, Egypt, Ethiopia and Nubia.  Course material will cover the social and religious history of Egypt under Roman rule; the collapse of the ancient Nubian civilization of Meroe; the emergence of its independent successor kingdoms; the birth of a centralized and literate society in the Ethiopian highlands; the Christianization of Egypt, Nubia, and Ethiopia; and the survival of all three civilizations in the early medieval period, Egypt under Islamic rule and Nubia and Ethiopia as independent powers. Field(s): ANC*

HIST W3050 Youth in Ancient Rome. 4 points.

This seminar will provide students with an in-depth interdisciplinary examination of the cultural and political history of a biological and social phenomenon in ancient Rome over a period of 350 years: that stage in the Roman life course which we today would identify as “youth” or “adolescence”. Students will become acquainted with the key methodological approaches to writing the history of an “age” and scrutinize their usefulness in the process, including traditional social history models, cultural anthropology, and more recent theories of age as a performance. The course traces thematic topics which adhere to a linear chronology, beginning with Roman comedy in the second century BCE and ending with the death and divinization of Hadrian’s favorite, the Bithynian youth, Antinous in 130 CE. The class will make substantial use of Columbia’s resources at Butler Library, including an ancient world research methods session at the library itself, as well as at least one “hands-on” session with the Roman epigraphic, papyrologicial, and numismatic material in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Our proximity to The Metropolitan Museum of Art will also be utilized, both in terms of a class visit and in one component of the course assessment that will culminate in a class website, “The History of Roman Youth in Objects”.

HIST W3053 Roman Coins in Context. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to the study of coins as historical disciplines. It will provide a survey of the production and use of coinage in the Roman world from the 3rd century BC to the 3rd century AD.  Students will also asses the contribution that the study of coinage makes to the study of Roman social, economic, and political history. The majority of the course will take place at the American Numismatic Society. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W3060 Laws of War in the Middle Ages. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The perception and regulation of war and wartime practices in Europe and the Mediterranean World in the period 300-1500, from the standpoint of legal and institutional history rather than of military history. Topics include: the Just War tradition, Holy War and Crusade, the Peace and Truce of God, prisoners and ransom, the law of siege, non-combatants, chivalry, and ambassadors and diplomacy. Readings are principally primary sources in translation. Group(s): A Field(s): MED

HIST W3063 Love and Hate in the Early Medieval Societies. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine the role of love and hate and their changing place in the culture of the elite groups from Late Antiquity to the twelfth century. Medieval chronicles, poems, letters and legal texts, both religious and civil, will be used, deconstructed and decoded with a special attention to gender and to the emotional relations between men and women. Field(s): MED

HIST W3065 Urban Culture in the Dutch Golden Age. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In the celebrated words of the 17th-century English ambassador Sir William Temple the Dutch Republic was "the fear of some, the envy of others, and the wonder of all their neighbors." This course introduces students to this powerful new state that arose from the epic revolt of the Netherlands against Spanish rule in the late sixteenth century. It analyzes how the federation of seven ‘united' provinces, a political anomaly in a time of centralized monarchies, became an economic superpower. A modern ‘bourgeois' society dominated by merchants and professional administrators rather than by noblemen, prelates, and aristocrats, the Dutch Republic built a colonial empire reaching from Brazil to Japan. It was the first European state to practice religious toleration on a large scale, while it produced artistic riches by the likes of Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Hals that are still treasured today. This course provides a varied and dynamic picture of a highly urbanized society in a period that the Dutch with good reason call their ‘Golden Age'.   Field(s): EME

HIST W3072 Once Upon a Time: Daily Life in Medieval Europe. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is designed as traveller’s guide to medieval Europe. Its purpose is to provide a window to a long-lost world that provided the foundation of modern institutions and that continues to inspire the modern collective artistic and literary imagination with its own particularities. This course will not be a conventional history course concentrating on the grand narratives in the economic, social and political domains but rather intend to explore the day-to-day lives of the inhabitants, and attempts to have a glimpse of their mindset, their emotional spectrum, their convictions, prejudices, fears and hopes. It will be at once a historical, sociological and anthropological study of one of the most inspiring ages of European civilization. Subjects to be covered will include the birth and childhood, domestic life, sex and marriage, craftsmen and artisans, agricultural work, food and diet, the religious devotion, sickness and its cures, death, after death (purgatory and the apparitions), travelling, merchants and trades, inside the nobles’ castle, the Christian cosmos, and medieval technology. The lectures will be accompanied by maps, images of illuminated manuscripts and of medieval objects. Students will be required to attend a weekly discussion section to discuss the medieval texts bearing on that week’s subject. The written course assignment will be a midterm, final and two short papers, one an analysis of a medieval text and a second an analysis of a modern text on the Middle Ages. Field(s): MED

HIST W3088 The Historical Jesus and the Origin of Christianity. 4 points.

The goal of this course will be to subject the source materials about Jesus and the very beginnings of Christianity (before about 150 CE) to a strictly historical-critical examination and analysis, to try to understand the historical underpinnings of what we can claim to know about Jesus, and how Christianity arose as a new religion from Jesus' life and teachings. In addition, since the search or quest for the "historical Jesus" has been the subject of numerous studies and books in recent times, we shall examine a selection of prominent "historical Jesus" works and theories to see how they stand up to critical scrutiny from a historical perspective.

HIST W3100 Early Modern Europe: Print and Society. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Standing at the intersection of the religious, cultural, and scientific upheavals within early modern Europe, the study of print and its intersection with culture allows students to learn how shifts in technology (much like those we are witnessing today) affect every aspect of society. This course will examine the signal cultural, political, and religious developments in early modern Western Europe, using the introduction and dissemination of printed materials as a fulcrum and entry point. From the sixteenth century Europeans were confronted with a technological revolution whose cultural consequences were incalculable and whose closest parallel might be the age of electronic information technology in our own day. From the Reformation of Luther, to the libelles of pre-revolutionary France, from unlocking the mysteries of the human body to those of the heavens, from humanist culture to the arrival of the novel, no important aspect of European culture in the sixteen- through eighteenth centuries can be understood without factoring in the role of print: its technology, its marketing and distribution channels, and its creation of new readers and new "republics." This course will examine key political, religious, and cultural movements in early modern western European history through the prism of print culture.

HIST W3103 Alchemy, Magic & Science. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Astrology, alchemy, and magic were central components of an educated person's view of the world in early modern Europe. How did these activities become marginalized, while a new philosophy (what we would now call empirical science) came to dominate the discourse of rationality? Through primary and secondary readings, this course examines these "occult" disciplines in relation to the rise of modern science. Group(s): A Field(s): *EME

HIST W3112 The Scientific Revolution in Western Europe: 1500-1750. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of the upheavals of astronomy, anatomy, mathematics, alchemy from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Field(s): EME

HIST W3113 Popular Culture in the Late Medieval Low Countries. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Court records surviving from the late medieval centuries -- the time of Chaucer and Boccaccio, the time of some of Europe’s most splendid courts, the time when cities like Venice and Bruges were at their height -- often contain lively records of popular culture – how people thought about the world, about their family, friends and neighbors, about their rulers, their God, and even their bodies. Court registers, verdicts by judges, notes of the bailiffs in their accounts, investigations of the prosecutors, critical examinations of eyewitnesses, and any other type of judicial  document surviving from this age often reveal human emotions, describe people’s motivations, document their blunders, and report their gossip. Among such sources, letters of remission, which princes issued to grant pardons to criminals of various kinds, are perhaps the most precious. Such documents cannot, however, be read straight, as though they were perfectly reliable accounts of facts or feelings. Rather they are laden with many contradictions. Rival accounts of the same events by the various involved parties and witnesses, outright lies, the biases of judges, narratives designed to please or mislead the rulers -- all such factors render any “pardon letter,” as these documents are known, a difficult, even if an incomparably rich, source. They need a significant effort of critical decoding. This course will focus on how we can use a collection of such letters surviving from the Low Countries, where commercial cities thrived and one of Europe’s most elegant courts was situated, to gain insight into late medieval society – its rich and poor, women and men, city-dwellers and peasants. Field(s): *MED

HIST W3155 Christian Missions in the Early Modern World. 4 points.

This course follows the spread and transformation of Christianity by Western missionaries in American, African, and Asian settings, from the late fifteenth through early nineteenth centuries. We examine what missionaries preached and urged others to believe and practice, and also what motivated missionaries, mission converts, and those who resisted proselytization. We also examine missions as sites of intercultural and colonial encounters with long-term impacts on politics, wars, and social dynamics.

HIST W3160 Empires and Cultures of the Atlantic World. 3 points.

This course follows interconnected historical developments in Western Europe, the Americas, and West Africa from the late fifteenth through early nineteenth century. It highlights both the comparative, structural evolutions of European colonial empires and the cultural experiences and perspectives of Atlantic World inhabitants, including soldiers, merchants, slaves, missionaries, and revolutionaries.

HIST W3176 Into the East: European Merchants in Asian Markets, ca. 1300-1800. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of medieval and early modern European merchants' entry into the global commercials economy then centered in various Asian markets.  The course begins in the late Middle Ages, when Europe was a minor outposts of the world economy, and ends about 1800, when european merchants, in alliance with national states, were competing to control Asian markets. Field(s): EME

HIST W3180 Conversion in Historical Perspective. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Boundary crossers have always challenged the way societies imagined themselves. This course explores the political, religious, economic, and social dynamics of religious conversion. The course will focus on Western (Christian and Jewish) models in the medieval and early modern periods. It will include comparative material from other societies and periods. Autobiographies, along with legal, religious and historical documents will complement the readings. Field(s): *JWS

HIST W3190 England and the Wider World. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course traces the history of English overseas expansion, and its consequences for the history of the British Isles, from early Atlantic exploration in the sixteenth century through the era of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars. Themes include the relationship between empire and state formation, the place of international rivalry in the formation of imperial ambitions, the character and dimensions of transoceanic trading networks, and the place of empire in the construction of British national identity. Group(s): B Field(s): EME

HIST W3197 You Are What You Eat: A History of Thinking About Food. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of the relationships between medical expertise and human dietary habits from Antiquity to the present, giving special attention to the links between practical and moral concerns and between expert knowledge and common sense. Field(s): EME

HIST W3200 Mass Violence in the Borderlands, 1914-1991. 3 points.

During the twentieth century, Eastern European borderland populations were devastated by episodes of mass violence during wars, revolutions, and even peacetime. The course focuses on this violence in four phases: the First World War and revolutions; the inter-war period; the Second World War; and the post-war period. Some of these episodes include pogroms, the Famine, deportations, terrorism, ethnic cleansing, and genocide. After the First World War, as imperial empires dissolved and new nation-states emerged, a conflagration of violence swept through the borderlands causing further instability and civil war. While some of these interwar states provided a modicum of stability, the growth of nationalism, as well as support for fascism and communism, brought new volatility to the region. The most dramatic and violent changes during the inter-war period and Second World War were a result of Nazi and Soviet projects, both of which sought to engineer these borderland societies socially as well as economically to fit their respective visions. This course examines not only how states carried out mass violence against various populations in this explosive region, but also how local movements and Eastern European civilians contributed to these events or participated in violence on their own accord.

HIST W3201 Culture and Society in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, 1867-1918. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course offers a critical examination of the history of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, once one of Europe's largest military powers which disappeared from the map after World War I. A restructured version of the Habsburg Empire, the Monarchy was a lasting, authoritarian framework of Central European ethnic groups which, however, gave rise to modernism in the field of arts and sciences.The juxtaposition of authority and modernity provides the focus of this survey which includes the study of the Monarchy as the birthplace of both Zionism and modern anti-Semitism. Nurturing a pioneering culture and a pre-modern society, Austria-Hungary is an exciting case of pioneering spirit and decadence, experimentation and dissolution, novelty and decay. The "disintegration of Austrian political culture" is particularly relevant today when presented as the "seedtime for fascism" (George V. Strong). Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W3202 Early Modern Eastern Europe 1500-1800. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course concentrates on the early modern period (roughly 1500 to 1800) and addresses the history of the region which includes mainly the territories of present day Poland, Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. The course presents the history of the region through the analysis of such important pan-European processes as the growth of empires and absolutism, the Reformation and revival of Catholicism, the Enlightenment and urbanization. It also emphasizes that that region's culture and society were in many ways unique and distinctive from the West European civilization.

HIST W3220 Imperial Russia, 1682-1918. 3 points.

A survey of Russian political, social, and intellectual developments from Peter the Great through the Revolution of 1917. Group(s): B

HIST W3231 Russia and the Soviet Union in the 20th Century. 3 points.

The course offers an introduction into the history of Russia and the Sovient Union in the twentieth century. It combines lectures and discussion sections as well as survey texts and a selection of sources, including documents generated by state/party bodies, various documents produced by individual authors (especially diaries, letters, and memoirs), and some film materials. Putting the Soviet phenomenon into its wider intellectual, cultural, and geographical contexts, we will also address questions of modernity and modernization, socialism and communism, and authoritarian practices in politics, culture, and society.   Field(s): MEU

HIST W3235 Central Asia: Imperial Legacies, New Images. 4 points.

This course is designed to give an overview of the politics and history of the five Central Asian states, including Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan starting from Russian imperial expansion to the present. We will examine the imperial tsarist and Soviet legacies that have profoundly reshaped the regional societies’ and governments’ practices and policies of Islam, gender, nation-state building, democratization, and economic development. Field(s): ME/EA

HIST W3246 Patterns of Soviet/Russian Interventions in Eastern Europe, 1939-2015. 3 points.

Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

The lecture course by Csaba BÉKÉS, a leading scholar on the Cold War, will analyze the patterns of Soviet interventions from the invasion of Poland at the onset of the Second World War and the Winter War against Finland up to the recent military conflict between Russia and Georgia in 2008 as well as the present crisis in Ukraine. The evolution of Soviet crisis management and conflict resolution will be analyzed by presenting the numerous internal crises of the Soviet Bloc: the uprising in East Germany in 1953, the Polish October in 1956, the 1956 Hungarian revolution, the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, the invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, the Solidarity crisis in Poland in 1980-81 as well as the peaceful dissolution of the Soviet Bloc and the end of the Cold War.

HIST W3250 Society and Political Thought in Modern Eastern Europe. 4 points.

Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

This lecture course will focus on key political ideas and intellectual currents that shaped Eastern European societies in the late 19th and 20th century. We will study a relationship between empires and nationalism, the triumph of self-determination that followed the collapse of Habsburg, Russian and German empires, population policies such as emigration and inner colonization, politics of conquest and occupation during the First and the Second World War, communism as lived ideology and everyday experience. The lecture will introduce political ideas that formed a turbulent history of the region: Marxism/socialism, living space/Lebensraum, race, genocide, peasantism and socialist modernization. Finally, we will consider how Eastern Europe fits into broader narratives of civilization and modern culture through the lens of literary works (Bohumil Hrabal, Herta Müller), films and a wide range of sources reflecting lived experiences of multi-ethnic Eastern European populations, including Jews and German-speaking communities.

HIST W3267 The Politics of Hatred and Fear: Key Issues in the History of Eastern Central Europe 1878-1956. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course gives a short survey of the major turning points in the political, social and intellectual history of Eastern and Central Europe, focusing on the political manifestations of powerful hatreds and fears. The main question to be addressed is the origins and regional peculiarities of authoritarian political regimes and ideologies: fascism and communism. Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W3271 History of Ukraine as Unmaking the Russian and Soviet Empires. 3 points.

Until its declaration of independence in 1991, Ukraine, Europe’s second-largest country, has been divided and controlled by Russia, Lithuania, Poland, Austria, Turkey and the Soviet Union. As a result, a history of Ukraine was interpreted as an integral component of the historical narratives of these neighboring countries, which governed the parts of Ukrainian territory. The Russian Empire and then the USSR have maintained their political control over Ukraine since 1654 until 1991, during the longest period of Ukrainian history. Eventually, the Russian and subsequently Soviet historical narrative prevailed in the interpretation of the Ukrainian past. In this interpretation, Ukraine lost its independent historical existence. Unfortunately, this Russian/Soviet historical narrative was adopted by historians in the West, particularly in the United States. Moreover, this narrative also ignored the crucial role of Ukraine not only in a formation of the medieval Russian civilization, beginning with Kievan Rus, but also in unmaking the Russian Empire in 1917, the Soviet Union in 1991, and its successor, the Commonwealth of Independent States, following Maidan Revolution and Russian annexation of Crimea in 2014.

HIST W3295 The Russian Fin de Siecle. 3 points.

This course introduces students to the artistic movements, everyday life, and socio-cultural upheavals of urban Russia in the fin-de-siecle (1880 to 1917). The fast-paces, consumer-oriented modern city, with its celebrities, fashions, and technological wonders, gripped the imagination of imperial Russia's urban denizens. The inhabitants of St. Petersburg and Moscow, conscious of living in a new era, embraced and grappled with the Modern Age as journalists, impresarios, and artists narrated and interpreted it. We will explore the ways revolution and war, industrialization, the commercialization of culture, and new sensibilities about the self and identity were reflected in modernist art and thought, literature, and autobiographical writings. We also will look closely at the realms of elite entertainment and popular amusement in an attempt to relate consumer culture notions of gender and sexuality, the redefinition of status and privilege, and concepts of leisure. Historians have offered competing explanations of how and why the rapid social, economic, and cultural changes of this period contributed to the fall of the Russian monarchy and the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. Our primary goals are to analyze and critique various historical texts, assess historians' arguments, and make our own. This course will introduce students to a wide array of primary and secondary sources, and help them to develop skills of critical reading, writing, and oral discussion.

HIST W3302 The European Catastrophe, 1914-1945. 3 points.

The history of Europe's second Thirty Years War marked by economic crises, political turmoil, totalitarian ideologies, massive population transfers, and genocide; but also by extraordinary economic, scientific, and cultural developments. Group(s): B Field(s): MWE

HIST W3304 Modern Germany, 1900-2000. 3 points.

The development of Germany has influenced the history of Europe and, indeed, the world in the 20th century in major and dramatic ways. Most historians agree that the country and its leaders played a crucial role in the outbreak of two world wars which cost at least 70 million lives. Germany experienced a revolution in 1918, hyperinflation in 1923, the Great Depression after 1929, and the Nazi seizure of power in 1933. Between 1939 and 1945 there followed the brutal conquest of most of its neighbors and the Holocaust. Subsequently, the country became divided into two halves in which emerged a communist dictotorship, on the one hand, and a Western-style parliamentary-representative system, on the other. The division ended in 1989 with the collapse of the Honecker regime and the unification of East and West Germany. No doubt, Germany's history is confused and confusing and has therefore generated plenty of debate among historians. This course offers a comprehensive survey of the country's development from around 1900 to 2000. It is not just concerned with political events and military campaigns, but will also examine in considerable detail German society and its structures, relations between women and men, trends in both high and popular culture, and the ups and downs of an industrial economy in its global setting. The weekly lectures and section discussions are designed to introduce you to the country's conflicted history and to the controversies it unleashed in international scholarship. Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W3306 The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Britain: Politics, Performance, Personhood. 4 points.

The British women’s suffrage movement was one of the significant and dramatic social movements of modern times.  Tens of thousands of women joined suffrage organizations and took part in suffrage activism in the decade before World War I, some of them adopting what were known as “militant” tactics of public disturbance and property damage, and of the hunger-strike in prison.  The suffrage question and the spectacle of militancy preoccupied politicians, divided parties, friends and families, mesmerized the public and the press, and utterly transformed the lives of the women who became caught up in it.  The movement spawned novels, plays, and artistic works of all kinds; it fostered new political theories and practices; it created new identities and new psychological orientations.  Historians to this day argue over its meanings and legacies.

HIST W3307 Italy in the Wider World. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Studies the swings between global and local in this particularly elastic European nation-state. Lectures, discussion, reading, and media highlight the Italian peninsula's changing situation depending on the global economy. The course starts with a look back to the legacy of maritime city states, why the Italians didn't discover America, and the "dark centuries" as trade moved from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic. But the main focus are 19th and 20th century topics including the Italian emigrant diaspora, fascist imperialism, post-colonialism in Africa, living with the Papacy, the Third Italy, Italy in the European Union, the Mafia connection, the new immigrants, the China threat.

HIST W3309 Victorian Worlds: British Society. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The Victorian period (1837-1901) and the nineteenth century in general seem to present a number of paradoxes. Britain came to embrace ideas of free trade and liberty (J.S. Mill was the most famous intellectual of his age), yet ran a coercive empire on a global scale. Britons were suspicious of government intervention in the lives of private citizens, yet British society was in many ways highly conformist. We tend to associate ‘Victorian morality' and Queen Victoria herself with prudishness and restriction, yet Victorians were fascinated by sex, and the birth rate in Britain was higher than it had ever been, before or since. This course will explore the ways in which Victorians lived, thought, worked and played, as well as how their experiences shaped a set of key social, artistic and political movements.

HIST W3312 British History, 1760-1867. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The history of Britain at the height of its global power. Particular attention will be paid to contestations over political power, and to the emergence of liberal economic and political institutions and ideas. Field(s):MWE

HIST W3314 Modern France and its Empire: 1789-present. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This lecture course surveys the main currents of French history from the Revolution to the present, with particular attention to the interaction between continental France and the rest of the empire. Throughout this course, the main questions will be: to what extent has the French Revolution served as point of political and cultural reference throughout the 19th and 20th centuries? Who is a citizen? And how has the response to this question been impacted by imperial developments? What is French Republicanism? And how to understand it in the imperial context? What have been the relations between political, social, economic and cultural developments? How have continental conflicts and World Wars impacted French history? How have the post WWII interrelated processes of decolonization, immigration and building of Europe deeply impacted contemporary France? We will tackle these questions by reading primary sources: works of political philosophy; literature; film; legal documents; and memoirs from the time, and by watching films.

HIST W3315 Reformation Europe in Global Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course follows developments in Christian communities and cultures across Europe and the globe in the era of the Protestant, Catholic, and Radical Reformations (c. 1500-1700). It covers the rise of Lutheranism, Calvinism, Anabaptist communities, Catholic reform efforts, and events such as the Wars of Religion alongside diverse Western Christian interactions with religious and cultural "others" within and beyond Europe.

HIST W3322 Globalization in Historical Perspective, 19th-20th century. 4 points.

This course is about the evolution the international economy since the first half of the 19th century, envisaged primarily from the perspective of its governance, i.e. the market rules and public institutions that governed it. Lectures and discussion sections thus focus successively on the First, pre-1914 Global era, then on the Interwar period and its many experiments, and lastly on the classic, post-1945 multilateralism, leading to the current Second global era. We shall thus look, for instance, at how the capital markets worked before World War I and how they were gradually reopened from the 1970s onwards; or at how the League of Nations and the IMF have addressed sovereign debt crisis and envisaged conditionality. But a strong accent is also put on the private, transnational dimension of economic governance, like international banking, market platforms, or commercial arbitration. Relations between Western and non-Western regions are also discussed though they are not at the core of this course.  

HIST W3330 Europe: from the Nazi New Order to the European Union. 3 points.

The history of Europe in the wider world from the Allies' victorious war against the Nazi New Order to the triumph of the European Union after the collapse of Soviet Empire. Lectures bring Eastern and Western Europe into one focus, to study the impact of the Cold War, the exit from colonial empire, Europe's "Economic Miracle, the sexual revolution, Europe's slowdown after the 1970s Oil Shock, Euro-Reaganism, and the impact of globalization from the 1990s to the 2008 crisis.  Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W3333 British Empire. 4 points.

This course surveys the history of the British Empire from its early modern origins to decolonization in the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on the "long nineteenth century"-the heyday of British imperial ideology and colonial expansion. The geographical reach of the course, like the empire itself, is broad, covering parts of Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, South Asia and Australasia. While the course will often emphasize the ideological and material motivations for expansion, conquest, and colonization, close attention will be paid to the experience of, and resistance to, the Empire as well, on the part of both settler colonists and indigenous peoples throughout the "new worlds.

HIST W3335 20th Century New York City. 4 points.

This course explores critical areas of New York's economic development in the 20th century, with a view to understanding the rise, fall and resurgence of this world capital. Discussions also focus on the social and political significance of these shifts. Assignments include primary sources, secondary readings, film viewings, trips, and archival research. Students use original sources as part of their investigation of New York City industries for a 20-page research paper. An annotated bibliography is also required. Students are asked to give a weekly update on research progress, and share information regarding useful archives and websites.

HIST W3347 Europe and Islam in the Modern Period. 4 points.

Though the relationship between Europe and Islam has a centuries-long and complex history, this course looks closely at the unfolding of this relationship in the modern period. Following Edward Said, we start with Napoleon's invasion of Egypt in 1798, then cover a series of topics including: migration and travel writing on the eve of conquest; colonial aggression in the Middle East and North Africa; colonial governance of Islam; race, gender, and religious difference; Islamic modernity; and Islamic veiling 'controversies.' The object of this course is to historicize contemporary debates on immigration, pluralism, and the management of difference by examining cases of discursive and institutional continuity from the colonial into the postcolonial periods. Instructor's permission required.

HIST W3349 German Thinkers Around Heidegger. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar is situated in the field of intellectual history and puts the focus on a group of German scholars around Martin Heidegger who were tracing the question of historical truth in the first half of the 20th century. The mostly Jewish thinkers like Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith and Erich Auerbach were forced into exile after 1933 and found at last academic and personal shelter in North-America. By the critical and close reading of exemplary texts the seminar aims a comparison of the different horizons on historical truth. We will open up a wide range panorama of crucial perspectives which were important contribution to the American culture in the tradition of European “Geisteswissenschaften” (Humanities).   Field(s): MEU

HIST W3351 American Big Business and German Industry, 1900-2000. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

There is a great deal of research and debate on the role that the United States played in the reconstruction and recasting of Europe after World War II. This work is usually seen in the larger context not only of the East-West conflict since 1945, if not since 1917, but also as part of the process of the "Americanization" of the world. By the end of the 20th century this process is deemed to have been replaced by a trend toward "globalization" which is assumed to have started before 1914 until it was interrupted by two world wars, integral nationalism, the Great Depression of the 1930s, the struggles over decolonization and seemingly endless civil wars. It was only in the 1990s that "globalization" is said to have resumed where it stopped in 1914. Against the background of these wide-ranging scholarly debates that also revolved around notions of "modernization" of both economies and societies,  this course "homes in" on the development of German industry and its relationship with American big business before coming back, at the end of the semester, to the big questions that have been raised at the beginning. Field(s): US/MEU

HIST W3352 Europe in the Cold War. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar is dedicated to studying the historical developments of Europe in the Cold War, from the immediate aftermath of the Second World War until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. We will examine the major shifts in contemporary European history as they relate to Cold War conflicts and competitions, including the Yalta and Potsdam meetings; Marshall Plan reconstruction; the workings of NATO; the Prague Spring; non-proliferation movements; and Eurocommunism trends. We will consider a wide range of historical perspectives, including but not limited to political, geographic, economic, cultural, and military frameworks. Field(s): MEU

HIST W3353 Early Modern France. 3 points.

This course will offer a survey of French history from the Wars of Religion to the outbreak of the Revolution in 1789. This formative period witnessed the rise of the Bourbon monarchy, the crystallization of absolutism as a political theology, the spectacular rise and collapse of John Law's financial system, the emergence of the philosophe movement during the Enlightenment, and the gradual de-legitimation of royal power through its association with despotism. Thematically, the course will focus on shifting logics of representation-that is, the means by which political, economic and religious power was not only reflected, but also generated and projected, through a range of interrelated practices that include Catholic liturgy, courtly protocols, aristocratic codes of honor, fiscal experimentation, and the critical styles of thinking and reading inculcated by the nascent public sphere.

HIST W3359 Dreaming of the Future in the 1820s: The Birth of Modernity. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is to explore the mental horizon of the 1820s through the works of professional revolutionaries, artists, poets and writers, as well as via recent historical and literary studies. The period marked the intellectual origins of modernity and many of our key organizing principles - the very idea of socialism, liberalism and communism for instance - originated then. Readings connect political transformations in Europe and across the globe to a new sense of time and speed, history, technology and economics. Field(s): MEU

HIST W3360 British History From 1867: Between Democracy and Empire. 3 points.

This course surveys the main currents of British history from 1867 to the present, with particular attention to the changing place of Britain in the world and the changing shape of politics. Group(s): B Field(s): MWE

HIST W3369 The Long War of the 1940s: The Dutch Case in European History and Memory in WWII. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will examine the immediate impact and the longer-running legacies of the Second World War in the Netherlands, with reference to several other Western European nations (France, Belgium). The ‘Long War' will relate to the Second World War as history in the first place, discussing the place of the occupied nation(s) in ‘Hitler's Empire' (Mark Mazower). We also will take into account that the end of the war in Europe was followed by new kinds of external conflicts with strong internal repercussions: the Cold War and the first wave of European decolonization. The perspective will focus on the nation-states, endangered in its very existence by oppressive foreign occupation, subsequently in need of rebuilding and reinventing themselves against many odds. The second element of the seminar is the legacy of the ‘Long War', stretching over the generations to the present day. The Long War has been subject to a never-ending series of controversies in the public sphere that have profoundly influenced the historiography of the war in the different nations. In the course, we will explore the interconnections between politics of memory, historiography and cultural interpretations of the embattled past (films, novels, televised documentaries in particular). Field(s): MEU

HIST W3377 International and Global History Since WWII. 3 points.

In this course students will explore contemporary international and global history, focusing on how states have cooperated and competed in the Cold War, decolonization, and regional crises. But lectures will also analyze how non-governmental organizations, cross-border migration, new means of communication, and global markets are transforming the international system as a whole. Group(s): B, C, D Field(s): INTL

HIST W3380 The Idea of Europe. 4 points.

This course, a seminar open to both advanced undergraduates and graduates, will examine the "Idea of Europe" from the perspective of the European Union's formation, expansion, and the crises now confronting the idea of European unity. Our point of departure is the Netherlands, whose political and social structure are of interest in their own right and exemplify many of the aspirations of the union, and whose present struggles reveal some of the tensions that threaten the cohesion of the European community. Its social, economic and political history have culminated in an unusual set of institutions, an idiosyncratic approach to policy domains such as social security, labor relations, health care and education, and a highly consensus driven mode of interaction among national stakeholders on the interface of civic society and the political system. Students will explore particular issues in independent response papers corresponding to three themes selected, and will be invited to make use of comparative literature in dealing with a broader perspective on Europe. Field(s): MWE

HIST W3381 Visions of International Order. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar will attempt to offer a historical context for evaluating contemporary discussions of the role of the UN and the nature of international relations. It will cover the formation and metamorphoses of the United Nations itself, exploring in particular its role in the Cold War and in the decolonisation process. We will look too at why some international organisations [the IMF] appear to have flourished while others failed. Among the topics to be covered are the changing role of international law, sovereignty and human rights regimes, development aid as international politics, the collapse of the gold standard and its impact. We will end by looking at the politics of UN reform, and new theories of the role of institutions in global affairs, and ask what light they shed on the future of international governance now that the Cold War is over. Students will be expected to read widely in primary as well as secondary sources and to produce a research paper of their own. Field(s): MEU/US

HIST W3383 European Sexual Modernities. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores how conceptions of desire and sexuality, gendered and raced bodies, shaped major events and processes in modern Europe: the Enlightenment and European empires; political and sexual revolutions; consumption and commodity fetishism; the metropolis and modern industry; psychoanalysis and the avant-garde; fascism and the Cold War; secularization,and post-socialism. Featuring: political and philosophical tracts; law, literature and film. Field(s): MEU

HIST W3398 The Politics of Terror: The French Revolution. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

 This course examines the political culture of eighteenth-century France, from the final decades of the Bourbon monarchy to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. Among our primary aims will be to explore the origins of the Terror and its relationship to the Revolution as a whole. Other topics we will address include the erosion of the king's authority in the years leading up to 1789, the fall of the Bastille, the Constitutions of 1791 and 1793, civil war in the Vendée, the militarization of the Revolution, the dechristianization movement, attempts to establish a new Revolutionary calendar and civil religion, and the sweeping plans for moral regeneration led by Robespierre and his colleagues in 1793-1794. Field(s): MEU

HIST W3400 The American Presidency from George Washington to Barak Obama. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course looks at the American Presidency in historical perspective. It examines the powers of the office, its place in the American imagination, and the achievements of the most significant presidents. Structured chronologically, it emphasizes the growth and transformation of the office and how it has come to assume its dominant place in the political landscape. Individual presidents are studied to understand not only their own times but also salient issues with which they are associated (Jefferson and Adams with the rise of parties; Andrew Johnson with impeachment; etc.) Intermittent thematic lectures break from the chronological thrust of the course to explore aspects of the presidency in greater depth across time.

HIST W3406 American Beginnings. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of the economic and social history of British North America (with excursions into French, Dutch, and Native American communities) from 1607 to 1763. Major themes will include immigration, community structures, the household economy, slavery and other labor systems, and the cultural transformation of the colonies in the eighteenth century. Group(s): A, D

HIST W3411 The Rise of American Capitalism. 3 points.

E-Commerce & Internet Technologies Track, Managing Emerging Technologies Track, Project Management Track, Discussion Section Required, Lab Required

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people. Readings include major secondary works and primary documents. Formerly: American Society in the age of Capital, 1819-1897. Field(s): US

HIST W3412 Revolutionary America, 1750-1815. 3 points.

This course examines the cultural, political, and constitutional origins of the United States. It covers the series of revolutionary changes in politics and society between the mid-18th and early 19th centuries that took thirteen colonies out of the British Empire and turned them into an independent and expanding nation. Starting with the cultural and political glue that held the British Empire together, the course follows the political and ideological processes that broke apart and ends with the series of political struggles that shaped the identity of the US. Using a combination of primary and secondary materials relating to various walks of life and experience from shopping to constitutional debates, students will be expected to craft their own interpretations of this fundamental period of American history. Lectures will introduce students to important developments and provide a framework from them to develop their own analytical skills. Group(s): D Field(s): US

HIST W3414 Modern American Indian Social and Political History. 4 points.

This undergraduate lecture-seminar is about the making, endurance, and resurgence of modern American Indian nations. We will examine broadly the varied historical experiences of American Indians from the late 19thC to the present, with a special focus on the 20th century. We approach this study with an understanding that American Indians (as well as Native Hawaiians, and Alaska Natives) are and were actors in history and not just hapless victims of Euro-American imperialism and power. Over the semester, we will focus on the ways indigenous peoples in the United States adapted and responded to the host of stresses that accompanied the rapid and often violent social, cultural, and environmental transformations of the 19th and 20th centuries. We will historicize modern social and political issues in Indian Country and examine the processes of resistance, renewal, accommodation, and change from the reservation era to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the ways native people and their communities have met the challenges they have confronted as they persist in their efforts to preserve their homelands, their cultures, their sovereignty, and their rights to selfdetermination.

HIST W3415 Immigrant New York. 3 points.

This seminar explores the intersection of immigration, race, and politics in New York City, both from the perspective of history and in relation to contemporary realities. In this course we will discuss the ways in which immigration has reshaped the cultural, economic, and political life of New York City both in the past as well as the present. Readings will focus on the divergent groups who have settled in New York City, paying close attention to issues of gender, class, race, the role of labor markets, the law, and urban development.

HIST W3420 The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1919. 4 points.

Closed to first-year students.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The period known as the "Progressive Era" in the United States witnessed major transformations in American society. We will examine currents of social change and reform in the terms of mass immigration, urbanization, and industrialization; commercialized culture; Jim Crow segregation; and U.S. projects on the world stage. The seminar will include history, historiography, and a term paper based on original research in archival and other primary materials. Field(s): US

HIST W3421 The United States and Empire. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Though the U.S. is unquestionably the world’s most powerful nation, Americans and especially American politicians are reluctant to describe their nation as an imperial one. Drawing on comparative examples and theories of empire, this seminar investigates the diverse theaters of American power (military, colonial, economic, cultural) and the reactions to them, through an imperial lens. How can the concept of empire and the experiences of other empires help to explain the nature and development of the United States? We will analyze the intersection of structure and action in the shaping of American foreign policy, and ponder the shifting meaning of empire in U.S. public discourse. For the final paper, students will apply insights from the course to contemporary topics in U.S. policy and society.   Field(s): US

HIST W3429 Telling About the South. 4 points.

A remarkable array of Southern historians, novelists, and essayists have done what Shreve McCannon urges Quentin Compson to do in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!--tell about the South--producing recognized masterpieces of American literature.  Taking as examples certain writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, this course explores the issues they confronted, the relationship between time during which and about they wrote, and the art of the written word as exemplified in their work. Group(s): D Field(s): US  Limited enrollment. Priority given to senior history majors. After obtaining permission from the professor, please add yourself to the course wait list so the department can register you in the course.

HIST W3432 The United States In the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The coming of the Civil War and its impact on the organization of American society afterwards. Group(s): D

HIST W3441 Making of the Modern American Landscape. 3 points.

Social history of the built environment since 1870, looking at urban and rural landscapes, vernacular architecture of industry, housing, recreation, and public space. Considers government policies, real estate investment, and public debates over land use and the natural environment. Group(s): D

HIST W3448 US History Since 1945. 3 points.

Topics include the cold War, McCarthyism, the postwar economy, suburbanization, consumer culture, Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, and Watergate. Field(s): US

HIST W3449 American Urban History. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Although images of the frontier and of the west have long dominated the popular imagination of American history, in fact the United States urbanized rapidly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and 80 percent of the national population now lives in metropolitan areas of more than a million people.  How did big cities respond to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, transportation, housing, open space, and recreation?  The course will feature frequent field trips via ferry, foot, and bus. Field(s): US

HIST W3453 Politics of Slavery and Anti-slavery in the United States. 4 points.

This course examines how Americans definied and redefined the boundaries of freedom from the American Revolution to Reconstruction. In particular, it focuses on how the relationship between slavery and politics shaped the meaning(s) of freedom in this time period and how various political actors defined and manipulated this relationship to advocate for themselves. This course takes a broad definition of politics that includes not just the electoral realm but also the actions of disenfranchised political actors including slaves, women, and freedpeople.

HIST W3458 Public History in America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will explore some of the ways historical subjects can be, and have been, engaged outside of the traditional channels of scholarship. Among the many forms in which history and the historical memory are presented, we will examine exhibits, film and television productions, websites, reenactments, memorials and monuments, historical sites, oral history, performance, et al. We will use interdisciplinary critical literature and our own experiences to examine how this interactive process between the historian, the public, and the historical object/subject represents the American past. The seminar requires students to make visits to public history sites outside of scheduled class time. Field(s): US

HIST W3460 Topics in the History of Women and Gender. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Since the emergence of a field called "women's history" in the early 1970s, the amount of information we have gathered about women has mounted astronomically. Historians have discovered the presence of women in every aspect of American life and culture. In more recent years they have begun to ask a different kind of question. Does it matter?  If so, how?  What is a gender analysis and how, if at all, does it alter the way we look at our past? How does the new knowledge we have acquired change our understanding of America's past? Or does it? This course is intended to introduce you to some of the newest questions now being asked by historians of women and gender and to some of the intriguing information we have uncovered about women in the American past.  Along the way, we will explore how this material shapes our interpretations of U.S. history and examine the relationship between the history of women and the history of gender. Readings are organized roughly chronologically, moving through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and rotating around encounters with some of the most salient ideas in American life, including: Liberty, Democracy, Equality, Individualism, and Nationalism. At each juncture we will ask how introducing a gendered perspective changes our perceptions of the past. Field(s): US

HIST W3478 U.S. Intellectual History, 1865 To the Present. 3 points.

This course examines major themes in U.S. intellectual history since the Civil War. Among other topics, we will examine the public role of intellectuals; the modern liberal-progressive tradition and its radical and conservative critics; the uneasy status of religion ina secular culture; cultural radicalism and feminism; critiques of corporate capitalism and consumer culture; the response of intellectuals to hot and cold wars, the Great Depression, and the upheavals of the 1960s. Fields(s): US

HIST W3481 Culture, Memory and Crisis in Modern US History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How have Americans used culture as a means of responding to, interpreting, and memorializing periods of social, economic, and political crisis? Do these periods create breaks in cultural forms and practices?  Or do periods of significant upheaval encourage an impetus to defend cultural practices, thereby facilitating the "invention of tradition"? How are the emotional responses produced by critical moments--whether trauma, outrage, insecurity, or fear--turned into cultural artifacts?  And, finally, how are cultural crises memorialized? This course focuses on Americans' cultural responses to the lynching of black Americans in the era of World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II to answer these questions. We will examine a wide range of individual and collective cultural expressions, including anti-lynching plays and songs, WPA programs, the 1939 World's Fair, war photographs and radio broadcasts, the zoot suit and swing culture, and the military's effort to preserve culture in European war areas. Field(s): US

HIST W3483 Military History and Policy. 4 points.

This seminar features extensive reading, multiple written assignments, and a term paper, as well as a likely trip to Gettsyburg.  It focuses on the Civil War and on World Wars I and II. Group(s): D Field(s): US

HIST W3488 Warfare in the Modern World. 3 points.

This course is a survey of the transformation of warfare between the American Civil War and 1945. Emphasis will be placed on military strategy, weaponry, and leadership.

HIST W3491 U.S. Foreign Relations, 1890-1990. 3 points.

The aim is to provide an empirical grasp of U.S. foreign relations and to put in question the historiographical views of the periods and critical events that have come up to make that history. Emphasis will be put on determining how "the United States" has been grasped in relation to the world and how historiography has in turn grasped that retrospectively. Group(s): D Field(s): US

HIST W3503 Workers in Industrial and Post-Industrial America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The history of work, workers, and unions during the 20th century.  Topics include scientific management, automation, immigrant workers, the rise of industrial unionism, labor politics, occupational discrimination, and working-class community life. Field(s): US

HIST W3509 Problems in International History. 4 points.

The general object of this course is to illuminate how histories of the realm we think of as "international" are structured by means of key concepts, foundational concepts that form semantic fields of politics and policy. The seminar this year will be devoted, specifically, to the combined problem of representation, empire and world fairs, the fairs that enjoyed a particular vogue around 1900, outstandingly in France and the United States. Instructor's permission is required; please see: http://www.history.columbia.edu/undergraduate/seminars/index.html for more information.

HIST W3514 Immigrants in American History and Life. 3 points.

The course surveys patterns of migration and immigrant experience from colonial time to the present. Migration to the US is considered as part of the evolving global labor market and colonial expansion in the modern world. The class considers migration in different historical periods, the relationship of immigration to nation-building, national expansion, war, and the production and reproduction of national identity; the history of the legal regulation of immigration; the experience of immigrants in settling and negotiating life in a new society, and political debates surrounding the role of immigration in American society. Course materials include recent historical literature, fiction, primary-source documents, and film. Group(s): D

HIST W3523 History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States. 3 points.

Through assigned readings and a group research project, students will gain familiarity with a range of historical and social science problems at the intersection of ethnic/racial/sexual formations, technological networks, and health politics since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's health organization and care; HIV/AIDS politics, policy, and community response; "benign neglect"; urban renewal and gentrification; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; and environmental justice. There are no required qualifications for enrollment, although students will find the material more accessible if they have had previous coursework experience in United States history, pre-health professional (pre-med, pre-nursing, or pre-public health), African-American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies. 

HIST W3528 The Radical Tradition in America. 3 points.

Major expressions of American radicalism, ranging from early labor and communitarian movements to the origins of feminism, the abolitionist movement, and on to Populism, Socialism, and the "Old" and "New" lefts. Field(s): US

HIST W3535 History of the City of New York. 3 points.

The social, cultural, economic, political, and demographic development of America's metropolis from colonial days to present. Slides and walking tours supplement the readings (novels and historical works).Field(s): US

HIST W3540 History of the South. 3 points.

A survey of the history of the American South from the colonial era to the present day, with two purposes: first, to afford students an understanding of the special historical characteristics of the South and of southerners; and second, to explore what the experience of the South may teach about America as a nation. Group(s): D Field(s): US 

HIST W3544 Science and Technology in the United States from Franklin to Facebook. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An exploration in global context of science and technology in the United States and their dynamic roles in the larger society from the colonial period to recent years. Attention will be given to key figures and their contributions to the earth, physical, and biological sciences and to innovators and their achievements.  Among the major topics covered will be exploration, the agricultural, industrial, and information economies, the military and national defense, religion, culture, and the environment. Field(s): US

HIST W3556 Narcotics and the Making of America. 4 points.

This seminar examines the history of narcotics, including sugar, tobacco, alcohol, opiates, and marijuana, in America from the colonial period to the early twentieth-century. It pays particular attention to the intoxicating and stimulating opportunities New World agriculture presented, alcohol- including its role in relations with Native Americans-, how tobacco influenced Chesapeake political culture, the spread of opiates and their medicalization, and the politics of anti-narcotic reform. The course considers the broad matters of economic role, social use, and political context. Students will propose and must receive approval for a twenty-page research paper based on primary sources, and present primary sources for discussion to the class.

HIST W3566 History of American Popular Culture Through Music. 3 points.

This course examines the history of American popular culture through music and radio, beginning in the 1830s with minstrelsy, the first distinctively "American" popular culture, and ending in the 1960s with Motown.  The course acquaints students with key concepts that aim to "read" cultural production and to explore what's unique about culture primarily experienced through the ears.  It examines debates over culture's qualifiers, from popular to mass, high to low. Field(s): US

HIST W3569 U.S. in the Nuclear Age. 4 points.

The dropping of the first atomic bomb at the end of World War II ushered in a new era in American history. From here on, warfare posed the threat of total annihilation and Americans lived with anxiety over atomic weapons. But nuclear power, with the promise of endless energy, also reflected the hopes for a prosperous future. This course explores multiple paths Americans pursued toward securing peace and prosperity in the nuclear age and the challenges they faced along the way. Topics include the Cold War, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement, the energy crisis of the 1970s, the Middle East and terrorism, nuclear power, and global warming.

HIST W3575 Power and Place: Black Urban Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of African-American history since the Civil War. An emphasis is placed on the black quest for equality and community. Group(s): D Formerly listed as "Explorations of Themes in African-American History, 1865-1945". 

HIST W3584 Race, Technology, and Health. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: previous coursework in African-American history or social science; United States social history; or sociomedical sciences required.

Students will gain a solid knowledge and understanding of the health issues facing African Americans since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's heath organization and care; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; sickle cell anemia; and substance abuse. Group(s): D Field(s): US Formerly listed as "History of African-American Health and Health Movements".

HIST W3588 Substance Abuse Politics in African-American History. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Through a series of secondary- and primary-source readings and research writing assignments, students in this seminar course will explore one of the most politically controversial aspects in the history of public health in the United States as it has affected peoples of color: intoxicating substances. Course readings are primarily historical, but sociologists, anthropologists, and political scientists are also represented on the syllabus. The course's temporal focus - the twentieth century - allows us to explore the historical political and social configurations of opium, alcohol, heroin, cocaine, medical maintenance (methadone), the War on Drugs, the carceral state and hyperpolicing, harm reduction and needle/syringe exchange. This semester's principal focus will be on the origins and evolution of the set of theories, philosophies, and practices which constitute harm reduction. The International Harm Reduction Association/Harm Reduction International offers a basic, though not entirely comprehensive, definition of harm reduction in its statement, "What is Harm Reduction?" (http://www.ihra.net/what-is-harm-reduction): "Harm reduction refers to policies, programmes and practices that aim to reduce the harms associated with the use of psychoactive drugs in people unable or unwilling to stop. The defining features are the focus on the prevention of harm, rather than on the prevention of drug use itself, and the focus on people who continue to use drugs."[1] Harm reduction in many U.S. communities of color, however, has come to connote a much wider range of activity and challenges to the status quo. In this course we will explore the development of harm reduction in the United States and trace its evolution in the political and economic context race, urban neoliberalism, and no-tolerance drug war. The course will feature site visits to harm reduction organizations in New York City, guest lectures, and research/oral history analysis. This course has been approved for inclusion in both the African-American Studies and History undergraduate curricula (majors and concentrators). HIST W4588 will be open to both undergraduate and masters students. To apply, please complete the Google form at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1xaPFhQOzkl1NHnIjQIen9h41iel2hXAdhV59D5wH8AQ/viewform?usp=send_form. Questions may be directed to skroberts@columbia.edu.  

HIST W3597 Memory and American Narratives of the Self. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will use readings from the interdisciplinary study of memory (theory) to examine published and unpublished American letters, diaries, and autobiographies (practice). With regard to memory, we will be concerned with what is remembered, what is forgotten, and how this process occurs. We’ll explore concepts including collective/shared memory, commemoration, documentation, trauma, nation, autobiography, nostalgia, etc., and we’ll test this theory against written narratives of the self. The goals of the seminar are to explore theoretical concepts of memory, apply them to written examples of memory, and to develop proficiency in the use of these skills inside and outside an academic environment. This is a history course and many of the narratives we will read are American 19th-century texts. These will include, but not be limited to, those on the experience of the Civil War. The course requires participants to commit substantial time outside of class working with unpublished materials in Columbia’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library for assignments and as part of a final project. Field(s): US

HIST W3600 Russian and Soviet Jews: On the Move. 3 points.

Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

This is an introductory course for students with no prior knowledge about East European Jewry. It will provide an overview of Jewish life in Russia and the USSR in the modern era. Particular attention will be devoted to the huge changes that East European Jews underwent during these years – a period of repeated wars and massive changes in policy, demography and culture. The goal is to familiarize students with the history and culture of Jews in the former Soviet Union and their diasporas throughout the world.

HIST W3609 Marriage and Kinship in Medieval Egypt. 4 points.

This class will explore the everyday culture reflected in the Geniza manuscripts through the lens of kinship relations and family life. The course will introduce a range of genres of Geniza documents (court records, contracts and deeds, legal responsa, and personal letters). We will read examples of these documents alongside contemporary Jewish legal and literary works, Islamic literature, and recent work in medieval Islamic social history. Taking a comparative approach to this material, we will work to understand how the authors of these documents understood marriage, divorce, and parenthood, and how these relationships positioned individuals economically and socially within the broader communities in which they lived. In the process, you will learn how to use documents and literary sources as evidence for social history, as well as learn a great deal about Jews' everyday life in medieval Egypt.

HIST W3611 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity. 3 points.

Field(s): ANC

HIST W3615 'Tradition, Tradition': Growing Up in the Shtetl. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar will focus on traditional Jewish life, in the Eastern European towns known as shtetlekh, from the early modern period until late 19th century. Through study of various primary sources, mainly memoirs, autobiographies, stories and poetry, we will portray the everyday life, especially childhood and adolescence, and the confrontation between tradition and modernity. Field(s): JEW

HIST W3616 Jews and Christians in the Medieval World. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Medieval Jews and Christians defined themselves in contrast to one another. This course will examine the conditions and contradictions that emerged from competing visions and neighborly relations. It is arranged to comprehend broad themes rather than strict chronology and to engage both older and very recent scholarship on the perennial themes of tolerance and hate. Group(s): A Field(s): JWS

HIST W3618 The Modern Caribbean. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This lecture course examines the social, cultural, and political history of the islands of the Caribbean Sea and the coastal regions of Central and South America that collectively form the Caribbean region, from Amerindian settlement, through the era of European imperialism and African enslavement, to the period of socialist revolution and independence. The course will examine historical trajectories of colonialism, slavery, and labor regimes; post-emancipation experiences and migration; radical insurgencies and anti-colonial movements; and intersections of race, culture, and neocolonialism. It will also investigate the production of national, creole, and transborder indentities. Formerly listed as "The Caribbean in the 19th and 20th centuries". Field(s): LAC 

HIST W3628 History of the State of Israel, 1948-Present. 3 points.

The political, cultural, and social history of the State of Israel from its founding in 1948 to the present. Group(s): C Field(s): ME

HIST W3630 American Jewish History. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the interaction between the changing makeup of Jewish immigration, the changing social and aconomic conditions in the United States, and the religious, communal, cultural, and political group life of American Jews. Group(s): D

HIST W3636 Farming a New/Old Land: Remaking the Jewish Nation in Israel, the Americas and Europe. 3 points.

This is an introductory course for students with an interest in, but no significant prior knowledge, about modern Jewish and Israeli history. The goal of the course is to introduce students to trends in the development of practical ideologies in the Jewish world from the late-nineteenth century onward and also the actual manifestations of these ideologies “on the ground” on four continents. Throughout this period Zionism in its many forms preached the development of the Land of Israel. But other adjacent, and competitive, ideologies sought answers to the “Jewish question” in other places and by other means.  Our main subject will be the relatively unknown history of organized farming in the modern Jewish world that sprouted from these ideologies in the Americas, Europe and, of course, in Palestine/Israel starting in the last decades of the nineteenth century.  Agricultural settlement in the modern Jewish world lies at the intersection of history, national narratives, memory, historiography, economy and politics. We shall explore all of these through the lens of the ideas and practices of these hundreds of thousands of Jewish farmers and their urban supporters. One cannot fully understand the contours of contemporary Israel, or Jewish communities throughout the diaspora, without taking into account the role of these agricultural endeavors.

HIST W3640 Jewish Women and Family, 1000-1800. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will explore the changing lives of Jewish women in the medieval Islamic and Christian worlds, based on readings of primary sources. We will examine Jewish women's roles in religious and ritual life, in the family, in educational systems and in the economy, and we will compare Jewish women's experiences to those of Christian and Muslim women from the medieval through the early-modern period.

Group(s): A

Field(s): JEW/ME

HIST W3644 Modern Jewish Intellectual History. 4 points.

This course analyzes Jewish intellectual history from Spinoza to 1939. It tracks the radical transformation that modernity yielded in Jewish life, both in the development of new, self-consciously modern, iterations of Judaism and Jewishness and in the more elusive but equally foundational changes in "traditional" Judaisms. Questions to be addressed include: the development of the modern concept of "religion" and its effect on the Jews; the origin of the notion of "Judaism" parallel to Christianity, Islam, etc.; the rise of Jewish secularism and of secular Jewish ideologies, especially the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), modern Jewish nationalism, Zionism, Jewish socialism, and Autonomism; the rise of Reform, Modern Orthodox, and Conservative Judaisms; Jewish neo-Romanticism and neo-Kantianism, and Ultra-Orthodoxy.

HIST W3657 Medieval Jewish Cultures. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will survey some of the major historical, cultural, intellectual and social developments among Jews from the fourth century CE through the fifteenth. We will study Jewish cultures from the Christianization of the Roman Empire, the age of the Talmuds, the rise of Islam, the world of the Geniza, medieval Spain, to the early modern period. We will look at a rich variety of primary texts and images, including mosaics, poems, prayers, polemics, and personal letters. Field(s): JEW/MED 

HIST W3659 Crime in Latin America. 4 points.

This seminar will focus on studies that take a historical look at crime in the Latin American context and will bring the discussion to the present. Transnational connections and comparisons will be encouraged, particularly as we explore the history and contemporary phenomenon of drug trafficking, incorporating the United States as a factor and a scene for Latin American crime. Readings, discussions and reports will try to identify commonalities across Latin American and dig deeper on some specific places and moments. In order to do this, we will devote part of the semester to the analysis of primary sources, and will require a research component in the final paper. Group(s): D Field(s): LA

HIST W3660 Latin American Civilization I. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from pre-Columbian times to 1810. Global Core Approved Group(s): A, D Field(s): *LA 

HIST W3661 Latin American Civilization II. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from 1810 to present. Group(s): D Field(s): LA 

HIST W3662 Slave Memory in Brazil: Public History and Audiovisual Narratives in Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The research on the making of racial identities in Brazil and on the history of Brazilian black culture and black social movements have increased significantly in the last twenty years, dialoguing directly with the idea of being part of the African diaspora at the Atlantic. The discussion of the content of audiovisual resources related with this process allows connecting the contemporary discussion about public memory of slavery in Brazil with the globalized perspective of politics of identity in the Atlantic World.

HIST W3663 Mexico From Revolution To Democracy. 3 points.

Twentieth-Century Mexican History from the revolution to transition  to democracy. The Course review politics, society, culture, foreign relations, and urbanization. Group(s): D Field(s): LA

HIST W3673 Latin American Popular Culture. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course we will study the popular culture of Latin America from a historical perspective. The primary sources, secondary texts, audiovisual materials, and lectures will give students a solid basis to understand the importance of popular culture in the formation of Latin American nationalisms, political processes, economic transformations, and demographic changes. Starting from the time of first contact with the Europeans and going up to the mid-twentieth century, we will focus on art, music, literature, and dance, as well as sports, film, and food. We will explore the role that institutions played in attempting to regulate the daily experiences and interactions among various socioeconomic groups, but we will also study how the "popular classes" contributed to shape the cultural practices of the elites across the continent.

HIST W3674 Cuba and Latin America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this colloquium we will examine what the Cold War meant in a Latin American context and how historians today are interpreting it. We will primarily be focusing on new conceptual frameworks and historiographical trends that have emerged in the last decade as a result of archival openings, oral histories and the publication of memoirs. Although it would be helpful to have a background in US-Latin American relations and/or Latin American history it is not a prerequisite of the course. Because the colloquium is largely structured chronologically, students will gain an understanding of events, turning points, and developments in Latin America throughout the twentieth century that will allow them to understand the region's past. It worth underlining that this is not a course about US interventions in the region, although the United States often contributed to the way in which the Cold War in Latin America unfolded. Instead, we will be focusing squarely on Latin American perspectives and looking at what the Cold War meant to those inside the region. Specifically, we will be addressing the role of ideology and ideological struggles in twentieth-century Latin America; how these ideas responded to the challenges of modernity and development; why Marxism was popular in the region and how it was interpreted; the extent to which it influenced nationalists and revolutionaries; and who opposed it, why, and how. Throughout the semester we will be focusing in on international and intra-regional dimensions to the conflict as well as transnational stories of exile and movements. Students will therefore also be exploring how events in one part of Latin America impacted upon people in other areas of region either directly or indirectly. In this respect, we will be paying particular attention to the overthrow of Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, the Cuban Revolution's impact on revolutionary and counter- evolutionary trends in Latin America in the 1960s, the significance of the Brazilian coup of 1964 and the subsequent influence that Brazil's military regime had in shaping politics the Southern Cone. The colloquium is also designed to allow students to examine how Latin American populations, parties, leaders and exiles interacted with their contemporaries in other parts of the world and to draw comparisons. Field(s): LA

HIST W3676 History of Cuba from Late Spanish Colonialiism to the Present. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An exploration of Cuba's late colonial period, wars of independence, republican/neocolonial period, 1933 and 1959 revolutions, and eras under the governments of Fidel and Raúl Castro, including recent history.  Topics considered will include: Cuban sovereignty; the agricultural basis of the Cuban economy under colonialism and neocolonialism; enslaved labor and abolition; social and political struggles, both nonviolent and armed; the development of Cuban nationalisms, with an emphasis on the roles of race, diaspora, and exile in this process; Cuban-U.S. relations over many decades; and Cuba's role as a global actor, particularly after the 1959 revolution. Field(s): LA

HIST W3678 Indigenous Worlds in Early Latin America. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This undergraduate seminar deals with the presence of indigenous peoples in Latin American colonial societies and aims to analyze indigenous responses to conquest and colonization. How did indigenous people see themselves and interact with other groups? What roles did they play in shaping Latin American societies? What spaces were they able to create for themselves? These and similar questions will guide our discussion through the semester. The course will offer a survey of all the main indigenous groups; however, the case studies are by necessity just a selection, and quite a few come from Mexico, reflecting the state of the scholarship in the field.

HIST W3683 Violence and History in Latin America. 4 points.

  This course will build the conceptual tools to understand Latin American violence in a historical perspective. We will look at violence as a component of oppressive power, class and gender relations. We will also consider the productive effects of violence, as violent practices constitute politics, nationalism, masculinity and revolutionary thought. We will also look at the way in which violence, particularly state but also revolutionary violence, generated enduring social efforts to seek justice and preserve the memory of victims. The course will combine readings on theory, history and the social sciences intended to build a historical perspective. In the second half of the semester, the focus will turn to the research and writing of a paper that will be based on primary sources but will also engage the readings from the first part of the semester. 

HIST W3688 1968 in Latin America: Leftist Radicalism and Youth Counterculture in Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on the cases of Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay to explore the complex relationships between social conflict, youth counterculture, and leftist radicalism which characterized the 1960s all over the region.  In-depth reading and discussion of a number of relevant primary sources and available scholarship in English will build a foundation for thinking through these issues.  In the first part of the class, we will analyze the political mobilization and cultural modernization in the framework of the conflicts that shaped the Cold War in the subcontinent.  After this general introduction, we will focus on 1968 to examine the impact of countercultural ideas and practices on different political traditions, particularly student and leftist politics.  Next we will analyze the rise and fall of the New Left, which challenged the ideological commitment, political strategies, and conservative cultural politics of the traditional left. Discussion will incorporate conventional views and recent academic debates on this shift in the region, which also addressing the spiraling of state repression that forced both old and new groups to reconsider strategies in the three countries under examination.  Finally, students will be encouraged to assess how all of these events and themes echoed in social memory through cultural representations and their increasing power to either legitimize or discredit political positions. Field(s): LA

HIST W3689 Human Rights Activism in Latin America, 1970s-1990s. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focusing on the cases of  Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay, this course examines the birth and development of the movements that protested human rights violations by right-wing authoritarian regimes in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. In the first part of the class, we will explore some of the basic concerns that historians, political theorists, and social scientists have raised about authoritarian regimes in late twentieth-century South America. We will aim at concocting a working definition of authoritarianism, discussing the emergence of a new authoritarian model in the Southern Cone and examining the specific challenges confronted by the human rights movements. After this brief survey, the class will focus on the different ways of dealing with the repressive, legal, and political legacies of these regimes. We will analyze the first efforts at denunciation launched by political exiles and transnational human rights groups, as well as the formation of groups of victims' relatives that aimed at exposing ongoing abuses in their countries. We will also study the role of human rights claims during the transitional periods and the ways in which the post-transitional democratic governments faced these calls for accountability. The course will make a basic distinction between concrete legal actions taken to punish those accused of human rights violations, where the state was called to play a decisive role, and more disorganized efforts to know what happened and spread this knowledge to the society at large. We will explore this distinction, discussing how different actors posed their claims and constructed narratives to account for human rights violations and past political violence. This exploration will include the existing literature on justice and truth telling in the politics of transition, as well as scholarship on social memory and historical commemorations. Field(s): LA

HIST W3701 Ottoman Empire. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will cover the seven-century long history of the Ottoman Empire, which spanned Europe, Asia, and Africa as well as the medieval, early modern, and modern periods. The many levels of continuity and change will be the focus, as will issues of confessional diversity, imperial governance, and political belonging within the empire and of the empire within larger regional and global phenomena over the centuries. 

HIST W3705 History of Modern Egypt. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate lecture course explores the events and currents that shaped the course of modern Egyptian history over the last two centuries. It ranges from the mid-18th century to present and covers such themes as Egypt under Ottoman, French and British rule; Egypt's dynastic rule, and its relation to neighbouring states in the 19th century; nationalism, modernism and feminism, and the role of cinema, literature and the politics of ideas in the 20th; and, finally, the regimes of Nasser, Sadat and Mubarak and their relation to the region and the wider world. Field(s): ME

HIST W3713 Orientalism and the Historiography of the Other. 4 points.

This course will examine some of the problems inherent in Western historical writing on non-European cultures, as well as broad questions of what itmeans to write history across cultures. The course will touch on therelationship between knowledge and power, given that much of the knowledge we will be considering was produced at a time of the expansion of Western power over the rest of the world. By comparing some of the "others" which European historians constructed in the different non-western societies they depicted, and the ways other societies dealt with alterity and self, we may be able to derive a better sense of how the Western sense of self was constructed. Group(s): C Field(s): ME

HIST W3715 Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Early Islamic World. 4 points.

This seminar examines how religion worked as a social and political category in the early Islamic world. In the seventh century, the Middle East was populated by a diverse mix of Christians, Jews, pagans, and others. By the eleventh century, most of these people’s descendants were Muslims; those who had not converted to Islam were mostly Jews and Christians. This transformation changed what it meant to belong to a religious community, for Muslims, Jews, and Christians alike. We will examine this enormous historical change and its outcome, focusing on the social and political contexts of conversion in the first Islamic centuries (7th-10th) and on the social, political, cultural, and intellectual dimensions of religious communal life in the period immediately after (11th-12th centuries).

HIST W3716 History of Islamic Societies. 0 points.

Focus on religions, conversion, ethnic relations, development of social institutions, and the relationship between government and religion. Field(d): ME

HIST W3719 History of the Modern Middle East. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

This course will cover the history of the Middle East from the 18th century until the present, examining the region ranging from Morocco to Iran and including the Ottoman Empire. It will focus on transformations in the states of the region, external intervention, and the emergence of modern nation-states, as well as aspects of social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the region. Field(s): ME

HIST W3722 America and the Muslim World. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Taking the events of September 11, 2001, and their aftermath as a point of departure, this course will begin by investigating in parallel histories of two sibling religious societies: Islam and western Christendom.  It will outline the European antecedents of American understandings and misunderstandings of the Muslim world down to World War I in comparison with Muslim experiences with, and selective efforts to appropriate, aspects of European society and thought over the same period. Field(s): INTL

HIST W3732 The Post-Ottoman World. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

In this seminar we will put the histories of the modern Balkans and Middle East in conversation by seeing them through the lens of the "post-Ottoman world." Moving beyond the national histories of countries such as Turkey, Greece, Egypt, Lebanon, Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia, we will examine the common dilemmas and divergent paths of a variety of groups, institutions, and individual figures throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Field(s): ME

HIST W3742 Modern Turkey. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Bulletin description: In this course we will explore the relationships between intellectual, social, cultural and political history of the Republic of Turkey. We will discuss questions of continuity from the Ottoman Empire, Turkey's predecessor state, and continue through the interwar, Cold War, and post-Cold War periods. Issues to be explored include Turks and their Others, political belonging within Turkey and the place of Turkey in the wider region(s) around it. Field(s): ME

HIST W3755 Oil and the History of Arab Gulf States. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar focuses on how the discovery and exploitation of petroleum at the turn of the 20th century has shaped the formation and consolidation of Arab states of the Persian Gulf, permanently changing the geo-political and social landscape of the Arabian Peninsula. We will study economic, social, and political formations across the Gulf on the eve of the discovery of oil and the attendant transformations that accompanied its exploitation. We will also pay close attention to the role that imperial rivalries and foreign oil companies played in shaping the Gulf states, their economies, systems of rule, foreign relations, borders, and built environment. We also study the populist, anti-imperialist movements of the mid-twentieth century in the context of the "Arab Cold War". Saudi Arabia has received more academic attention than the other Gulf states and thus takes up a larger part of the course, but we will also cover Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, UAE and Oman. We will read historical, anthropological, literary and political economy studies and oil firm histories, drawing on works on Yemen, Iraq, Iran, and the US, to follow transformations in political, social and economic life in this understudied region that has played a central role in world politics and economy since the 1900s. Field(s): ME

HIST W3764 History of East Africa: Early Time to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of East African history over the past two millennia with a focus on political and social change. Themes include early religious and political ideas, the rise of states on the Swahili coast and between the Great Lakes, slavery, colonialism, and social and cultural developments in the 20th century.  This course fulfills the Global Core requirement. Field(s): AFR  

HIST W3772 West African History. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course offers a survey of main themes in West African history over the last millenium, with particular emphasis on the period from the mid-15th through the 20th century. Themes include the age of West African empires (Ghana, Mali, Songhay); re-alignments of economic and political energies towards the Atlantic coast; the rise and decline of the trans-Atlantic trade in slaves; the advent and demise of colonial rule; and internal displacement, migrations, and revolutions. In the latter part of the course, we will appraise the continuities and ruptures of the colonial and post-colonial eras. Group(s): C Field(s): AFR 

HIST W3800 Gandhi's India. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focus on the history of modern India, using the life and times of Mohandas Gandhi as the basis for not only an engagement with an extraordinary historical figure, but also for a consideration of a great variety of historical issues, including the relationship between nationalism and religion, caste politics in India and affirmative action policies in the United States today, and racism as encountered by Gandhi in relation to colonialism and the Civil Rights movement in the U.S. Field(s): SA 

HIST W3803 The Worlds of Mughal India. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course provides a political and social history of India from the 16th-19th century, focusing on the Mughal empire. Two central concerns: first, the Mughal regnal politics towards their rival imperial concerns within India and West Asia (the Maratha, the Rajput, the Safavid, the Ottoman); and second, the foreign gaze onto the Mughals (via the presence of Portuguese, English, and French travelers, merchants, and diplomats in India). These interlocked practices (how Mughals saw the world and how the world saw the Mughals) will allow us develop a nuanced knowledge of universally acknowledged power of the early modern world. 

HIST W3811 South Asia II: Empire and Its Aftermath. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: None.

(No prerequisite.) We begin with the rise and fall of the Mughal Empire, and examine why and how the East India Company came to rule India in the eighteenth century. As the term progresses, we will investigate the objectives of British colonial rule in India and we will explore the nature of colonial modernity. The course then turns to a discussion of anti-colonial sentiment, both in the form of outright revolt, and critiques by early nationalists. This is followed by a discussion of Gandhi, his thought and his leadership of the nationalist movement. Finally, the course explores the partition of British India in 1947, examining the long-term consequences of the process of partition for the states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. We will focus in particular on the flowing themes: non-Western state formation; debates about whether British rule impoverished India; the structure and ideology of anti-colonial thought; identity formation and its connection to political, economic and cultural structures. The class relies extensively on primary texts, and aims to expose students to multiple historiographical perspectives for understanding South Asia's past.

HIST W3859 Asian Migration to the U.S.. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course explores the history of migration from Asia to, and throughout, the United States and North, Central and South America from the late 19th to the early 21st century. The goal of the course is to explore how and why people moved, their experiences in settlement and sojourning and their impact on life in the Americas. The course consists of a combination of readings, discussions, and research workshops.

HIST W3902 History of the World to 1450 CE. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement, Discussion Section Required

This course presents and at the same time critiques a narrative world history from prehistoric times to 1500. The purpose of the course is to convey an understanding of how this rapidly growing field of history is being approached at three different levels: the narrative textbook level, the theoretical-conceptual level, and through discussion sections, the research level. All students are required to enroll in a weekly discussion section. Graded work for the course consists of two brief (5 page) papers based on activities in discussion sections as well as a take-home midterm and a final examination. Field(s): *ANC/ME 

HIST W3903 History of the World from 1450 CE to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course presents and at the same time critiques a narrative world history from 1500 to the present. The purpose of the course is to convey an understanding of how this rapidly growing field of history is being approahced at three different levels: the narrative textbook level, the theoretical-conceptual level, and, through discussion sections, the research level. All students are required to enroll in a weekly discussion section. Graded work for the courses consists of two brief (5 page) papers based on activities in discussion sections as well as a take-home midterm and final examination. Graduate students who enroll in the course must take a discussion section conducted by the instructor and can expect heavier reading assignments. Field(s): INTL 

HIST W3904 History of Finance. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course surveys the history of modern finance, from the origin of novel banking institutions in early-modern Italy (like the Medici Bank, founded 1397) to the financial crisis of 2008. "Finance," broadly understood as the activity of allocating capital (in particular, money) within communities, will be examined from a variety of historical perspectives-economic, political, intellectual, cultural. While the course often emphasizes "high" finance in centers of Western financial power (Florence in the 1400s, London in the 1800s, New York in the 2000s), careful attention is paid to how financial activities in such global centers have impacted people across different socioeconomic and geographic locations, from "Wall St." to "Main St." and from Illinois to Argentina.

HIST W3906 Quantifying People: A History of Social Science. 3 points.

This course examines the history of the quest to understand human society scientifically. The focus will be on one specific approach to social investigation-quantification-which has been central to the historical development of "social science" and which has become especially esteemed in the 21st-century "data" age. Built around careful reading of primary social-scientific texts, the course will span from the "political arithmetic" of the 17th century through the late 20th century, touching upon the historical aspects of several modern social-science disciplines (economics, sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science). We will explore past attempts to count, calculate, measure, and model many dimensions of human social life: population, wealth, health, happiness, intelligence, crime, deviance, race. We will pay particular attention to how social-scientific numbers have not only reflected, but transformed, the individuals and communities they sought to measure. Readings will include Condorcet, Thomas Malthus, W. S. Jevons, Emile Durkheim, Francis Galton, Franz Boas, Richard Herrnstein & Charles Murray, and Ian Hacking.

HIST W3909 Information Revolutions. 4 points.

Surveying major moments in history of information technologies, this course introduces students to major kinds of historical inquiry-philosophical, engineering, labor, material, social, and cultural-necessary to understand the creation and impact of computers and other information technologies in the last 150 years.

HIST W3911 Medicine and Western Civilization. 4 points.

This seminar seeks to analyze the ways by which medicine and culture combine to shape our values and traditions. To this end, it will examine notable literary, medical, and social texts from classical antiquity to the present.

HIST W3914 Future as History. 4 points.

An introduction to the historical origins of forecasting, projections, long-range planning, and future scenarios. Topics include apocalyptic ideas and movements, utopias and dystopias, and changing conceptions of time, progress, and decline. A key theme is how relations of power, including understandings of history, have been shaped by expectations of the future.

HIST W3919 Modernity and Nation in the Twentieth Century. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course compares and contrasts the paths to modernity of four societies: China, Germany, Japan, and Italy. By adopting a comparative approach, and looking closely at the way that international contexts influenced domestic developments, this course will give students the chance to view history from outside the nation-state focus that tended to dominate history in the past. In this sense, while students are expected to expand their familiarity with the basic history of these countries, more important will be the capacity to think about the world from multiple perspectives. Key topics include national consolidation, the growth of nationalist sentiment, imperialism and fascism, the impact of World War II and the Cold War, and historical memory. Based largely on primary sources, the course presents modernity both as understood by each of these societies and also in its global interconnectedness, an interconnectedness that shapes our world today. Field(s): MEU/EA

HIST W3920 Re-Imagining Cuba, 1868-Present. 3 points.

This course explores Cuban/U.S. relations from the nineteenth century to the present. Drawing upon monographs, travel writings, primary documents, and audio/visual materials, students will examine the complex interactions between the island’s population and their U.S. American neighbors across all facets of society. While this is a course primarily rooted in Cuban history, its primary goal is to encourage students to write transnational histories of Cuban/U.S. interaction. 

HIST W3926 Historical Origins of Human Rights. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Dedicated to four main topics on human rights: 1) long-term origins; 2)short-term origins; 3) evolution through the present; 4) moral defenses and ideological criticisms Field(s): INTL

HIST W3929 War and Memory. 4 points.

This course provides an overview on the remembering of wars and conflicts, at a global scale, in the 20th and 21th centuries. It intends to present how and why this issue became a central one in contemporary politics, culture, and society. It is based on my own research and a large experience as an expert for many French and European private and public institutions. It offers first a general framework, presenting the theories and methods used in the field of “Memory Studies” through the writings of major authors like Maurice Halbwachs and the invention of the concept of “collective memory”, or Pierre Nora and the invention of the “history of memory”. It addresses than a series of examples throughout contemporary history: the memory of WWI and WWII in a short and a long-term perspective; the question of the Holocaust; the issue Colonial wars, Communism, and the memory of other Genocides in the XXth and XXIth centuries. It ends with the study of some specific testimonies and monuments, in a comparative perspective. 

HIST W3940 Science Across Cultures. 3 points.

HIST W3943 Cultures of Empire. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Empires have been consistent - but ever changing - forms of rule in the modern world. This course explores how empires and imperialism have connected the world by forging new forms of politics and culture from 1850 to 2011. It examines key dimensions of imperialism such as nationalism, capitalism, racism, and fascism in Asia, Europe, Africa, and America. Based largely on primary sources - novels, memoirs, official documents, and visual arts, including photographs and film - the course presents imperialism both as experienced in different societies and also in its global interconnectedness. Field(s): INTL 

HIST W3948 Capitalism in Crisis 2007-2015: A Global History of the Great Recession. 4 points.

The Financial Crisis that struck the United States and Europe in 2007 is the most severe in history. We are still living with its fall out. This course will explore the history of the crisis and the political reaction to it. We will explore how the crisis radiated out from the Atlantic economy where it originated to the rest of the world economy.

HIST W3979 Childhood and Policy in Europe & the U.S.. 4 points.

This course explores the relationship between changing perceptions of childhood and the development of social policies over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the United States and Europe. Conceiving of childhood as a social construct, rather than a fixed and biological stage of life, historians of childhood have focused on the experiences of children to understand how society perceives of itself and how it has been affected by economic, political, intellectual, and social shifts over time. In this course, we will ask what might explain similarities and differences in how childhood was perceived across regions and cultures? The course focuses on how various class, racial, and gender inequalities affected the material experience of children in the past and how these clashed with ideologies of childhood, examining whether it is possible for a child to not experience a childhood. We will also concentrate on the place of children in the emergence of welfare state programs, paying particular attention to the burgeoning influence of the medical and social sciences. We will ask: what is the relationship between children and the national community? What are some of the instrumental ways in which childhood was used to shape the values or norms of the citizenry? How did concerns about child protection, and tensions regarding the public or private responsibility for children’s well-being, shape the formation of social policy?

HIST W3993 Healthcare and the Welfare State. 4 points.

This course examines state-based guarantees to healthcare through a comparative analysis of different welfare states. It asks why unlike most other advanced, industrial, and wealthy countries, the United States has not guaranteed a right to healthcare. Depending on the country, the place of healthcare amidst other demands for social insurance, which includes unemployment benefits, parental leave, childcare, and pensions varies widely. This course aims towards a closer understanding of the political and social choices that influence whether healthcare is a social right.

HIST W3997 World War II in History and Memory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An exploration of the changes in public memory of World War Two in different countries in Asia, Europe, and North America over the past sixty-five years, with particular attention to the heightened interest in the war in recent decades and the relation of this surge of memory to what we used to call history. Field: INTL

HIST W4001 The Eastern Mediterranean in the Late Bronze Age. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A comparative study of the histories of Egypt, the Near East, Anatolia, and the Aegean World in the period from c. 1500-1100 BC, when several of the states provide a rich set of textual and archaeological data. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W4007 Development of the Greek City-State. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will trace the development of the polis or city-state as the dominant socio-political unit in ancient Greece, looking at how and why this development took place and what effect it had on Greek society and culture. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W4008 Wealth and Poverty in the Classical World. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

The seminar will combine cultural with economic history, but with more stress on the former. The aim is to investigate the meaning of being rich and being poor among the Greeks and Romans, that is to say in a pre-industrial society, with special attention to methods of research. We shall discuss among other topics ways of getting rich, contempt for wealth, safety nets, ostentation, consumption choices, bribery, markers of well-being - and money. The time period will extend from Homer to about 250 CE. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W4010 The Roman World in Late Antiquity. 4 points.

This course explores the social history, cultural and economic history of the Roman Empire in late antiquity.  This period, from 284 to 642 AD, begins with the accession of Diocletian and ends with the Islamic conquest of Egypt.  The course focuses primarily on the eastern half of the Roman Empire, which presents a political unity absent from the western half of the Roman Empire and its successor states in the same period.  It will explore the decline of traditional (pagan) religions and the role of Christianity in this period.  The rise of monasticism; the role of Christian holy men; and the doctrinal disputes that caused internal rifts throughout the Christian world will require special attention.  The course will approach the social history of the city and the countryside through specific case studies: riots in Alexandria and peasant agency in Syria and Egypt.  The course will explore the poetry, rhetoric and philosophy that comprised an important part of elite culture in this period, and also attempt to use chariot racing and the circus factions to access the culture of the masses.  Exploration of economic history will focus on an emerging gap in the field’s historiography between materialists who see the period as one of rising oppression of the peasantry by a profit-driven elite on the one hand and papyrologists who see a risk-averse elite working alongside an entrepreneurial and growing middle class on the other hand.  The semester will close with a study in micro-history, the Roman Egyptian village of Aphrodito, its leading families and its agricultural working classes whose lives are recorded in the documentary papyri.

HIST W4024 The Golden Age of Athens. 4 points.

The 5th century BCE, beginning with the Persian Wars, when the Athenians fought off the might of the Persian Empire, and ending with the conclusion of the Peloponnesian War in 404, is generally considered the "Golden Age" of ancient Athens. This is the century when Athenian drama, both tragedy and comedy, throve; when the Greeks began to develop philosophy at Athens, centered around the so-called "Sophistic movement" and Sokrates; when classical Greek art and architecture approached perfection in the monuments and sculptures of the great Athenian building programs on and around the Akropolis. This seminar will cover the political, military, economic, social, and cultural history of Athens' "Golden Age". Much of the course reading will be drawn from the ancient Athenian writing themselves, in translation. Everyone will be required to read enough to participate in weekly discussions; and all students will prepare two oral reports on topics to be determined. The course grade will be based on a ca. 20-25 page research paper to be written on an agreed upon topic. Group(s): A Field(s): *ANC

HIST W4045 Rome: A Preindustrial Metropolis. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Ancient Rome from the 1st century BCE to the beginning of the 5th Century  AD had about one million inhabitants. This demographic density is an exceptional feature among all preindustrial societies, equalled by London only at the beginning of the nineteenth century.. After a short theoretical introduction to the subject of urbanism in pre-industrial societies and in particular in the classical period, the seminar will focus on  three issues: the demographic trend of the city, the grain and water supply and the actual organization of water and grain distribution, and  the role of the imperial court and government in building activities, feeding the people and assuring basic administrative services. Special attention will be paid to quantitative aspects of the social and economic history of the city. A wide range of sources will be examined: literary and juridical texts, inscriptions, archaeological and topographic evidence. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W4046 Egypt, Ethiopia and Nubia in Late Antiquity. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This is a fifteen-week undergraduate seminar.  It is designed to provide an introduction to the late antique period of the three great civilizations of the ancient Nile Valley, Egypt, Ethiopia and Nubia.  Course material will cover the social and religious history of Egypt under Roman rule; the collapse of the ancient Nubian civilization of Meroe; the emergence of its independent successor kingdoms; the birth of a centralized and literate society in the Ethiopian highlands; the Christianization of Egypt, Nubia, and Ethiopia; and the survival of all three civilizations in the early medieval period, Egypt under Islamic rule and Nubia and Ethiopia as independent powers. Field(s): ANC*

HIST W4053 Roman Coins in Context. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to the study of coins as historical disciplines. It will provide a survey of the production and use of coinage in the Roman world from the 3rd century BC to the 3rd century AD.  Students will also asses the contribution that the study of coinage makes to the study of Roman social, economic, and political history. The majority of the course will take place at the American Numismatic Society. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W4061 Medieval Society, Politics, and Ethics: Major Texts. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar examines major texts in social and political theory and ethics written in Europe and the Mediterranean region between the fifth and the fifteenth centuries CE.  Students will be assigned background readings to establish historical context, but class discussion will be grounded in close reading and analysis of the medieval sources themselves. Field(s): MED

HIST W4063 Love and Hate in the Early Medieval Societies. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine the role of love and hate and their changing place in the culture of the elite groups from Late Antiquity to the twelfth century. Medieval chronicles, poems, letters and legal texts, both religious and civil, will be used, deconstructed and decoded with a special attention to gender and to the emotional relations between men and women. Field(s): MED

HIST W4065 Urban Culture in the Dutch Golden Age. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In the celebrated words of the 17th-century English ambassador Sir William Temple the Dutch Republic was "the fear of some, the envy of others, and the wonder of all their neighbors." This course introduces students to this powerful new state that arose from the epic revolt of the Netherlands against Spanish rule in the late sixteenth century. It analyzes how the federation of seven ‘united' provinces, a political anomaly in a time of centralized monarchies, became an economic superpower. A modern ‘bourgeois' society dominated by merchants and professional administrators rather than by noblemen, prelates, and aristocrats, the Dutch Republic built a colonial empire reaching from Brazil to Japan. It was the first European state to practice religious toleration on a large scale, while it produced artistic riches by the likes of Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Hals that are still treasured today. This course provides a varied and dynamic picture of a highly urbanized society in a period that the Dutch with good reason call their ‘Golden Age'.   Field(s): EME

HIST W4076 Devotional Objects in Medieval and Early Modern Christianity. 4 points.

This course will consider the history of religious objects from ca. 1200 to ca. 1600 mostly in northern Europe, examining both what kind of religious "charge" they carried and what sorts of ambivalence and/or rejection they met with in the period of the Protestant Reformation. Although we will spend approximately half the course time studying examples of what we would today call "art"-that is panel paintings, miniatures, and statues-we will place these in the context of other sorts of things (for example, relics of the saints, the Eucharist, and religious clothing) that also expressed the sacred through their materiality, as well as in the context of written sources.

HIST W4081 Building Forever: Rome through its Monuments, Antiquity and the Middle Ages. 4 points.

How did a small Italian settlement by the Tiber River rise to become the capital of a vast Mediterranean Empire? How did this same city reinvent itself as the spiritual capital of Western Christendom? How were these dramatic changes registered, recorded, remembered, forgotten or erased in the urban fabric? This course ‘reads’ the multilayered city of Rome from its origins through the Middle Ages: Part I: From Village to Empire; Part II: A Christian Capital; Part III: Reform and Renewal in the Middle Ages. Each meeting focuses on select sites or monuments in the city, each paired with a primary text, to consider larger economic, social, cultural, religious, and political changes taking place in Rome and the impact that they had on the urban landscape. Throughout, we will delve into the methodological challenges faced by scholars in understanding these changes. Students will be encouraged to think creatively about the intersections of history and legend and the participation of monuments in their wider urban setting.

HIST W4083 Crime and Punishment in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

How a society defines crime, and how it deals with the criminals tells us a lot about the moral values, and the political and economic structure of that society, as well as its internal conflicts, superstitions, and fears. Often supposed to be a barbaric community of ignorant unruly men governed by greedy kings and popes, the medieval society in the popular culture is often an inspiration to the grotesque representations of violence and torture. Even an intellectual like Michel Foucault did not hesitate to advance a theory of medieval punishment, albeit a terribly wrong one, as one that focuses on the body and spectacle.  This course is designed to trace the origins of the modern criminal legislation and practices to the Middle Ages, some of which were jury trial, public persecution, and prisons. How did these practices come about, and under which social conditions? The focus of the course will be on violent crimes, such as murder, robbery, assault and suicide, and some particularly medieval crimes like sorcery, blasphemy and sodomy. The geographical scope will be limited to England, Italy and France. The class discussions are expected to take the form of collective brainstorming on how the political powers, social classes, cultural values, and religious beliefs affect the development of criminal legislation and institutions. Whenever possible the weekly readings will feature a fair share of medieval texts, including trial records, criminal laws, a manual for trying witches, and prison poetry. Field(s): *MED

HIST W4101 The World We Have Lost: Daily Life in Pre-Modern Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What was daily life like for the "average" European in pre-industrial society? This course will examine the material circumstances of life in Europe from 1400-1800, and will investigate how historians are able to enter into the inner life and mental world of people who lived in past. How did people respond intellectually and emotionally to their material circumstances? The readings and discussions in the course aim to examine such questions, with an eye both to learning about the material conditions of life in pre-modern Europe, and to understanding the techniques by which historians are able to make the imaginative leap back into the mental world of the past. Field(s): *EME

HIST W4103 Empires and Cultures of the Early Modern Atlantic World. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course follows historical developments in the Atlantic World-across Western Europe, the Americas, West Africa, and-from the late fifteenth through early nineteenth century. It highlights both the comparative, structural evolutions of European colonial empires and the cultural experiences and perspectives of Atlantic World inhabitants-including soldiers, merchants, slaves, missionaries, and revolutionaries. 

HIST W4104 Family, Sexuality & Marriage in Pre-Modern Europe. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This course examines the meaning of marriage in European culture from the early Middle Ages until the eighteenth century, concentrating on the period from 1200 to 1800. It begins with a study of Jewish and Christian teachings about marriage – the nature of the conjugal bond, the roles of men and women within marriage, and marital sexuality. It traces changes in that narrative over the centuries, analyzes its relationship to actual practice among various social groups, and ends in the eighteenth century with an examination of the ideology of the companionate marriage of modern western culture and its relation to class formation. Group(s): A Field(s): EME

HIST W4110 French America, 1534-1804. 4 points.

A study of the French Atlantic World from the exploration of Canada to the Louisiana Purchase and Haitian Independence, with a focus on the relationship between war and trade, forms of intercultural negotiation, the economics of slavery, and the changing meaning of race. The demise of the First French Colonial Empire occurred in two stages: the British victory at the end of the Seven Years War in 1763, and the proclamation of Haitian Independence by insurgent slaves in 1804. The first French presence in the New World was the exploration of the Gulf of St. Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534. At its peak the French Atlantic Empire included one-third of the North American continent, as well as the richest and most productive sugar and coffee plantations in the world. By following the history of French colonization in North America and the Caribbean, this class aims to provide students with a different perspective on the history of the Western hemisphere, and on US history itself. At the heart of the subject is the encounter between Europeans and Native Americans and between Europeans and Africans. We will focus the discussion on a few issues: the strengths and weaknesses of French imperial control as compared with the Spanish and the British; the social, political, military, and religious dimensions of relations with Native Americans; the extraordinary prosperity and fragility of the plantation system; evolving notions of race and citizenship; and how the French Atlantic Empire shaped the history of the emerging United States. The course is designed for advanced undergraduates. It will be open to graduate students by permission of the History DGS and the instructor.

HIST W4113 Popular Culture in the Late Medieval Low Countries. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Court records surviving from the late medieval centuries -- the time of Chaucer and Boccaccio, the time of some of Europe’s most splendid courts, the time when cities like Venice and Bruges were at their height -- often contain lively records of popular culture – how people thought about the world, about their family, friends and neighbors, about their rulers, their God, and even their bodies. Court registers, verdicts by judges, notes of the bailiffs in their accounts, investigations of the prosecutors, critical examinations of eyewitnesses, and any other type of judicial  document surviving from this age often reveal human emotions, describe people’s motivations, document their blunders, and report their gossip. Among such sources, letters of remission, which princes issued to grant pardons to criminals of various kinds, are perhaps the most precious. Such documents cannot, however, be read straight, as though they were perfectly reliable accounts of facts or feelings. Rather they are laden with many contradictions. Rival accounts of the same events by the various involved parties and witnesses, outright lies, the biases of judges, narratives designed to please or mislead the rulers -- all such factors render any “pardon letter,” as these documents are known, a difficult, even if an incomparably rich, source. They need a significant effort of critical decoding. This course will focus on how we can use a collection of such letters surviving from the Low Countries, where commercial cities thrived and one of Europe’s most elegant courts was situated, to gain insight into late medieval society – its rich and poor, women and men, city-dwellers and peasants. Field(s): *MED

HIST W4115 Culture, Politics, and the Economy in the Low Countries in the Later Middle Ages. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will examine the relation between a rich and urban elite and artistic creativity during The Low Countries' several and successive ‘Golden Ages'. Therefore, the course will address the Dutch Republic in the seventeenth century, Antwerp and Brabant from c. 1480 to c. 1580, and the southern Low Countries as a whole from c. 1380 to c. 1480. The following questions will be considered: Who were the sponsors, and why did they invest in specific artistic genres? Why did the gravity centers regularly shift to a neighboring region, from south to north? What were the reasons for the dynamics in the system as a whole, which surely also have political dimensions? All these questions will be discussed for the period from the 13th to the 16th-early 17th century, keeping in mind that these patterns may have a more general character. Field(s): EME

HIST W4120 Witchcraft and the State in Early Modern Europe. 3 points.

Tens of thousands of women and men died as a result of witchcraft trials in early modern Europe.  The same period witnessed the consolidation of the territorial state in many parts of Europe and the rise of modern science.  How are these developments related?  Through primary and secondary readings, this course examines the phenomenon of witchcraft belief and trials in Europe. This course involves reading a sequence of books about philosophy and politics: more specifically, about what it might mean to forge a convincing philosophy of modern political life.  This historical goal is following the development of a specific tradition of theoretical inquiry about politics (and eventually about democracy and human rights).  The chronological and historcial focus is on France, in the postwar years, and Russian history

HIST W4125 Censorship and Freedom of Expression in Early Modern Europe. 0 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

In this course we will examine theoretical and historical developments that framed the notions of censorship and free expression in early modern Europe. In the last two decades, the role of censorship has become one of the significant elements in discussions of early modern culture. The history of printing and of the book, of the rise national-political cultures and their projections of control, religious wars and denominational schisms are some of the factors that intensified debate over the free circulation of ideas and speech. Indexes, Inquisition, Star Chamber, book burnings and beheadings have been the subjects of an ever growing body of scholarship. Field(s): EME

HIST W4127 Enlightenment and its Critics: Montaigne & Skepticism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines Montaigne's double-sided skepticism regarding our capacity for knowledge and the wisdom of pursuing it, which inspired both partisans and critics of the modern Enlightenment.  Group(s): A; Field(s): EME

HIST W4147 A Botanical History of European Expansion, 1400-1850. 4 points.

This course investigates the connection between plants and European empires from roughly 1450 to 1850. The search for spices and other Asian luxury goods compelled Europeans to cross the Atlantic. Instead, they stumbled upon continents that were new to them and held great riches of their own. They found both new plants, like tobacco and potatoes, and lands suitable for growing exotic Old World crops, like sugar and coffee. To capitalize on the riches these plants promised, empires imported slaves, destroyed civilizations, altered landscapes, and transformed cultures. Plants made the global world in which we live. In this seminar, you will meet a diverse cast of characters: monarchs who financed the search for new botanicals; seafarers and merchants who helped take them all over the world; unfree and indigenous laborers who grew them; and the everyday men, women, and children who consumed them. By considering how plants and their products were grown, bought, sold, used, and circulated, this course will provide cultural, economic, and environmental histories of European empires in the early modern era.

HIST W4152 Byzantine Encounters: Western Europeans in Constantinople, Byzantine Culture in Western Europe. 4 points.

This course examines western Europeans' encounters with Constantinople and Byzantine culture after the separation of the "Latin" from the "Greek." We will follow merchants, pilgrims and merchants as they visit, trade with, or march into Constantinople, study the sources they have left recording their impressions and their encounters, and consider what westerners took from Byzantium in the way of art forms, learning, sociopolitical practices, and material artifacts.

HIST W4155 Christian Missions in the Early Modern World. 4 points.

This course follows the spread and transformation of Christianity by Western missionaries in American, African, and Asian settings, from the late fifteenth through early nineteenth centuries. We examine what missionaries preached and urged others to believe and practice, and also what motivated missionaries, mission converts, and those who resisted proselytization. We also examine missions as sites of intercultural and colonial encounters with long-term impacts on politics, wars, and social dynamics.

HIST W4176 Into the East: European Merchants in Asian Markets, ca. 1300-1800. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of medieval and early modern European merchants' entry into the global commercials economy then centered in various Asian markets.  The course begins in the late Middle Ages, when Europe was a minor outposts of the world economy, and ends about 1800, when european merchants, in alliance with national states, were competing to control Asian markets. Field(s): EME

HIST W4180 Conversion in Historical Perspective. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Boundary crossers have always challenged the way societies imagined themselves. This course explores the political, religious, economic, and social dynamics of religious conversion. The course will focus on Western (Christian and Jewish) models in the medieval and early modern periods. It will include comparative material from other societies and periods. Autobiographies, along with legal, religious and historical documents will complement the readings. Field(s): *JWS

HIST W4189 Composing the Self in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores manners of conceiving and being a self in early modern Europe (ca. 1400-1800). Through the analysis of a range of sources, from autobiographical writings to a selection of theological, philosophical, artistic, and literary works, we will address the concept of personhood as a lens through which to analyze topics such as the valorization of interiority, the formation of mechanist and sensationalist philosophies of selfhood, and, more generally, the human person's relationship with material and existential goods. This approach is intended to deepen and complicate our understanding of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and other movements around which histories of the early modern period have typically been narrated. Field(s): EME

HIST W4197 You Are What You Eat: A History of Thinking About Food. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of the relationships between medical expertise and human dietary habits from Antiquity to the present, giving special attention to the links between practical and moral concerns and between expert knowledge and common sense. Field(s): EME

HIST W4200 Beyond Serfdom: History of Modern Eastern and Central Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The emancipation of serfs in Prussia, Habsburg empire and Russia (1780s to 1860s) coincided with the process of rejection of slavery. All over the globe, the acts of emancipation unleashed political contestations, socioeconomic experiments and population policies that targeted former serf/slaves and generations of their descendants. Postemancipation as a predicament of the nineteenth and twentieth-century Eastern and Central Europe, in other words, the abolition of serfdom and its historical significance, is the keynote of the seminar. We will focus on pivotal issues in Eastern and Central European modernity: unfree/free labor, backwardness/progress, mass emigration vs. access to ethnic nationalism, as well as politics of class, race and ethnicity from the Enlightement to the establishment of communist rule. The seminar asks: what happened to the populations and economies of the region in the wake of enserfed labor? How can we historically relate postemancipation Eastern and Central Europe to postemancipation societies in other parts of the modern world? Students of modern Europe, but also those interested in modern history of bondage, labor, empire and social migrations are welcome.

HIST W4202 Early Modern Eastern Europe 1500-1800. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course concentrates on the early modern period (roughly 1500 to 1800) and addresses the history of the region which includes mainly the territories of present day Poland, Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. The course presents the history of the region through the analysis of such important pan-European processes as the growth of empires and absolutism, the Reformation and revival of Catholicism, the Enlightenment and urbanization. It also emphasizes that that region's culture and society were in many ways unique and distinctive from the West European civilization.

HIST W4206 Power and Violence in Russian History. 4 points.

Each meeting of this seminar will consider a particular way in which power was structured and exercised in Imperial and Soviet Russia, looking at violence in its various manifestations, at the role of law in containing it, and at the changing ways Russia's rulers represented their personal authority. Through a combination of novels, memoirs, and selected scholarly texts, we will also examine Russians' traditional obsession with war and all things military; the development of modern terrorism, secret police, and political repression; and power hierarchies within families and communities.

HIST W4214 The Era of Witness: Twentieth Century Poland in Personal Accounts. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course explores the dramatically changing human landscape of modern Poland through personal narratives (diaries, letters, memoirs) and social documentation (autobiography contests, life-record method, and the Oyneg Shabes Archive in the Warsaw ghetto). The course serves as an introduction to key personal experiences of the Poland's twentieth century: social distress, emigration and forced dislocation, genocide, and political violence. We will reflect critically on the main categories of "the era of the witness," such as personal experience and literary responses to it, testimony, memory and eye-witnessing. The course aims to broaden, both historically and conceptually, our understanding of the witness as an iconic figure of the twentieth-century atrocities by including the East Central European tradition of personal writing and social documentation of the interwar and postwar periods. Field(s): MEU

HIST W4218 The Black Sea in History. 4 points.

      We are used to thinking of history in national terms, or at least in reference to major civilizations (“Western civilization,”  “Near Eastern civilization,” etc.). In  “real life,” however, interactions among people, linguistic communities, and cultures frequently cut across political divisions. Water – rivers, streams, seas – is often an invitation to settlement, commerce, and conquest. This course offers a look (inspired in part by Fernand Braudel's Mediterranean) at a body of water – the Black Sea – and the lands around it, in sweeping historical perspective. Focus is on those moments when the various civilizations and empires that originated and flourished around the Black Sea met and intersected in friendship or in enmity. We will look at ancient civilizations, Greek colonization, Byzantine-Slav interactions, the period of Ottoman dominance, Russian-Turkish rivalry, and decolonization and wars in the 19th and 20th centuries. We hope that we will be able to pay particular attention to questions of ecology, language, religion, and cultural interaction throughout.

HIST W4225 The Future of the Soviet Union: New Approaches to the Soviet Past. 4 points.

The Soviet Union ceased to exist within living memory. Its dissolution largely coincided with the end of much of the post-World-War-Two international order, whether called Cold War or Détente. We are still living through the reverberations of these two "ends of history." One consequence is that our perspective on Soviet history has been changing and will continue to change.  This course will introduce its participants to what is new about the Soviet past. It will combine approaches that are mostly still new when applied to Soviet history (subaltern studies or the history of sexuality, for instance), topics that are largely new (capitalism, for instance), and topics that are traditional (revolution or Communism, for instance), which we will seek to look at in a fresh way. Focusing on what is new does not mean to exclude the "classics"; in fact, sometimes it means to return to them.   Field(s); MEU

HIST W4227 Empire and Nation: Nationality Issues in the Russian Empire. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This senior seminar deals with nationalist challenges and nationality policies in imperial Russia. Particular emphasis will be placed on the imperial policies vis-à-vis national peripheries (primarily Poland, Ukraine, the Baltic, and Volga region) as well as religious minorities (particularly Jews, Roman Catholics, and Muslims). We will also analyze the relationship between the imperial government and Russian nationalism. The gap between nation and empire in Russia will be considered. The main chronological focus of the seminar is the long nineteenth century, the late eighteenth-the early twentieth centuries. Field(s): MEU

HIST W4271 Rock-n-Roll, Western Films, and a Crisis of Soviet Identity: Problems of Cultural Consumption in Ukraine after Stalin. 4 points.

Traditionally, for their studies of late (after Stalin) socialism in the Soviet Union, a majority of post-Soviet and Western scholars use only material from Moscow and Leningrad/St. Petersburg, ignoring provincial cities and towns, especially in non-Russian Soviet republics such as Ukraine. This Moscow/Leningrad centered and Russian focused approach does not allow to understand not only the “late socialist” developments in provincial Soviet society, but also completely ignores and misinterprets the apparent anti-Soviet character of the recent political events in post- Soviet space such as Maidan Revolution. These recent events also demonstrated the important role of cultural consumption and visual media in identity formation and national mobilization in post-Soviet politics. Therefore, using the new research based on the archival material from Ukraine and the recent studies on cultural production and consumption, this seminar challenges the traditional Moscowcentered interpretations of Soviet History and explores how consumption of the western cultural products, such as popular music, books and movies, contributed to the crisis of Soviet identity in Ukraine after Stalin. This seminar also offers a historical comparison of the popular cultural consumption in the West and Soviet Ukraine during the Cold War between 1953 and 1991, showing a process of indigenization of Western popular culture in the Ukrainian context. Major focus of seminar’s discussions is on historical role of popular music, films and television in identity formation and cultural politics in Soviet and post-Soviet Ukraine. Students will read a core set of course reading as noted below, but will be expected to develop their own research/reading projects on a topic of their individual interest – to be approved by the instructor.

HIST W4281 Culture in Polish Lands. 4 points.

There are few places in the world that witnessed the shift from the multi-ethnic territory to the nationally homogenous nation-state as much as Polish lands. Crucial site of collapse of Central and Eastern European empires, the Holocaust, ethnic cleansings, Nazi occupation, Soviet-style socialism and the EU-accession, Poland’s twentieth-century and contemporary culture has developed in the shadow of catastrophe and political economic revolutions. This seminar investigates shifting meanings of cultural difference and sameness since 1918 until present, including Polish debates on multiculturalism spurred by the ongoing European refugee crisis. We will look at meanings attached to peoples, things and landscapes - Polish, Jewish Ukrainian, German or Soviet - through the lens of visual arts, objects of everyday life, scholarly discourses as well urban and rural topographies. The cultural responses to the political transformations, wars and revolutions include StanisÅ‚aw Lem’s philosophy of chance, creation of socialist cities and the remaking of Jewish and German spaces. While we will pay special attention to historiography of the twentieth-century Eastern Europe, the course relies on interdisciplinary approaches and welcomes students interested in history of arts and architecture, intellectual history anthropology, cultural studies, including critical museology. 

HIST W4287 Russian Rulers: History and Myth. 4 points.

To this day, the power of Russia's rulers often appears to be uncommonly expansive and even consecrated by its centuries-old tradition of monarchical government. This course will begin with medieval Eastern Slavic conceptions of kingship and focus on the emergence and development of unlimited monarchy as a key political institution in Russia, discussing the ways in which ordinary individuals -rich and poor- responded to these presentations. We will consider several of Russia's most prominent historical figures as case studies, including Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Nicholas II, as well as Stalin, described by one recent biographer as the "red tsar.

HIST W4288 Russia at War, 1462-1945. 4 points.

This seminar introduces students to the impact of the military and war on Russia’s politics, culture, and society, beginning with the “military revolution” of the 15th-17th century and ending with Russia’s role in the two world wars. The course is organized chronologically to cover the major European and world-wide conflicts in which Russia and the early Soviet Union participated, as well as the “small” wars of imperial conquest. Throughout the course, we will focus on the connections between Russia’s geopolitical situation, technological changes, and the impact of wars and of the military on Russian daily life and on the mentalities and culture of ordinary Russians. All of these events and issues are crucial for understanding today’s Russia. This course will rely on a wealth of exciting new scholarship, as well as several carefully chosen primary sources, including fiction and film.

HIST W4295 Wars within a War: A History of the Second World War in Eastern Europe. 4 points.

Traditionally, the Second World War on the Eastern Front has been analyzed as a military conflict between two behemoths, the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, as well as a battle driven by two personalities, Stalin and Hitler (due to the “Great Man” theory of history). However, since the fall of the Soviet Union and opening up of eastern European archives, a reevaluation of this conflict through the lenses of local populations and local conflicts has begun. Scholars have begun to tackle the complex issues of collaboration/resistance, nationalist uprisings, inter-ethnic conflict, and local internecine struggles that are shot through this larger war. Nowhere are these struggles more apparent than in the lands that make up current-day Ukraine. This seminar will analyze new scholarship on these controversial topics in the Eastern European borderland region, with a focus on Ukraine as the centerpiece. Students will become acquainted with the literature on these topics and learn to think critically not only about how these topics relate to the larger history of the Second World War, but how they influence politics and society in contemporary Eastern Europe.

HIST W4300 Modern Greece. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This is an undergraduate research seminar which will allow students with an interest in the Balkans, eastern Europe and the Ottoman empire to trace in detail the emergence of the independent Greek nation-state in the early 19th century and to draw on contemporary literature and the secondary historiography to evaluate theories of ethnicity, nationalism and state formation. It is open to all students with a background in modern European or Middle Eastern history and covers the period from the mid-18th to the mid-19th centuries.

HIST W4303 HISTORY OF SOFT POWER IN EUROPE AND THE U.S. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar examines the history of the ambiguous concept "Soft Power," by bringing together literatures in European and U.S. history, international relations, and communications studies that are normally treated in isolation. After thoroughly familiarizing seminar participants with the recent U.S. evolution of the concept and comparing its usage to related terms, such as "normative power," "hegemony," "propaganda," "strategic communication," and "public diplomacy," weekly classes focus on several case studies. These span the period from the 19th to 21st centuries and include Napoleon's Propaganda Wars, France's "Civilizing Mission" in Africa, Germany's Kultur Empire, Wilson versus Lenin, The Nazi-Fascist Effort to coopt Muslim peoples, Vatican Diplomacy and the Holocaust, The Marshall Plan, Soviet Soft Power in Eastern Europe, and U.S. Public Diplomacy in the wake of 9/11. Class requirements include weekly reading, organizing class discussion, and a 15-page research paper to be presented at a final student-organized workshop.

HIST W4305 The European Enlightenment. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will include an in-depth examination of some major tinkers and texts of the French, Germans, and Scottish Enlightenments. By reading works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Lessing, Mendelssohn, and Hume, we will examine their radically divergent responses to the central intellectual quandries of their day, and in many ways our own: the realtionship between rationalism, science, and faith; religion and the state; the individual and the polity; cosmopolitanism and particularism; pluralism and relativism; and the meaning of liberty. Group(s): A, B

HIST W4308 Nations and Nationalisms in Nineteenth Century Europe. 4 points.

This seminar will address the emergence and course of nationalism in Western Europe (France, Germany and Italy) from the period of the French Revolution to that of the unifications of Italy and Germany.  It will be comparative in approach, transnational in perspective, political and cultural in focus, and entail engagement with current historiographical debates

HIST W4311 European Romanticism. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will introduce students to the manifold expressions of Romanticism in Europe from the late eighteenth century to the late nineteenth century. It is geared both at History majors, particularly but not exclusively those specializing in European Intellectual History and at students interested in the literature and culture of Germany, France, and Graet Britain, as well as brief looks at Romantic writers in Eastern Europe.

HIST W4345 John Stuart Mill: Life, Work, Legacy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is designed for undergraduates and graduate students who, having had some introduction to Mill in CC or elsewhere, would like to spend a semester exploring his life, thought, and impact. This task is particularly interesting today, for Mill, revered by progressives in his own time for his support for intellectual liberties, a wider democratic franchise, and women's suffrage, and for his fierce criticism of military repression in Jamaica, is now often seen as one of the architects of Victorian thought, examining his writings in the context of political debates at the time, as well as his own involvement in key controversies over economic policy, the nature of the Victorian state, political reform and imperial governance. Together, we will try to understand not only what Mill though and did, but why has he continued to act as a lightening-rod for political controversy, in his time and in our own. 

HIST W4347 Europe and Islam in the Modern Period, 1798-Present. 4 points.

Though the relationship between Europe and Islam has a centuries-long and complex history, this course looks closely at the unfolding of this relationship in the modern period. Following Edward Said, we start with Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in 1798, then cover a series of topics including: migration and travel writing on the eve of conquest; colonial aggression in the Middle East and North Africa; colonial governance of Islam; race, gender, and religious difference; Islamic modernity; and Islamic veiling ‘controversies.’ The object of this course is to historicize contemporary debates on immigration, pluralism, and the management of difference by examining cases of discursive and institutional continuity from the colonial into the postcolonial periods. Instructor's permission required: http://www.history.columbia.edu/undergraduate/seminars/index.html

HIST W4349 German Thinkers Around Heidegger. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar is situated in the field of intellectual history and puts the focus on a group of German scholars around Martin Heidegger who were tracing the question of historical truth in the first half of the 20th century. The mostly Jewish thinkers like Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith and Erich Auerbach were forced into exile after 1933 and found at last academic and personal shelter in North-America. By the critical and close reading of exemplary texts the seminar aims a comparison of the different horizons on historical truth. We will open up a wide range panorama of crucial perspectives which were important contribution to the American culture in the tradition of European “Geisteswissenschaften” (Humanities).   Field(s): MEU

HIST W4351 American Big Business and German Industry, 1900-2000. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

There is a great deal of research and debate on the role that the United States played in the reconstruction and recasting of Europe after World War II. This work is usually seen in the larger context not only of the East-West conflict since 1945, if not since 1917, but also as part of the process of the "Americanization" of the world. By the end of the 20th century this process is deemed to have been replaced by a trend toward "globalization" which is assumed to have started before 1914 until it was interrupted by two world wars, integral nationalism, the Great Depression of the 1930s, the struggles over decolonization and seemingly endless civil wars. It was only in the 1990s that "globalization" is said to have resumed where it stopped in 1914. Against the background of these wide-ranging scholarly debates that also revolved around notions of "modernization" of both economies and societies,  this course "homes in" on the development of German industry and its relationship with American big business before coming back, at the end of the semester, to the big questions that have been raised at the beginning. Field(s): US/MEU

HIST W4352 Europe in the Cold War. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar is dedicated to studying the historical developments of Europe in the Cold War, from the immediate aftermath of the Second World War until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. We will examine the major shifts in contemporary European history as they relate to Cold War conflicts and competitions, including the Yalta and Potsdam meetings; Marshall Plan reconstruction; the workings of NATO; the Prague Spring; non-proliferation movements; and Eurocommunism trends. We will consider a wide range of historical perspectives, including but not limited to political, geographic, economic, cultural, and military frameworks. Field(s): MEU

HIST W4357 History of the Self: Rousseau. 4 points.

This course is one of a series on the history of the modern self.  After examining Montaigne and Pascal in previous semesters we now focus on Rousseau, and in particular Emile,  his treatise on education and psychology.   We then examine two of his autobiographical works, the Confessions and the Reveries of a Solitary Walker, to see how this theory of the self shapes and is shaped by his understanding of himself.  Seminar application required: http://www.history.columbia.edu/undergraduate/seminars/index.html

HIST W4358 Themes in Intellectual History: Pascal. 4 points.

Themes in Intellectual History offers an intensive examination of one major intellectual concept or problem as it develops over time.

HIST W4359 Dreaming of the Future in the 1820s: The Birth of Modernity. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is to explore the mental horizon of the 1820s through the works of professional revolutionaries, artists, poets and writers, as well as via recent historical and literary studies. The period marked the intellectual origins of modernity and many of our key organizing principles - the very idea of socialism, liberalism and communism for instance - originated then. Readings connect political transformations in Europe and across the globe to a new sense of time and speed, history, technology and economics. Field(s): MEU

HIST W4364 The Other Idea of Europe: Mass Annihilation in the 20th Century. 4 points.

The idea of Europe implies the notions of "Civilization" and "Modernity," but also images of conquest, tyranny and mass annihilation. This seminar will explore the "dark side of Europe:" the succession of genocidal episodes perpetrated during the long 20th century by Europeans in colonial expeditions overseas and in murderous campaigns on the subcontinent itself. The assigned literature ranges from anthropology, sociology and political science, to psychology and contemporary history. It contains a variety of perspectives on genocidal regimes and their perpetrators, as well as an array of descriptive accounts of episodes of mass anihilation. An overall theoretical framework is provided by Prof. Abram de Swaan's The Killing Compartments: The Mentality of Mass Murder (Yale UP, 2015). The experience with mass violence of the Dutch - a nation with a relatively peaceful past and a self-image of righteousness - will serve as a touchstone for a subcontinent that at the dawn of the 20th century was considered the epitome of peace an progress. Field: MEU  

HIST W4369 The Long War of the 1940s: The Dutch Case in European History and Memory in WWII. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will examine the immediate impact and the longer-running legacies of the Second World War in the Netherlands, with reference to several other Western European nations (France, Belgium). The ‘Long War' will relate to the Second World War as history in the first place, discussing the place of the occupied nation(s) in ‘Hitler's Empire' (Mark Mazower). We also will take into account that the end of the war in Europe was followed by new kinds of external conflicts with strong internal repercussions: the Cold War and the first wave of European decolonization. The perspective will focus on the nation-states, endangered in its very existence by oppressive foreign occupation, subsequently in need of rebuilding and reinventing themselves against many odds. The second element of the seminar is the legacy of the ‘Long War', stretching over the generations to the present day. The Long War has been subject to a never-ending series of controversies in the public sphere that have profoundly influenced the historiography of the war in the different nations. In the course, we will explore the interconnections between politics of memory, historiography and cultural interpretations of the embattled past (films, novels, televised documentaries in particular). Field(s): MEU

HIST W4371 Europe in International Thought, 1815-1914. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar explores the changing meaning of the term 'Europe" from its emergence as an organizing principle of international life after Napoleon's defeat in 1815 until the end of the First World War.  It aims to combine an exploration of the term's conceptual and intellectual history with a study of its deployment in practice in the realms of diplomacy, international law, and radical politics.  Topics to be covered include: the establishment and transformation of the Concert of Europe; the idea of European civilization, its rise and fall; the international thought of Mazzini, Mill, Marx, Cobden, Burckhardt and Nietzsche among others.

HIST W4377 Cold War Public Diplomacy: Cultural Battles Abroad. 4 points.

This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role of culture and the arts as a reflection and enactment of Cold War politics; (ii) to provide an understanding of the arts as a cultural force in building ideas in foreign markets; (iii) to reframe the arts as a part of Cold War cultural battles.

HIST W4380 The Idea of Europe. 4 points.

This course, a seminar open to both advanced undergraduates and graduates, will examine the "Idea of Europe" from the perspective of the European Union's formation, expansion, and the crises now confronting the idea of European unity. Our point of departure is the Netherlands, whose political and social structure are of interest in their own right and exemplify many of the aspirations of the union, and whose present struggles reveal some of the tensions that threaten the cohesion of the European community. Its social, economic and political history have culminated in an unusual set of institutions, an idiosyncratic approach to policy domains such as social security, labor relations, health care and education, and a highly consensus driven mode of interaction among national stakeholders on the interface of civic society and the political system. Students will explore particular issues in independent response papers corresponding to three themes selected, and will be invited to make use of comparative literature in dealing with a broader perspective on Europe. Field(s): MWE

HIST W4381 Visions of International Order. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar will attempt to offer a historical context for evaluating contemporary discussions of the role of the UN and the nature of international relations. It will cover the formation and metamorphoses of the United Nations itself, exploring in particular its role in the Cold War and in the decolonisation process. We will look too at why some international organisations [the IMF] appear to have flourished while others failed. Among the topics to be covered are the changing role of international law, sovereignty and human rights regimes, development aid as international politics, the collapse of the gold standard and its impact. We will end by looking at the politics of UN reform, and new theories of the role of institutions in global affairs, and ask what light they shed on the future of international governance now that the Cold War is over. Students will be expected to read widely in primary as well as secondary sources and to produce a research paper of their own. Field(s): MEU/US

HIST W4383 European Sexual Modernities. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores how conceptions of desire and sexuality, gendered and raced bodies, shaped major events and processes in modern Europe: the Enlightenment and European empires; political and sexual revolutions; consumption and commodity fetishism; the metropolis and modern industry; psychoanalysis and the avant-garde; fascism and the Cold War; secularization,and post-socialism. Featuring: political and philosophical tracts; law, literature and film. Field(s): MEU

HIST W4396 Britain in the Age of Revolutions: Radicalism, Repression, and Reform. 4 points.

This course examines Britain from the 1780s to the 1830s. The first part concentrates on how Britain responded to, and was shaped by, the American and French Revolutions. It focuses in particular on the political impact of these conflicts, including their effect on political thought and grassroots political activism. The second half of the course then looks at how reactions to these revolutions created conditions for reform in the early nineteenth century, and how Britain became Europe's first modern democracy. Themes to be explored include: political agitation and government repression; revolutionary and anti-revolutionary ideologies; national identity; class conflict and consciousness; propaganda; empire and imperial culture; and industrialization.

HIST W4400 Americans and the Natural World, 1800 to the Present. 4 points.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar deals with how Americans have treated and understood the natural world, connected or failed to connect to it, since 1800. It focuses on changing context over time, from the agrarian period to industrialization, followed by the rise of the suburban and hyper-technological landscape. We will trace the shift from natural history to evolutionary biology, give special attention to the American interest in entomology, ornithology, and botany, examine the quest to save pristine spaces, and read from the works of Buffon, Humboldt, Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Darwin, Aldo Leopold, Nabokov, among others. Perspectives on naming, classifying, ordering, and most especially, collecting, will come under scrutiny.  Throughout the semester we will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the environmentalist movement, confront those who thought they could defy nature, transcend it, and even live without it. Field(s): US

HIST W4404 Native American History. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to the forces that transformed the aboriginal inhabitants of the Americas into "Indians." The class takes a very broad approach, moving chronologically and thematically from the dawn of time to the present. The course aims to expose students to the diversity of the Native American experience by including all of the inhabitants of the Americas, from Greenland to Tierra del Fuego, within its purview. Group(s): A, D Field(s): *US 

HIST W4410 Old and New Religions in the New World: Religion and the Colonization of North America. 4 points.

The course introduces students to a historical perspective on religion in the settlement of the New World, in particular North America. It looks at Islam, Judaism, Native American religion, and different kinds of Christianity. The course emphasizes the formative influence of social and political context as well as the dynamism of religion. How and why did Judaism and Islam come to the New World? How did Protestantism influence Anglo colonial society, and how did Catholicism shape New Spain and New France? What about African religions and why is Afro-American Christianity different? Who were the Puritans and why are they famous? The course concludes with a look at the beginnings of Mormonism, perhaps the characteristic American religion.

HIST W4411 Colonial American History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This reading seminar will examine the history of colonial North America from the sixteenth through mid-eighteenth centuries.  Employing a comparative Atlantic framework to study Spanish, French, Dutch, and English settlements in North America, this course will explore key themes of conflict and community in the societies that developed during this era.  Readings will include some of the most important recent literature in the field and cover topics such as European-indigenous relations, race and slavery, religious culture, and gender construction. This seminar requires two response papers, a final historiographical essay, and class participation, including an oral presentation. Field(s): US

HIST W4412 Americans and the Good Life, 1750-1910. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Americans have not always agreed about the nature of the good life or about how to achieve it. In this course we focus on a range of compelling writers, among the best in American history, each with a different perspective on what matters and each articulated within a different context. Among the paths to good life examined will be religion, nature, aesthetics or beautify, farming or country life, urban living, untrammeled individual expression, and money and consumption. We begin with the sermons of Jonathan Edwards and end with Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser. In between are works by Benjamin Franklin, Henry Thoreau, Walt Whitman, George Santayana, Liberty Hyde Bailey, Anna Comstock, Charles Cooley, and William James.   Field(s): US

HIST W4413 Archives and Knowledge. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will examine interdisciplinary approaches to the writing of history using archival material. We will look at how knowledge is organized, stored, described, accessed, and replicated through the use of digital and material objects held in archives. The seminar takes as its point of departure the University of Michigan Sawyer Seminar's conception of archives "not simply as historical repositories but as a complex of structures, processes, and epistemologies situated at a critical point of the intersection between scholarship, cultural practices, politics, and technologies." Among the topics we will explore are how archives and archiving intersect with the production of knowledge, with social memory, and with politics. This is a U.S. history course. While the theoretical approaches we will study are, of necessity, interdisciplinary, the application of them will be to archival material related to U.S. history. This seminar requires participants to commit substantial time outside of class working with unpublished materials in Columbia's Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML) both for reading assignments and as part of a final project. Field(s): US

HIST W4414 Modern American Indian Social and Political History. 4 points.

This undergraduate lecture-seminar is about the making, endurance, and resurgence of modern American Indian nations. We will examine broadly the varied historical experiences of American Indians from the late 19thC to the present, with a special focus on the 20th century. We approach this study with an understanding that American Indians (as well as Native Hawaiians, and Alaska Natives) are and were actors in history and not just hapless victims of Euro-American imperialism and power. Over the semester, we will focus on the ways indigenous peoples in the United States adapted and responded to the host of stresses that accompanied the rapid and often violent social, cultural, and environmental transformations of the 19th and 20th centuries. We will historicize modern social and political issues in Indian Country and examine the processes of resistance, renewal, accommodation, and change from the reservation era to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the ways native people and their communities have met the challenges they have confronted as they persist in their efforts to preserve their homelands, their cultures, their sovereignty, and their rights to selfdetermination.

HIST W4415 The U.S. and Latin America in the Cold War and Beyond: Revolution, Globalization and Power. 4 points.

This course seeks to understand the Cold War and what it meant for the United States, inter-American relations and Latin America during the second half of the twentieth century. The course encourages students to consider to what extent the Cold War is helpful as a way of understanding Latin American nations and people, and their relationships with their Northern neighbor.

HIST W4420 The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1919. 4 points.

Closed to first-year students.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The period known as the "Progressive Era" in the United States witnessed major transformations in American society. We will examine currents of social change and reform in the terms of mass immigration, urbanization, and industrialization; commercialized culture; Jim Crow segregation; and U.S. projects on the world stage. The seminar will include history, historiography, and a term paper based on original research in archival and other primary materials. Field(s): US

HIST W4421 The United States and Empire. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Though the U.S. is unquestionably the world’s most powerful nation, Americans and especially American politicians are reluctant to describe their nation as an imperial one. Drawing on comparative examples and theories of empire, this seminar investigates the diverse theaters of American power (military, colonial, economic, cultural) and the reactions to them, through an imperial lens. How can the concept of empire and the experiences of other empires help to explain the nature and development of the United States? We will analyze the intersection of structure and action in the shaping of American foreign policy, and ponder the shifting meaning of empire in U.S. public discourse. For the final paper, students will apply insights from the course to contemporary topics in U.S. policy and society.   Field(s): US

HIST W4429 Telling About the South. 4 points.

A remarkable array of Southern historians, novelists, and essayists have done what Shreve McCannon urges Quentin Compson to do in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!--tell about the South--producing recognized masterpieces of American literature.  Taking as examples certain writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, this course explores the issues they confronted, the relationship between time during which and about they wrote, and the art of the written word as exemplified in their work. Group(s): D Field(s): US  Limited enrollment. Priority given to senior history majors. After obtaining permission from the professor, please add yourself to the course wait list so the department can register you in the course.

HIST W4431 Making the Modern: Bohemia from Paris to Los Angeles. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course interrogates the function of art and artists within modern capitalist societies. We will trace the cultural productions, internal dynamics, and social significance of bohemian communities from their origins in 1840s Paris to turn of the century London and New York to interwar Los Angeles to present day Chicago. Students will conduct research exploring the significance of some aspect of a bohemian community. Field(s): US

HIST W4434 The Atlantic Slave Trade. 4 points.

This seminar provides an intensive introduction to the history of the Atlantic slave trade. The course will consider the impact of the traffic on Western Europe and the Americas, as well as on Africa, and will give special attention to the experiences of both captives and captors. Assignments include three short papers and a longer research paper of 20 to 25 pages. Field(s): INTL 

HIST W4437 Poisoned Worlds: Corporate Behavior and Public Health. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

In the decades since the publication of Silent Spring and the rise of the environmental movement, public awareness of the impact of industrial products on human health has grown enormously. There is growing concern over BPA, lead, PCBs, asbestos, and synthetic materials that make up the world around us. This course will focus on environmental history, industrial and labor history as well as on how twentieth century consumer culture shapes popular and professional understanding of disease. Throughout the term the class will trace the historical transformation of the origins of disease through primary sources such as documents gathered in lawsuits, and medical and public health literature. Students will be asked to evaluate historical debates about the causes of modern epidemics of cancer, heart disease, lead poisoning, asbestos-related illnesses and other chronic conditions. They will also consider where responsibility for these new concerns lies, particularly as they have emerged in law suits. Together, we will explore the rise of modern environmental movement in the last 75 years. Field(s): US

HIST W4452 American Conservatism Since 1945. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar will ask students to examine primary sources and important works of scholarship on the rise of conservatism since 1945. Few issues of the postwar era have been more important in the last half century than the rapid growth of the right – its political clout, its intellectual bases, its movements and organizations, and its alliances with the Republican Party and much of the corporate world. Field(s): US

HIST W4455 Transnational Migration and Citizenship. 4 points.

This course will read recent scholarship on migration and citizenship (with some nod to classic works); as well as theoretical work by historians and social scientists in the U.S. and Europe on the changing conceptual frameworks that are now shaping the field.  The first half of the course will read in the literature of U.S. immigration history.  The second half of the course is comparative, with readings in the contexts of empire, colonialism and contemporary refugee and migration issues in the U.S. and Europe.

HIST W4458 Public History in America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will explore some of the ways historical subjects can be, and have been, engaged outside of the traditional channels of scholarship. Among the many forms in which history and the historical memory are presented, we will examine exhibits, film and television productions, websites, reenactments, memorials and monuments, historical sites, oral history, performance, et al. We will use interdisciplinary critical literature and our own experiences to examine how this interactive process between the historian, the public, and the historical object/subject represents the American past. The seminar requires students to make visits to public history sites outside of scheduled class time. Field(s): US

HIST W4481 Culture, Memory and Crisis in Modern US History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How have Americans used culture as a means of responding to, interpreting, and memorializing periods of social, economic, and political crisis? Do these periods create breaks in cultural forms and practices?  Or do periods of significant upheaval encourage an impetus to defend cultural practices, thereby facilitating the "invention of tradition"? How are the emotional responses produced by critical moments--whether trauma, outrage, insecurity, or fear--turned into cultural artifacts?  And, finally, how are cultural crises memorialized? This course focuses on Americans' cultural responses to the lynching of black Americans in the era of World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II to answer these questions. We will examine a wide range of individual and collective cultural expressions, including anti-lynching plays and songs, WPA programs, the 1939 World's Fair, war photographs and radio broadcasts, the zoot suit and swing culture, and the military's effort to preserve culture in European war areas. Field(s): US

HIST W4483 Military History and Policy. 4 points.

This seminar features extensive reading, multiple written assignments, and a term paper, as well as a likely trip to Gettsyburg.  It focuses on the Civil War and on World Wars I and II. Group(s): D Field(s): US

HIST W4485 Politics and Culture in Cold War America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

An examination of the years from the end of World War II to the beginning of the 1960s, focusing on three areas:  the Cold War, the “Affluent Society,” and the “Haunted Fifties,” It includes both works of history and works of literature. Field(s): US

HIST W4509 Problems in International History. 4 points.

The general object of this course is to illuminate how histories of the realm we think of as "international" are structured by means of key concepts, foundational concepts that form semantic fields of politics and policy. The seminar this year will be devoted, specifically, to the combined problem of representation, empire and world fairs, the fairs that enjoyed a particular vogue around 1900, outstandingly in France and the United States. Instructor's permission is required; please see: http://www.history.columbia.edu/undergraduate/seminars/index.html for more information.

HIST W4518 Research Seminar: Columbia and Slavery. 4 points.

In this course, students will write​ ​ original, independent​ ​ papers of around 25 pages, based on research in both​ ​ primary and secondary sources, on an aspect of the relationship between Columbia​ ​ College​,​ and its colonial predecessor King's College, with the institution of slavery​.​

HIST W4534 Capitalism in the Archives. 4 points.

This course explores how documentary sources of the history of capitalism have been created, preserved, collected, and organized in the archives; and how scholars have used these sources to interpret changing economic institutions, social relations, politics, and cultural practices of capitalism in the United States. The course meets at Columbia's Rare Books and Manuscripts Library and links its collections to the historiography of capitalism in the twentieth century. Learning how to evaluate and use archival materials to interpret the past, students will write a substantial research paper based on Rare Books and Manuscript Library collections.   NOTE: This course meets in the Chang Room in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library on the 6th floor of Butler Library.

HIST W4535 20th Century New York City History. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This course explores critical areas of New York's economic development in the 20th century, with a view to understanding the rise, fall and resurgence of this world capital. Discussions also focus on the social and political significance of these shifts. Assignments include primary sources, secondary readings, film viewings, trips, and archival research. Students use original sources as part of their investigation of New York City industries for a 20-page research paper. An annotated bibliography is also required. Students are asked to give a weekly update on research progress, and share information regarding useful archives and websites.Field(s): US

HIST W4555 American Nativism: Crusades Against Immigrants in a Nation of Immigrants. 4 points.

This seminar examines the history of nativism, or intense hostility toward foreigners, in the United States. While the constant influx of immigrants characterizes the history of the United States, intolerance with foreigners who seemed to threaten the cultural, economic, and political fabric of American society from the perspective of native-born Americans has equally shaped the American immigration experience. By exploring nativist writings, cartoons, images, immigrant memoirs, and laws as well as scholarly books and articles based on intensive reading and class discussion, we will trace the historical development of American nativism from the late colonial period to the present. Themes to be pursued in the course include the ideological and religious origins of anti-alien sentiment in America; the social, economic, and political circumstances of the time for the rise of nativism; principal targets of nativism in each period; the various ways hostile sentiment was expressed; and governmental policy against foreigners. An exercise in interdisciplinary study, this course draws materials from a wide range of academic disciplines, including History, Law, Ethnic Studies, and Political Science.

HIST W4556 Narcotics and the Making of America. 4 points.

This seminar examines the history of narcotics, including sugar, tobacco, alcohol, opiates, and marijuana, in America from the colonial period to the early twentieth-century. It pays particular attention to the intoxicating and stimulating opportunities New World agriculture presented, alcohol- including its role in relations with Native Americans-, how tobacco influenced Chesapeake political culture, the spread of opiates and their medicalization, and the politics of anti-narcotic reform. The course considers the broad matters of economic role, social use, and political context. Students will propose and must receive approval for a twenty-page research paper based on primary sources, and present primary sources for discussion to the class.

HIST W4568 The American Landscape to 1877. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Field(s): US

HIST W4569 American Consumer Capitalism: 1800-Present. 4 points.

This seminar studies the history of consumer capitalism in America from the early 19th century to the present. It will establish when capitalism emerged, what it meant, and how it challenged and transformed American Civilization

HIST W4577 Culture and Politics in the Progressive Era, 1890-1945. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class begins during the fabled "Gilded Age," when the nation's capitalist expansion created the world's largest economy but splintered Americans' ideals. From the fin-de-siècle through the cataclysms of World War II, we will explore how Americans defined, contested, and performed different meanings of American civilization through social reform movements, artistic expressions, and the everyday habits and customs of individuals and groups. The class will pay particular attention to how gender, race, and location--regional, international, and along the class ladder--shaped perspectives about what constituted American civilization and the national discourse about what it should become. Field(s): US

HIST W4584 Race, Technology, and Health. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: previous coursework in African-American history or social science; United States social history; or sociomedical sciences required.

Students will gain a solid knowledge and understanding of the health issues facing African Americans since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's heath organization and care; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; sickle cell anemia; and substance abuse. Group(s): D Field(s): US Formerly listed as "History of African-American Health and Health Movements".

HIST W4588 Substance Abuse Politics in African-American History. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Through a series of secondary- and primary-source readings and research writing assignments, students in this seminar course will explore one of the most politically controversial aspects in the history of public health in the United States as it has affected peoples of color: intoxicating substances. Course readings are primarily historical, but sociologists, anthropologists, and political scientists are also represented on the syllabus. The course's temporal focus - the twentieth century - allows us to explore the historical political and social configurations of opium, alcohol, heroin, cocaine, medical maintenance (methadone), the War on Drugs, the carceral state and hyperpolicing, harm reduction and needle/syringe exchange. This semester's principal focus will be on the origins and evolution of the set of theories, philosophies, and practices which constitute harm reduction. The International Harm Reduction Association/Harm Reduction International offers a basic, though not entirely comprehensive, definition of harm reduction in its statement, "What is Harm Reduction?" (http://www.ihra.net/what-is-harm-reduction): "Harm reduction refers to policies, programmes and practices that aim to reduce the harms associated with the use of psychoactive drugs in people unable or unwilling to stop. The defining features are the focus on the prevention of harm, rather than on the prevention of drug use itself, and the focus on people who continue to use drugs."[1] Harm reduction in many U.S. communities of color, however, has come to connote a much wider range of activity and challenges to the status quo. In this course we will explore the development of harm reduction in the United States and trace its evolution in the political and economic context race, urban neoliberalism, and no-tolerance drug war. The course will feature site visits to harm reduction organizations in New York City, guest lectures, and research/oral history analysis. This course has been approved for inclusion in both the African-American Studies and History undergraduate curricula (majors and concentrators). HIST W4588 will be open to both undergraduate and masters students. To apply, please complete the Google form at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1xaPFhQOzkl1NHnIjQIen9h41iel2hXAdhV59D5wH8AQ/viewform?usp=send_form. Questions may be directed to skroberts@columbia.edu.  

HIST W4594 American Society, 1776-1861. 0 points.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar examines the transformation of American society from national independence to the Civil War, paying particular attention to changes in agriculture, war, and treaty-making with Indian nations, the rise of waged labor, religious movements, contests over slavery, and the ways print culture revealed and commented on the tensions of the era. The readings include writings of de Tocqueville, Catherine Beecher, and Frederick Douglass, as well as family correspondence, diaries, and fiction. Students will write a 20 page research paper on primary sources. Field(s): US

HIST W4596 American Consumer Culture. 4 points.

This seminar examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the “good life” through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

HIST W4597 Memory and American Narratives of the Self. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will use readings from the interdisciplinary study of memory (theory) to examine published and unpublished American letters, diaries, and autobiographies (practice). With regard to memory, we will be concerned with what is remembered, what is forgotten, and how this process occurs. We’ll explore concepts including collective/shared memory, commemoration, documentation, trauma, nation, autobiography, nostalgia, etc., and we’ll test this theory against written narratives of the self. The goals of the seminar are to explore theoretical concepts of memory, apply them to written examples of memory, and to develop proficiency in the use of these skills inside and outside an academic environment. This is a history course and many of the narratives we will read are American 19th-century texts. These will include, but not be limited to, those on the experience of the Civil War. The course requires participants to commit substantial time outside of class working with unpublished materials in Columbia’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library for assignments and as part of a final project. Field(s): US

HIST W4601 Jews in the Later Roman Empire, 300-600 CE. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will explore the background and examine some of the manifestations of the first Jewish cultural explosion after 70 CE. Among the topics discussed: the Late Roman state and the Jews, the rise of the synagogue, the redaction of the Palestinian Talmud and midrashim, the piyyut and the Hekhalot. Field(s): JWS, ANC

HIST W4604 Jews and the City. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Over the course of the nineteenth century, millions of Jews uprooted themselves from their places of birth and moved to cities scattered throughout the world.  This mass urbanization not only created new demographic centers of world Jewry, but also fundamentally transformed Jewish political and cultural life.  In this course, we shall analyze primary source material, literary accounts as well as secondary sources as we examine the Jewish encounter with the city, and see how Jewish culture was shaped by and helped to shape urban culture.  We shall compare Jewish life in six cities spanning from Eastern Europe to the United States and consider how Jews’ concerns molded the urban economy, urban politics, and cosmopolitan culture.  We shall also consider the ways in which urbanization changed everyday Jewish life.  What impact did it have on Jewish economic and religious life?  What role did gender and class play in molding the experiences of Jews in different cities scattered throughout the world?

HIST W4607 Rabbis for Historians. 4 points.

This course introduces the central historical issues raised by ancient Palestinian and Babylonian rabbinic literature through exploration of some of the crucial primary texts and analysis of the main scholarly approaches to these texts.

HIST W4609 Marriage and Kinship in Medieval Egypt. 4 points.

This class will explore the everyday culture reflected in the Geniza manuscripts through the lens of kinship relations and family life. The course will introduce a range of genres of Geniza documents (court records, contracts and deeds, legal responsa, and personal letters). We will read examples of these documents alongside contemporary Jewish legal and literary works, Islamic literature, and recent work in medieval Islamic social history. Taking a comparative approach to this material, we will work to understand how the authors of these documents understood marriage, divorce, and parenthood, and how these relationships positioned individuals economically and socially within the broader communities in which they lived. In the process, you will learn how to use documents and literary sources as evidence for social history, as well as learn a great deal about Jews' everyday life in medieval Egypt.

HIST W4610 The Ancient Jews and the Mediterranean. 4 points.

What can the history and ethnography of the Mediterranean world teach us about ancient Jews and early Christians and how can the experiences of the ancient Jews and early Christians be used to criticize and refine modern ideas about Mediterranean culture. We will examine selected ancient Jewish, Christian and Roman texts from a critical "mediterraneanist" perspective.

HIST W4611 Jews and Muslims in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines aspects of the history of the Jews in the medieval Islamic world, beginning with the historiographical debate about this contentious subject. The seminar will move from discussion of the early encounter between Islam and the Jews at the time of the Prophet Muhammad, discussing the Qur'an and other foundational texts, to the legal and actual status of the Jews. We will examine how the famous Cairo Geniza documents illuminate Jewish economic life, and how the realities of economic life affected commercial autonomy, with its foundations in the Geonic period. Through a discussion of the problem of adjudication we will address the large problem of how much autonomy the Jews actually had. Comparisons will be drawn with the situation of the Jews in medieval Latin Europe, as well as with Christian communities under Islam. In addition to discussion of secondary readings, classes will focus on the close reading of seminar primary resources in English translation.   Field(s): MED/JEW

HIST W4615 'Tradition, Tradition': Growing Up in the Shtetl. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar will focus on traditional Jewish life, in the Eastern European towns known as shtetlekh, from the early modern period until late 19th century. Through study of various primary sources, mainly memoirs, autobiographies, stories and poetry, we will portray the everyday life, especially childhood and adolescence, and the confrontation between tradition and modernity. Field(s): JEW

HIST W4617 Jews in Muslim Lands in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

This undergraduate seminar examines central aspects of the history of the Jews in the medieval Islamicate world, including Islamic attitudes and policies towards the dhimmis (non-Muslim monotheists); the legal and actual status of the Jews; the evidence of the Cairo Geniza documents; economic life; Jewish law; community organization; and the question of communal autonomy.

HIST W4635 Ancient Jewish Texts: Leviticus Rabbah. 4 points.

May be repeated.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Close reading in the original languages of ancient Jewish texts including selected tractates from Mishnah, Tosefta, Palestinian Talmud, early midrash collections, and pre-Islamic liturgical poetry. Field(s): *ANC/JEW

HIST W4641 Holocaust and Genocide in American Culture. 4 points.

When the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. opened in 1993, some people asked why a “European” catastrophe was being memorialized alongside shrines to Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln while there was still no museum documenting the experience of African slaves in the United States or the effort to exterminate the Native Americans on the continent. Why has the Holocaust in Europe become the subject of many museums, high school and college courses and continuing media attnetion while in contrast, the genocide against Native Americans garners scant attention in any of these forums? This course is comparative at its core as it examines the implications of the United States' failure to come to grips with its own genocidal programs. The course will review how historical trauma -- the intergenerational effects of community-wide traumas such as genocide, which has been validated by science, continues to manifest in both Holocaust survivors and Native American communities such that the need to come to terms with these events is not just an academic exercise but one necessary to assist Native communities overcome the severe poverty, high youth suicide, alcoholism and incarceration rates that is the legacy of the genocide against them. It is the hope that students will learn from the ways this country has dealt with the Holocaust to give the Native American genocide the visibility needed to finally produce healing as well as to examine the implications of new scientific findings showing that the trauma suffered by Holocaust survivors are inherited by their children.

HIST W4644 Modern Jewish Intellectual History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course analyzes Jewish intellectual history from Spinoza to 1939. It tracks the radical transformation that modernity yielded in Jewish life, both in the development of new, self-consciously modern, iterations of Judaism and Jewishness and in the more elusive but equally foundational changes in "traditional" Judaisms. Questions to be addressed include:  the development of the modern concept of "religion" and its effect on the Jews; the origin of the notion of "Judaism" parallel to Christianity, Islam, etc.; the rise of Jewish secularism and of secular Jewish ideologies, especially the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), modern Jewish nationalism, Zionism, Jewish socialism, and Autonomism; the rise of Reform, Modern Orthodox, and Conservative Judaisms; Jewish neo-Romanticism and neo-Kantianism, and Ultra-Orthodoxy. Field(s): JWS

HIST W4645 Spinoza to Sabbatai: Jews in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

A seminar on the historical, political, and cultural developments in the Jewish communities of early-modern Western Europe (1492-1789) with particular emphasis on the transition from medieval to modern patterns. We will study the resettlement of Jews in Western Europe, Jews in the Reformation-era German lands, Italian Jews during the late Renaissance, the rise of Kabbalah, and the beginnings of the quest for civil Emancipation. Field(s): JWS/EME

HIST W4659 Crime in Latin America. 4 points.

This seminar will focus on studies that take a historical look at crime in the Latin American context and will bring the discussion to the present. Transnational connections and comparisons will be encouraged, particularly as we explore the history and contemporary phenomenon of drug trafficking, incorporating the United States as a factor and a scene for Latin American crime. Readings, discussions and reports will try to identify commonalities across Latin American and dig deeper on some specific places and moments. In order to do this, we will devote part of the semester to the analysis of primary sources, and will require a research component in the final paper. Group(s): D Field(s): LA

HIST W4667 The Nahua World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate seminar aims to give the students a basic knowledge of Nahuatl, the main indigenous language of central Mexico, still in use nowadays. During the classes we will explore the principal structures as for grammar and usage, focusing on classical Nahuatl, the version of the language employed during colonial times to produce documents and communicate. A vast and varied literature of mundane documents and ecclesiastically sponsored texts exists; we are going to concentrate on the type of everyday Nahuatl which goes well into the eighteenth century and includes all the Spanish contact phenomena that are still in the language today. The objective goes beyond pure language learning, using the language as a way to reach a better understanding of indigenous society and history. Following an agreement with the universities of Yale and Chicago, the seminar will offer the possibility to join an intensive training in contemporary Nahuatl in the state of Guerrero, Mexico, during the summer, with Professor Jonathan Amith (FLAS scholarships are available). In addition, pending an agreement with the University of Zacatecas, Mexico, there will be the possibility to work with an indigenous speaker for one week during the seminar. Group(s): A, D Field(s): LA Listed formerly as "Nahuatl Language and Culture"  

HIST W4669 The Dictatorship that Changed Brazil, 1964-1985. 0 points.

This course seeks to analyze the period of military dictatorship in Brazil (1964-1985), supported by many civilians as well. Different conjunctures will be studied, since the years before the coup of 1964 until the process of democratization. The course aims to understand a paradox: the dictatorship was established in the name of democracy, allegedly threatened. The main hypothesis is that the paradox was due to the character of the conservative modernization of society imposed by the military regime and its civilian allies. The dictatorship had ambiguities and distinct phases, involving a complex set of political and military forces. The involvement with the modernization also implied the use of illegitimate brute force against its enemies, which allows to characterize the regime as a dictatorship, in spite of its democratic façade. Special attention will be given to the opponents of the order. The relationship between the dominant and the dominated, even in authoritarian regimes, must be understood not only based on confrontation and repression, but also on negotiation and concessions to the opponents, without which it is impossible to build a base of legitimacy. The topics will be examined in the light of concepts such as conservative modernization (Barrington Moore Jr.), legitimate domination (Weber), hegemony (Gramsci), among others. The course also introduces students to critical interpretations of society and politics produced by Brazilian and Brazilianist historians and social scientists. Field(s): LA

HIST W4670 Culture and Politics in Brazil, 1960-1989. 4 points.

This course seeks to elucidate the elective affinities between culture and politics in the activities of artists and intellectuals, especially those who opposed the military dictatorship in Brazil. The problem of the identity of the Brazilian people was essential for them. They sought alleged popular roots and wanted to overcome underdevelopment. At the time there was a revolutionary romanticism which involved the utopia of integrating intellectuals with the common man of the people, which could give life to an alternative project of society that was eventually defeated by the military dictatorship (1964-1985). Many artists and intellectuals engaged in the opposition to the regime, in spite of its efforts of modernization, which gave them good job opportunities, in a complex process that involved both dissent and integration to the established order. The lectures will analyze different conjunctures, from the years before the coup of 1964 until the end of the democratization process that was completed with the free elections of 1989. Particularly the decades of 1960 and 1970 were some of the most creative periods of Brazilian culture, including the Cinema Novo, the Teatro de Arena, the Bossa Nova and the Tropicalism. The topics will be examined in the light of concepts such as structures of feeling (Raymond Williams), field (Bourdieu), engagement (Sartre), commodity fetishism and reification (Karl Marx, G. Lukacs, Walter Benjamin, F. Jameson), society of the spectacle (Guy Debord), culture industry (Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer), revolutionary romanticism (Michael Löwy and Robert Sayre), among others. The course also introduces students to critical interpretations of society and culture produced by Brazilian and Brazilianist historians and social scientists.

HIST W4674 Cuba and Latin America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this colloquium we will examine what the Cold War meant in a Latin American context and how historians today are interpreting it. We will primarily be focusing on new conceptual frameworks and historiographical trends that have emerged in the last decade as a result of archival openings, oral histories and the publication of memoirs. Although it would be helpful to have a background in US-Latin American relations and/or Latin American history it is not a prerequisite of the course. Because the colloquium is largely structured chronologically, students will gain an understanding of events, turning points, and developments in Latin America throughout the twentieth century that will allow them to understand the region's past. It worth underlining that this is not a course about US interventions in the region, although the United States often contributed to the way in which the Cold War in Latin America unfolded. Instead, we will be focusing squarely on Latin American perspectives and looking at what the Cold War meant to those inside the region. Specifically, we will be addressing the role of ideology and ideological struggles in twentieth-century Latin America; how these ideas responded to the challenges of modernity and development; why Marxism was popular in the region and how it was interpreted; the extent to which it influenced nationalists and revolutionaries; and who opposed it, why, and how. Throughout the semester we will be focusing in on international and intra-regional dimensions to the conflict as well as transnational stories of exile and movements. Students will therefore also be exploring how events in one part of Latin America impacted upon people in other areas of region either directly or indirectly. In this respect, we will be paying particular attention to the overthrow of Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, the Cuban Revolution's impact on revolutionary and counter- evolutionary trends in Latin America in the 1960s, the significance of the Brazilian coup of 1964 and the subsequent influence that Brazil's military regime had in shaping politics the Southern Cone. The colloquium is also designed to allow students to examine how Latin American populations, parties, leaders and exiles interacted with their contemporaries in other parts of the world and to draw comparisons. Field(s): LA

HIST W4676 History of Cuba from Late Spanish Colonialiism to the Present. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An exploration of Cuba's late colonial period, wars of independence, republican/neocolonial period, 1933 and 1959 revolutions, and eras under the governments of Fidel and Raúl Castro, including recent history.  Topics considered will include: Cuban sovereignty; the agricultural basis of the Cuban economy under colonialism and neocolonialism; enslaved labor and abolition; social and political struggles, both nonviolent and armed; the development of Cuban nationalisms, with an emphasis on the roles of race, diaspora, and exile in this process; Cuban-U.S. relations over many decades; and Cuba's role as a global actor, particularly after the 1959 revolution. Field(s): LA

HIST W4677 Latin American Growth and Wellbeing in Historical Perspective. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

In this seminar the main debates about long-run economic development in Latin America are examined from an international perspective. In particular, the course will address the impact of Latin American integration into the world market (including trade, capital flows, immigration, and changes in wellbeing and inequality) and the reactions to globalization (including restrictions to free trade and capital and labor mobility).

HIST W4678 Indigenous Worlds in Early Latin America. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This undergraduate seminar deals with the presence of indigenous peoples in Latin American colonial societies and aims to analyze indigenous responses to conquest and colonization. How did indigenous people see themselves and interact with other groups? What roles did they play in shaping Latin American societies? What spaces were they able to create for themselves? These and similar questions will guide our discussion through the semester. The course will offer a survey of all the main indigenous groups; however, the case studies are by necessity just a selection, and quite a few come from Mexico, reflecting the state of the scholarship in the field.

HIST W4688 1968 in Latin America: Leftist Radicalism and Youth Counterculture in Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on the cases of Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay to explore the complex relationships between social conflict, youth counterculture, and leftist radicalism which characterized the 1960s all over the region.  In-depth reading and discussion of a number of relevant primary sources and available scholarship in English will build a foundation for thinking through these issues.  In the first part of the class, we will analyze the political mobilization and cultural modernization in the framework of the conflicts that shaped the Cold War in the subcontinent.  After this general introduction, we will focus on 1968 to examine the impact of countercultural ideas and practices on different political traditions, particularly student and leftist politics.  Next we will analyze the rise and fall of the New Left, which challenged the ideological commitment, political strategies, and conservative cultural politics of the traditional left. Discussion will incorporate conventional views and recent academic debates on this shift in the region, which also addressing the spiraling of state repression that forced both old and new groups to reconsider strategies in the three countries under examination.  Finally, students will be encouraged to assess how all of these events and themes echoed in social memory through cultural representations and their increasing power to either legitimize or discredit political positions. Field(s): LA

HIST W4689 Human Rights Activism in Latin America, 1970s-1990s. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focusing on the cases of  Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay, this course examines the birth and development of the movements that protested human rights violations by right-wing authoritarian regimes in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. In the first part of the class, we will explore some of the basic concerns that historians, political theorists, and social scientists have raised about authoritarian regimes in late twentieth-century South America. We will aim at concocting a working definition of authoritarianism, discussing the emergence of a new authoritarian model in the Southern Cone and examining the specific challenges confronted by the human rights movements. After this brief survey, the class will focus on the different ways of dealing with the repressive, legal, and political legacies of these regimes. We will analyze the first efforts at denunciation launched by political exiles and transnational human rights groups, as well as the formation of groups of victims' relatives that aimed at exposing ongoing abuses in their countries. We will also study the role of human rights claims during the transitional periods and the ways in which the post-transitional democratic governments faced these calls for accountability. The course will make a basic distinction between concrete legal actions taken to punish those accused of human rights violations, where the state was called to play a decisive role, and more disorganized efforts to know what happened and spread this knowledge to the society at large. We will explore this distinction, discussing how different actors posed their claims and constructed narratives to account for human rights violations and past political violence. This exploration will include the existing literature on justice and truth telling in the politics of transition, as well as scholarship on social memory and historical commemorations. Field(s): LA

HIST W4700 Utopia. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The idea of utopia can be traced across many different periods and places. This seminar explores (imagined or reasoned) conceptions of the perfect society in literary, intellectual, and political texts. The ambiguous character of the utopian ideal holds out the promise of human perfection but also encodes a precariousness that speaks to some inevitable future disorder. Reading across a variety of genres and times, examining this interplay between visions of collective redemption and human suffering allows us to consider the ways in which authors have recorded the ideals and fears of their own political or social orders. It thus examines the very idea, whether historical or "mythical", of human progression or retrogression (understood as the "fall") to examine conceptions of time, history and humanity across numerous discursive traditions. The course will pay special attention to a number of themes and ideals. Among these are: the idea of a "golden age," as exemplified in some of the earliest cosmological and other writings and found in number of "visions of paradise"; the rise of millenarianist movements, ideas of eschatology and apocalypse; the ideal republic, whether as a proper political order or as exemplified through a new epistemic community, or "republic of letters"; the "perfect state," ranging from revolutionary, democratic, anarchist and socialist ones; and, finally, ending finally with modernist visions of dystopia which many of these same ideals would come to inspire. We will read a selection of texts ranging from Hesiod's Works and Days, Plato's Republic, works by Augustine and Farabi, and Thomas More's Utopia to Voltaire's Candide and Marx and Engels's The Communist Manifesto.

HIST W4705 Constitutions and Democracy in the Middle East. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: application requirements: SEE UNDERGRAD SEMINAR SECTION OF DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

Where the establishment of sustainable democracies is concerned, the Middle East has perhaps the poorest record of all regions of the world since World War II. This is in spite of the fact that two of the first constitutions in the non-Western world were established in this region, in the Ottoman Empire in 1876 and in Iran in 1906. Notwithstanding these and other subsequent democratic and constitutional experiments, Middle Eastern countries have been ruled over the past century by some of the world's last absolute monarchies, as well as a variety of other autocratic, military-dominated and dictatorial regimes. This course, intended primarily for advanced undergraduates, explores this paradox. It will examine the evolution of constitutional thought and practice, and how it was embodied in parliamentary and other democratic systems in the Middle East. It will examine not only the two Ottoman constitutional periods of 1876-78 and 1908-18, and that of Iran from 1905 onwards, but also the various precursors to these experiments, and some of their 20th century sequels in the Arab countries, Turkey and Iran. This will involve detailed study of the actual course of several Middle Eastern countries' democratic experiments, of the obstacles they faced, and of their outcomes. Students are expected to take away a sense of the complexities of the problems faced by would-be Middle Eastern democrats and constitutionalists, and of some of the reasons why the Middle East has appeared to be an exception to a global trend towards democratization in the post-Cold War era.

HIST W4713 Orientalism and the Historiography of the Other. 4 points.

This course will examine some of the problems inherent in Western historical writing on non-European cultures, as well as broad questions of what itmeans to write history across cultures. The course will touch on therelationship between knowledge and power, given that much of the knowledge we will be considering was produced at a time of the expansion of Western power over the rest of the world. By comparing some of the "others" which European historians constructed in the different non-western societies they depicted, and the ways other societies dealt with alterity and self, we may be able to derive a better sense of how the Western sense of self was constructed. Group(s): C Field(s): ME

HIST W4714 Modern Arabic History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate seminar course will introduce students to major trends in modern Arabic intellectual history. Drawing on a range of intellectual movements from the 18th century to the present, we will cover such themes as: the history of readers and the role of publics and 'counter-publics' in the Middle east; encounters with Europe, Orientalism and its critics; the impact of liberalism, positivism and colonialism, and, finally, the rise of new discourses around law, science, socialism and religious reform.  We will end by paying special attention to contemporary religious movements, from the Salafiyya reformers to the Muslim Brotherhood and contemporary expressions of the new 'global Islam'. This is a general introductory course: no knowledge of Arabic or previous experience in modern Middle East history is necessary. Students who can work with Arabic of other language sources, however, are encouraged to do so, particularly for their final assignment. Field(s): ME

HIST W4715 Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Early Islamic World. 4 points.

This seminar examines how religion worked as a social and political category in the early Islamic world. In the seventh century, the Middle East was populated by a diverse mix of Christians, Jews, pagans, and others. By the eleventh century, most of these people’s descendants were Muslims; those who had not converted to Islam were mostly Jews and Christians. This transformation changed what it meant to belong to a religious community, for Muslims, Jews, and Christians alike. We will examine this enormous historical change and its outcome, focusing on the social and political contexts of conversion in the first Islamic centuries (7th-10th) and on the social, political, cultural, and intellectual dimensions of religious communal life in the period immediately after (11th-12th centuries).

HIST W4718 Theories of Islamic History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Unlike European history, which divides into generally agreed upon eras and is structured around a clear narrative of religious and political events from Roman times down to the present, the broad sweep of Islamic and Middle Eastern history appears in quite different lights depending on who is wielding the broom. Theories of Islamic history can embody or conceal political, ethnic, or religious agendas; and no consensus has gained headway among the many writers who have given thought to the issue. The study of theories of Islamic history, therefore, provides a good opportunity for history majors to explore and critique broad conceptual approaches. A seminar devoted to such explorations should be a valuable capstone experience for studnets with a special interest in Islam and the Middle East. One or two works will be read by the entire class each week, and two students will be assigned to lead the discussions of the week's readings. Grades for the course will be based half on class participation and half on a 15-page term paper devoted to a topic approved by the instructor. Field(s): ME

HIST W4732 The Post-Ottoman World. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

In this seminar we will put the histories of the modern Balkans and Middle East in conversation by seeing them through the lens of the "post-Ottoman world." Moving beyond the national histories of countries such as Turkey, Greece, Egypt, Lebanon, Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia, we will examine the common dilemmas and divergent paths of a variety of groups, institutions, and individual figures throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Field(s): ME

HIST W4746 Modern Turkey. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Bulletin description: In this course we will explore the relationships between intellectual, social, cultural and political history of the Republic of Turkey. We will discuss questions of continuity from the Ottoman Empire, Turkey's predecessor state, and continue through the interwar, Cold War, and post-Cold War periods. Issues to be explored include Turks and their Others, political belonging within Turkey and the place of Turkey in the wider region(s) around it. Field(s): ME

HIST W4751 The Ottomans and the West, 1700-1900. 4 points.

This is an undergraduate seminar covering two centuries of transformation of the Ottoman Empire viewed from the perspective of contacts with, and of the influence of, the western world. Based on a wide perspective embracing political, economic, social, and cultural history, the seminar will address such basic issues as modernization, modernity, westernization, orientalism, and imperialism to understand a long process of transformation from an early-modern imperial structure to a periphery of the modern world order.

HIST W4755 Oil and the History of Arab Gulf States. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar focuses on how the discovery and exploitation of petroleum at the turn of the 20th century has shaped the formation and consolidation of Arab states of the Persian Gulf, permanently changing the geo-political and social landscape of the Arabian Peninsula. We will study economic, social, and political formations across the Gulf on the eve of the discovery of oil and the attendant transformations that accompanied its exploitation. We will also pay close attention to the role that imperial rivalries and foreign oil companies played in shaping the Gulf states, their economies, systems of rule, foreign relations, borders, and built environment. We also study the populist, anti-imperialist movements of the mid-twentieth century in the context of the "Arab Cold War". Saudi Arabia has received more academic attention than the other Gulf states and thus takes up a larger part of the course, but we will also cover Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, UAE and Oman. We will read historical, anthropological, literary and political economy studies and oil firm histories, drawing on works on Yemen, Iraq, Iran, and the US, to follow transformations in political, social and economic life in this understudied region that has played a central role in world politics and economy since the 1900s. Field(s): ME

HIST W4768 Writing Contemporary African History. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

An exploration of the historiography of contemporary (post-1960) Africa, this course asks what African history is, what is unique about it, and what is at stake in its production. Field(s): AFR

HIST W4779 Africa and France. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: reading knowledge of French is highly encouraged.

This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current ‘memory wars’ in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa. Group(s): B, C Field(s): AFR, MEU

HIST W4789 Poverty in Africa: Historical Perspectives. 4 points.

In this course we will explore in a critical manner the concept of poverty in Africa. The emphasis is on historicizing categories such as poverty and wealth, debt and charity and on the ways in which people in Africa have understood such categories. As such the course takes a longue durée approach spanning over a millennium of history, ending with contemporary understandings of poverty. Field(s): AFR

HIST W4803 Subaltern Studies and Beyond: History and the Archive. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This is an advanced undergraduate seminar course that will retrace the history of the making of the Subaltern Studies problematic, considered a major intervention in both Indian nationalist history and the wider discipline of history itself, with a focus on the relationship between method, archives, and the craft of history writing. Group(s): A, C Fields: *SA

HIST W4848 Pakistan in Modern South Asia: 1924-2014. 4 points.

Pakistan is the second largest Muslim nation and the sixth most populous country in the world. Entangled in multiple political, economic, and social conflicts, the citizens of the country are likewise engaged in multiple struggles for re-imagining, resistance, and survival. This course will situate Pakistan in the context of modern South Asia, and examine its diverse struggles and life-worlds from a historical, environmental, and literary perspective. It will cover topics such as the partitions of 1947 and 1971, debates on Islam and the constitution, gender and sexuality, and the literary imagination. The course will engage with the most recent historiographic debates in studying Pakistan within the South Asian and global contexts.

HIST W4858 Islam in India since 1526: Coexistence and Conflict, Gender and Personhood. 4 points.

This course explores five hundred years of the history of Islam and Muslims in India. It is concerned with understanding the many faces of Islam and the many ways of being Muslim in India and how these have changed over time. On one level we will study the connection between Islam and political power in South Asia: the course explores the ruling ideologies of the Mughal Emperors, the different ways in which Muslims responded to the rise of British power on the subcontinent, and the various responses Muslims articulated in response to the introduction of democracy in India. These questions naturally ensure that the course is also concerned the question of how different Muslims interacted with members of other religious groups in India. We will interrogate moments of coexistence and conflict between religious communities to try to understand their origins and nature. At another level, the course is concerned with the changing shape of Muslim lives over the same period. It explores everyday practices of Muslim belief as well as notions of gender, family and personhood, and explores the interplay of these with political, economic and cultural changes over five centuries of history.

HIST W4859 Asian Migration to the U.S.. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course explores the history of migration from Asia to, and throughout, the United States and North, Central and South America from the late 19th to the early 21st century. The goal of the course is to explore how and why people moved, their experiences in settlement and sojourning and their impact on life in the Americas. The course consists of a combination of readings, discussions, and research workshops.

HIST W4865 Vietnam War: History, Media, Memory. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The wars in Vietnam and Indochina as seen in historical scholarship, contemporary media, popular culture and personal recollection. The seminar will consider American, Vietnamese, and international perspectives on the war, paying particular attention to Vietnam as the "first television war" and the importance of media images in shaping popular opinion about the conflict. Group(s): B, C, D

HIST W4870 Japan Before 1600. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduces the cultural, political, social, and economic history of the Japanese archipelago from earliest times through the 16th century C.E.  A variety of primary source materials in translation and a sampling of English-language secondary sources.  Loosely organized around particular places or spaces of premodern Japan, and emphatically not a comprehensive survey. Field(s): EA*

HIST W4900 Historian's Craft. 4 points.

Intended for history majors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This course raises the issues of the theory and practice of history as a discipline.  Considers different approaches to the study of history and offers an introduction to research and the use of archival collections. Special emphasis on conceptualization of research topics, situating projects historiographically, locating and assessing published and archival sources. Field(s): METHODS

HIST W4902 World War II. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A global examination of the coming, course, and consequences of World War II from the differing viewpoints of the major belligerents and those affected by them.  Emphasis is not only on critical analysis but also on the craft of history-writing. Group(s): B, C, D Field(s): INTL

HIST W4911 Medicine and Western Civilization. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors, but other majors are welcome.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar seeks to analyze the ways by which medicine and culture combine to shape our values and traditions. To this end, it will examine notable literary, medical, and social texts from classical antiquity to the present. A, B, D

HIST W4914 The Future as History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to the historical origins of forecasting, projections, long-range planning, and future scenarios. Topics include apocalyptic ideas and movements, utopias and dystopias, and changing conceptions of time, progress, and decline. A key theme is how relations of power, including understandings of history, have been shaped by expectations of the future. Group(s): ABCD

HIST W4915 History of Domestic Animals. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will consider the evolution of human-animal relations on a global basis over the entire course of human history.  Student papers will engage specific topics from different times and places. Field(s): INTL

HIST W4917 Children of the Revolution. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In 1972 the British rock band Tyrannosaurus Rex sang "no, you won't fool the children of the revolution" implying the commitment of the 1968ers to the revolutionary cause; in 1987 David Horowitz, one of the most prominent figures of 1960s radicalism, publicized his regret for belonging to the "destructive generation". What happens to revolutionary movements when the "great steam engine of history" seems not to be heading to the desired destination? Main goal of this course is to explore the transformation of revolutionary generations and the connection between disillusioned radicals and the shaping of political and intellectual trends of the 20th century.

HIST W4919 History of Public Policy: Diplomacy from the Cold War to the War on Terrorism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

History of changes in the concept and practice of public diplomacy, mainly American. The course focuses on state-coordinated efforts to influence foreign public opinion, examining these against the background of major shifts in U.S. hegemonic strategies since the 1930s. Class topics and readings, drawing on histories, political science, communications theory, are mainly devoted to comparing two periods, the Cold War and the Global War on Terrorism. Class work includes analysis of military-strategic and other primary sources and a research paper to be presented at end-of-the semester workshop. Field(s): INTL

HIST W4920 Global Justice in Historical Perspective. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In Anglo-American political philosophy today, "global justice" is a booming field. How did this happen? Where did it come from? This course offers an alternative introduction to the field, assuming that history helps place it in a different perspective. In 1971, John Rawls published his Theory of Justice, which arrived at social principles through abstraction - from the constraints and particularities of body, class, and culture, but taking extant national spaces as fixed architecture. Within a few years, however, some of his own followers challenged this constraint. After 1989, a long-term canon emerged, casting "cosmopolitanism" as long-brewing since the time of the Greeks, running through Immanuel Kant, into our own day. We will revisit this canon as intellectual historians, attempting to reconcile it with the sudden turn to global justice in our own age of globalization.

HIST W4922 The Engineering and Ownership of Life. 4 points.

This course will examine the history of innovation in plants, animals, and human genes and the arrangements that innovators have devised through the law and by other means to establish and protect intellectual property rights in the fruits of their labors. Attending mainly though not exclusively to the United States, it will probe the history of these two subjects both in their own right and their connections to each other and the larger social, economic, and political context from the late eighteenth century to the present. In the first half of the course, which will run to about 1950, we will consider the history of plant and animal breeding and the role in establishing and maintaining intellectual property rights in plants and animals of devices such as breeder's associations, paintings, contracts, trade secrets, and the Plant Patent Act of 1930 which provided the first patent coverage of any type of living organisms in the world. The second half of the course, which will run from c. 1950 to the present, will cover in part advances in plant breeding and the enlargement of intellectual property protection for plants both in the U.S. and Europe through the creation of the plant variety protection system. The bulk of the second half will be devoted to the rise of genetic engineering, statutory and case law establishing patent protection for living organisms in the U.S. and Europe, the biotechnologies of medical diagnostics, pharmaceuticals, and agriculture, and the controversies surrounding these developments, including the legal battles over the patenting of human DNA, in the context of globalization.

HIST W4923 Narratives of World War II. 4 points.

An examination of literary and cinematic narratives of the Second World War produced in the decades since 1940 in Europe, America, and Asia. The analytic approach centers both on the historicity of, and the history in, the texts, with the goal of questioning the nature of narrative in different forms through a blend of literary and historical approaches.

HIST W4928 Comparative Slavery and Abolition in the Atlantic World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar investigates the experiences of slavery and freedom among African-descended people living and laboring in the various parts of the Atlantic World. The course will trace critical aspects of these two major, interconnected historical phenomena with an eye to how specific cases either manifested or troubled broader trends across various slaveholding societies. The first half of the course addresses the history of slavery and the second half pertains to experiences in emancipation. However, since the abolition of slavery occurs at different moments in various areas of the Atlantic World, the course will adhere to a thematic rather than a chronological structure, in its examination of the multiple avenues to freedom available in various regions. Weekly units will approach major themes relevant to both slavery and emancipation, such as racial epistemologies among slaveowners/employers, labor regimes in slave and free societies, cultural innovations among slave and freed communities, gendered discourses and sexual relations within slave and free communities, and slaves’ and freepeople’s resistance to domination. The goal of this course is to broaden students’ comprehension of the history of slavery and freedom, and to promote an understanding of the transition from slavery to freedom in the Americas as creating both continuities and ruptures in the structure and practices of the various societies concerned. Group(s): ABCD Field(s): US/LA 

HIST W4934 Poisons in World History. 4 points.

For the Greeks, a pharmakon could be both medicine and poison. The German alchemist Paracelsus went even further: ”All things are poisons,” he famously wrote, “and nothing is without poison.” Today, we tend to use different words to differentiate “medicines,” “poisons,” and “drugs” - but as this class will explore, the histories of these three categories have more in common than we might think. Readings for this class will range from the “Poison King” Mithridates I of Pergamum to the theories of Paracelsus, the techniques of early modern assassins, the use of poisons as a form of resistance by African slaves, and finally the emergence of the discipline of toxicology in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. No prior knowledge in poisons is required, but students should have an interest in premodern history and/or the life sciences. 

HIST W4946 International Criminal Law: History and Theory. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Many people in our time think some of the highest ethical purposes today were achieved in the struggle to establish the International Criminal Court in 2002, and continue to be at stake in the institution's first steps. Why do people think so, and of what use are the tools of history (assisted by theory) to put this belief in perspective? Answering this question is the main purpose of this course, which presupposes covering the court's origins and several dimensions of its doctrines and workings during its short existence. A main theme is the politics of law, and whether Judith Shklar's brilliant account of legalism is defensible. Field(s): INTL

HIST W4947 History of the Wheel in Transport. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will address critical turning points in the world history of wheeled transport, starting with the time, place, and rationale for the first appearance of wheels; moving onto the diffusion of wheeled transport to other parts of the world; and thence to the emergence of modern wheeled transport out of technological innovations that became evident in eastern Europe in late medieval times. Student papers may be devoted either to these early historical developments, or to episodes in motor-driven vehicular history from more recent times. Field(s): INTL

HIST W4949 The Passions: Introduction to the History of Emotions. 4 points.

This course is designed to introduce students to the history of emotions. We look at classical and contemporary philosophy and history as well as art and poetry on “the passions” – defined variously as emotions, feelings, physical or non-rational sensations or states of consciousness or affects. We begin by asking what is an emotion, and by considering the various historical and philosophical responses to that question. We then look at a number of key emotions from a similarly eclectic, episodic historical perspective. Among those we look at are such classic affective states as love, pleasure, pain, compassion, anger, and fear and terror, and the rise of later more contemporary ones like stress and anxiety, paranoia and trauma.

HIST W4959 A History of the Body in the Atlantic World. 4 points.

This course examines the history of the body in the Atlantic world with a focus on race and gender in North America and the Caribbean. It is designed primarily for students with some background in history, as we will examine a number of primary sources. We will analyze these sources in the context of secondary readings on health and disease, class and labor, transgression and punishment, and the relationship between people and their environment. Through all of these readings we will consider the ways in which race, gender, and bodily difference are constructed over time and space, and reflect on how these categories of difference and power were(and are)culturally specific and subject to change.

HIST W4976 Symbolic Geography: East and West in Modern European Political Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar discusses how frequent changes in European political borders during the 19th and 20th centuries have been reflected in the political thought of the continent. It focuses on 20th century Eastern and Central European interpretations of the regions. Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W4977 History, Big and Deep. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will engage in close readings of recent works that attempt to understand human history within broader contexts of natural history, evolution and complexity theory. In addition to looking carefully at the kinds of logic and evidence used in each work, we will also follow these works into broader discussions of the relationship of human history to the natural world, the development and significance of consciousness and human culture, and the relevance of huge scales of time and space to understanding human life.   Field(s): INTL

HIST W4983 Science and Empire from Baghdad to Byzantium. 4 points.

This seminar explores the flourishing world of medieval science and scientists in the Byzantine and Islamic empires. Scholars read and wrote books on astronomy, medicine, alchemy, and other subjects in a variety of changing social and political contexts. What was the nature of the relationship between science and empire, between knowledge and power, in Byzantium and the medieval Islamic world? How did specialized knowledge and its bearers serve, subvert, and complicate imperial agendas? What was science understood to entail, and to what end? The course is designed for students interested in the history of science, Mediterranean and Middle Eastern empires, and/or the pre-modern world. It introduces students to medieval Greek and Arabic science and political contexts, from roughly the 7th to the 12th century. Readings from primary sources (in translation) and modern scholarship will be analyzed and discussed with respect to several interrelated themes, including: knowledge in the service of empire; communities of knowledge-producers (Christian, Muslim, Jewish, and other); narratives of the history of science and their political significance; and taxonomies of the sciences.

HIST W4985 Citizenship, Race, Gender and the Politics of Exclusion. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the surge of increasingly radical political revolutions that crisscrossed the Atlantic beginning with Britain's Glorious Revolution, extending through the US and French Revolutions to the Haitian Revolution and efforts to establish an Irish Republic in the 1790s. These successive revolutions created the first modern republics and the first modern republican citizens. In the process, they raised a host of questions: What rights could the modern citizen claim? Who could claim those rights? Do the rights of citizens war with human rights? As one revolution led to another, the answers to these questions became progressively democratized and radicalized - until Caribbean slaves' bloody assertion of their freedom and independence (the Haitian Revolution) sent a shudder through Europe and the Americas leading to a retreat from the radical inclusionary vision initially espoused by both the American and the French Revolutions. Field(s): INTL 

HIST W4993 Histories of Cold. 4 points.

Common sense tells us that cold is a basic fact of existence: cold can be seen registered on a thermometer, or felt by stepping out of doors on a winter’s day. But what is cold? This is a question that has fascinated scientists and engineers for at least the last few hundred years. Beginning with Francis Bacon’s famous experiments on frozen chickens, this course follows a frosty trail through experimental science, polar exploration, and social and environmental engineering from the seventeenth century to the present day, asking along the way, how cold itself functioned as an object of scientific inquiry, a basic element of the natural world, and a potential source of economic profit. We will ask, how did lay observers and scientific experts define cold, and how did these understandings change over time? To what extent did temporal and geographic context shape understandings of cold? Was cold the same entity or experience for ocean voyagers becalmed in the tropics in the 1840s as it was for Antarctic explorers at the turn of the twentieth century? What was the relationship between embodied experience and experimental knowledge for people interested in making sense of cold? Between sensation and measurement? Above all, what is cold? And what does it mean to contemplate it in an age of global warming? Students in this course will explore these questions in the context of the expansion of the West and the globalization of western science during the early modern and modern period.

HSEA W2863 The History of Modern Korea. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Recommended: HSEA W3862.

Korean history from the mid 19th century to the present, with particular focus on politics, society, and culture in the 20th century. Major Cultures Requirement: East Asian Civilization List B. Group(s): C

HSEA W3837 Postwar Japan in the World. 4 points.

Field(s): EA

HSEA W3863 The History of Modern Korea. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Recommended: HSEA W3862.

Korean history from the mid 19th century to the present, with particular focus on politics, society, and culture in the 20th century. Major Cultures Requirement: East Asian Civilization List B. Group(s): C

HSEA W4837 Postwar Japan in the World. 4 points.

Field(s): EA

HSEA W4839 Family in Chinese History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Field(s): EA

HSEA W4890 Historiography of East Asia. 3 points.

This course is designed primarily for majors in East Asian studies in their junior year; others may enroll with the instructor's permission.

Major issues in the practice of history illustrated by critical reading of important historical works on East Asia. Group(s): A, C Field(s): EA

HSME UN2810 History of South Asia I: al-Hind to Hindustan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6998 version of this course.

This survey lecture course will provide students with a broad overview of the history of South Asia as a region - focusing on key political, cultural and social developments over more than two millennia. The readings include both primary sources (in translation) and secondary works. Our key concerns will be the political, cultural and theological encounters of varied communities, the growth of cities and urban spaces, networks of trade and migrations and the development of both local and cosmopolitan cultures across Southern Asia. The survey will begin with early dynasties of the classical period and then turn to the subsequent formation of various Perso-Turkic polities, including the development and growth of hybrid political cultures such as those of Vijayanagar and the Mughals. The course also touches on Indic spiritual and literary traditions such as Sufi and Bhakti movements. Near the end of our course, we will look forward towards the establishment of European trading companies and accompanying colonial powers.

Fall 2017: HSME UN2810
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSME 2810 001/29344 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
520 Mathematics Building
Manan Ahmed 4 45/50

HSME UN3810 History of South Asia I: al-Hind to Hindustan. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

This survey lecture course will provide students with a broad overview of the history of South Asia as a region - focusing on key political, cultural and social developments over more than two millennia. The readings include both primary sources (in translation) and secondary works. Our key concerns will be the political, cultural and theological encounters of varied communities, the growth of cities and urban spaces, networks of trade and migrations and the development of both local and cosmopolitan cultures across Southern Asia. The survey will begin with early dynasties of the classical period and then turn to the subsequent formation of various Perso-Turkic polities, including the development and growth of hybrid political cultures such as those of Vijayanagar and the Mughals. The course also touches on Indic spiritual and literary traditions such as Sufi and Bhakti movements. Near the end of our course, we will look forward towards the establishment of European trading companies and accompanying colonial powers.

HSME W3810 History of South Asia I: al-Hind to Hindustan. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

This survey lecture course will provide students with a broad overview of the history of South Asia as a region - focusing on key political, cultural and social developments over more than two millennia. The readings include both primary sources (in translation) and secondary works. Our key concerns will be the political, cultural and theological encounters of varied communities, the growth of cities and urban spaces, networks of trade and migrations and the development of both local and cosmopolitan cultures across Southern Asia. The survey will begin with early dynasties of the classical period and then turn to the subsequent formation of various Perso-Turkic polities, including the development and growth of hybrid political cultures such as those of Vijayanagar and the Mughals. The course also touches on Indic spiritual and literary traditions such as Sufi and Bhakti movements. Near the end of our course, we will look forward towards the establishment of European trading companies and accompanying colonial powers.

HSPB UN2950 Social History of American Public Health. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical understanding of the role public health has played in American history. The underlying assumptions are that disease, and the ways we define disease, are simultaneously reflections of social and cultural values, as well as important factors in shaping those values. Also, it is maintained that the environments that we build determine the ways we live and die. The dread infectious and acute diseases in the nineteenth century, the chronic, degenerative conditions of the twentieth and the new, vaguely understood conditions rooted in a changing chemical and human-made environment are emblematic of the societies we created. Among the questions that will be addressed are: How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape our history? How do ideas about health reflect broader attitudes and values in American history and culture? How does the American experience with pain, disability, and disease affect our actions and lives? What are the responsibilities of the state and of the individual in preserving health? How have American institutions--from hospitals to unions to insurance companies--been shaped by changing longevity, experience with disability and death?

HSPB W2950 Social History of American Public Health. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical understanding of the role public health has played in American history. The underlying assumptions are that disease, and the ways we define disease, are simultaneously reflections of social and cultural values, as well as important factors in shaping those values. Also, it is maintained that the environments that we build determine the ways we live and die. The dread infectious and acute diseases in the nineteenth century, the chronic, degenerative conditions of the twentieth and the new, vaguely understood conditions rooted in a changing chemical and human-made environment are emblematic of the societies we created. Among the questions that will be addressed are: How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape our history? How do ideas about health reflect broader attitudes and values in American history and culture? How does the American experience with pain, disability, and disease affect our actions and lives? What are the responsibilities of the state and of the individual in preserving health? How have American institutions--from hospitals to unions to insurance companies--been shaped by changing longevity, experience with disability and death?

HSPB W3950 Social History of American Public Health. 3 points.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical understanding of the role public health has played in American history. The underlying assumptions are that disease, and the ways we define disease, are simultaneously reflections of social and cultural values, as well as important factors in shaping those values. Also, it is maintained that the environments that we build determine the ways we live and die. The dread infectious and acute diseases in the nineteenth century, the chronic, degenerative conditions of the twentieth and the new, vaguely understood conditions rooted in a changing chemical and human-made environment are emblematic of the societies we created. Among the questions that will be addressed are: How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape our history? How do ideas about health reflect broader attitudes and values in American history and culture? How does the American experience with pain, disability, and disease affect our actions and lives? What are the responsibilities of the state and of the individual in preserving health? How have American institutions--from hospitals to unions to insurance companies--been shaped by changing longevity, experience with disability and death?

HSSL W3224 Cities and Civilizations: an Introduction To Eurasian Studies. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to the study of the region formerly occupied by the Russian and Soviet Empires focusing on cities as the space of self-definition, encounter, and tension among constituent peoples. Focus on incorporating and placing in dialogue diverse disciplinary approaches to the study of the city through reading and analysis of historical, literary, and theoretical texts as well as film, music, painting, and architecture. Group(s): B

HSSL W3860 Post-Socialist Cities of Eurasia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Beginning with the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, the reorganization of urban life was a central goal of Marxist-Leninist state socialism. Despite its claim to be making a radical break with the past, however, this new vision of the city was realized in practice through interaction with earlier urban forms, and the legacy of socialist urbanity continues to be felt in the physical spaces and daily lives of current post-Soviet and post-communist metropolises. This course examines the "socialist city" from its origins in the early USSR, through its transformations across time and space in Eastern Europe and East Asia, down to the present day. Our definition of "Eurasia" therefore extends beyond the former Soviet space to include cities in socialist and post-socialist societies such as China, East Germany, Poland, Mongolia, and North Korea. The course will also venture as far afield as Havana, Brasilia, Mexico City, and New York, considering the socialist city as an experiment in urban living carried out in various times and places well outside the former socialist "bloc." These cities will be studied through a variety of sources across several disciplines, including history, literature, film, art and architecture, anthropology and geography. The spring course continues with the Global Scholars Program Summer Workshop 2014, "Contemporary Cities of Eurasia: Berlin, Moscow, Ulan Bator, Beijing." Students are expected to enroll in both courses.

HSSL W4860 Post-Socialist Cities of Eurasia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Beginning with the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, the reorganization of urban life was a central goal of Marxist-Leninist state socialism. Despite its claim to be making a radical break with the past, however, this new vision of the city was realized in practice through interaction with earlier urban forms, and the legacy of socialist urbanity continues to be felt in the physical spaces and daily lives of current post-Soviet and post-communist metropolises. This course examines the "socialist city" from its origins in the early USSR, through its transformations across time and space in Eastern Europe and East Asia, down to the present day. Our definition of "Eurasia" therefore extends beyond the former Soviet space to include cities in socialist and post-socialist societies such as China, East Germany, Poland, Mongolia, and North Korea. The course will also venture as far afield as Havana, Brasilia, Mexico City, and New York, considering the socialist city as an experiment in urban living carried out in various times and places well outside the former socialist "bloc." These cities will be studied through a variety of sources across several disciplines, including history, literature, film, art and architecture, anthropology and geography. The spring course continues with the Global Scholars Program Summer Workshop 2014, "Contemporary Cities of Eurasia: Berlin, Moscow, Ulan Bator, Beijing." Students are expected to enroll in both courses.

TBD UN2901 Data: Past, Present, and Future. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Corequisite discussion/lab section HSAM UN2902

Critical thinking and practice regarding the past, present, and future of data.  Readings covering how students, scholars, and citizens can make sense of data in science, public policy, and our personal lives.  Labs covering descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive modeling of data.

TBD UN3504 Columbia 1968. 4 points.

This undergraduate seminar examines the social, political, and cultural transformations of the 1960s through the lens of local history. The course is centered on the student and community protests that took place at Columbia University and in Morningside Heights in 1968. Although the protest is one of the touchstone events from the year and the decade, reliable historical treatment is still lacking. This class encourages students to examine and recraft histories of the university and the surrounding community in this period. Modeled on the recently designed “Columbia and Slavery” course, this course is a public-facing seminar designed to empower students to open up a discussion of all the issues connected with the protests, its global, national, and local context, and its aftermath. The course aims to prompt fresh answers to old questions: What were the factors that led to the protests? How did the student and community mobilization shape, and were shaped by, national and international forces? What were the local, national, and international legacies of Columbia 1968?  This seminar is part of an on-going, multiyear effort to grapple with such questions and to share our findings with the Columbia community and beyond.  Working independently, students will define and pursue individual research projects.  Working together, the class will create digital visualizations of these projects.