Neuroscience and Behavior

Departmental Office: 406 Schermerhorn; 212-854-3608
https://psychology.columbia.edu/

Directors of Undergraduate Studies:

Psychology Major and Concentration:
Prof. Patricia Lindemann, 358E Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-8285; pgl2@columbia.edu (Students with last names beginning A-K and X-Z)
Prof. Katherine Fox-Glassman, 314 Schermerhorn; 212-854-4550; kjt2111@columbia.edu (Students with last names beginning L-W)
Prof. Nim Tottenham, 370 Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-1925; nlt7@psych.columbia.edu (Honors)

Neuroscience and Behavior Major:
Psychology: Prof. Carl Hart 416 Schermerhorn; 212-851-9421; clh42@columbia.edu
Psychology: Prof. Caroline Marvin, 355B Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-0166; cbm2118@columbia.edu
Biology: Prof. Jian Yang, 917A Fairchild; 212-854-6161; jy160@columbia.edu
Biology: Prof. Deborah Mowshowitz, 744 Mudd; 212-854-4497; dbm2@columbia.edu

Director of Instruction:

Prof. Caroline Marvin, 355B Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-0166; cbm2118@columbia.edu

Directors of Psychology Honors Program:
Prof. Kevin Ochsner, 369 Schermerhorn Extension; 212-851-9348; ochsner@psych.columbia.edu
Prof. Nim Tottenham, 370 Schermerhorn Extension; 212-854-1925; nlt7@columbia.edu

Preclinical Adviser: Prof. E'mett McCaskill, 415O Milbank; 212-854-8601; emccaski@barnard.edu

Administrative Coordinator: Joanna Borchert-Kopczuk, 406 Schermerhorn; 212-854-3940; jb2330@columbia.edu

Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant: Kathe Blydenburgh, 406 Schermerhorn; 212-854-8859; uca@psych.columbia.edu

The Department of Psychology offers students a balanced curriculum in psychological science, including research methods, cognition, neuroscience, developmental, social, and clinical areas. The curriculum prepares majors for graduate education in these fields and provides a relevant background for social work, education, medicine, law, and business. Psychology course offerings are designed to meet the varying needs and interests of students, from those wishing to explore a few topics in psychology or to fulfill the science requirement, to those interested in majoring in Psychology or in Neuroscience and Behavior.

Program Goals

The department's program goals start with the development of a solid knowledge base in psychological science. Consistent with the value psychology places on empirical evidence, courses at every level of the curriculum nurture the development of skills in research methods, quantitative literacy, and critical thinking, and foster respect for the ethical values that undergird the science of psychology.

Most of these program goals are introduced in PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology, the recommended first psychology course required for all majors that satisfies the prerequisite for most 2000-level courses. These goals are extended and reinforced in our statistics (1600-level) and research methods (1400-level) laboratory courses, as well as in the 2000-level lecture courses and 3000- and 4000-level seminars. Each of the 2000-level lecture courses enables students to study systematically, and in greater depth, one of the content areas introduced in PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology. These lecture courses are the principal means by which psychology majors satisfy the distribution requirements, ensuring not only depth but also breadth of coverage across three central areas of psychology: (1) perception and cognition, (2) psychobiology and neuroscience, and (3) social, personality, and abnormal psychology. To complete the major, students take one or more advanced seminars and are encouraged to participate in supervised research courses, where they have the opportunity to explore research questions in depth and further develop their written and oral communication skills.

Research Participation

All qualified students are welcome to participate in research project opportunities within the Department of Psychology. Students may volunteer to work in a lab, register for supervised individual research (PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research), or participate in the department’s two-year Honors Program. Information on faculty research is available on the departmental website. Students are advised to read about research laboratories on faculty lab sites and visit the professor’s office hours to discuss opportunities. At the beginning of the fall term, the department also hosts a Lab-Preview event for students to learn about research opportunities for the upcoming semester.

Program Planning

Majors and concentrators in psychology and majors in neuroscience and behavior should begin planning a program of study as early as possible. All necessary forms and information are available in Program Planning Tips. All majors and concentrators in Psychology and majors in Neuroscience and Behavior should complete a Major Requirement Checklist before consulting a program adviser to discuss program plans. At minimum, all students must submit a Major Requirement Checklist prior to the start of their final semester, so that graduation eligibility can be certified.

Advising

The Department of Psychology offers a variety of advising resources to provide prospective and current undergraduate majors and concentrators with the information and support needed to successfully plan their programs. An overview of these resources is provided on the Psychology Undergraduate Advising Resources website.

Students are encouraged to consult with Peer, Faculty, and Program Advisers as they plan their course of study in Psychology or Neuroscience and Behavior. Faculty and Peer Advisers are important contacts for general advice on class choices, research opportunities, and post-graduation plans. For definitive answers to questions regarding major requirements and other aspects of your degree, including transfer credit, current and prospective majors should consult their Program Adviser (Director of Undergraduate Studies) or the Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant in the departmental office. Program Adviser assignments and contact information are provided on the departmental website. Please see this page as well for additional information about program, faculty, peer, and pre-clinical advising, please see the Psychology Undergraduate Advising Resources website.

E-mail Communication

The department maintains an e-mail distribution list with the UNIs of all declared majors and concentrators. Students are held responsible for information sent to their Columbia e-mail addresses. Students should read these messages from the department regularly and carefully. They are intended to keep students informed about deadlines, requirements, events, and opportunities. Prospective majors or concentrators who would like to be added to the e-mail distribution list should contact the Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant in the departmental office.

Guide to Course Numbers

Course numbers reflect the structure of the Psychology curriculum:

  • The 1000-level comprises introductions to psychology, introductory research methods courses, and statistics. PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology and PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior are introductory courses with no prerequisites. Either one can serve as the prerequisite for most of the 2000-level courses. However, most students find it advantageous to take PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology first. The 1400s contain the research methods laboratory courses, and the 1600s contain statistics courses; these two course types are designed to prepare students for the types of research found in many psychology and neuroscience labs.
  • The 2000-level comprises lecture courses that are introductions to areas within psychology; most require PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology or PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior as a prerequisite.
  • The 3000-level comprises more advanced and specialized undergraduate courses; most are given in a seminar format and require instructor permission.
  • The 3900s are the courses providing research opportunities for undergraduates.
  • The 4000-level comprises advanced seminars suitable for both advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Subcategories within the 2000-, 3000-, and 4000-levels correspond to the three groups in our distribution requirement for undergraduate Psychology majors:

  1. Perception and cognition (2200s, 3200s, and 4200s),
  2. Psychobiology and neuroscience (2400s, 3400s, and 4400s), and
  3. Social, personality, and abnormal psychology (2600s, 3600s, and 4600s).

Note that Barnard psychology courses do not follow the same numbering scheme.

Honors Program

The department offers a two-year Honors Program, designed for a limited number of juniors and seniors interested in participating in research. Beginning in the first term of junior year and continuing through senior year, students take PSYC UN3920 Honors Research and simultaneously participate in an honors research course (PSYC UN3920 Honors Research) under the supervision of a member of the department. Students make a formal presentation and complete an honors essay based on this research toward the end of their senior year.

To qualify for honors, students must take a total of 6 points beyond the number required for their major and satisfy all other requirements for the major. The additional 6 points may include the Honors Seminar and Honors Research courses. Interested students should apply at the end of their sophomore year. Instructions and an application form are available on the Honors Program page of the department website. Typically no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Requirements for Admission to Graduate Programs in Psychology

Most graduate programs in psychology, including those in clinical psychology, require:

An undergraduate course in introductory psychology:
PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology
A course in statistics such as one of the following:
PSYC UN1610 Introductory Statistics for Behavioral Scientists
PSYC UN1660 Advanced Statistical Inference
STAT UN1001 Introduction to Statistical Reasoning
STAT UN1101 Introduction to Statistics
STAT UN1201 Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
A laboratory course in research methods such as one of the following:
PSYC UN1420 Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior
PSYC UN1450 Experimental Psychology: Social Cognition and Emotion
PSYC UN1455 Experimental Psychology: Social and Personality
PSYC UN1490 Experimental Psychology: Thinking and Decision Making

Students should also take a variety of more advanced undergraduate courses and seminars and participate in PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research. Students are encouraged to apply for the Psychology Honors Program at the end of their sophomore year. 

Students interested in clinical psychology should obtain experience working in a community service program in addition to supervised individual research experience. Students should consult the department's pre-clinical adviser, Prof. E'mett McCaskill, and attend the department's pre-clinical advising events for more information. Additional resources to help prepare students for graduate study in psychology, and for careers in clinical psychology, are available on the Department of Psychology’s website.

On-Line Information

The Department of Psychology website provides access to a wide variety of information for majors and prospective majors. Among other useful resources, students will find syllabi posted for most lecture and lab courses and for many advanced seminars. Students should read the on-line course syllabi prior to registering for psychology courses. For assistance in finding all necessary resources, students should contact the undergraduate curriculum assistant (uca@psych.columbia.edu).

Science Requirement

PSYC UN1001 The Science of PsychologyPSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior, and any PSYC course in the 2200- or 2400-level may be used to fulfill the science requirement.

2600-level and some other psychology courses, including PSYC BC1001 Introduction to Psychology and other Barnard psychology courses, may not be used to fulfill the science requirement.

For more detailed information regarding psychology courses that may be applied toward the science requirement, see the Core Curriculum section in this bulletin.

For more detailed information regarding psychology courses that may be applied toward the science requirement, see Core Requirements in the General Studies bulletin.

Evening and Columbia Summer Courses

The department normally offers at least one lab course (currently PSYC UN1420 Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior and PSYC UN1450 Experimental Psychology: Social Cognition and Emotion) in the late afternoon with evening labs. A number of other courses are occasionally offered in late afternoon and evening hours. No more than one quarter of the courses required for the major are normally available in the evening. Working students may find the wide variety of early morning (8:40 a.m.) classes, as well as Summer Session offerings, helpful in completing degree requirements.

Any course offered by the Psychology Department during the Summer Session is applicable toward the same major requirement(s) as the corresponding course of that same number offered during the academic year. For instance, PSYC S1001D The Science of Psychology meets the same major requirements as does PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology.

See Academic Regulations—Study Outside Columbia College in this Bulletin for additional information.

See Summer Courses for policies governing Summer Session courses.

Professors

  • Niall Bolger
  • Geraldine Downey
  • William Fifer (Psychiatry, Pediatrics)
  • Norma Graham
  • Carl Hart (Chair)
  • Tory Higgins
  • Donald C. Hood
  • Sheena S. Iyengar (Business School)
  • Leonard Matin
  • Janet Metcalfe
  • Michael Morris (Business School)
  • Kevin Ochsner
  • Rae Silver (Barnard)
  • Ursula M. Staudinger (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • Yaakov Stern (Neurology and Psychiatry)
  • Herbert Terrace
  • Sarah M.N. Woolley 

Associate Professors

  • Valerie Purdie-Vaughns
  • Daphna Shohamy
  • Nim Tottenham
  •  

Assistant Professors

  • Mariam Aly
  • Yunglin Gazes (Neurology)
  • Larisa Heiphetz
  • Koleen McCrink (Barnard)
  • Joshua New (Barnard)
  • Julie Spicer (Psychiatry)

Adjunct Faculty

  • Helen Brew
  • Ljubica Chatman
  • Stephanie Consentino
  • Teal Eich
  • David Friedman 
  • Karen Kelly
  • Svetlana Komissarouk
  • E'mett McCaskill
  • Catherine Peña
  • Svetlana Rosis
  • Kathleen Taylor

Lecturers in Discipline

  • Katherine Fox-Glassman
  • Patricia Lindemann
  • Caroline Marvin

Guidelines for all Psychology Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors

Double Majors/Concentrations

All students attempting to complete double majors, double concentrations, or a combination of a major and a concentration must complete separate sets of required and related courses for each program. Generally speaking, a single course may not be counted twice. Students should consult with one of the directors of undergraduate studies or the undergraduate curriculum assistant if they have questions. Note one exception: students attempting to complete two programs with a statistics requirement are able to use one course—e.g., STAT UN1201 Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics (formerly STAT W1211)—to satisfy the requirement for both programs (i.e., the student does not need to take two different statistics courses). 

Overlapping Courses

Students cannot receive credit for two courses—one completed at Columbia and one at another institution (including Barnard)—if those courses have largely overlapping content. For example,  PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology is similar in content to introductory psychology courses offered at many other institutions, including Barnard; only one such course will receive credit. Similarly, PSYC UN2630 Social Psychology and PSYC BC1138 Social Psychology have overlapping content; only one will receive credit. Please refer to the table of Overlapping Courses for a partial list of courses at Columbia and Barnard that are known to overlap.

Grade Requirements for the Major

A grade of C- or higher must be earned and revealed on the transcript in any Columbia or Barnard course, including the first, that is used to satisfy the major requirements. The grade of P is not accepted for credit towards the Psychology major, Psychology concentration, or Neuroscience and Behavior major. Courses taken only on a Pass/D/Fail basis may not be used to satisfy the major or concentration requirements unless the grade of P is uncovered by the Registrar's deadline. Courses taken only on a Pass/Fail basis may not be used to satisfy the major or concentration requirements under any circumstances.

Major Requirement Checklist 

Prior to the start of their final semester, all seniors must submit a Major Requirement Checklist showing all major courses they have taken and those they plan to take. The Psychology department evaluates each checklist to determine whether or not the course plan completes the major requirements and then notifies the student accordingly. If the student's course plan changes, or if it does not satisfy the major requirements, a revised checklist must be submitted. Departmental approval of an accurate and up-to-date checklist will help ensure completion of all major requirements on time for graduation. 


Major in Psychology

Please read Guidelines for all Psychology Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors above.

Thirty or more points are needed to complete the major and must include:

The Introductory Psychology Course

A Statistics Course

Select one of the following:

  • PSYC UN1610 Introductory Statistics for Behavioral Scientists
  • PSYC UN1660 Advanced Statistical Inference
  • STAT UN1001 Introduction to Statistical Reasoning
  • STAT UN1101 Introduction to Statistics (formerly STAT W1111)
  • STAT UN1201 Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics (formerly STAT W1211)

A Research Methods Course

Select one of the following:

  • PSYC UN1420 Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior
  • PSYC UN1450 Experimental Psychology: Social Cognition and Emotion
  • PSYC UN1455 Experimental Psychology: Social and Personality
  • PSYC UN1490 Experimental Psychology: Thinking and Decision Making

Majors are strongly advised to complete the statistics and research methods requirements, in that order, by the fall term of their junior year. Students are advised to verify the specific prerequisites for research methods courses, most of which require prior completion of a statistics course.

Distribution Requirement

One course (3 points or more) must be taken from each of the following three groups (in addition to the introductory, statistics, and research methods courses described above):

  • Group I—Perception and cognition: courses numbered in the 2200s, 3200s, or 4200s. Also PSYC UN1420 Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior and PSYC UN1490 Experimental Psychology: Thinking and Decision Making.

  • Group II—Psychobiology and neuroscience: courses numbered in the 2400s, 3400s, or 4400s. Also PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior.

  • Group III—Social, personality, and abnormal: courses numbered in the 2600s, 3600s, or 4600s. Also PSYC UN1450 Experimental Psychology: Social Cognition and Emotion and PSYC UN1455 Experimental Psychology: Social and Personality.

If a 1400-level course is used to satisfy a distribution requirement, it cannot also be used to fulfill the laboratory requirement, and vice versa.

Seminar Requirement

For students entering Columbia in Fall 2013 or later, one seminar course numbered in the 3000s or 4000s must be taken for 3 or more points.

Seminars are usually taken in the senior year as a culmination of the major program. Enrollment in seminar courses requires the instructor's permission; students are advised to contact instructors at least one month prior to registration to request seminar admission. Note that honors and supervised individual research courses (PSYC UN3910 Honors SeminarPSYC UN3920 Honors Research, and PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research) will not meet the seminar requirement.

No course may be counted twice in fulfillment of the above major requirements, with the following exception: a seminar course may fulfill both the seminar requirement and a group requirement if it meets the criteria for both.

Additional Courses

Additional psychology courses ("electives") must be taken for a total of 30 points. As described below, these may include research courses, transfer courses, and Barnard psychology courses not approved for specific requirements.

Research Credits

No more than 4 points of PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research  or PSYC UN3920 Honors Research may be taken in any one term, and no more than 8 points total of research and field work courses (PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research, PSYC BC3466 Field Work and Research Seminar: The Barnard Toddler Center, PSYC BC3473 Field Work Seminar in Psychological Services and Counseling, PSYC BC3592 Senior Research Seminar and PSYC BC3599 Individual Projects) may be applied toward the major. See below for further restrictions on applying Barnard courses toward the psychology major.

Barnard Courses

No more than 9 points (minus any transfer credits) from Barnard psychology courses may be applied as credit toward the major. The table of approved Barnard psychology courses indicates which courses have been approved for specific requirements of the psychology major. Courses not on the approved list may only be applied toward a specific requirement with prior written approval from a program adviser. Courses not on the approved list for a specific requirement may be applied as elective credit toward the 30 points for the major.

Transfer Credits

No more than 9 transfer credits (or combination of transfer and Barnard credits) will be accepted toward the psychology major. Approval of transfer credits on a student’s Entrance Credit Report toward general requirements for the B.A. degree does not grant approval of these credits toward the psychology major. Students must apply for written approval of transfer credit towards the major by submitting the Major Requirement Substitution Form. This form, along with additional information about transfer credits can be found on the Transfer Credit page of our website. To be approved for the major, a course taken at another institution should be substantially similar to one offered by the department, the grade received must be a B- or better, and the course must have been taken within the past 8 years. As noted above, if two courses overlap in content, only one will be applied towards the major. With the exception of approved Barnard courses, students should consult with one of the directors of undergraduate studies before registering for psychology courses offered outside the department.

Students who have completed an introductory psychology course at another institution prior to declaring a psychology major should consult with one of the directors of undergraduate studies to verify whether or not this course meets departmental standards for major transfer credit. If transfer credit toward the major is not approved, the student must enroll in PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology or PSYC BC1001 Introduction to Psychology to complete this major requirement. Note that College Board Advanced Placement (AP) psychology scores do not satisfy the PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology requirement, nor do they confer elective credit toward the major.


Major in Neuroscience and Behavior

Please read Guidelines for all Psychology Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors above.

The department cosponsors an interdepartmental major in neuroscience and behavior with the Department of Biological Sciences. For assistance in planning the psychology portion of the neuroscience and behavior major, refer to the Program Planning Tips website and use the appropriate major requirement checklist.

No course may be counted twice in fulfillment of the biology or psychology requirements described below. Most graduate programs in neuroscience also require one year of calculus, one year of physics, and chemistry through organic.

Required Courses

In addition to one year of general chemistry (or the high school equivalent), ten courses are required to complete the major—five from the Department of Biological Sciences and five from the Department of Psychology. For the definitive list of biology requirements, see the Department of Biological Sciences website.

Required Biology Courses

  1. BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology
  2. BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology
  3. BIOL UN3004 Neurobiology I: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology
  4. BIOL UN3005 Neurobiology II: Development Systems
  5. One additional 3000- or 4000-level biology course from a list approved by the biology adviser to the program.

Required Psychology Courses

  1. PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology
  2. PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior or PSYC UN2450 Behavioral Neuroscience
  3. One statistics or research methods course from the following:

    • PSYC UN1420 Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior
    • PSYC UN1450 Experimental Psychology: Social Cognition and Emotion
    • PSYC UN1610 Introductory Statistics for Behavioral Scientists
    • PSYC UN1660 Advanced Statistical Inference
    • STAT UN1101 Introduction to Statistics (formerly STAT W1111)
    • STAT UN1201 Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics (formerly STAT W1211)
  4. One additional 2000- or 3000-level psychology lecture course from a list approved by the psychology adviser to the program. 
  5. One advanced psychology seminar from a list approved by the psychology adviser to the program.

Transfer Credit for Psychology Courses Taken Elsewhere

Students should consult a psychology adviser before registering for psychology courses offered outside the department. With the adviser's approval, one, and only one, course from another institution, including Barnard, may be applied toward the psychology portion of the Neuroscience and Behavior major. Students who wish to obtain credit for a course taken at Barnard or at another institution should complete the Major Requirement Substitution Form. To be approved for the major, the course should be substantially similar to one offered by this department and approved for this major, and the grade received must be a C- or better if from Barnard, or B- or better if from another institution. Advanced Placement (AP) psychology scores will not satisfy the PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology requirement.

Exceptions to Biology Requirements

Any exceptions must be approved in advance by a biology adviser and students must receive an email notification of that approval. Students may substitute Barnard College courses only with prior permission from an adviser.


Concentration in Psychology

Please read Guidelines for all Psychology Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors above.

A concentration in psychology requires a minimum of 18 points, including PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology and courses in at least two of the three groups listed under “Distribution Requirement” for the psychology major. Restrictions on research credits, Barnard credits, and transfer credits are modified from those of the psychology major as follows:

  1. Only 4 points total may be applied toward the concentration from research or field-work courses, including: PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research, PSYC UN3920 Honors Research PSYC BC3466 Field Work and Research Seminar: The Barnard Toddler Center, PSYC BC3473 Field Work Seminar in Psychological Services and Counseling, PSYC BC3592 Senior Research Seminar, and PSYC BC3599 Individual Projects;
  2. Only 5 points from Barnard (including PSYC BC1001 Introduction to Psychology) may be applied toward the concentration.
  3. Only 5 points total (including any Barnard points) from approved psychology courses taken outside the department may be applied toward the concentration.

Except as noted above, other regulations outlined in the Psychology Major section regarding grades, transfer credits, and overlapping courses also apply toward the concentration.

PSYC UN1001 The Science of Psychology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment may be limited. Attendance at the first two class periods is mandatory.

Broad survey of psychological science including: sensation and perception; learning, memory, intelligence, language, and cognition; emotions and motivation; development, personality, health and illness, and social behavior. Discusses relations between the brain, behavior, and experience. Emphasizes science as a process of discovering both new ideas and new empirical results. PSYC W1001 serves as a prerequisite for further psychology courses and should be completed by the sophomore year.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1001 001/69472 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 3 183/189
PSYC 1001 002/77588 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Gregory Jensen 3 161/189
Fall 2017: PSYC UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1001 001/73676 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 3 150/189
PSYC 1001 002/69572 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Kathleen Taylor 3 48/189

PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Introduction to the biological approach to the experimental study of behavior. Includes consideration of the types of biological data relevant to psychology, as well as the assumptions and logic permitting the interpretation of biological data in psychological terms.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1010 001/64756 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Caroline Marvin 3 131/130
Fall 2017: PSYC UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1010 001/63965 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Caroline Marvin 3 101/150

PSYC UN1420 Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior. 4 points.

Lab Required
Attendance at the first class is mandatory. Fee: $70.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, and a statistics course (PSYC W1610 or the equivalent), or the instructor's permission.
Corequisites: PSYC W1421.

Introduction to the techniques of research employed in the study of human behavior. Students gain experience in the conduct of research, including design of simple experiments, observation and measurement techniques, and the analysis of behavioral data.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1420 001/15236 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 4 64/72

PSYC UN1421 Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior (Lab). 0 points.

Limited enrollment in each section.

Corequisites: PSYC W1420.

Required lab section for PSYC W1420.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1421
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1421 001/29185 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 0 18/18
PSYC 1421 002/14330 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 0 18/18
PSYC 1421 003/72651 M 8:10pm - 10:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 0 13/18
PSYC 1421 004/13441 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 0 15/18
PSYC 1421 005/76662 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Patricia Lindemann 0 0/15

PSYC UN1450 Experimental Psychology: Social Cognition and Emotion. 4 points.

Lab Required
Attendance at the first class is essential. Priority given to psychology majors. Fee: $70.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, and a statistics course (PSYC W1610 or the equivalent), or the instructor's permission.
Corequisites: PSYC W1451.

An introduction to research methods employed in the study of human social cognition and emotion. Students gain experience in the design and conduct of research, including ethical issues, observation and measurement techniques, interpretation of data, and preparation of written and oral reports.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN1450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1450 001/74856 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Kevin Ochsner 4 58/60

PSYC UN1451 Experimental Psychology: Social Cognition and Emotion (Lab). 0 points.

Limited enrollment in each section.

Corequisites: PSYC W1450.

Required Lab for PSYC W1450.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN1451
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1451 001/25431 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Kevin Ochsner 0 15/15
PSYC 1451 002/20688 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Kevin Ochsner 0 15/15
PSYC 1451 003/70126 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Kevin Ochsner 0 0/0
PSYC 1451 004/74178 M 8:10pm - 10:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Kevin Ochsner 0 0/0

PSYC UN1455 Experimental Psychology: Social and Personality. 4 points.

Lab Required
Fee: $70.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, and a statistics course (PSYC W1610 or the equivalent), or the instructor's permission.
Corequisites: PSYC W1456.

Methodology and procedures of personality and social psychological research and exercises in data analysis and research design. Ethical issues in psychological research. Statistical concepts such as parameter estimation and testing, measurement reliability and validity, merits and limitations of correlational and experimental research designs, and empirical evaluation of theories.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1455
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1455 001/20495 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Niall Bolger 4 34/36

PSYC UN1456 Experimental Psychology: Social and Personality (Lab). 0 points.

Limited enrollment in each section.

Required lab for PSYC W1455.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1456
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1456 001/66408 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Niall Bolger 0 21/18
PSYC 1456 002/15845 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Niall Bolger 0 13/18

PSYC UN1490 Experimental Psychology: Thinking and Decision Making. 4 points.

Corequisites: PSYC UN1491

Prerequisites: Science of Psychology (PSYC 1001) or Mind, Brain, & Behavior (PSYC 1010) or equivalent intro psych course, plus an introductory statistics course. Introduces research methods employed in the study of the cognitive and social determinants of thinking and decision making. Students gain experience in the conduct of research, including: design of simple experiments; observation and preference elicitation techniques; the analysis of behavioral data, considerations of validity, reliability, and research ethics; and preparation of written and oral reports.


Note: Fee: $70. Attendance at the first class is essential.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN1490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1490 001/21347 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Katherine Fox-Glassman 4 35/35

PSYC UN1491 Experimental Psychology: Thinking & Decision Making Lab. 0 points.

Prerequisites: Or equivalent introductory psychology and statistics courses.
Corequisites: PSYC UN1490

Required lab for PSYC UN1490

Fall 2017: PSYC UN1491
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1491 001/78596 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Katherine Fox-Glassman 0 20/20
PSYC 1491 002/81247 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Katherine Fox-Glassman 0 10/20

PSYC UN1610 Introductory Statistics for Behavioral Scientists. 4 points.

Lab Required
Lecture and lab. Priority given to psychology majors. Fee $70.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010. Recommended preparation: one course in behavioral science and knowledge of high school algebra.
Corequisites: PSYC W1611.

Introduction to statistics that concentrates on problems from the behavioral sciences.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1610
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1610 001/26335 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Gregory Jensen 4 36/40

PSYC UN1611 Introductory Statistics for Behavioral Scientists (Lab). 0 points.

Limited enrollment in each section.

Corequisites: PSYC W1610.

Required lab section for PSYC W1610.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN1611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1611 001/66874 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Gregory Jensen 0 18/18
PSYC 1611 002/21578 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Gregory Jensen 0 18/15
PSYC 1611 003/16070 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Gregory Jensen 0 0/15
PSYC 1611 004/75627 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Gregory Jensen 0 0/15

PSYC UN2220 Cognition: Memory and Stress. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Attendance at the first class is mandatory.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, or the instructor's permission.

Memory, attention, and stress in human cognition.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN2220
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2220 001/19426 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Janet Metcalfe 3 55/95

PSYC UN2235 Thinking and Decision Making. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: an introductory course in psychology.

Models of judgment and decision making in both certain and uncertain or risky situations, illustrating the interplay of top-down (theory-driven) and bottom-up (data-driven) processes in creating knowledge. Focuses on how individuals do and should make decisions, with some extensions to group decision making and social dilemmas.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN2235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2235 001/73766 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
309 Havemeyer Hall
Katherine Fox-Glassman 3 169/180

PSYC UN2250 Evolution of Cognition. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, or the instructor's permission.

A systematic review of different forms of cognition as viewed in the context of the theory of evolution. Specific topics include the application of the theory of evolution to behavior, associative learning, biological constraints on learning, methods for studying the cognitive abilities of animals, levels of representation, ecological influences on cognition, and evidence of consciousness in animals.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN2250
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2250 001/13147 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Herbert Terrace 3 44/95

PSYC UN2280 Introduction to Developmental Psychology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment may be limited. Attendance at the first two classes is mandatory.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, or the equivalent.

Introduction to the scientific study of human development, with an emphasis on psychobiological processes underlying perceptual, cognitive, and emotional development.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN2280
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2280 001/74217 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Nim Tottenham 3 77/95

PSYC UN2420 Animal Behavior. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, or a college-level biology course, or the instructor's permission.

Introduction to behavioral systems, evolution of behavioral traits, and analysis of behavior. Topics include reproductive and social behavior, mating systems, competition, cooperation, communication, learning, development and the interplay of genes and environment.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN2420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2420 001/29291 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Gregory Jensen 3 61/80

PSYC UN2450 Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, or the instructor's permission.

Examines the principles governing neuronal activity, the role of neurotransmitter systems in memory and motivational processes, the presumed brain dysfunctions that give rise to schizophrenia and depression, and philosophical issues regarding the relationship between brain activity and subjective experience.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN2450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2450 001/13295 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
209 Havemeyer Hall
Kathleen Taylor 3 71/95

PSYC UN2620 Abnormal Behavior. 3 points.

Prerequisites: An introductory psychology course.

Examines definitions, theories, and treatments of abnormal behavior.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN2620
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2620 001/21934 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
E'mett McCaskill 3 150/150

PSYC UN2630 Social Psychology. 3 points.

Surveys important methods, findings, and theories in the study of social influences on behavior. Emphasizes different perspectives on the relation between individuals and society.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN2630
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2630 001/29559 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Tory Higgins 3 145/150

PSYC UN2640 Introduction to Social Cognition. 3 points.

Prerequisites: an introductory course in psychology or the instructor's permission.

An introduction to basic concepts in social cognition. Topics include attribution theory (how we explain our own and other's behavior), social categories and schema (social perception and stereotyping), the social self (the development and maintenance of a self-concept), attention and consciousness, person memory, affect and cognition, and social inference, among others.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN2640
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2640 001/18047 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Larisa Heiphetz 3 93/100

PSYC UN2670 Social Development. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, or the equivalent.

This lecture course introduces students to the study of typical human social development with a particular focus on genetic, familial and peer influences on the development of social behaviors during early childhood.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN2670
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2670 001/64819 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
614 Schermerhorn Hall
James Curley 3 77/95

PSYC UN3270 Computational Approaches to Human Vision (Seminar). 3 points.

This course will be offered in Fall 2016.

Prerequisites: some background in psychology and/or neurophysiology (e.g., PSYC W1001, PSYC W1010, PSYC W2230, PSYC W2450; BIOL W3004 or BIOL W3005) is desirable. See instructor if you have questions about your background. Some background in mathematics and computer science (e.g., calculus or linear algebra, a programming language) is highly recommended.

Study of human vision--both behavioral and physiological data--within a framework of computational and mathematical descriptions. Please contact Prof. Graham by e-mail (nvg1@columbia.edu) if you are interested in this course.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN3270
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3270 001/11019  
Norma Graham 3 0/12

PSYC UN3445 The Brain & Memory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology and the instructor's permission

This seminar will give a comprehensive overview of episodic memory research: what neuroimaging studies, patient studies, and animal models have taught us about how the brain creates, stores, and retrieves memories. 

Fall 2017: PSYC UN3445
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3445 001/83596 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Mariam Aly 4 12/12

PSYC UN3450 Evolution of Intelligence and Consciousness (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, and the instructor's permission.

A systematic review of the implications of Darwin's theory of evolution and Freud's theory of the unconscious for contemporary studies of animal and human cognition.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN3450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3450 001/77422 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Herbert Terrace 3 7/12

PSYC UN3470 Brain Evolution: Becoming Human (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two other psychology courses and the instructor's permission.

An investigation of the uniqueness of the human brain and human behavior from an evolutionary perspective.

PSYC UN3615 Children at Risk (Lecture). 4 points.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1010, PSYC W2280, PSYC W2620, or PSYC W2680, and the instructor's permission.

Considers contemporary risk factors in children's lives. The immediate and enduring biological and behavioral impact of risk factors.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN3615
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3615 001/83501  
4 0/40
Fall 2017: PSYC UN3615
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3615 001/69228 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Geraldine Downey 4 41/40

PSYC UN3625 Clinical Neuropsychology (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: an introductory course in neuroscience, like PSYC W1010 or PSYC W2450, and the instructor's permission.

Analysis of the assessment of physical and psychiatric diseases impacting the central nervous system, with emphasis on the relationship between neuropathology and cognitive and behavioral deficits.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN3625
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3625 001/67629 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
E'mett McCaskill 3 18/12

PSYC UN3690 The Self in Social Context (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or W1010, or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

This course centers on understanding the self embedded in the social context. We will integrate knowledge from various areas of psychology (developmental, cognitive, social cognition) with a main focus in social psychology. This course will provide the opportunity to gain an understanding of research in the following areas: the development of self in a social context, the relationship between the self and the broader socio-cultural context, the impact of self-involvement on social/cognitive processes, and contemporary research on individual differences.

Fall 2017: PSYC UN3690
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3690 001/22651 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Ljubica Chatman 4 0/12

PSYC UN3910 Honors Seminar. 1 point.

Year-long course. Students receive credit only after both terms have been completed. May be repeated for additional credit.

Prerequisites: open to students in the honors program only.

Discussion of a variety of topics in psychology, with particular emphasis on recent developments and methodological problems. Students propose and discuss special research topics.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN3910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3910 001/70493 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Kevin Ochsner 1 18/18
Fall 2017: PSYC UN3910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3910 001/16098 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Nim Tottenham 1 0

PSYC UN3920 Honors Research. 1-4 points.

May be repeated for additional credit.

Prerequisites: open to students in the honors program only.

Except by special permission of the director of undergraduate studies, no more than 4 points of individual research may be taken in any one term. This includes both PSYC W3950 and PSYC W3920. No more than 12 points of PSYC W3920 may be applied toward the honors program in psychology. Special research topics arranged with the instructors of the department leading toward a senior honors paper.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3920 001/64124  
Kevin Ochsner 1-4 18
Fall 2017: PSYC UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3920 001/65387  
1-4 0

PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research. 1-4 points.

May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Except by special permission of the director of undergraduate studies, no more than 4 points of individual research may be taken in any one term. This includes both PSYC W3950 and PSYC W3920. No more than 8 points of PSYC W3950 may be applied toward the psychology major, and no more than 4 points toward the concentration. Readings, special laboratory projects, reports, and special seminars on contemporary issues in psychological research and theory.

Spring 2017: PSYC UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3950 001/26782  
Niall Bolger 1-4 3
PSYC 3950 002/21616  
Frances Champagne 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 003/66740  
James Curley 1-4 4
PSYC 3950 004/13224  
Geraldine Downey 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 005/61010  
Norma Graham 1-4 1
PSYC 3950 006/73935  
Carl Hart 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 007/20428  
Larisa Heiphetz 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 008/68351  
Tory Higgins 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 009/73554  
Donald Hood 1-4 1
PSYC 3950 010/24616  
Sheena Iyengar 1-4 3
PSYC 3950 011/16151  
Leonard Matin 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 012/25826  
Janet Metcalfe 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 013/22802  
Walter Mischel 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 014/28489  
Michael Morris 1-4 1
PSYC 3950 015/68991  
Kevin Ochsner 1-4 1
PSYC 3950 016/27579  
Valerie Purdie-Vaughns 1-4 4
PSYC 3950 017/22762  
Lois Putnam 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 018/11768  
Daphna Shohamy 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 019/70614  
Rae Silver 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 020/73679  
Ursula Staudinger 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 021/72149  
Yaakov Stern 1-4 1
PSYC 3950 022/22110  
Kathleen Taylor 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 023/64635  
Herbert Terrace 1-4 3
PSYC 3950 024/65692  
Nim Tottenham 1-4 2
PSYC 3950 025/18935  
Elke Weber 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 026/68473  
Sarah Woolley 1-4 2
PSYC 3950 027/64494  
Caroline Marvin 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 028/98445  
Katherine Fox-Glassman 1-4 1
Fall 2017: PSYC UN3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3950 001/72650  
Mariam Aly 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 002/76521  
Niall Bolger 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 005/12518  
Geraldine Downey 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 006/16691  
Katherine Fox-Glassman 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 007/20489  
Norma Graham 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 008/13500  
Carl Hart 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 009/60996  
Larisa Heiphetz 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 010/62717  
Tory Higgins 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 011/66961  
Donald Hood 1-4 1
PSYC 3950 012/61655  
Sheena Iyengar 1-4 1
PSYC 3950 013/11783  
Caroline Marvin 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 014/27582  
Janet Metcalfe 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 016/74432  
Michael Morris 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 017/63876  
Kevin Ochsner 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 018/26684  
Valerie Purdie-Vaughns 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 019/17919  
Daphna Shohamy 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 020/23825  
Rae Silver 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 021/68817  
Ursula Staudinger 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 022/14366  
Yaakov Stern 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 023/20599  
Kathleen Taylor 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 024/16680  
Herbert Terrace 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 025/11115  
Nim Tottenham 1-4 0
PSYC 3950 026/62084  
Sarah Woolley 1-4 0

PSYC GU4222 The Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: courses in introductory psychology and cognitive psychology; and the instructor's permission.

Comprehensive overview of various conceptual and methodologic approaches to studying the cognitive neuroscience of aging. The course will emphasize the importance of combining information from cognitive experimental designs, epidemiologic studies, neuroimaging, and clinical neuropsychological approaches to understand individual differences in both healthy and pathological aging.

Fall 2017: PSYC GU4222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4222 001/72548 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Teal Eich, Stephanie Cosentino 4 6/12

PSYC GU4223 Memory and Executive Function Thru the Lifespan. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission, plus PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010, or the equivalent. Optimal preparation will include some background in experimental design and statistics.

Memory and executive processing are critical cognitive functions required for successfully navigating everyday life. In lifespan studies, both exhibit relatively long developmental trajectories followed by stasis and then relative decline in old age. Yet, neither memory nor executive function is a unitary construct. Rather, each is comprised of separable components that may show different developmental trajectories and declines or maintenance at older ages. Moreover, memory is malleable and is a reconstruction of past experience, not an exact reproduction. We will discuss a range of topics related to the development, maintenance and potential decline in memory and executive function from infancy through old age.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4223
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4223 001/19487 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
David Friedman 4 9/12

PSYC GU4235 Special Topics in Vision (Seminar). 3 points.

This course will be offered in Fall 2016. May be repeated for additional credit.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Please contact Prof. Graham by e-mail (nvg1@columbia.edu) if you are interested in this course.

Fall 2017: PSYC GU4235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4235 001/19428  
Norma Graham 3 0/12

PSYC GU4250 Evolution of Intelligence, Cognition, and Language (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010 or the equivalent, based on instructor assessment, plus one of the instructors' permission.

How did language evolve and why are human beings the only species to use language? How did the evolution of social intelligence, in particular, cooperation, set the stage for the origin of language and consciousness? We will explore how psychologists, philosophers, neuroscientists, anthropologists, biologists and computational scientists, among others, have collaborated during recent years to produce important insights in the evolution of intelligence, consciousness and language.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4250
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4250 001/66949 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Joshua New 3 10/12

PSYC GU4265 Auditory Perception. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1010 or equivalent; background in statistics/research methods recommended

How does the human brain make sense of the acoustic world? What aspects of auditory perception do humans share with other animals? How does the brain perform the computations necessary for skills such as sound
localization? How do we focus our auditory attention on one voice in a crowd? What acoustic cues are important for speech perception? How is music perceived? These are the types of questions we will address by studying
the basics of auditory perception from textbook readings and reviews, and reading classic and current literature
to understand scientific progress in the field today.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4265 001/27748 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Helen Brew 4 8/12

PSYC GU4270 Cognitive Processes (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: For undergraduates: one course in cognitive psychology or cognitive neuroscience, or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Metacognition and control processes in human cognition. Basic issues include the cognitive mechanisms that enable people to monitor what they know and predict what they will know, the errors and biases involved in self-monitoring, and the implications of metacognitive ability for people's self-determined learning, behavior, and their understanding of self.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4270
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4270 001/13050 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Janet Metcalfe 3 14/12

PSYC GU4280 Core Knowledge (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: For undergraduates: courses in introductory psychology, cognitive or developmental psychology, and the instructor's permission.

Core Knowledge explores the origins and development of knowledge in infants and children, with an additional emphasis on evolutionary cognition. In this course, we will examine evidence from cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, comparative psychology, neuroscience, and linguistics to look at the child's conception of objects, number, space, language, agency, morality and the social world. We will look at which aspects of knowledge are uniquely human, which are shared with other animals, and how this knowledge changes as children develop.

Fall 2017: PSYC GU4280
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4280 001/04090 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Koleen McCrink 4 8/10

PSYC GU4420 Animal Cognition (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: For undergraduates: the instructor's permission.

Seminar concerning a nonverbal animal's use of internal representations of past experience as a basis for action. Topics include how representations are formed, what aspects of experience are encoded, how information is stored, and how it is used later to guide behavior.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4420 001/14537 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Herbert Terrace 3 3/12

PSYC GU4430 Learning and the Brain (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: courses in introductory psychology and/or neuroscience, and the instructor's permission.

What are the neural mechanisms that support learning, memory, and choices? We will review current theories in the cognitive neuroscience of human learning, discuss how learning and decision making interact, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of two influential methods in the study of human brain and behavior--functional imaging and patient studies.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4430
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4430 001/64870 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Daphna Shohamy 4 15/12

PSYC GU4440 Topics in Neurobiology and Behavior (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines current topics in neurobiology and behavior.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4440
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4440 001/13619 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Svetlana Rosis 3 10/12
Fall 2017: PSYC GU4440
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4440 001/70177 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Svetlana Rosis 3 7/12
PSYC 4440 002/21875 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Helen Brew 3 0/12

PSYC GU4480 Psychobiology of Infant Development (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or W1010, a course in developmental psychology, and the instructor's permission.

The focus of the seminar is on human development during the fetal period and early infancy. We will examine the effects of environmental factors on perinatal perceptual, cognitive, sensory-­â€motor, and neurobehavioral capacities, with emphasis on critical conditions involved in both normal and abnormal brain development. Other topics include acute and long term effects of toxic exposures (stress, smoking, and alcohol) during pregnancy, and interaction of genes and the environment in shaping the developing brain of "high-risk" infants, including premature infants and those at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4480
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4480 001/60089 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
William Fifer 4 15/12

PSYC GU4486 Developmental and Affective Neuroscience (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: courses in developmental psychology, and either research methods or affective neuroscience, and the instructor's permission.

Introduction to leading theoretical perspectives employed by developmental psychologists in the study of affective neuroscience. Exploration of the developmental brain and behavior relationships in humans and animal models of typical and atypical emotional behavior, with a critical reading of recent research findings in the field.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4486
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4486 001/60990 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Nim Tottenham 4 19/12

PSYC GU4490 Inheritance (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: basic knowledge of biology and neuroscience recommended; the instructor's permission required.

Explores the concept of inheritance and the mechanisms through which inheritance is mediated. Will focus on the generational transmission of physiology and behavior, but will also consider the inheritance of culture and language.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4490 001/64524 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Frances Champagne 4 10/12

PSYC GU4498 Behavioral Epigenetics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: basic background in neurobiology (for instance PSYC W1010, W2450, W2460, W2480, and G4499) and the instructor's permission.

This course will provide an overview of the field of epigenetics, with an emphasis on epigenetic phenomena related to neurodevelopment, behavior and mental disorders. We will explore how epigenetic mechanisms can be mediators of environmental exposures and, as such, contribute to psychopathology throughout the life course. We will also discuss the implications of behavioral epigenetic research for the development of substantially novel pharmacotherapeutic approaches and preventive measures in psychiatry.

Fall 2017: PSYC GU4498
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4498 001/27253 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Catherine Pena 4 11/12

PSYC GU4615 The Psychology of Culture and Diversity (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission; some basic knowledge of social psychology is desirable.

A comprehensive examination of how culture and diversity shape psychological processes. The class will explore psychological and political underpinnings of culture and diversity, emphasizing social psychological approaches. Topics include culture and self, cuture and social cognition, group and identity formation, science of diversity, stereotyping, prejudice, and gender. Applications to real-world phenomena discussed.

Fall 2017: PSYC GU4615
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4615 001/67888 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Valerie Purdie-Vaughns 4 0/12

PSYC GU4635 The Unconscious Mind (Seminar). 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission; some basic knowledge of social psychology is desirable.

Discussion of the unconscious mind from the perspective of social cognition, with an emphasis on both theoretical and empirical background, as well as current issues in measuring automatic processing. Topics include: implicit memory systems; unconscious attitudes, goals and behavior, emotions, and decision making; the activation and deactivation of knowledge systems; and priming.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4635
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4635 001/61232 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Ran Hassin 4 12/12

PSYC GU4645 Culture, Motivation, and Prosocial Behavior. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Research Methods, Statistics, and Social Psychology, plus Instructor's Permission.

Reviews and integrates current research on three important topics of social psychology: culture, motivation, and prosocial behavior. Discussions and readings will cover theoretical principles, methodological approaches, and the intersection of these three topics. Students will write a personal research proposal based on the theories presented during the seminar.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4645
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4645 001/16037 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Svetlana Komissarouk 4 10/12
Fall 2017: PSYC GU4645
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4645 001/71069 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Svetlana Komissarouk 4 8/12

PSYC GU4672 Moral Psychology. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Two courses in psychology, including at least one course with a focus on social and/or developmental psychology, and permission of the instructor.

Review of theories and current research on moral cognition and behavior. Topics include definitions of morality, the development of moral cognition, the role that other aspects of human experience (e.g., emotion, intentions) play in moral judgments, and the relationship between moral psychology and other areas of study (e.g., religious cognition, prejudice and stereotyping, the criminal justice system).

Fall 2017: PSYC GU4672
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4672 001/13375 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Larisa Heiphetz 4 8/12

PSYC GU4682 FAQs about Life: Applications of Psychological Research to Everyday Experiences. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Two courses in psychology, with at least one focusing on statistics and/or research methods in psychology, and permission of the instructor.

Review of basic psychological research that is relevant to questions people frequently encounter during the course of everyday life. Potential topics for this seminar include research on decision-making, emotion, and/or interpersonal relationships.

Fall 2017: PSYC GU4682
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4682 001/83546 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
200c Schermerhorn Hall
Larisa Heiphetz 4 4/12

PSYC GU4685 Social Cognitive Neuroscience (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: for graduate students, course equivalents of at least two of the following courses: PSYC W1001, W1010, W2630, W3410, W3480, and W3485; and/or the instructor's permission.

An introduction to the emerging interdisciplinary field of social cognitive neuroscience, which examines topics traditionally of interest to social psychologists (including control and automaticity, emotion regulation, person perception, social cooperation) using methods traditionally employed by cognitive neuroscientists (functional neuroimaging, neuropsychological assessment).

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4685
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4685 001/74351 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Schermerhorn Hall
Kevin Ochsner 3 11/12

PSYC GU4690 Social Factors and Psychopathology (Seminar). 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Reviews and integrates current research on the role of social factors in psychopathology. The immediate and long-term effects of chronic and traumatic stressors originating outside the family (e.g., natural disasters, chronic poverty) and inside the family (e.g., family violence, divorce, parental psychopathology) on psychopathology.

Spring 2017: PSYC GU4690
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 4690 001/60635 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
200b Schermerhorn Hall
Geraldine Downey 3 35/30