Portuguese Studies

*Portugese Studies is offered exclusively as a concentration.

Departmental Office: 101 Casa Hispánica, 612 W. 116th Street; 212-854-4187; 212-854-5322 (fax)
http://www.laic.columbia.edu/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Alessandra Russo, 401 Casa Hispánica; 212-854-5267; ar2701@columbia.edu

Director of Graduate Studies: Prof. Graciela Montaldo, 307 Casa Hispánica; 212-854-4882; gm2168@columbia.edu

Directors of the Spanish Language Program:
Lee B. Abraham, 506 Casa Hispánica; 212-854-8075; lba2133@columbia.edu
Angelina Craig-Flórez, 404 Casa Hispánica; 212-854-4187; ac68@columbia.edu

The Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures (LAIC) at Columbia, located in Casa Hispánica, has long enjoyed an international reputation as a center for Hispanic and Lusophone studies. The department provides linguistic preparation in Spanish, Portuguese, and Catalan, and offers a flexible program to study manifestations of the Hispanic and Lusophone worlds in all historical periods—from the medieval to the globalized present—and in a variety of cultural contexts: the Iberian Peninsula, Latin America, the former colonies of Portugal, and the United States.

Students can enter the program at any level of linguistic and cultural preparedness. The department offers a placement exam to determine the level at which students may either begin or continue study. Majors and concentrators in Hispanic studies and Portuguese studies are typically double majors who bring insights and methods from fields such as history, political science, women's studies, anthropology, economics, Latino studies, Latin American studies, etc., which fosters engaging discussions.

Academic Programs

The department offers two majors. The major in Hispanic studies gives students a well-rounded preparation in the history and culture of the Hispanic world. The second option, a major in Hispanic studies with specialization, allows students to study the Hispanic world through a number of fields, among them Latin American studies, gender studies, political science, economics, history, and sociology. The department also offers two concentrations: Hispanic studies and Portuguese studies. 

The language and major programs have also been designed in close consultation and cooperation with Barnard's Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures. All courses taken in one program may be used to fulfill the requirements of the other. Hence, Columbia and Barnard students may move freely between departments of both institutions for courses that best fit their intellectual interests and schedules.

Advanced Placement

The department grants 3 credits for a score of 5 on the AP Spanish Language exam, which satisfies the foreign language requirement. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of a 3300-level (or higher) course with a grade of B or higher. This course must be for at least 3 points of credit and be taught in Spanish. Courses taught in English may not be used for language AP credit.

The department grants 0 credits for a score of 4 on the AP Spanish Language exam, but the foreign language requirement is satisfied.

The department grants 3 credits for a score of 5 on the AP Spanish Literature exam, which satisfies the foreign language requirement. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of a 3300-level (or higher) course with a grade of B or higher. This course must be for at least 3 points of credit and be taught in Spanish. Courses taught in English may not be used for language AP credit.

The department grants 0 credits for a score of 4 on the AP Spanish Literature exam, but the foreign language requirement is satisfied.

Study Abroad

The department strongly recommends that all Hispanic and Portuguese studies majors/concentrators study abroad. Most courses taken abroad can be used to fulfill the requirements for the major and concentration, and with adequate planning, even some of the requirements for a second major or concentration. A maximum of four (4) courses taken abroad may be applied to the major, and a maximum of three (3) to the concentration in Hispanic or Portuguese studies.

All students are strongly advised to take either SPAN UN3349 Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period or SPAN UN3350 Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present before studying abroad. Actual or potential majors and concentrators in Hispanic or Portuguese studies should seek tentative approval of their programs from the director of undergraduate studies before their departure.

Internships

The department maintains an updated list of internship resources and volunteer opportunities in New York City, the United States, and abroad. No academic credit is given for internships.

The Hispanic Institute

The department hosts the Hispanic Institute at Columbia. Founded in 1920 as the Instituto de las Españas, the Institute sponsors and disseminates research on Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian culture. Since 1934, the Institute has published the Revista Hispánica Moderna, a distinguished journal in Hispanic criticism and theory.

In Fulfillment of the Language Requirement

For students with no knowledge of Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan, at least four terms of the language are required: UN1101-UN1102 (or UN1120) and UN2101-UN2102 (or UN2120). All courses must be taken for a letter grade to fulfill the language requirement.

Students with prior knowledge of Spanish who plan to continue studying Spanish are required to take the department’s on-line placement examination before registering for courses. Students with prior knowledge of Portuguese or Catalan should speak with the director of language programs.

Students may be exempted from the language requirement in one of four ways:

  1. Present a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Spanish Language or Spanish Literature Exams. Students who receive a score of 5 in either exam are awarded 3 AP credits upon successful completion of a 3300-level (or above) course with a grade of B or higher. AP credit is not granted for a score of 4.
  2. Present a score of 780 or above on the SAT Subject Test. Students with a score lower than 780 should take the department's on-line placement exam and follow the placement advice received.
  3. Present a score of a 7, 6, or 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Level Exam in Spanish.

Departmental Honors

Beginning in Spring 2015, the department has put in place a new timeline and training program for juniors, in order to assist students with planning and completing the Honors Thesis during their senior year. The Honors Thesis is an excellent option for any student interested in pursuing a Master's degree or Ph.D.; but, above all, it is a highly formative research and writing experience—one that can bear unexpected fruits toward any path the student decides to take in the future.

All students pursuing a major through the department may apply to write an Honors Thesis. The department envisions the thesis as an intellectually challenging and rewarding experience that crowns four years of undergraduate studies with an original contribution in the field chosen by the student.

The department supports students in shaping their research topic and provides frequent advising throughout the research and writing process. The timeline is as follows:

  • During the junior year, students take into consideration the possibility of writing an Honors Thesis in the following year. The topic of the Honors Thesis may likely originate in an advanced course taken during the junior year; students may also choose to develop ideas discussed or papers written in courses taken in previous years. Juniors schedule a meeting (or, if the student is studying abroad, a Skype conversation) with the director of undergraduate studies to discuss their proposed topic and faculty adviser.
  • By May 15, juniors who have decided to write an Honors Thesis in their senior year send a formal proposal to the director of undergraduate studies, which includes:
    • A title and a one-page abstract;
    • The name of the proposed faculty adviser;
    • An application for departmental partial funding support (for those who would like to pursue research during the summer).
  • By May 30, the Honors Thesis committee reviews the proposals and informs the students of its decision.
  • In the fall of the senior year:
    • Seniors selected to write the Honors Thesis enroll in SPAN UN3998 Supervised Individual Research (Spring) with their faculty adviser and write the Honors Thesis during the entire senior year under the direction of their adviser. For the purposes of the major, this independent study counts as a 3-point course towards elective courses.
    • Faculty advisers organize Honors Thesis Workshops to discuss students' ongoing projects and provide advising on research tools, methodological and theoretical frames, and overall writing process.
  • In either the fall or spring of the senior year, students enroll in SPAN UN3991 Senior Seminar or SPAN W3992 Senior Seminar: Modern Cities and Global Cities.
  • By April 15 of the senior year, students complete and present their Honors Thesis for consideration towards departmental honors and prizes. Students submit their thesis in hard copy, following the formatting specifications provided on the LAIC website.
  • By May 1, the Honors Thesis committee informs the students of its decision. Departmental honors and prizes are assigned. The committee provides publishing options to students whose work has resulted in a highly original scholarship piece.

In order to facilitate the transition to this new schedule, the department will organize an Honors Thesis Introductory Session during the last week of April 2015. All undergraduate students are welcome; students in the junior year will have the opportunity to discuss possible research themes and thesis topics.

To be considered for departmental honors, a student must write an Honors Thesis and maintain a GPA of at least 3.6 in major courses. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Undergraduate Prizes

The faculty awards an undergraduate prize every year:

Susan Huntington Vernon Prize

Established in 1941 by a member of the noted family of New York Hispanophiles, it is given to the Columbia College senior major who has demonstrated excellence in the study of Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin American languages and cultures.

Dr. Antonio G. Mier Prize

Awarded for excellence in Hispanic Studies to a major degree candidate in the School of General Studies at Columbia University.

Professors

  • Carlos J. Alonso
  • Patricia E. Grieve
  • Graciela R. Montaldo
  • Gustavo Pérez-Firmat
  • Jesús Rodríguez-Velasco

Associate Professors

  • Alberto Medina
  • Alessandra Russo

Assistant Professors

  • Joaquín Barriendos
  • Karen Benezra
  • Seth Kimmel
  • Ana Paulina Lee

Senior Lecturer

  • Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo

Lecturers

  • Lee B. Abraham
  • Irene Alonso-Aparicio
  • José Antonio Castellanos-Pazos
  • Angelina Craig-Flórez
  • Ana Paula Huback
  • Juan Pablo Jiménez-Caicedo
  • Reyes Llopis-García
  • Francisco Meizoso
  • Sonia Montero
  • João Nemi Neto
  • Mercedes Pérez Serrano
  • Diana P. Romero
  • Francisco Rosales-Varo
  • Perla Rozencvaig
  • José Plácido Ruiz-Campillo
  • Elsa Úbeda

Major in Hispanic Studies

The requirements for this program were modified on March 2, 2016. Students who declared this program before this date should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their correct course of study.

The major in Hispanic studies requires 11 courses (minimum of 33 points) as follows:

Core Courses
SPAN UN3300Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]
SPAN UN3349Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period
SPAN UN3350Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present
Elective Courses
Select seven elective courses (21 points): a minimum of three 3000- or 4000-level electives must be chosen within the department and up to three electives related to Hispanic Studies may be taken outside the department.
Senior Seminar
SPAN UN3991Senior Seminar
or SPAN W3992 Senior Seminar: Modern Cities and Global Cities

Major in Hispanic Studies with Specialization

The requirements for this program were modified on March 2, 2016. Students who declared this program before this date should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their correct course of study.

The major in Hispanic studies with specialization requires 14 courses (minimum of 42 points) as follows. Students should consult the director of undergraduate studies to plan their program and refer to the Hispanic Studies Major Worksheet.

Core Courses
SPAN UN3300Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]
SPAN UN3349Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period
SPAN UN3350Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present
Elective Courses
Select ten elective courses (30 points): four of which must be chosen within the department and six of which must be in the field of specialization. Approved courses taken abroad may be counted as inside or outside the department for the specialization. A maximum of four courses taken abroad may be counted toward the major.
Senior Seminar *
SPAN UN3991Senior Seminar
or SPAN W3992 Senior Seminar: Modern Cities and Global Cities
*

In exceptional cases and with the director of undergraduate studies' approval, students may take a senior seminar in their area of specialization as a seventh course outside the department, if they have completed enough foundational courses to manage the demands of an advanced seminar. In such cases, the director of undergraduate studies must receive a letter or e-mail from the seminar instructor indicating approval of a student's membership in the course; the seminar project must be on a Hispanic topic; and a copy of the project must be turned in to the director of undergraduate studies for the student's file upon completion of the course. Students who complete the senior seminar in another department may also count it as the third elective course on a Hispanic topic outside the department, in which case they may take a fourth 3000- or 4000-level course in the department.


Concentration in Hispanic Studies

The requirements for this program were modified on March 2, 2016. Students who declared this program before this date should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their correct course of study.

The concentration in Hispanic studies requires eight courses (minimum of 24 points) as follows:

Core Courses
SPAN UN3300Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]
SPAN UN3349Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period
SPAN UN3350Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present
Elective Courses
Select five elective courses (15 points): a minimum of four 3000- or 4000-level courses must be chosen within the department and up to one elective related to Hispanic Studies may be taken outside the department. A maximum of three courses taken abroad may be counted toward the concentration.

Concentration in Portuguese Studies

The concentration in Portuguese studies requires eight courses (minimum 24 points) as follows:

Core Courses
PORT UN3101Conversation about the Lusophone World
PORT UN3300Advanced Language through Content
PORT UN3330Introduction to Portuguese Studies
PORT UN3350Lusophone Africa and Afro Brazilian Culture
Elective Courses
Select four elective courses (12 points): at least two must have a PORT designation and be chosen from the department’s 3000-level offerings. Electives taken outside of the department must have the director of undergraduate studies' approval and be related to Portuguese studies. A maximum of two courses taught in English may be counted toward the concentration overall. Refer to the Portuguese Concentration Worksheet.

Fall 2017
Spanish

SPAN UN1101 Elementary Spanish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: a score of 0-279 in the department's Placement Examination.

An introduction to Spanish communicative competence, with stress on basic oral interaction, reading, witting, and cultural knowledge. Principal objectives are to understand and produce commonly used sentences to satisfy immediate needs; ask and answer questions about personal details such as where we live, people we know and things we have; interact in a simple manner with people who speak clearly, slowly and are ready to cooperate; and understand simple and short written and audiovisual texts in Spanish. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 001/29259 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 002/29050 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 003/60792 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Amelia Bande 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 004/72374 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 005/60433 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 006/21633 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 007/74188 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 7/15
SPAN 1101 008/72178 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 009/23143 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 5/15
SPAN 1101 010/06086 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 011/00511 Th 10:10am - 11:25am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 011/00511 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
501 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 10/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 001/71943 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Ibai Atutxa 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 002/28847 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
401 Hamilton Hall
Rachel Stein 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 003/71132 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Rachel Stein 4 14/15
SPAN 1101 004/19271 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 005/68309 M W F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 8/15
SPAN 1101 007/19461 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 008/72146 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 010/60704 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 011/17041 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 012/24748 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 13/15
SPAN 1101 013/04304 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
501 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 14/15
SPAN 1101 014/04913 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 015/09207 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 016/00997 F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
207 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 016/00997 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 12/15

SPAN UN1102 Elementary Spanish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN1101 or a score of 280-379 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive introduction to Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on basic oral interaction, reading, writing and cultural knowledge as a continuation of SPAN UN1101. The principal objectives are to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance; communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information on familiar matters; describe in simple terms aspects of our background and personal history; understand the main point, the basic content, and the plot of filmic as well as short written texts.  All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 001/65417 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 002/76397 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 003/66361 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 004/66675 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 005/15575 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Lee Abraham 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 006/21679 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 007/28210 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 008/26548 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 009/13118 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 010/19315 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 011/16134 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Pupin Laboratories
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 10/15
SPAN 1102 012/25522 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 9/15
SPAN 1102 014/07842 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
202 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 015/02224 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
306 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 016/06432 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
302 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 017/02413 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 018/03325 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
237 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 9/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 001/17938 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
406 Hamilton Hall
Adrian Espinoza Staines 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 002/76517 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 003/66781 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 004/20423 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
613 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1102 005/11714 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
613 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 006/19551 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 007/16200 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 008/61089 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 009/26951 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 010/07364 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 16/15
SPAN 1102 011/00615 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 14/15

SPAN UN1113 Spanish Rapid Reading and Translation. 3 points.

Open to graduate students in GSAS only.

This course, conducted in English, is designed to help graduate students from other departments gain proficiency in reading and translating Spanish texts for scholarly research. The course prepares students to take the Reading Proficiency Exam that most graduate departments demand to fulfill the foreign-language proficiency requirement in that language. Graduate students with any degree of knowledge of Spanish are welcome. A grade of A- or higher in this class will satisfy the GSAS foreign language proficiency requirement in Spanish.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1113
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1113 001/10413 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Wendy Muniz 3 1/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1113
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1113 001/14187 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Miguel Ibanez Aristondo 3 9/15

SPAN UN1120 Comprehensive Beginning Spanish. 4 points.

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and fast-paced coverage of both SPAN UN1101 and SPAN UN1102. Students MUST meet the following REQUIREMENTS: 1. A minimum of 3 years of high school Spanish (or the equivalent) AND a score of 330 or above in the Department's Placement Examination, OR 2. fluency in a language other than English (preferably another Romance language). If you fulfill the above requirements, you do not need instructor's permission to register. HOWEVER, the instructor will additionally assess student proficiency during the Change of Program Period. Students who do not have the necessary proficiency level may not remain in this course. Replaces the sequence SPAN UN1101-SPAN UN1102. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1120 001/14661 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
253 International Affairs Bldg
Diana Romero 4 7/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1120 001/17157 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15

SPAN UN2101 Intermediate Spanish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN1102 or SPAN UN1120 or or a score of 380-449 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive course in Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on oral interaction, reading, writing, and culture as a continuation of SPAN UN1102 or SPAN UN1120. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 001/23107 M W F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Nicole Basile 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 002/18463 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
402 Hamilton Hall
Juan Cadena Botero 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 003/62854 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Iria Ameixeiras Cundins 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 004/20154 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 005/10605 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 006/60968 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 007/17046 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 008/76965 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 009/23158 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Perla Rozencvaig 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 010/09567 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/15
SPAN 2101 011/04230 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 001/61926 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Alberto Carpio Jimenez 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 002/62989 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Begona Alberdi 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 003/27993 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Pablo Justel Vicente 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 004/24448 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
206 Casa Hispanica
Rachel Stein 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 005/26319 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Pupin Laboratories
Felipe Becerra 4 11/15
SPAN 2101 006/75352 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Jennifer Calles Izquierdo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 007/66964 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Luisina Gentile 4 7/15
SPAN 2101 008/19414 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 009/63698 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 010/18489 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 011/21269 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 012/64723 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 013/19275 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 10/15
SPAN 2101 014/72346 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 9/15
SPAN 2101 015/70500 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 9/15
SPAN 2101 016/06179 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 017/06409 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 018/08349 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
202 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 18/18
SPAN 2101 019/02433 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 10/15

SPAN UN2102 Intermediate Spanish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN2101 or a score of 450-625 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive course in Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on oral interaction, reading, writing and culture as a continuation of SPAN UN2101. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 001/63245 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 002/15781 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 003/27143 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 004/27396 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 005/73750 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 006/10836 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 007/16028 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 008/22210 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 009/68370 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 11/15
SPAN 2102 010/73859 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
414 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 011/75945 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
253 Engineering Terrace
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 012/19570 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 013/21109 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 014/29712 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 11/15
SPAN 2102 015/12933 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
414 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 016/09111 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 16/15
SPAN 2102 017/04596 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 018/06478 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 019/06384 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 020/06469 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
302 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 8/15
SPAN 2102 021/06662 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 8/14
SPAN 2102 022/21002 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 9/15
SPAN 2102 023/21446 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 7/15
SPAN 2102 024/92116 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
505 Casa Hispanica
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 6/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 001/20189 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 002/17383 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 003/62794 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 004/28690 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 005/76810 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 006/23272 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 007/11512 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 008/12790 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 009/70644 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 010/17403 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 011/69082 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 012/12066 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 013/05504 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 16/16
SPAN 2102 014/04596 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 15/16

SPAN UN2108 Spanish for Spanish-Speaking Students. 4 points.

Prerequisites: heritage knowledge of Spanish. Students intending to register for this course must take the department's on-line Placement Examination. You should take this course if your recommended placement on this test is SPAN UN2102 (a score of 450-624). If you place below SPAN UN2102 you should follow the placement recommendation received with your test results. If you place above SPAN UN2102, you should choose between SPAN UN3300 and SPAN UN4900. If in doubt, please consult with the Director of the Language Programs.

Designed for native and non-native Spanish-speaking students who have oral fluency beyond the intermediate level but have had no formal language training.

Fall 2017: SPAN UN2108
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2108 001/05777 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/17
SPAN 2108 002/05317 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 17/16

SPAN UN2120 Comprehensive Intermediate Spanish. 4 points.

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and fast-paced coverage of both SPAN UN2101 and SPAN UN2102. Students MUST demonstrate a strong foundation in Spanish and meet the following REQUIREMENTS: a score ABOVE 480 on the Department's Placement Examination; or A- or higher in SPAN UN1120. If you fulfill the above requirements, you do not need the instructor's permission to register. HOWEVER, the instructor will additionally assess student proficiency during the Change of Program Period. Students who do not have the necessary proficiency level may not remain in this course. Replaces the sequence SPAN UN2101-SPAN UN2102. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2120 001/64121 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 4 10/15
SPAN 2120 002/66261 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Perla Rozencvaig 4 9/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2120 001/11487 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
644 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Perla Rozencvaig 4 14/15
SPAN 2120 002/65400 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 4 10/15

SPAN UN3300 Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]. 3 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN2102 or AP score of 4 or 5; or SAT score.

An intensive exposure to advanced points of Spanish grammar and structure through written and oral practice, along with an introduction to the basic principles of academic composition in Spanish. Each section is based on the exploration of an ample theme that serves as the organizing principle for the work done in class (Please consult the Directory of Classes for the topic of each section.) This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies. Formerly SPAN W3200 and SPAN BC3004. If you have taken either of these courses before you cannot take SPAN UN3300. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3300 001/10302 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 002/60921 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 5/15
SPAN 3300 003/63012 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Alexandra Mendez 3 4/15
SPAN 3300 004/64695 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
David Mejia 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 005/69636 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 3 6/15
SPAN 3300 006/73948 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 3 11/15
SPAN 3300 007/75900 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Analia Lavin 3 7/15
SPAN 3300 008/04348 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
203 Diana Center
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 3 8/15
SPAN 3300 009/01614 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 3 15/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3300 001/75268 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
206 Casa Hispanica
Iria Ameixeiras Cundins 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 002/23740 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Juan Cadena Botero 3 6/15
SPAN 3300 003/74728 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Nicole Basile 3 12/15
SPAN 3300 004/25538 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 3 10/15
SPAN 3300 005/62928 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 3 9/15
SPAN 3300 006/77473 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 3 13/15
SPAN 3300 007/26708 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 3 11/15
SPAN 3300 009/04772 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 3 12/15

SPAN W3330 Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Cultures. 3 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3300.

The course studies cultural production in the Hispanic world with a view to making students aware of its historical and constructed nature. It explores concepts such as language, history, and nation; culture (national, popular, mass, and high); the social role of literature; the work of cultural institutions; globalization and migration; and the discipline of cultural studies. The course is divided into units that address these subjects in turn, and through which students will also acquire the fundamental vocabulary for the analysis of cultural objects. The course also stresses the acquisition of rhetorical skills with which to write effectively in Spanish about the topics discussed. This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies.

SPAN UN3349 Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: L" course: enrollment limited to 15 students. Completion of language requirement, third-year language sequence (W3300).

Provides students with an overview of the cultural history of the Hispanic world, from eighth-century Islamic and Christian Spain and the pre-Hispanic Americas through the late Middle Ages and Early Modern period until about 1700, covering texts and cultural artifacts from both Spain and the Americas.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3349
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3349 001/16918 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Miguel Ibanez Aristondo 3 9/15
SPAN 3349 002/19427 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
David Colmenares Gonzalez 3 10/15
SPAN 3349 003/16973 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Roberto Valdovinos 3 9/15
SPAN 3349 004/00142 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Orlando Bentancor 3 14/15
SPAN 3349 005/92100 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Noel Blanco Mourelle 3 11/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3349
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3349 001/20198 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Daniella Wurst 3 15/15
SPAN 3349 002/20843 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Mariana-Cecilia Velazquez Perez 3 13/15
SPAN 3349 003/64698 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Alexandra Mendez 3 15/15
SPAN 3349 005/09462 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
203 Diana Center
Ana Mendez-Oliver 3 10/15

SPAN UN3350 Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course surveys cultural production of Spain and Spanish America from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Students will acquire the knowledge needed for the study of the cultural manifestations of the Hispanic world in the context of modernity. Among the issues and events studied will be the Enlightenment as ideology and practice, the Napoleonic invasion of Spain, the wars of Spanish American independence, the fin-de-siècle and the cultural avant-gardes, the wars and revolutions of the twentieth century (Spanish Civil War, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions), neoliberalism, globalization, and the Hispanic presence in the United States. The goal of the course is to study some key moments of this trajectory through the analysis of representative texts, documents, and works of art. Class discussions will seek to situate the works studied within the political and cultural currents and debates of the time. All primary materials, class discussion, and assignments are in Spanish. This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/73673 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Santiago Acosta 3 14/15
SPAN 3350 002/29441 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Almudena Marin-Cobos 3 6/15
SPAN 3350 003/16534 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Alejandro QUINTERO MARCHER 3 14/15
SPAN 3350 004/65676 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Marta Ferrer 3 12/15
SPAN 3350 005/04777 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Ronald Briggs 3 3/15
SPAN 3350 007/61291 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Agnese Codebo 3 10/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/67165 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 7/15
SPAN 3350 002/75252 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 9/15
SPAN 3350 003/73379 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201 Casa Hispanica
David Mejia 3 10/15
SPAN 3350 004/23165 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Gustavo Perez-Firmat 3 18/20
SPAN 3350 005/74557 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Analia Lavin 3 14/15

SPAN W3408 Latin American and Latino Art Archives: Theory, Practice, Display. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate seminar is a practicum for developing interdisciplinary approaches to the use, interpretation, and exhibition of art archives, with special emphasis on the way in which archival materials and artistic documentation have been instrumental in the articulation and critique of the idea of Latin American and Latino art of the 20th and 21st centuries. The course explores three different areas: 1) archival theories (the Latino/Latin American art archive as an object of study); 2) documentary centers in and beyond the museum (the collection, organization, and digitization of art archives for researching purposes); 3) and the use of artist's papers within the exhibition (the 'artistification' of documents, and the 'archival turn' of curatorial discourses). During the course, students will analyze how archives constitute institutional and epistemic authority, how museums discriminate between artworks and art documentation, as well as how we can narrate counter-histories from and against the archive. Students will be exposed to archival materials put into storage in diverse local museums and documentary centers. An important component of this course will be the direct contact with Latino and Latin American repositories in New York. In order to achieve this aim, a series of visits to the most important local archives and museums will be scheduled, such as the Latino Art and Activism Collection (Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia), the Museo del Barrio, the Archives of Latino and Latin American Art at MoMA, the Bronx Museum of the Art, and the Americas Society. Finally, this course will pay special attention to the 'digital' turn of humanities, that is, to the democratization of knowledge production technologies and the configuration of new databases and online open source repositories. Thus, Latino and Latin American art archives will be described in this course not only as bridges between museums, libraries, and universities, but also as crossroads between North and South America.

SPAN W3409 A Reader of Early Modern Spain. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

It is impossible to separate literature from its material, social, and political conditions of production and consumption. But if the fields of literary criticism and cultural history are interwoven, how should we read and define literature? To what extent are poems or novels objects as well as texts? In addition to authors, how do readers, editors, and publishers shape a text’s meaning? Focusing on early modern Spain, this class is an introduction to the study of manuscripts and early printed books. Like many specialists in the history of reading and material culture, we will use Cervantes’s Don Quijote as a foundation, but we will also study poetry, letters, biblical commentary, and treatises on printing from the early modern period. Each of our texts will describe or thematize the acts of writing, printing, and reading. Throughout the semester we will thus toggle between “close readings” of these texts’ themes, vocabulary, and imagery, on the one hand, and their histories of edition, publication, circulation, and preservation, on the other hand. In this way, we will consider what it means to be a reader of and in early modern Spain. In order to contemplate these material concerns first hand, we will visit New York area archives and museums, and each student will undertake a semester long research project using primary sources. Drawing in part on works by early modern pedagogues like Juan Luis Vives and Francisco Sánchez de las Brozas, we will discuss strategies for research, writing, and revision. We will also study works by Benito Arias Montano, Luís de Camões, Antonio de Guevara, Fernando de Herrera, Cristóbal Suárez de Figueroa, Teresa de Ávila, and Garcilaso de la Vega, as well as scholarly essays or book chapters by Roland Barthes, Roger Chartier, Hipólito Escolar, Michel Foucault, D. F. McKenzie, and others.

SPAN W3499 Configurations of Time in Contemporary American Art and Fiction. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: SPAN W3349 or SPAN W3350.

Pragmatics is a most helpful criterion in the interpretation of many different types of texts. As a new course within our Department's curriculum this instrument of rhetoric analysis is a basic tool in the comprehension of our students' discourse in their literary, cultural, and critical papers. The main objective of this new course is twofold: 1. To provide the student with criteria for analyzing oral discourse beyond Syntax and Semantics. The Pragmatic approach proposed here interprets communication not through forms but through context and cognitive conditions; 2. To improve not only the student's linguistic and communicative competence in Spanish but also their pragmatic skills while giving them ample opportunities to use the language.

SPAN UN3558 LATIN AMERICAN FILM. 3 points.

This course aims to give students an introductory overview of some of the most salient issues surrounding contemporary Latin American film since the late 1960s. Starting with a selection of films from the experimental “new cinema” or “third cinema” of the 1960s, we will also study the contemporary production of international blockbuster movies in the 2000s, in Argentina, Brazil, Cuba and Mexico. Topics to be covered include the relationship between cinema and underdevelopment; cinema and revolution; cinema and emancipation; documentary film and fiction; gender and sexuality; neoliberalism and the market; spectatorship and subjectivity.

SPAN UN3710 20th Century Latin American Literature. 3 points.

A survey of major works and authors in their historical and personal context, with emphasis on lyric poetry, narrative and essay.

SPAN UN3991 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Seniors (major or concentrator status).

SENIOR SEMINAR

,

Section 001 - "Iberian Globalization"

,

A seminar based on a great variety of primary sources and theoretical texts that help to rethink, from the vantage point of the early modern period, the most unexpected sides of a process today called "globalization."

,

Section 002 - "Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture"

,

The Spanish transition to modernity (in politics, class relations, social roles) involved both the appearance of historically new emotions and the establishment of emotional regimes regulating feelings and practices. We will explore this process through readings in affect theory and nineteenth-century print culture (literary and nonliterary). Seniors will write about related problematics in the cultural production of 19th-21st century Spain.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3991 001/74705 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Alberto Medina 4 4/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3991 001/63989 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Alessandra Russo 4 8/15

SPAN UN3998 Supervised Individual Research (Spring). 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

Students register in this course while they pursue independent study work under the supervision of a faculty member during the spring semester.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3998 001/62637  
Alberto Medina 3 0/15
SPAN 3998 002/27452  
Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco 3 0/15
SPAN 3998 003/15240  
Alessandra Russo 3 0/15
SPAN 3998 004/27398  
Graciela Montaldo 3 0/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3998 001/13827  
Alessandra Russo 3 0
SPAN 3998 002/28415  
Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco 3 0
SPAN 3998 003/65947  
Elsa Ubeda 3 0

SPAN G4030 Spanish Pragmatics. 4 points.

In one sense, Pragmatics is concerned with how we use the language, why and how the speakers communicate in social interactions. The interpretation of meaning in context is probably the main field of study of this multidiscipline, considering the speaker-meaning as the central point of departure. The term Pragmatics refers to a broad perspective on different aspects of communication, including linguistics, but also cognitive psychology, cultural anthropology, philosophy, sociology and rhetoric among others. Through this course we will study chronologically and apply in specific cases of study of the Spanish language the most meaningful pragmatic theories, such as: Context, Deixis, Speech acts, Implicature, Cooperative Principle, Politeness, Relevance, Pragmatic markers, Metaphors and Cross-cultural pragmatics. Pragmatics, as we know, is a most helpful criterion in the interpretation of many different types of texts. As a course within our Department’s curriculum this instrument of rhetoric analysis is a basic tool in the comprehension of our students’ discourse in their literary, cultural, and critical papers. This discipline goes beyond the analysis of strictly forms or verbal utterances, hence its multidisciplinary applicability to a wide range of fields of studies in Spanish. Whichever the student’s field of study might be, Pragmatics provides a valuable and accurate vocabulary that can be applied to any textual interpretation. In this course, the pragmatic perspective is a starting point to delve into the processes of communication in Spanish. After this first approach, the student will gain an insight into new aspects of the linguistics of language use in general and the use of Spanish in particular.

SPAN W3692 Labor Culture in Twentieth-Century Latin America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Industrial modernization often went hand-in-hand with the constitution of a new kind of national-popular culture during the twentieth century in Latin America .For many such projects, becoming a political subject meant being a worker. This course will interrogate the ways in which labor and culture informed and produced one another, from the Mexican muralists’ use of industrial materials and techniques in the 1920s in the constitution of a their spectators to the creation of the “credit card citizen; of consumption in the late 1990s. Class discussions and writing assignments will analyze novels, essays, short stories, chronicles, films and works of visual art in order to pose and answer some of the following questions: How is work imagines and represented at different historical moments and what ideaological role might such representations play? How do artists and writers think about the nature, organization and political import of their work in relation to other kinds of intellectual and manual labor? In what ways and in what contexts do labor and labor movements become the protagonists of radical political change? Alternatively, to what extent do the tactics of political revolution imply a laborious exercise of their own? How do such artists, writers and thinkers conceive of work before and after capitalism? Authors to be studies may include Diego Rivera, Alfaro Siqueiros, Jorge Luis Borges, Eduardo Coutinho, José Carlos Mariátegui and Ernesto Guevara, among others.

SPAN W3695 Made in Latin America: Consumer Culture and Contemporary Narratives. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course focuses on consumer culture in contemporary Latin America throughout literature, essays, visual texts, films and new cultural experiences as “poor tourism” and food. The course discusses the problem of peripheral countries in the globalized economy and how culture offers a place of reflection and interchange of new experience. In the frame of the new consumer culture studies, we will study works and practices where consumerism is a political issue. Students will be introduced to theoretical writing on consumerism in different contexts (Argentina, Brazil, México, Perú). This course will provide students with an accurate understanding of some of the topics of contemporary Latin American culture related to the market, aesthetics and politics including topics as elite culture vs. popular culture, practices of resistance, representation of the violence, cities as spectacles and new phenomena as “poor tourism” and landfill art. The class will be conducted in Spanish and all written assignments will also be in that language.

SPAN W3698 Introduction to Undergraduate Research. 4 points.

The "Introduction to Undergraduate Research" will ensure that majors, concentrators, and other students in advance courses in the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures (LAIC) master the skills, techniques, and practices they will need to undertake research in Latin American and Iberian Cultures and to pursue further lines of inquiry within the humanities. Throughout this course, students will hone their academic writing skills in Spanish, Portuguese, and/or Catalan while they develop the necessary methodology to identify and approach primary sources, understand the manual and digital systems of analysis of those sources, and conduct bibliographical research toward advance scholarship. Over the course of the semester, students will propose, research, plan and write an article-length research paper on the topic of their choice, which they will have the opportunity to submit to the LAIC Journal of Undergraduate Research. The seminar will familiarize students with the resources and tools that will help them to pursue such a project, including Columbia's library and archival collections, other institutional libraries accessible digitally, annotation and citation apps, and word-processing programs that are ideal for large-scale writing projects. As such, the course will be largely methodological, designed to provide hands-on knowledge to students that will both orient them within the field of Latin American and Iberian Cultures and arm them with research and project-planning skills that are applicable beyond the discipline.

Portuguese

PORT UN1101 Elementary Portuguese I. 4 points.

A beginning course designed for students who wish to start their study of Portuguese and have no proficiency in another Romance language. The four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing are developed at the basic level.

Spring 2017: PORT UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1101 001/62194 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Victor Araujo Coutinho 4 6/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1101 001/26138 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Ana Huback 4 11/15
PORT 1101 002/23964 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Ana Luiza Gabatteli Vieira 4 7/15

PORT UN1102 Elementary Portuguese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1101 or the equivalent.

A course designed to acquaint students with the Portuguese verbal, prepositional, and pronominal systems. As a continuation of Elementary Portuguese I (PORT W1101), this course focuses on the uses of characteristic forms and expressions of the language as it is spoken and written in Brazil today.

Spring 2017: PORT UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1102 001/75532 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Ana Huback 4 5/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1102 001/62881 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Ana Huback 4 5/15

PORT W1220 Comprehensive Intermediate Portuguese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1102 or PORT W1320.

This course discusses contemporary issues based on articles from Lusophone newspapers and magazines. Students will review grammar, expand their vocabulary and improve oral expression, writing, and reading skills. They are also exposed to audiovisual material that will deepen their understanding of Lusophone societies and culture.

PORT UN1320 Comprehensive Elementary Portuguese I and II for Spanish Speakers. 4 points.

Prerequisites: knowledge of Spanish or another Romance language.

An intensive beginning language course in Brazilian Portuguese with emphasis on Brazilian culture through multimedia materials related to culture and society in contemporary Brazil. Recommended for students who have studied Spanish or another Romance language. The course is the equivalent of two full semesters of elementary Portuguese with stress on reading and conversing, and may be taken in place of PORT W1101-W1102. For students unable to dedicate the time needed cover two semesters in one, the regularly paced sequence PORT W1101-W1102 is preferable.

Spring 2017: PORT UN1320
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1320 001/71136 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 6/15
PORT 1320 002/74548 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Northwest Corner
Joao Nemi Neto 4 8/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN1320
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1320 001/72705 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
601b Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 13/15
PORT 1320 002/12848 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 11/15

PORT UN2101 Intermediate Portuguese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1120 or the equivalent.

General review of grammar, with emphasis on self-expression through oral and written composition, reading, conversation, and discussion.

Spring 2017: PORT UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 2101 001/61264 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Ana Huback 4 6/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 2101 001/64782 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Ana Huback 4 8/15

PORT UN3101 Conversation about the Lusophone World. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1220.

This conversation class will help students develop their oral proficiency in Portuguese. We will discuss current events, participate in challenging pronunciation exercises, improve understanding of Portuguese idioms, develop conversation strengths, confront weaknesses, and increase fluency in spoken Portuguese.

Fall 2017: PORT UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 3101 001/74216 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Joao Nemi Neto 3 6/15

PORT UN3301 Advanced Writing and Composition in Portuguese. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1220.

This course focuses on three elements: 1) the main elements of formal discourse in Portuguese (grammar, vocabulary, expressions, etc.); 2) discourse genres, based on the theoretical bases laid out by Textual Linguistics and Discourse Analysis; 3) cultural, economic, social, political themes related to the reality of Brazil or other Portuguese-speaking countries. However, students should be able to define their areas of interest and shape their experience in the course according to them. Such an approach takes advantage of the diversity in the classroom, stimulates participation, and promotes independent academic research. Therefore, students will start a weblog, where their writing activities will be posted, so that their colleagues may read and comment on them. The mandatory genres-forms for all students are in the modules of discourse genres and academic writing, and the corresponding forms, the pronominal system and semelfectives. Students will then choose one more genre among biographical texts (resumé, facebook, biography), lyrical texts (music, poetry), subjective texts (description, narrative, commentary, editorial), and journalistic texts, as well as the corresponding forms assigned to those modules: indirect speech, mandates, past verbal tenses, conjunctions, redundancy/repetition, and semelfactives (conditionals). Every student will study and practice all genres and forms, but they will be responsible for larger assignments (module notes, to be posted on their blogs) on the two mandatory modules and the optional one. At the beginning of the semester they will choose a thematic topic for the course (in their field of study or area of personal interest), and will select a literature list with the assistance of the instructor. All assignments in the course must be related to the chosen thematic topic and will involve research based on the literature list. At the end of the semester, they will produce an essay on their thematic choice.

PORT UN3490 Brazilian Society and Civilization. 3 points.

Each week, a historical period is studied in connection to a particular theme of ongoing cultural expression. While diverse elements of popular culture are included, fiction is privileged as a source of cultural commentary. Students are expected to assimilate the background information but are also encouraged to develop their own perspective and interest, whether in the social sciences, the humanities (including the fine arts), or other areas.

Fall 2017: PORT UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 3490 001/71840 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Alexandra Cook 3 10/15

Catalan

CATL UN1120 Comprehensive Beginning Catalan. 4 points.

An extensive introduction to the Catalan language with an emphasis on oral communication as well as the reading and writing practice that will allow the student to function comfortably in a Catalan environment.

Spring 2017: CATL UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 1120 001/17413 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
255 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 8/15
Fall 2017: CATL UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 1120 001/64482 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 5/15

CATL UN2101 Intermediate Catalan I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CATL W1120.

The first part of Columbia University´s comprehensive intermediate Catalan sequence. The main objectives of this course are to continue developing communicative competence - reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension - and to further acquaint students with Catalan cultures.

Spring 2017: CATL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 2101 001/13821 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
326 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 3/15
Fall 2017: CATL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 2101 001/27707 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 4/15

CATL W1202 Intermediate Catalan II. 4 points.

Corequisites: CATL 1201 or the equivalent.

Catalan 1202 is the second part of Columbia University's intermediate Catalan sequence. Course goals are to enhance student exposure to various aspects of Catalan culture and to consolidate and expand reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills.

CATL W3330 Introduction to Catalan Culture. 3 points.

This is a content course covering topics regarding Catalan history, society, literature and visual arts. The objective of the course is to examine the main socio-cultural manifestations in the Catalan-speaking territories. Topics to be discussed include: bilingualism and language as the marker of "authentic" national identity; the influx of immigration and the constant redefinition of all things Catalan; the very locally rooted and at the same time very international outlook of the Catalan avant-garde from Foix to Tàpies; the protest song and the cultural manifestations during the Franco repression, and the crucial role of the city of Barcelona as a cultural focus and its impact on literature, film, and arts. By the end of the semester students will be familiar with the main social and cultural issues of the Catalan-speaking territories. The course will be taught in Spanish and counts as an elective towards the major in Hispanic Cultures. No previous knowledge of the Catalan language is required.

Of Related Interest

Art History and Archaeology
AHIS G4085Andean Art and Architecture
American Studies
AMST UN3920American Studies Senior Project Colloquium
AMST UN3931Topics in American Studies
Anthropology
ANTH V3983Ideas and Society in the Caribbean
Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race
CSER W1601Introduction to Latino/a Studies
Institute for Comparative Literature and Society
CPLS UN3900Introduction to Comparative Literature and Society
Poltical Science
POLS W3245Race and Ethnicity In American Politics
POLS UN3260
POLS GU4461Latin American Politics
POLS V3313American Urban Politics
Sociology
SOCI V3247The Immigrant Experience, Old and New

Spring 2017
Spanish

SPAN UN1101 Elementary Spanish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: a score of 0-279 in the department's Placement Examination.

An introduction to Spanish communicative competence, with stress on basic oral interaction, reading, witting, and cultural knowledge. Principal objectives are to understand and produce commonly used sentences to satisfy immediate needs; ask and answer questions about personal details such as where we live, people we know and things we have; interact in a simple manner with people who speak clearly, slowly and are ready to cooperate; and understand simple and short written and audiovisual texts in Spanish. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 001/29259 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 002/29050 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 003/60792 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Amelia Bande 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 004/72374 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 005/60433 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 006/21633 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 007/74188 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 7/15
SPAN 1101 008/72178 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 009/23143 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 5/15
SPAN 1101 010/06086 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 011/00511 Th 10:10am - 11:25am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 011/00511 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
501 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 10/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 001/71943 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Ibai Atutxa 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 002/28847 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
401 Hamilton Hall
Rachel Stein 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 003/71132 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Rachel Stein 4 14/15
SPAN 1101 004/19271 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 005/68309 M W F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 8/15
SPAN 1101 007/19461 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 008/72146 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 010/60704 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 011/17041 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 012/24748 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 13/15
SPAN 1101 013/04304 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
501 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 14/15
SPAN 1101 014/04913 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 015/09207 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 016/00997 F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
207 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 016/00997 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 12/15

SPAN UN1102 Elementary Spanish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN1101 or a score of 280-379 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive introduction to Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on basic oral interaction, reading, writing and cultural knowledge as a continuation of SPAN UN1101. The principal objectives are to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance; communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information on familiar matters; describe in simple terms aspects of our background and personal history; understand the main point, the basic content, and the plot of filmic as well as short written texts.  All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 001/65417 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 002/76397 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 003/66361 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 004/66675 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 005/15575 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Lee Abraham 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 006/21679 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 007/28210 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 008/26548 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 009/13118 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 010/19315 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 011/16134 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Pupin Laboratories
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 10/15
SPAN 1102 012/25522 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 9/15
SPAN 1102 014/07842 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
202 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 015/02224 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
306 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 016/06432 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
302 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 017/02413 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 018/03325 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
237 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 9/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 001/17938 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
406 Hamilton Hall
Adrian Espinoza Staines 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 002/76517 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 003/66781 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 004/20423 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
613 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1102 005/11714 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
613 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 006/19551 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 007/16200 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 008/61089 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 009/26951 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 010/07364 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 16/15
SPAN 1102 011/00615 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 14/15

SPAN UN1120 Comprehensive Beginning Spanish. 4 points.

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and fast-paced coverage of both SPAN UN1101 and SPAN UN1102. Students MUST meet the following REQUIREMENTS: 1. A minimum of 3 years of high school Spanish (or the equivalent) AND a score of 330 or above in the Department's Placement Examination, OR 2. fluency in a language other than English (preferably another Romance language). If you fulfill the above requirements, you do not need instructor's permission to register. HOWEVER, the instructor will additionally assess student proficiency during the Change of Program Period. Students who do not have the necessary proficiency level may not remain in this course. Replaces the sequence SPAN UN1101-SPAN UN1102. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1120 001/14661 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
253 International Affairs Bldg
Diana Romero 4 7/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1120 001/17157 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15

SPAN UN2101 Intermediate Spanish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN1102 or SPAN UN1120 or or a score of 380-449 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive course in Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on oral interaction, reading, writing, and culture as a continuation of SPAN UN1102 or SPAN UN1120. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 001/23107 M W F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Nicole Basile 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 002/18463 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
402 Hamilton Hall
Juan Cadena Botero 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 003/62854 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Iria Ameixeiras Cundins 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 004/20154 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 005/10605 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 006/60968 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 007/17046 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 008/76965 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 009/23158 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Perla Rozencvaig 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 010/09567 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/15
SPAN 2101 011/04230 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 001/61926 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Alberto Carpio Jimenez 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 002/62989 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Begona Alberdi 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 003/27993 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Pablo Justel Vicente 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 004/24448 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
206 Casa Hispanica
Rachel Stein 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 005/26319 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Pupin Laboratories
Felipe Becerra 4 11/15
SPAN 2101 006/75352 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Jennifer Calles Izquierdo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 007/66964 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Luisina Gentile 4 7/15
SPAN 2101 008/19414 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 009/63698 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 010/18489 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 011/21269 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 012/64723 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 013/19275 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 10/15
SPAN 2101 014/72346 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 9/15
SPAN 2101 015/70500 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 9/15
SPAN 2101 016/06179 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 017/06409 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 018/08349 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
202 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 18/18
SPAN 2101 019/02433 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 10/15

SPAN UN2102 Intermediate Spanish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN2101 or a score of 450-625 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive course in Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on oral interaction, reading, writing and culture as a continuation of SPAN UN2101. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 001/63245 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 002/15781 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 003/27143 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 004/27396 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 005/73750 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 006/10836 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 007/16028 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 008/22210 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 009/68370 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 11/15
SPAN 2102 010/73859 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
414 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 011/75945 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
253 Engineering Terrace
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 012/19570 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 013/21109 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 014/29712 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 11/15
SPAN 2102 015/12933 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
414 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 016/09111 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 16/15
SPAN 2102 017/04596 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 018/06478 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 019/06384 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 020/06469 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
302 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 8/15
SPAN 2102 021/06662 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 8/14
SPAN 2102 022/21002 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 9/15
SPAN 2102 023/21446 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 7/15
SPAN 2102 024/92116 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
505 Casa Hispanica
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 6/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 001/20189 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 002/17383 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 003/62794 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 004/28690 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 005/76810 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 006/23272 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 007/11512 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 008/12790 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 009/70644 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 010/17403 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 011/69082 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 012/12066 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 013/05504 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 16/16
SPAN 2102 014/04596 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 15/16

SPAN UN2120 Comprehensive Intermediate Spanish. 4 points.

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and fast-paced coverage of both SPAN UN2101 and SPAN UN2102. Students MUST demonstrate a strong foundation in Spanish and meet the following REQUIREMENTS: a score ABOVE 480 on the Department's Placement Examination; or A- or higher in SPAN UN1120. If you fulfill the above requirements, you do not need the instructor's permission to register. HOWEVER, the instructor will additionally assess student proficiency during the Change of Program Period. Students who do not have the necessary proficiency level may not remain in this course. Replaces the sequence SPAN UN2101-SPAN UN2102. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2120 001/64121 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 4 10/15
SPAN 2120 002/66261 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Perla Rozencvaig 4 9/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2120 001/11487 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
644 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Perla Rozencvaig 4 14/15
SPAN 2120 002/65400 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 4 10/15

SPAN UN3300 Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]. 3 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN2102 or AP score of 4 or 5; or SAT score.

An intensive exposure to advanced points of Spanish grammar and structure through written and oral practice, along with an introduction to the basic principles of academic composition in Spanish. Each section is based on the exploration of an ample theme that serves as the organizing principle for the work done in class (Please consult the Directory of Classes for the topic of each section.) This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies. Formerly SPAN W3200 and SPAN BC3004. If you have taken either of these courses before you cannot take SPAN UN3300. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3300 001/10302 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 002/60921 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 5/15
SPAN 3300 003/63012 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Alexandra Mendez 3 4/15
SPAN 3300 004/64695 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
David Mejia 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 005/69636 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 3 6/15
SPAN 3300 006/73948 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 3 11/15
SPAN 3300 007/75900 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Analia Lavin 3 7/15
SPAN 3300 008/04348 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
203 Diana Center
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 3 8/15
SPAN 3300 009/01614 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 3 15/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3300 001/75268 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
206 Casa Hispanica
Iria Ameixeiras Cundins 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 002/23740 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Juan Cadena Botero 3 6/15
SPAN 3300 003/74728 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Nicole Basile 3 12/15
SPAN 3300 004/25538 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 3 10/15
SPAN 3300 005/62928 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 3 9/15
SPAN 3300 006/77473 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 3 13/15
SPAN 3300 007/26708 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 3 11/15
SPAN 3300 009/04772 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 3 12/15

SPAN W3302 Latino New York: Cultural Identifies and Expressions. 3 points.

This course examines the long-standing cultural presence in New York City of peoples of Latin American and Spanish Caribbean descent. Beginning with a brief overview of key grounding concepts to trace the development of New York Latino cultural identity, we then examine the cultural foundations of Latino communities in New York, dating back to the nineteenth century. We proceed to study the mass migrations of Puerto Ricans during the post-WWII period, and the consequent political and aesthetic movements of the 1960s and 1970s. We examine the plurality of cultural expressions and identities grouped under the rubric Latin@ which involves focusing on the particularities of race, gender, class, sexuality, class, and language. Finally, we examine the growing and diversified presence of immigrants from all over the Spanish-speaking world, from the mid-1970s onward, a “Latino boom” which solidified the place of Nueva York (to paraphrase author Luis Rafael Sánchez) as the symbolic capital of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN W3308 Minimal Editions: From the Manuscript to the Web. 3 points.

The main goal of this course is to introduce students to textual scholarship in general and digital scholarly editing in particular. The main outcome of this new course will be to publish a small-scale digital scholarly edition online of one of the most remarkable Spanish literary works, the Lazarillo de Tormes (XVIth century). The course is conceived as a combination between collaborative research and technical skills. At all steps of the process, we will work together toward the completion of our digital edition. Unlike other courses in digital editing taught worldwide, this course will introduce you to a "full stack," giving you the ability to make your own digital editions in the future without the need for funding, a publisher, or a "technical" team. The course will be divided into lectures and recitation sessions, in order to offer a theoretical concepts and to transfer them into practice.

SPAN W3315 New York as Theatre of Spanish Modernity. 3 points.

From the beginning of the XXth Century some of the key figures of Spanish contemporary culture, writers, filmmakers or architects, had a very close relationship to New York, sometimes as travelers, sometimes living in the city for long periods of time. That transatlantic contact, far from anecdotal, turned into an essential element of the self-understanding of those authors and a crucial presence in their work. The contact with New York modernity would be an unavoidable component in their own versions of modernity but their presence would also leave an important trace in the city. As yet more Spanish cultural travelers got in contact with the city a different phenomenon developed: from the 1950’s, New York would be used as a privileged stage to project a certain institutional idea of Spain, to sell a refurbished image of the nation as sophisticated and modern after decades of international marginalization under Francoism. This course will develop a comparative study of both processes as seen in literary sources, film and architecture (García Lorca, Camba, Dalí, Tápies, Buñuel, Loriga, Sert, Calatrava…)

SPAN UN3349 Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: L" course: enrollment limited to 15 students. Completion of language requirement, third-year language sequence (W3300).

Provides students with an overview of the cultural history of the Hispanic world, from eighth-century Islamic and Christian Spain and the pre-Hispanic Americas through the late Middle Ages and Early Modern period until about 1700, covering texts and cultural artifacts from both Spain and the Americas.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3349
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3349 001/16918 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Miguel Ibanez Aristondo 3 9/15
SPAN 3349 002/19427 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
David Colmenares Gonzalez 3 10/15
SPAN 3349 003/16973 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Roberto Valdovinos 3 9/15
SPAN 3349 004/00142 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Orlando Bentancor 3 14/15
SPAN 3349 005/92100 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Noel Blanco Mourelle 3 11/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3349
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3349 001/20198 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Daniella Wurst 3 15/15
SPAN 3349 002/20843 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Mariana-Cecilia Velazquez Perez 3 13/15
SPAN 3349 003/64698 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Alexandra Mendez 3 15/15
SPAN 3349 005/09462 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
203 Diana Center
Ana Mendez-Oliver 3 10/15

SPAN UN3350 Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course surveys cultural production of Spain and Spanish America from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Students will acquire the knowledge needed for the study of the cultural manifestations of the Hispanic world in the context of modernity. Among the issues and events studied will be the Enlightenment as ideology and practice, the Napoleonic invasion of Spain, the wars of Spanish American independence, the fin-de-siècle and the cultural avant-gardes, the wars and revolutions of the twentieth century (Spanish Civil War, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions), neoliberalism, globalization, and the Hispanic presence in the United States. The goal of the course is to study some key moments of this trajectory through the analysis of representative texts, documents, and works of art. Class discussions will seek to situate the works studied within the political and cultural currents and debates of the time. All primary materials, class discussion, and assignments are in Spanish. This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/73673 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Santiago Acosta 3 14/15
SPAN 3350 002/29441 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Almudena Marin-Cobos 3 6/15
SPAN 3350 003/16534 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Alejandro QUINTERO MARCHER 3 14/15
SPAN 3350 004/65676 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Marta Ferrer 3 12/15
SPAN 3350 005/04777 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Ronald Briggs 3 3/15
SPAN 3350 007/61291 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Agnese Codebo 3 10/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/67165 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 7/15
SPAN 3350 002/75252 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 9/15
SPAN 3350 003/73379 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201 Casa Hispanica
David Mejia 3 10/15
SPAN 3350 004/23165 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Gustavo Perez-Firmat 3 18/20
SPAN 3350 005/74557 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Analia Lavin 3 14/15

SPAN UN3361 Artistic Humanity. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: This is an advanced class in Spanish

Between the 15 th and 17 th centuries, in the context of the Iberian expansion, the presence and observation of unexpected artistic forms, media, and monuments triggered a new space of inquiry. Novel objects, surfaces, architectures, materials, and ideas about artistry were observed far and near—in the Americas, in Asia, in Africa, and in Europe. They traveled between continents in physical and textual forms: sent and offered as proofs of the new territories, desired and collected as unique treasures, but also described, compared and analyzed in letters, histories, or inventories. All around a sphere that could now be mentally embraced, missionaries, collectors, travelers, historians, and artists felt under the power of novel creations: body painting, gold byobu, intricate sculptures, but also turquoise masks, feather mosaics, painted manuscripts, fish-bone necklaces, ivory spoons, carved temples, monumental cities, and so on. These splendid artworks deeply challenged conceptual boundaries such as those between idol and image, beautiful and frightening, civilized and barbarian, center and periphery, classic and modern, and ancient and new. But most importantly, these artworks and their descriptions in chronicles, histories, and inventories contributed to define humanity as immanently creative—and to conceive artistic creation as a distinctive form of thought.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3361 001/79696 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
402 Hamilton Hall
Alessandra Russo 3 7/15

SPAN W3416 Transnational Cultures: Spacialities in Latin America. 3 points.

The course focuses on the cultural representation of the cities in contemporary Hispanic American literature, essays, visual texts and films. The problem of “modernity” and “postmodernity” in a peripheral culture and it’s relationships with public spaces is in the core of the discussion of all the texts. This course will provide students with an accurate understanding of some of the topics of contemporary Hispanic American culture. The main hypothesis will be that urban narratives articulate the new experiences during changes periods. Students will be introduced to theoretical writing on urban and spatial reflections, modern and postmodern thought and contemporary Hispanic American contexts. We focus on the representation of urban spaces in literary and visual texts, films and essays from Argentina, Mexico, Central America, Cuba and border cities. Students will become familiar with major problems and significant political, social and cultural trends in the contemporary Hispanic American world including topics as elite culture vs. popular culture, practices of resistance, representations of the violence and Otherness. The class will be conducted in Spanish and all written assignments will also be in that language.

SPAN W3468 Spanish American Poetry. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: SPAN W3349, W3350, or the instructor's permission.

The aims of the class are twofold: 1) to explore the language of poetry and ways of approaching it; 2) to study selected poems by major figures of XXth- and XXIst-century Spanish American poetry. For the purposes of the class, poems will be considered not as ideological constructs or forms of cultural production, but as aesthetic artifacts, sources of readerly pleasure and enlightenment. As the American poet Robert Frost put it: A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom. Authors to be discussed include Pablo Neruda, César Vallejo, Alfonsina Storni, Nicolás Guillén, Alejandra Pizarnik, Nicanor Parra, and José Kozer.

SPAN UN3488 Public Intellectuals (before modernity) . 4 points.

Were there public intellectuals before the advent of modernity? What was it like to be a public intellectual before the existence of the public sphere as we know it today —including the media, mass communication, etc.? Who were there? Where were they located? How public were their interactions? What kind of impact did they expect form their interlocution with power? How did they “speak truth to power”? In this course we will explore these and other questions. For this purpose, we will be reading works from Christine de Pizan, a 14th-15th century woman political scientist; Teresa de Cartagena, a 15th century nun interested in the intellectual value of women in a man’s world; Averroes, a Muslim intellectual from the 12th century who went into exile because of his ideas before the dynastic changes taking place in al-Andalus; Maimonides, a 12th century Jewish lawyer and thinker who challenged the way in which global legal scholars studied the Jewish law; Juan Hispano, a 16th century professor and poet of African descent (son to black slaves) who wrote poems about the wars in the Mediterranean; Diego de Valera, a 15th century plebeian intellectual who spoke truth to power with the purpose of stop the civil war; Mancebo de Arévalo, a morisco from the 16th century who engaged in an ethnographic trip across the Iberian Peninsula in order to rebuild the moorish culture after the processes of geographical displacement undertaken by the Spanish monarchy; Olivia Sabuco de Nantes Barrera, a sixteenth century woman who engaged in philosophical research; etc. In addition to that, we will be reading critical and theoretical work of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Gayatri Spivak, and others. In this course, we intend to create an #inclusivesyllabus. This course will be cross-listed with the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. 

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3488
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3488 001/16397 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco 4 2/15

SPAN W3490 Latin American Humanities I: From Pre-Columbian Civilizations to the Creation of New Nations. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course aims to offer an overview of Latin American cultures that emphasizes specific social and intellectual movements through an analysis of representative historical and literary texts, as well as visual sources, covering Pre-columbian, colonial and independence periods. Selected materials are essential documents of their times and provide a comprehensive view of the origins and construction of Latin American cultures and identities. We read and analyze the selected sources as essential documents that are also often influential statements about Latin American histories.

SPAN W3690 Seeing and Describing. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

With the expansion projects of Portugal and Spain throughout the world between the 15th and the 17th centuries, travelers, conquistadors, missionaries, art theorists, and collectors were suddenly challenged by the encounter with a myriad new forms, images, objects, sculptures, cities, monuments, and techniques—those produced and developed in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. They recorded their emotions, surprise, reactions, and desires in written texts, mainly written in Spanish (and Portuguese) encompassing chronicles, letters, inventories, and artistic treatises. Several of these texts were printed and translated into other languages, becoming accessible to a larger audience. In this seminar we will study how the intensity of these simultaneous visual experiences of the objects encountered in the four parts of the world—or observed once they were sent to Europe—was translated into textual accounts, which often also included drawings and engravings. Participating in the long-lasting tradition of “ekphrasis,” (a description of or comment on a work of art) the texts written in the context of the Iberian expansion reinvent the art of describing artworks in unexpected ways. Compared with ancient texts addressing objects and images, the challenge of the Early Modern Iberian descriptions was driven by new intellectual challenges: to think of the “opening of the world” and its variety via the novelty of the objects; to relate the world and its forms through a common, almost “atemporal,” antiquity of the globe that would enable different societies and their histories to synchronize; to redefine the humanity via the artistic capacities and skills to make and to create. We will read a great corpus of these primary sources, mainly written in Spanish, as well as secondary sources (classic studies along the most recent contributions), which will help us envision the art-historical, anthropological, and philosophical implications of these unstudied texts.

SPAN W3698 Introduction to Undergraduate Research. 4 points.

The "Introduction to Undergraduate Research" will ensure that majors, concentrators, and other students in advance courses in the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures (LAIC) master the skills, techniques, and practices they will need to undertake research in Latin American and Iberian Cultures and to pursue further lines of inquiry within the humanities. Throughout this course, students will hone their academic writing skills in Spanish, Portuguese, and/or Catalan while they develop the necessary methodology to identify and approach primary sources, understand the manual and digital systems of analysis of those sources, and conduct bibliographical research toward advance scholarship. Over the course of the semester, students will propose, research, plan and write an article-length research paper on the topic of their choice, which they will have the opportunity to submit to the LAIC Journal of Undergraduate Research. The seminar will familiarize students with the resources and tools that will help them to pursue such a project, including Columbia's library and archival collections, other institutional libraries accessible digitally, annotation and citation apps, and word-processing programs that are ideal for large-scale writing projects. As such, the course will be largely methodological, designed to provide hands-on knowledge to students that will both orient them within the field of Latin American and Iberian Cultures and arm them with research and project-planning skills that are applicable beyond the discipline.

SPAN UN3710 20th Century Latin American Literature. 3 points.

A survey of major works and authors in their historical and personal context, with emphasis on lyric poetry, narrative and essay.

SPAN UN3991 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Seniors (major or concentrator status).

SENIOR SEMINAR

,

Section 001 - "Iberian Globalization"

,

A seminar based on a great variety of primary sources and theoretical texts that help to rethink, from the vantage point of the early modern period, the most unexpected sides of a process today called "globalization."

,

Section 002 - "Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture"

,

The Spanish transition to modernity (in politics, class relations, social roles) involved both the appearance of historically new emotions and the establishment of emotional regimes regulating feelings and practices. We will explore this process through readings in affect theory and nineteenth-century print culture (literary and nonliterary). Seniors will write about related problematics in the cultural production of 19th-21st century Spain.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3991 001/74705 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Alberto Medina 4 4/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3991 001/63989 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Alessandra Russo 4 8/15

Portuguese

PORT UN1101 Elementary Portuguese I. 4 points.

A beginning course designed for students who wish to start their study of Portuguese and have no proficiency in another Romance language. The four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing are developed at the basic level.

Spring 2017: PORT UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1101 001/62194 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Victor Araujo Coutinho 4 6/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1101 001/26138 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Ana Huback 4 11/15
PORT 1101 002/23964 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Ana Luiza Gabatteli Vieira 4 7/15

PORT UN1102 Elementary Portuguese II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1101 or the equivalent.

A course designed to acquaint students with the Portuguese verbal, prepositional, and pronominal systems. As a continuation of Elementary Portuguese I (PORT W1101), this course focuses on the uses of characteristic forms and expressions of the language as it is spoken and written in Brazil today.

Spring 2017: PORT UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1102 001/75532 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Ana Huback 4 5/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1102 001/62881 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Ana Huback 4 5/15

PORT UN1320 Comprehensive Elementary Portuguese I and II for Spanish Speakers. 4 points.

Prerequisites: knowledge of Spanish or another Romance language.

An intensive beginning language course in Brazilian Portuguese with emphasis on Brazilian culture through multimedia materials related to culture and society in contemporary Brazil. Recommended for students who have studied Spanish or another Romance language. The course is the equivalent of two full semesters of elementary Portuguese with stress on reading and conversing, and may be taken in place of PORT W1101-W1102. For students unable to dedicate the time needed cover two semesters in one, the regularly paced sequence PORT W1101-W1102 is preferable.

Spring 2017: PORT UN1320
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1320 001/71136 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 6/15
PORT 1320 002/74548 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Northwest Corner
Joao Nemi Neto 4 8/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN1320
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 1320 001/72705 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
601b Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 13/15
PORT 1320 002/12848 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 11/15

PORT UN2101 Intermediate Portuguese I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1120 or the equivalent.

General review of grammar, with emphasis on self-expression through oral and written composition, reading, conversation, and discussion.

Spring 2017: PORT UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 2101 001/61264 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Ana Huback 4 6/15
Fall 2017: PORT UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 2101 001/64782 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Ana Huback 4 8/15

PORT W1202 Intermediate Portuguese II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1120 or the equivalent.

General review of grammar, with emphasis on self-expression through oral and written composition, reading, conversation, and discussion.

PORT W1220 Comprehensive Intermediate Portuguese. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1102 or PORT W1320.

This course discusses contemporary issues based on articles from Lusophone newspapers and magazines. Students will review grammar, expand their vocabulary and improve oral expression, writing, and reading skills. They are also exposed to audiovisual material that will deepen their understanding of Lusophone societies and culture.

PORT UN3300 Advanced Language through Content. 3 points.

Corequisites: PORT UN1220

An intensive exposure to advanced points of Portuguese grammar and structure through written and oral practice, along with an introduction to the basic principles of academic composition in Portuguese.  This course is required for the concentration  in Portuguese Studies. "This course is intended to improve Portuguese language skills in grammar, comprehension, and critical thinking through an archive of texts from literature, film, music, newspapers, critical reception and more. To do so, we will work through Portuguese-speaking communities and cultures from Brazil, to Portugal and Angola, during the twentieth and twenty-first century, to consider the mode in which genre, gender and sexuality materialize and are codified, disoriented, made, unmade and refigured through cultural productions, bodies, nation and resistant vernaculars of aesthetics and performance, always attentive to the intersections of gender with class and racism.

Fall 2017: PORT UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 3300 001/13874 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
326 International Affairs Bldg
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 3 5/15

PORT UN3330 Introduction to Portuguese Studies. 3 points.

This course presents the students with the information and basic tools needed to interpret a broad range of topics and cultural production from the Portuguese-speaking world: literary, filmic, artisitic, architectural, urban, etc. We will use a continuing cross-disciplinary dialogue to study everyday acts as a location of culture. This course will center on interpretation as an activity and as the principal operation though which culturally sited meaning is created and analyzed. Among the categories and topics discussed will be history, national and popular cultures, literature (high/low), cultural institutions, migration, and globalization. Students will also acquire the fundamental vocabulary for the analysis of cultural objects. This course is required for the concentration in Portuguese Studies.

Spring 2017: PORT UN3330
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 3330 001/75537 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Deneb Kozikoski Valereto 3 3/15

PORT UN3101 Conversation about the Lusophone World. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1220.

This conversation class will help students develop their oral proficiency in Portuguese. We will discuss current events, participate in challenging pronunciation exercises, improve understanding of Portuguese idioms, develop conversation strengths, confront weaknesses, and increase fluency in spoken Portuguese.

Fall 2017: PORT UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 3101 001/74216 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Joao Nemi Neto 3 6/15

PORT UN3301 Advanced Writing and Composition in Portuguese. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PORT W1220.

This course focuses on three elements: 1) the main elements of formal discourse in Portuguese (grammar, vocabulary, expressions, etc.); 2) discourse genres, based on the theoretical bases laid out by Textual Linguistics and Discourse Analysis; 3) cultural, economic, social, political themes related to the reality of Brazil or other Portuguese-speaking countries. However, students should be able to define their areas of interest and shape their experience in the course according to them. Such an approach takes advantage of the diversity in the classroom, stimulates participation, and promotes independent academic research. Therefore, students will start a weblog, where their writing activities will be posted, so that their colleagues may read and comment on them. The mandatory genres-forms for all students are in the modules of discourse genres and academic writing, and the corresponding forms, the pronominal system and semelfectives. Students will then choose one more genre among biographical texts (resumé, facebook, biography), lyrical texts (music, poetry), subjective texts (description, narrative, commentary, editorial), and journalistic texts, as well as the corresponding forms assigned to those modules: indirect speech, mandates, past verbal tenses, conjunctions, redundancy/repetition, and semelfactives (conditionals). Every student will study and practice all genres and forms, but they will be responsible for larger assignments (module notes, to be posted on their blogs) on the two mandatory modules and the optional one. At the beginning of the semester they will choose a thematic topic for the course (in their field of study or area of personal interest), and will select a literature list with the assistance of the instructor. All assignments in the course must be related to the chosen thematic topic and will involve research based on the literature list. At the end of the semester, they will produce an essay on their thematic choice.

PORT UN3490 Brazilian Society and Civilization. 3 points.

Each week, a historical period is studied in connection to a particular theme of ongoing cultural expression. While diverse elements of popular culture are included, fiction is privileged as a source of cultural commentary. Students are expected to assimilate the background information but are also encouraged to develop their own perspective and interest, whether in the social sciences, the humanities (including the fine arts), or other areas.

Fall 2017: PORT UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PORT 3490 001/71840 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Alexandra Cook 3 10/15

Catalan

CATL UN1120 Comprehensive Beginning Catalan. 4 points.

An extensive introduction to the Catalan language with an emphasis on oral communication as well as the reading and writing practice that will allow the student to function comfortably in a Catalan environment.

Spring 2017: CATL UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 1120 001/17413 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
255 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 8/15
Fall 2017: CATL UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 1120 001/64482 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 5/15

CATL UN2101 Intermediate Catalan I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CATL W1120.

The first part of Columbia University´s comprehensive intermediate Catalan sequence. The main objectives of this course are to continue developing communicative competence - reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension - and to further acquaint students with Catalan cultures.

Spring 2017: CATL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 2101 001/13821 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
326 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 3/15
Fall 2017: CATL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CATL 2101 001/27707 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Elsa Ubeda 4 4/15

CATL W1202 Intermediate Catalan II. 4 points.

Corequisites: CATL 1201 or the equivalent.

Catalan 1202 is the second part of Columbia University's intermediate Catalan sequence. Course goals are to enhance student exposure to various aspects of Catalan culture and to consolidate and expand reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills.

CATL W3330 Introduction to Catalan Culture. 3 points.

This is a content course covering topics regarding Catalan history, society, literature and visual arts. The objective of the course is to examine the main socio-cultural manifestations in the Catalan-speaking territories. Topics to be discussed include: bilingualism and language as the marker of "authentic" national identity; the influx of immigration and the constant redefinition of all things Catalan; the very locally rooted and at the same time very international outlook of the Catalan avant-garde from Foix to Tàpies; the protest song and the cultural manifestations during the Franco repression, and the crucial role of the city of Barcelona as a cultural focus and its impact on literature, film, and arts. By the end of the semester students will be familiar with the main social and cultural issues of the Catalan-speaking territories. The course will be taught in Spanish and counts as an elective towards the major in Hispanic Cultures. No previous knowledge of the Catalan language is required.