Italian Cultural Studies

Departmental Office: 502 Hamilton; 212-854-2308
http://italian.columbia.edu/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Asst. Prof. Konstantina Zanou, 513 Hamilton; 212-854-0747; kz2269@columbia.edu

A major in Italian offers students the opportunity to study Italian literature and culture in an intimate, seminar setting with the close supervision of the department’s faculty. In addition, the prerequisite and corequisite sequence of language courses is designed to give students a command of written and spoken Italian.

Majors must complete 30 points and concentrators must complete 24 points. All majors and concentrators are required to take two semesters of Advanced Italian (ITAL UN3335 Advanced Italian-ITAL UN3336 Advanced Italian II: Italian Language Culture, ITAL UN3337 Advanced Italian Through Cinema, or ITAL UN3338 Italiana. Introduction to Italian Culture, the High, the Low, and the In-between) as well as one of the following two sequences:

  • Introduction to Italian Literature I and II (ITAL UN3333-ITAL UN3334) provides an overview of major authors and works in the Italian literary tradition from the Middle Ages to the present;
  • Italian Cultural Studies I and II (ITAL GU4502-ITAL GU4503) is an interdisciplinary investigation into Italian culture and society from national unification in 1860 to the present.

In consultation with the director of undergraduate studies, majors select six additional courses (concentrators select four additional courses) from the department’s 3000- or 4000-level offerings or from other humanities and social science departments with a focus on Italian culture. Students who have taken courses in Italian Literature, Italian History, and/or Italian Culture while abroad should consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to determine if the courses may be applicable to the major.

Highly motivated students have the opportunity to pursue a senior thesis under the guidance of a faculty adviser in an area of Italian literature or culture of their choosing. The senior thesis tutorial, ITAL UN3993 Senior Thesis/Tutorial, will count for 3 points.

Departmental courses taught entirely in English do not have linguistic prerequisites and students from other departments who have interests related to Italian culture are especially welcome to enroll.

Italian language instruction employs a communicative approach that integrates speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Courses make use of materials that help students to learn languages not just as abstract systems of grammar and vocabulary but as living cultures with specific content. Across the levels from elementary to advanced, a wide range of literary, cultural and multimedia materials, including books, film, and opera, supplement the primary course text.

The sequence in elementary and intermediate Italian enables students to fulfill the College’s foreign language requirement and thoroughly prepares them for advanced study of language and for literature courses taught in Italian. Specialized language courses allow students to develop their conversational skills.

For highly motivated students, the department offers intensive elementary and intensive intermediate Italian, both of which cover a full year of instruction in one semester. Courses in advanced Italian, although part of the requirements for a major or a concentration in Italian, are open to any qualified student whose main goal is to improve and perfect their competence in the language.

Outside the classroom, the Department of Italian organizes a weekly Caffè e conversazione where students at all levels can converse with fellow students and faculty members over Italian espresso and cookies. Students can also attend the Serata al cinema, Italian film viewings scheduled in the evening throughout the academic year, in which faculty and graduate students introduce each film and then conclude with a question and answer session. In addition, the student-run Società Italiana (culasocieta@gmail.com) organizes events such as pasta-making workshops, movie nights, and costume parties.

Advanced Placement

The department grants 3 credits for a score of 5 on the AP Italian Language exam, which satisfies the foreign language requirement. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of a 3000-level (or higher) course with a grade of B or higher. This course must be for at least 3 points of credit and be taught in Italian. Courses taught in English may not be used for language AP credit. The department grants 0 credits for a score of 4 on the AP Italian Language exam, but the foreign language requirement is satisfied.

Casa Italiana

A wide range of cultural programs are sponsored by the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, located in Casa Italiana. These programs, which include the activities of the Columbia Seminar on Modern Italian Studies and the Italian Academy Film Festival, enrich the learning experience of the student and offer opportunities to meet distinguished Italian and Italian-American visitors to the University. The Paterno book collection is housed in Butler Library and contains valuable resources on Italian literature and culture.

For inquiries into the department and its undergraduate and graduate degrees offered, please contact 212-854-2308 or italian@columbia.edu.

Language Resource Center

The Language Resource Center (LRC) provides resources for intensive practice in pronunciation, diction, and aural comprehension of some twenty-five modern languages. LRC exercises are closely coordinated with the classroom's work.

Coordinated tape programs and on-line audio are available and mandatory for students registered in elementary and intermediate Italian language courses. Taped exercises in pronunciation and intonation, as well as tapes of selected literary works, are also available to all students in Italian courses.

Electronic Classrooms

Language instruction courses meet at least once a week in a multimedia-equipped electronic classroom in order to facilitate exposure to Italian arts such as music, opera, and film, and for other pedagogical uses.

Departmental Honors

Majors in Italian literature or Italian cultural studies who wish to be considered for departmental honors in Italian must: (1) have at least a 3.6 GPA in their courses for the major; and (2) complete a senior thesis or tutorial and receive a grade of at least A- within the context of the course ITAL UN3993 Senior Thesis/Tutorial. Normally no more than one graduating senior receives departmental honors in a given academic year.

Professors

Teodolinda Barolini
Jo Ann Cavallo (Chair)
Elizabeth Leake

Associate Professor

Nelson Moe (Barnard)

Assistant Professor

Pier Mattia Tommasino (on leave 2016-17)
Konstantia Zanou

Senior Lecturers

  • Maria Luisa Gozzi
  • Carol Rounds (Hungarian)
  • Barbara Spinelli

Lecturers

  • Felice Italo Beneduce
  • Federica Franze
  • Patrizia Palumbo
  • Alessandra Saggin

Guidelines for all Italian Majors and Concentrators

The courses in the Department of Italian are designed to develop the student’s proficiency in all the language skills and to present the literary and cultural traditions of Italy. The program of study is to be planned as early as possible with the director of undergraduate studies. Students are advised to meet with the director of undergraduate studies each semster in order to obtain program approval.

For students with no knowledge of Italian, the required language course sequence is:

ITAL UN1101
 - ITAL UN1102
Elementary Italian I
and Elementary Italian II
ITAL UN2101
 - ITAL UN2102
Intermediate Italian I
and Intermediate Italian II

For students planning to enroll in Intensive Italian courses, a minimum of three semesters of Italian language instruction is required, such as:

ITAL UN1121
 - ITAL UN2101
 - ITAL UN2102
Intensive Elementary Italian
and Intermediate Italian I
and Intermediate Italian II
ITAL UN1101
 - ITAL UN1102
 - ITAL UN1203
Elementary Italian I
and Elementary Italian II
and Intensive Intermediate Italian
ITAL UN1121
 - ITAL UN1203
Intensive Elementary Italian
and Intensive Intermediate Italian
And one of the following courses:
ITAL UN3335Advanced Italian
ITAL UN3336Advanced Italian II: Italian Language & Culture
ITAL UN3337Advanced Italian Through Cinema
ITAL UN3338Italiana. Introduction to Italian Culture, the High, the Low, and the In-between

Italian language proficiency equivalent to the elementary and intermediate sequence may be demonstrated by the departmental placement test, offered before the start of every semester; with a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination; or with a score of 780 or higher on the SAT II Subject Test in Italian.

As noted above, courses given entirely in English do not have linguistic prerequisites; students planning a major in Italian may enroll in such courses before completing the language prerequisite for the major or concentration.


Major in Italian

Please read Guidelines for all Italian Majors and Concentrators above.

Requirements

The major in Italian literature requires a minimum of 30 points in Italian courses numbered above the intermediate level, i.e., above ITAL UN2121, to include the following:

Two semesters of Advanced Italian
ITAL UN3335
 - ITAL UN3336
Advanced Italian
and Advanced Italian II: Italian Language & Culture
Two semesters of Italian Literature
ITAL UN3333
 - ITAL UN3334
Introduction To Italian Literature, I
and Introduction To Italian Literature, II
- OR -
Two Semesters of Italian Culture
ITAL GU4502
 - ITAL GU4503
Italian Cultural Studies I: From Unification to World War I
and Italian Cultural Studies II: From World War I to the Present
Additional Courses
Select at least two other courses from the department's GU4000-level courses.
In consultation with the director of undergraduate studies, the remaining courses may be selected from the department's 3000- or 4000-level offerings or from other humanities and social science departments with a focus on Italian literature or culture.
ITAL UN3993Senior Thesis/Tutorial (or another course in Italian literature or culture)

Native speakers and students with superior proficiency (as demonstrated by a departmental exam) may replace the Advanced Italian sequence with six points of Italian literature courses of their choice.

Period Distribution

At least two courses that cover material before 1700 and two courses that cover material after 1700.



Concentration in Italian

Please read Guidelines for all Italian Majors and Concentrators above.

Requirements

The concentration in Italian literature requires a minimum of 24 points in Italian courses numbered above the intermediate level, i.e., above ITAL UN2121, to include the following:

Two semesters of Advanced Italian
ITAL UN3335
 - ITAL UN3336
Advanced Italian
and Advanced Italian II: Italian Language & Culture
or ITAL UN3337 Advanced Italian Through Cinema
or ITAL UN3338 Italiana. Introduction to Italian Culture, the High, the Low, and the In-between
Two semesters of Italian Literature
ITAL UN3333
 - ITAL UN3334
Introduction To Italian Literature, I
and Introduction To Italian Literature, II
- OR -
Two Semesters of Italian Culture
ITAL GU4502
 - ITAL GU4503
Italian Cultural Studies I: From Unification to World War I
and Italian Cultural Studies II: From World War I to the Present
Additional Courses
Select at least two other courses from the department's GU4000-level courses.
In consultation with the director of undergraduate studies, the remaining courses may be selected from the department's 3000- or 4000-level offerings or from other humanities and social science departments with a focus on Italian literature or culture.

Italian Courses

ITAL UN1101 Elementary Italian I. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Same course as ITAL V1101-V1102.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1101 001/16657 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Alessandra Saggin 4 12/16
ITAL 1101 002/71300 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
509 Hamilton Hall
Umberto Mazzei 4 8/16
Fall 2017: ITAL UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1101 001/26813 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
511 Kent Hall
Alex Cuadrado 4 11/16
ITAL 1101 002/73498 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
313 Hamilton Hall
Tylar Colleluori 4 15/16
ITAL 1101 003/10758 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Claudia Sbuttoni 4 10/16
ITAL 1101 004/17673 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
404 Hamilton Hall
Isabella Livorni 4 9/16
ITAL 1101 005/66836 M T W Th 12:10pm - 1:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Catherine Bloomer 4 14/16
ITAL 1101 006/13089 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Christina Mcgrath 4 13/16
ITAL 1101 007/22011 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Marco Sartore 4 6/16
ITAL 1101 008/63470 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Patrizia Palumbo 4 16/16

ITAL UN1102 Elementary Italian II. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1101 or the equivalent.

Introduction to Italian grammar, with emphasis on reading, writing, listening and speaking skills.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1102 001/62561 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
507 Hamilton Hall
Felice Beneduce 4 10/16
ITAL 1102 002/68396 M T W Th 9:00am - 9:50am
509 Hamilton Hall
Claudia Sbuttoni 4 13/16
ITAL 1102 003/17945 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
607 Hamilton Hall
Felice Beneduce 4 9/16
ITAL 1102 004/75611 M T W Th 12:10pm - 1:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Lorenzo Mecozzi 4 9/16
ITAL 1102 005/25068 M T W Th 1:00pm - 1:50pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Christina Mcgrath 4 14/16
ITAL 1102 006/70616 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
502b Hamilton Hall
Felice Beneduce 4 2/16
ITAL 1102 007/28406 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Nicole Kiviat 4 14/16
ITAL 1102 008/76474 M T W Th 12:00pm - 12:50pm
A36 Union Theological Seminary
Beatrice Mazzi 4 4/16
Fall 2017: ITAL UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1102 001/71728 M T W Th 9:00am - 9:50am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Margaret Scarborough 4 1/16
ITAL 1102 002/12675 M T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Alessandra Saggin 4 7/16

ITAL UN1112 Elementary Conversation II. 2 points.

Prerequisites: Sufficient fluency to satisfy the instructor. Recommended corequisite courses: UN1101-1102 or UN1121

Intensive practice in pronunciation, vocabulary, comprehension of the spoken language, and conversation. Conversation courses may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or fulfill major or concentration requirements.

ITAL UN1121 Intensive Elementary Italian. 6 points.

Limited enrollment.

No previous knowledge of Italian required. An intensive course that covers two semesters of elementary Italian in one, and prepares students to move into Intermediate Italian. Grammar, reading, writing, and conversation. May be used to fulfill the language requirement only if followed by an additional two (2) semesters of Italian language. ITAL V1201x-V1202y, or ITALV1203y and ITAL V3333, V3334, V3335, or V3336, for a total of three(3) semesters of Italian Language.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1121 001/62442 T Th F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Barbara Spinelli 6 9/16
Fall 2017: ITAL UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1121 001/12635 T Th F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Barbara Spinelli 6 9/16

ITAL UN1201 Intermediate Italian I. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or W1102, or the equivalent. If you did not take Elementary Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

Same course as ITAL V1201-V1202.

ITAL V1201 Intermediate Italian I. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or W1102, or the equivalent. If you did not take Elementary Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

A review of grammar, intensive reading, composition, and practice in conversation. Exploration of literary and cultural material. Lab: hours to be arranged.

ITAL W1201 Intermediate Italian I. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or W1102, or the equivalent. If you did not take Elementary Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

Same course as ITAL V1201-V1202.

ITAL V1202 Intermediate Italian II. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1201 or W1201, or the equivalent. If you did not take Elementary Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

A review of grammar, intensive reading, composition, and practice in conversation. Exploration of literary and cultural material. Lab: hours to be arranged. ITAL V1202 fulfils the basic foreign language requirement and prepares students for advanced study in Italian language and literature.

ITAL W1202 Intermediate Italian II. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1201 or W1201, or the equivalent. If you did not take Elementary Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

Same course as ITAL V1201-V1202.

ITAL UN1203 Intensive Intermediate Italian. 6 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or the equivalent, with a grade of B+ or higher.

An intensive course that covers two semesters of intermediate Italian in one, and prepares students for advanced language and literature study. Grammar, reading, writing, and conversation. Exploration of literary and cultural materials. This course may be used to fulfill the language requirement if preceded by both V1101 and V1102. Students who wish to use this course for the language requirement, and previously took Intensive Elementary, are also required to take at least one of the following: ITAL V3333, V3334, V3335, or V3336, for a total of three (3) semesters of Italian Language.

Fall 2017: ITAL UN1203
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1203 001/24761 M T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
522a Kent Hall
Maria Luisa Gozzi 6 6/16

ITAL W1204 Rapid Reading and Translation. 3 points.

Restricted to graduate students.

Primarily for graduate students and others who need to develop their reading knowledge of Italian. Grammar and vocabulary review; practice in reading and translating Italian from a variety of fields, including literature, art history, and political science, depending on the needs of the students. No previous knowledge of Italian is required. Note: this course may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or to fulfill major or concentration requirements.

ITAL UN1221 Intermediate Conversation. 2 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL W1112 or sufficient fluency to satisfy the instructor.
Corequisites: Recommended: ITAL V1201-V/W1202 or ITAL W1201-W1202.

Conversation courses may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or fulfill major or concentration requirements. Intensive practice in the spoken language, assigned topics for class discussions, and oral reports.

Fall 2017: ITAL UN1221
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1221 001/29114 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Barbara Spinelli 2 7/16

ITAL UN1222 Intermediate Conversation II. 2 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL W1221 or sufficient fluency to satisfy the instructor.
Corequisites: Recommended: ITAL V1201-V/W1202 or ITAL W1201-W1202.

Conversation courses may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or fulfill major or concentration requirements. Intensive practice in the spoken language, assigned topics for class discussions, and oral reports.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN1222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1222 001/73950 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
507 Hamilton Hall
Barbara Spinelli 2 5/16

ITAL V1231 Intermediate Italian I With Opera: Italian for Opera Lovers. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or the equivalent.

A review of grammar, extensive reading, composition, and practice, with masterpieces of Italian opera providing a context for language study and practice on the intermediate level.  No specialized musical knowledge is required. This course is the equivalent of the sequence ITAL V1201-V1202 and covers the same grammatical material.

ITAL V1232 Intermediate Italian II With Opera: Italian for Opera Lovers. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or the equivalent.

A review of grammar, extensive reading, composition, and practice, with masterpieces of Italian opera providing a context for language study and practice on the intermediate level.  No specialized musical knowledge is required. This course is the equivalent of the sequence ITAL V1201-V1202 and covers the same grammatical material.

ITAL V1301 Accelerated Elementary Italian I. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: completion of the language requirement, knowledge of another Romance language, and the department's permission.

Two-semester course is recommended for students who have already completed the language requirement in another language and can acquire Italian at a faster pace than the ITAL V1101-V1102/W1101-W1102 sequence. Covers the equivalent of a full year of first-year Italian grammar and then moves on to intensive writing and to reading literary texts in Italian. Students who wish to further their studies in Italian may continue on to ITAL V1201-V1202/W1201-W1202.

ITAL V1302 Accelerated Elementary Italian II. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: completion of the language requirement, knowledge of another Romance language, and the department's permission.

Two-semester course is recommended for students who have already completed the language requirement in another language and can acquire Italian at a faster pace than the ITAL V1101-V1102/W1101-W1102 sequence. Covers the equivalent of a full year of first-year Italian grammar and then moves on to intensive writing and to reading literary texts in Italian. Students who wish to further their studies in Italian may continue on to ITAL V1201-V1202/W1201-W1202.

ITAL UN1311 Advanced Conversation. 2 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL W1222 or sufficient fluency to satisfy the instructor.
Corequisites: Recommended: ITAL V3335x-V3336y.

Conversation courses may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or fulfill major or concentration requirements. Practice in the spoken language through assigned topics on contemporary Italian culture.

Fall 2017: ITAL UN1311
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1311 001/73692 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Patrizia Palumbo 2 6/16

ITAL UN1312 Advanced Conversation II. 2 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL W1311 Or sufficient fluency to satisfy the instructor.

Conversation courses may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or fulfill major or concentration requirements. Practice in the spoken language through assigned topics on contemporary Italian culture.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN1312
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1312 001/27335 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Federica Franze 2 14/16

ITAL UN2101 Intermediate Italian I. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or W1102, or the equivalent. If you did not take Elementary Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

A review of grammar, intensive reading, composition, and practice in conversation. Exploration of literary and cultural material. Lab: hours to be arranged.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 2101 001/17439 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
511 Hamilton Hall
Federica Franze 4 6/16
ITAL 2101 002/77292 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
613 Hamilton Hall
Federica Franze 4 11/16
Fall 2017: ITAL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 2101 001/69513 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
511 Hamilton Hall
Luca Naponiello 4 3/16
ITAL 2101 002/13056 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
507 Hamilton Hall
Alessandra Saggin 4 12/16
ITAL 2101 003/61087 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
511 Hamilton Hall
Federica Franze 4 8/16
ITAL 2101 004/71804 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Lorenzo Mecozzi 4 9/16
ITAL 2101 005/61287 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Nicole Kiviat 4 9/16
ITAL 2101 006/21458 M T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Alessandra Saggin 4 7/16

ITAL UN2102 Intermediate Italian II. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1201 or W1201, or the equivalent. If you did not take Elementary Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

A review of grammar, intensive reading, composition, and practice in conversation. Exploration of literary and cultural material. Lab: hours to be arranged. ITAL V1202 fulfils the basic foreign language requirement and prepares students for advanced study in Italian language and literature.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 2102 001/16526 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
315 Hamilton Hall
Alessandra Saggin 4 7/16
ITAL 2102 002/68181 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
511 Hamilton Hall
Alessandra Saggin 4 6/16
ITAL 2102 003/73027 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Patrizia Palumbo 4 8/16
ITAL 2102 004/20976 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Patrizia Palumbo 4 10/16
ITAL 2102 005/63433 F 10:10am - 11:25am
507 Hamilton Hall
Massimiliano Delfino 4 1/16
ITAL 2102 005/63433 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
323a Thompson Hall (Tc)
Massimiliano Delfino 4 1/16
ITAL 2102 006/26645 M T W Th 5:10pm - 6:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Carlo Arrigoni 4 16/16
Fall 2017: ITAL UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 2102 001/73978 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
509 Hamilton Hall
Felice Beneduce 4 9/16
ITAL 2102 002/17047 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
509 Hamilton Hall
Beatrice Mazzi 4 8/16

ITAL UN2121 Intensive Intermediate Italian. 6 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1102 or the equivalent, with a grade of B+ or higher.

An intensive course that covers two semesters of intermediate Italian in one, and prepares students for advanced language and literature study. Grammar, reading, writing, and conversation. Exploration of literary and cultural materials. This course may be used to fulfill the language requirement if preceded by both V1101 and V1102. Students who wish to use this course for the language requirement, and previously took Intensive Elementary, are also required to take at least one of the following: ITAL V3333, V3334, V3335, or V3336, for a total of three (3) semesters of Italian Language.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN2121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 2121 001/29344 T Th F 10:00am - 11:50am
501 Hamilton Hall
Maria Luisa Gozzi 6 2/16

ITAL UN2221 Intermediate Conversation. 2 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL W1112 or sufficient fluency to satisfy the instructor.
Corequisites: Recommended: ITAL V1201-V/W1202 or ITAL W1201-W1202.

Conversation courses may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or fulfill major or concentration requirements. Intensive practice in the spoken language, assigned topics for class discussions, and oral reports.

ITAL V3101 Advanced Italian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: V1201-V1202 or equivalent.

Written and oral self-expression in Italian; brief papers and oral reports on a variety of topics, including films and literature; grammar review.

ITAL V3102 Advanced Italian II: Italian Language & Culture. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL V3335.

Advanced reading, writing, speaking with emphasis on authentic cultural materials. Topic and semester theme varies.

ITAL V3103 Advanced Italian Through Cinema. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: ITAL V3335.

Students will develop advanced language competence while analyzing and discussing Italian film comedies and their reflection of changing Italian culture and society. Films by Monicelli, Germi, Moretti, Wertmuller, Soldini and others.

ITAL V3235 The Representation of Women In Medieval and Modern Italian Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of the image of women and the forms of their representation in Italian literary production. Issues such as exemplarity, gender construction, and the sociopolitical influences on writing will be discussed in light of works by 14th- and 20th-century authors.

ITAL UN3311 Advanced Conversation. 2 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL UN2222 or sufficient fluency to satisfy the instructor.
Corequisites: Recommended: ITAL V3335x-V3336y.

Conversation courses may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or fulfill major or concentration requirements. Practice in the spoken language through assigned topics on contemporary Italian culture.

ITAL UN3333 Introduction To Italian Literature, I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Italian II ITAL UN2102 or the equivalent.

UN3334x-UN3333y is the basic course in Italian literature.

,

UN3333: This course, entirely taught in Italian, introduces you to Medieval and early modern Italian literature. It will give you the opportunity to test your ability as a close-reader and discover unusual and fascinating texts that tell us about the polycentric richness of the Italian peninsula. We will read poems, tales, letters, fiction and non-fiction, travel writings and political pamphlets. The great “Three Crowns” - Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio -  as well as renowned Renaissance authors such as Ludovico Ariosto and Niccolò Machiavelli, will show us the main path to discover Italian masterpieces and understand the European Renaissance. But we will also explore China with Marco Polo and the secrets of the Medieval soul diving into the mystical poems by Jacopone da Todi. We will study parody and laughter through the “poesia giocosa” (parodic poetry) by Cecco Angiolieri and the legacy of Humanism through the letters of Poggio Bracciolini. This first overview will allow you to explore Italian literature from its complex and multicultural beginnings to its diffusion across Europe during the Renaissance.

Fall 2017: ITAL UN3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3333 001/25274 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
305 Union Theological Seminary
Pier Mattia Tommasino 3 5/18

ITAL UN3334 Introduction To Italian Literature, II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1202 or W1202 or the equivalent.

V3334x-V3333y is the basic course in Italian literature. V3334: Authors and works from the Cinquecento to the present. Taught in Italian.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN3334
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3334 001/21701 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
509 Hamilton Hall
Lynn MacKenzie 3 6/18

ITAL UN3335 Advanced Italian. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL V1202 or W1202 or the equivalent. If you did not take Intermediate Italian at Columbia in the semester preceding the current one, you must take the placement test, offered by the Italian Department at the beginning of each semester.

Written and oral self-expression in compositions and oral reports on a variety of topics; grammar review.  Required for majors and concentrators.

Fall 2017: ITAL UN3335
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3335 001/69255 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Felice Beneduce 3 10/16

ITAL UN3336 Advanced Italian II: Italian Language & Culture. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL V3335

Advanced reading, writing, speaking with emphasis on authentic cultural materials. Topic and semester theme varies.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN3336
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3336 001/16111 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Patrizia Palumbo 3 3/16

ITAL UN3337 Advanced Italian Through Cinema. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: ITAL V3335.

Students will develop advanced language competence while analyzing and discussing Italian film comedies and their reflection of changing Italian culture and society. Films by Monicelli, Germi, Moretti, Wertmuller, Soldini and others.

Fall 2017: ITAL UN3337
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3337 001/29569 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
522b Kent Hall
Federica Franze 3 4/16

ITAL UN3338 Italiana. Introduction to Italian Culture, the High, the Low, and the In-between. 3 points.

"Italiana. Introduction to Italian Culture, the High, the Low, and the In-between" aims at expanding the students' knowledge of Italian culture and improving and refining their language skills, through writing, reading, speaking, and listening. This is a content based course in which the students familiarize with the most crucial moments of Italian history and are exposed to the issues that are currently debated in Italy, such as national identity, immigration, emigration, homoparental family, and the truthfulness or deceptiveness of the brand Made in Italy. Naturally, considerable attention is given to the distinctive geographical, economical, and cultural traits of Italian regions and their cities. The students apply their communicative skills in Italian by conversing with the Italian students currently registered at Columbia University and by conducting interviews within New York's Italian communities on the subjects studied and discussed in class.

ITAL V3338 Italiana. Introduction to Italian Culture, the High, the Low, and the In-between. 3 points.

"Italiana. Introduction to Italian Culture, the High, the Low, and the In-between" aims at expanding the students' knowledge of Italian culture and improving and refining their language skills, through writing, reading, speaking, and listening. This is a content based course in which the students familiarize with the most crucial moments of Italian history and are exposed to the issues that are currently debated in Italy, such as national identity, immigration, emigration, homoparental family, and the truthfulness or deceptiveness of the brand Made in Italy. Naturally, considerable attention is given to the distinctive geographical, economical, and cultural traits of Italian regions and their cities. The students apply their communicative skills in Italian by conversing with the Italian students currently registered at Columbia University and by conducting interviews within New York's Italian communities on the subjects studied and discussed in class.

ITAL W3480 Italian Renaissance Epic and Its Classical Heritage. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Close analysis of selected episodes from Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato, Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, and Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata, that are creative rewritings of episodes in Homer, Virgil, and Ovid.  In addition to discussing how the Renaissance poets create meaning in relation to their classical counterparts, we will look at such issues as gender and ethnicity, ethics and allegory, and politics and ideology.  In English.

ITAL UN3590 Anatomy of Fantastic Fiction: The Uncanny, the Monstrous and the Other in Modern and Contemporary Italy. 3 points.

What is a fantastic text and what renders it "scandalous" (R. Caillois)? How do nineteenth-century fantastic tropes and motifs survive in present-day narratives? What assumptions about "real" and "reality" do they reveal? How can fantastic representations of the inexplicable, supernatural and inhuman shape and enrich our understanding of the human mind and the world around us? And finally, why are we so fascinated by that which frightens us? In this course, we will address these and many other questions by looking at short stories, films, TV shows and comic books from the Italian and other traditions, from the 19th century to the present day. The course will be loosely chronological, but will be based mainly around thematic units. Through a comparative approach, we will explore the relationship between the fantastic mode and notions such as the uncanny, the repressed and the unconscious. We will look at our primary texts through an interdisciplinary lens spanning literary theory and genre studies to psychoanalysis and reader-response theory. Some primary texts are only available in Italian; however, accommodations can be made for non- Italian speakers.

Spring 2017: ITAL UN3590
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3590 001/83279 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
608 Lewisohn Hall
Irene Bulla 3 7/15

ITAL UN3642 Road Trips: Travel in Italian Cinema. 3 points.

This course meets Wednesdays from 6:10-10:00 in 225 Milbank Hall.

Explores the representation of national identity in Italian cinema from the Facist era to the present. Examines how both geography and history are used to construct an image of Italy and the Italians. Special focus on the cinematic representation of travel and journeys between North and South. Films by major neo-realist directors (Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti) as well as by leading contemporaries (Moretti, Amelio).

Fall 2017: ITAL UN3642
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3642 001/02651 W 6:10pm - 10:00pm
225 Milbank Hall
Nelson Moe 3 6/25

ITAL UN3645 Grand Tour in Italy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Note: Italian is the language of instruction.

Course Description


            This course proposes a virtual tour of the country’s most famous sites, looking at the ways in which what is local and peculiar, diverse and marginal, contributes its distinctive style and character to the overall unity and uniqueness of Italy.  Each week we consider a different aspect of Italy’s richness and variety: from the evolution of its language/s and dialects to its humor; its art and landscapes; the music from ancient times to current pop songs; its cinema and web serials, its cuisine, the contributions of migrants, and much more.


            The course is highly interdisciplinary and will assist students in the development of their linguistic and cultural skills, while tracing the origins of most mainstream Italian cultural phenomena, and imparting an awareness of modern Italy's multiculturalism. 



Fall 2017: ITAL UN3645
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 3645 001/96896 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
404 Hamilton Hall
Maria Luisa Gozzi 3 4/20

ITAL V3650 Italian Theatre Practicum. 3 points.

May be repeated for credit; content varies.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Students study and discuss in depth a major Italian play that they will collectively perform at the conclusion of the semester. Particular attention to grammar, pronunciation, meaning of the play, character exploration, and acting techniques. All classes and conversations are conducted in Italian.

ITAL UN3993 Senior Thesis/Tutorial. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the faculty adviser's permission.

Senior thesis or tutorial project consisting of independent scholarly work in an area of study of the student’s choosing, under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

ITAL V3993 Senior Thesis/Tutorial. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the faculty adviser's permission.

Senior thesis or tutorial project consisting of independent scholarly work in an area of study of the student’s choosing, under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

ITAL GU4000 Research In the Humanities: a Practicum On Resources and Methods. 1.5 point.

Introduction to bibliographic resources and their organization in both printed and electronic formats that are fundamental to advanced research.

ITAL G4000 Research In the Humanities: a Practicum On Resources and Methods. 1.5 point.

Introduction to bibliographic resources and their organization in both printed and electronic formats that are fundamental to advanced research.

ITAL W4000 Stylistics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ITAL V3336 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission.

Students read short texts, analyze the anatomy of an Italian essay, observe and practice sophisticated sentence structures, solidify their knowledge and usage of Italian grammar, and expand their vocabulary. After discussing and analyzing examples of contemporary prose, students will integrate the structures and vocabulary they have acquired into their own writing.

ITAL GU4005 Rapid Reading and Translation. 3 points.

Restricted to graduate students.

For graduate students and others who need to develop their reading knowledge of Italian. Open to undergraduate students as well, who want a compact survey/review of Italian structures and an approach to translation. Grammar, syntax, and vocabulary review; practice in reading and translating Italian texts of increasing complexity from a variety of fields, depending on the needs of the students. No previous knowledge of Italian is required. Note: this course may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or to fulfill major or concentration requirements.

ITAL G4005 Italian Lyric Poetry I. 3 points.

May be repeated for credit; content varies.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Developments and trends from the Duecento to our time; in-depth textual analysis of representative texts.

ITAL W4005 Rapid Reading and Translation. 3 points.

Restricted to graduate students.

Primarily for graduate students and others who need to develop their reading knowledge of Italian. Grammar and vocabulary review; practice in reading and translating Italian from a variety of fields, including literature, art history, and political science, depending on the needs of the students. No previous knowledge of Italian is required. Note: this course may not be used to satisfy the language requirement or to fulfill major or concentration requirements.

ITAL G4006 Italian Lyric Poetry II. 3 points.

May be repeated for credit; content varies.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Developments and trends from the Duecento to our time; in-depth textual analysis of representative texts.

ITAL G4009 Development of the Italian Language. 3 points.

The external history and internal development of the Italian language from its origins to the present.

ITAL G4010 Italian Travel Literature to Jerusalem, Egypt and Asia (13th-17th c.). 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: knowledge of Italian.

The seminar offers an interdisciplinary analysis of several travellogues to the Middle East and beyond, written in Italian between the 13th and the 17th century. Using this approach, perspective, and secondary readings from the field of literary criticism and textual bibliography - and with the addition of many interdisciplianry readings - we will discuss the role of Italy and the Italian language in the making of a transnational literary genre.

ITAL W4012 The Theory and Practice of Writing: Laboratorio di scrittura. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Development of advanced reading and conversational skills. Close reading and extensive practice writing in a variety of genres which will include: the letter, the diary, the essay, the critical review, and will focus especially on the composition of short stories and vignettes. In Italian.

ITAL G4015 Italian Food in a Globalized World. 3 points.

This seminar examines the many meanings of food in Italian culture and tradition; how values and peculiarities are transmitted, preserved, reinvented and rethought through a lens that is internationally known as “Made in Italy”; how the symbolic meanings and ideological interpretations are connected to creation, production, presentation, distribution, and consumption of food. Based on an anthropological perspective and framework, this interdisciplinary course will analyze ways in which we can understand the ‘Italian taste’ through the intersections of many different levels: political, economic, aesthetic, symbolic, religious, etc. The course will study how food can help us understand the ways in which tradition and innovation, creativity and technology, localism and globalization, identity and diversity, power and body, are elaborated and interpreted in contemporary Italian society, in relation to the European context and a globalized world. Short videos that can be watched on the computer and alternative readings for those fluent in Italian will be assigned. In English.

ITAL G4018 Renaissance Italy and the Ottoman Empire. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The main focus of this seminar is the analysis and the discussion of a specific Renaissance literary genre. The turcica were texts on the Turks and the Ottoman Empire written approximately between the Conquest of Constantinople (1453) and the battle of Vienna (1683). The genre includes military reports, histories, and genealogies of the Ottoman empire, ethnographic accounts and polemical pamphlets. Through an in-depth analysis of primary source, we will discuss the role of the Ottoman Empire in the self-definition of European identity, with a particular interest in the Italian historians and orientalists. PDFs or photocopies of the texts will be distributed one week before each class meeting so that students may prepare them for discussion.

ITAL W4018 The Theory and Practice of Writing II: Laboratorio di Traduzione. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Experiments and analyses of translations, especially from literary texts, from English into Italian and from Italian into English. Classroom discussion of aspects of the translation process, and of the general interpretation of the translated texts. Each student will keep a "Translation Notebook." In Italian

ITAL G4019 Italian Histories, Italian Stories: Stendhal, Sciascia and microhistory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Between 1960 and 1980 Leonardo Sciascia and Italian micro historians reflected extensively on the relation between history and fiction. How did they relate with 19th-century historical fiction? How did they use fiction and non-fiction as hermeneutical tools to understand Italian past, and especially Early Modern Italy? How did Carlo Ginzburg and Leonardo Sciascia read Stendhal? And what did Sciascia find in Natalie Zemon Davis' books? Why should we return to these texts while leading historians are going against micro history? Are micro history and global history compatible? We will probe these questions of large import for both literary historians and historians through an examination of historical non-fictions (many Sciascia's inchieste), and the masterpieces of Italian and American micro history. Topics include popular culture, the Inquisition, the role of justice in Italian culture, popular culture and philology, and the relation between 16th-century Italy and the global world.

ITAL W4020 Mediterranean contacts, Mediterranean conflicts. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Was Dante influenced by Arabic literature? And what about Petrarch? What can we learn about the problem of salvation in three Faiths reading Boccaccio? Which Saladin did Paolo Giovio choose for his Renaissance gallery of portraits? This course proposes a new approach to Medieval and Early Modern Italian Literature. We will read classics of Italian Literature, such as Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio, focusing on historical and religious issues such as exile and translation or trans-confessional nobility. This course will give you insight into and philological tools to engage in the current debate about religions of the Mediterranean. We will analyze primary sources such as Dante’s Comedy, Boccaccio’s Decameron and Massuccio’s novelle, with the aim to discuss scholarly works about Christian and Muslim interactions, tolerance and salvation, and anti-Judaism.

ITAL GU4022 The Qur'an in Europe. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Is the Qur’an translatable? Was the Qur’an translated? Are non Arabic-speaking Muslims allowed to translate the Qur’an? And what about non-Muslims? Did Muslims and non-Muslims collaborate in translating the text of the Qur’an into Latin and European vernaculars? This course focuses on the long history of the diffusion of the Qur’an, the Scripture of the Muslims, and one of the most important texts in the history of humanity. We will focus on reading and translation practices of the Qur’an in Europe and the Mediterranean, from the Middle Ages to the contemporary world. We will explore how European Muslims, such as Iberian moriscos, European Jews, as well as Orthodox, Protestants and Catholics read, copied, collected, translated and printed the Qur’an. We will also explore why the Qur’an was confuted, forbidden, burned and even eaten, drunk and worn along eight centuries of the history of Europe. This long excursus, based on a close reading of the Qur’an and on the discussion of the major themes this close reading proposes, will help us to understand the role of Islam and its revelation in the formation of European societies and cultures.  

Fall 2017: ITAL GU4022
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4022 001/63007 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
233 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Pier Mattia Tommasino 3 31/45

ITAL G4030 Tasso. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: reading knowledge of Italian.

Tasso as a poet and literary theorist through an analysis of Rinaldo, Aminta and Gerusalemme Liberata and discussion of Dialoghi. Emphasis on epic and pastoral precedents, contemporary philosophical currents, the moral and political influence of the Counter Reformation.

ITAL W4030 Tasso. 3 points.

A close reading of Tasso's Rinaldo, Aminta, Gerusalemme Liberata, and Discorsi. Emphasis on epic and romance antecedents, contemporary philosophical currents, ideological and political pressures.   In English, with texts in Italian, but non-Italianists may read the texts in translation

ITAL W4039 Imitation and Innovation In Italian Renaissance Theatre. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: knowledge of Italian.

A study of several 16th-century Italian plays, focussing on comedy, but also exploring tragedy, favola, pastoral, and tragicommedia. Plays by Bernardo Dovizi da Bibbiena, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Bruno, Aretino, Trissino, Tasso, and Guarini.

ITAL G4042 Allegorical Fiction of the Italian Renaissance and Its Classical and Medieval Heritage. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The evolution of the allegorical literary tradition from the classical and medieval periods to its development in Italian Renaissance fiction. Allegorical commentaries of the Aenid, the Roman de la Rose, Petrarch’s Trionfi, Boccaccio's Amorosa visione, Poliziano’s Stanze, selections of Boiardo’s Orlando Innamorato and Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, and Machiavelli’s Asino d’oro.

ITAL GU4043 Italian Renaissance Literature and Culture. 3 points.

This course on Italian Renaissance literature and culture will pay special attention to the crossing of boundaries, whether socio-cultural, religious, linguistic, gendered, ethnic, or strictly geographical, in a range of fourteenth- to early seventeenth-century texts in a variety of genres, including travelogue, chivalric epic poetry, comedy, dialogues, and the novella, as well as political, philosophical, and scientific writing. Authors covered include Marco Polo, Leonardo Bruni, Pico della Mirandola, Boiardo, Ariosto, Machiavelli Castiglione, Beolco, Giraldi Cinzio, Tasso, Moderata Fonte, Tarabotti, and Galileo.  In English.

Fall 2017: ITAL GU4043
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4043 001/88007 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Jo Ann Cavallo 3 10/25

ITAL W4048 Women In the Italian Renaissance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: reading knowledge of Italian.

An examination of 15th- and 16th-century writings by women and about women. The education of women, women and the family, the notion of women and the woman writer, women at court, and querelle des femme, poet-courtesans, rape and pornography

ITAL G4050 The Medieval Lyric: From the Scuola Siciliana To Dante. 3 points.

This course maps the origins of the Italian lyric, starting in Sicily and following its development in Tuscany, in the poets of the dolce stil nuovo and ultimately, Dante. Lectures in English; text in Italian, although comparative literature students who can follow with the help of translations are welcome.

ITAL W4050 Dazzling Italy: Braudel and His Critics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course offers an overview of the historiography of the Mediterranean from Braudel to the contemporary debate about Mediterraneism in Italian literature and philosophy. We will use Italian literary sources, such as Matteo Bandello, Carlo Levi, and Vincenzo Consolo to discuss historiography of the Mediterranean. PDFs or photocopies of the texts will be distributed one week before each class meeting so that students may prepare them for class discussion. In English with selected readings in Italian.

ITAL G4051 Ideology and Politics In Italian Renaissance Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Moves from political and historical to literary text;  examines each author’s perspective on the sociopolitical issues that dominated Italian Renaissance culture.  Major authors (e.g., L. B. Alberti, Guicciardini, Ariosto) and lesser-known ones.

ITAL G4053 Contemporary Italian Literature I (In Italian). 3 points.

May be repeated for credit; content varies.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

From D’Annunzio and Pirandello to the poets and novelists of our  day.

ITAL G4054 Contemporary Italian Literature II (In Italian). 3 points.

May be repeated for credit; content varies.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

From D’Annunzio and Pirandello to the poets and novelists of our  day.

ITAL GU4055 Anthropology of Contemporary Italy: Pluralism, Creativity and Identity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines ways in which Italy is understood and represented by Italians and non-Italians. It will analyze the formation of multiple discourses on Italy, how Italian culture and society are imagined, represented and/or distorted. Based on an anthropological perspective, this course will examine ways in which we can understand Italy through the intersections of pluralism, ethnicity, gender, and religion. The course will study how Italy strives for political and economic unity, while there is a concurrent push toward inequality, exclusion, and marginalization. Moreover, the course will analyze the revitalization of nationalism on one hand of regionalism on the other, and will focus on the concepts of territory, identity, and tradition. Short videos that can be watched on computer and alternative readings for those fluent in Italian will be assigned. There are no pre-requisites for this course.

Fall 2017: ITAL GU4055
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4055 001/13137 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Barbara Faedda 3 9/25

ITAL G4058 Italian Romanticism In Its European Context. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The different aspects of Italian Romanticism, and its complex relations with the German and English movements.

ITAL G4059 19th-Century Italian Short Fiction: Verga and Pirandello. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A close reading of a selection of short stories (novelle) by two authors, with reference to the social and historical environment of southern Italy.

ITAL W4059 The Culture of Italian Fashion. 3 points.

This seminar examines the many meanings of fashion, design, and style, especially in Italian culture and tradition; how values are preserved, reinvented and rethought through a lens that is internationally known as "Made in Italy"; how the symbolic meanings and ideological interpretations are connected to creation, production, and consumption of goods. Based on an anthropological perspective and framework, this interdisciplinary course will analyze ways in which we can understand the ‘Italian style' through the intersections of many different levels: political, economic, aesthetic, symbolic, religious, etc. The course will study how fashion can help us understand the ways in which tradition and innovation, creativity and technology, localism and globalization, identity and diversity, power and body, are elaborated and interpreted in contemporary Italian society, in relation to a globalized world. Short videos that can be watched on the computer and alternative readings for those fluent in Italian will be assigned. There are no pre‐requisites for this course. In English.

ITAL G4060 Italian Quattrocento Civic Humanism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Moral philosophy, art and literary theory, history, and educational methods in the writings of Coluccio Salutati, Leonardo Bruni, Poggio Bracciolini, Matteo Palmieri, L.B. Alberti, Guarino Veronese and his son Battista, and Lorenzo Valla.

ITAL W4060 Italian Quattrocento Civic Humanism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Discussion of texts by the major 15th-century humanist writers including Coluccio Salutati, Leonardo Bruni, Poggio Bracciolini, Matteo Palmieri, L.B. Alberti, and Guarino da Verona. Students can read texts in Latin, Italian, and/or English.

ITAL G4062 Alfieri and Foscolo. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focus on the two authors in the context of European Romanticism (German and English).  Attention to the legacy of classical antiquity in Foscolo’s formation, evidenced in his poetical, critical and philological works.

ITAL G4066 The World Beyond Europe in Italian Renaissance Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will explore encounters with the lands and peoples of Asia and Africa in a selection of Italian fictional works from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, with attention to the historical and literary context. Classes will be in English, but many of the works are available in Italian only.

ITAL G4072 Manzoni. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

One of the most significant prose writers of the 19th century, Manzoni is an emblematic representative of the Catholic tradition.  His major works read in the context of European debates on Romanticism.  Manzoni’s European dimension is assessed at the levels of the genesis of individual works and their critical reception.

ITAL G4074 Montale [In Italian]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Montale’s work, against the background of Italian and European  poetry.

ITAL G4079 Boccaccio's Decameron. 3 points.

ITALIAN MAJORS AND ITALIAN DEPT GRADUATE STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR SECTION 001.

While focusing on the Decameron, this course follows the arc of Boccaccio's career from the Ninfale Fiesolano, through the Decameron, and concluding with the Corbaccio, using the treatment of women as the connective thread. The Decameron is read in the light of its cultural density and contextualized in terms of its antecedents, both classical and vernacular, and of its intertexts, especially Dante's Commedia, with particular attention to Boccaccio's masterful exploitation of narrative as a means for undercutting all absolute certainty. Lectures in English; text in Italian, although comparative literature students who can follow with the help of translations are welcome.

ITAL G4086 Castiglione and the Italian Renaissance Court. 3 points.

Focus on Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier as educational treatise, philosophical meditation, sociopolitical document, and book of courtly manners; other courtly writings of the period, from Della Casa’s Galateo to Ariosto’s Satires to Bembo’s Asolani. Lectures in English; text in Italian, although comparative literature students who can follow with the help of translations are welcome.

ITAL G4088 Beyond Petrarchism: Women's Voices In the Italian Renaissance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the cultural relevance of women's poetry in the male-dominated literature of the Italian Renaissance. Emphasis on such notions as gender, selfhood, politics, power and tradition. The authors considered are: Gaspara Stampa, Vittoria Colonna, Veronica Gambara, Veronica Franco, Chiara Matraini, Isabella Di Morra, Laura Terracina, Tullia d'Aragona.

ITAL GU4089 Petrarch's Canzoniere. 3 points.

This course presents a reading of Petrach's Canzoniere and a theory of the lyric sequence as a genre. In this course we examine Petrarch as he fashions himself authorially, especially in the context of Ovid, Dante, and previous lyric poets. We bring to bear ideas on time and narrative from authors such as Augustine and Ricoeur in order to reconstruct the metaphysical significance of collecting fragments in what was effectively a new genre. We will consider Petrarch's lyric sequence in detail as well as read Petrarch's Secretum and Trionfi. Lectures in English; text in Italian, although students from other departments who can follow with the help of translations are welcome.

Spring 2017: ITAL GU4089
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4089 001/87646 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Teodolinda Barolini 3 12/20
ITAL 4089 002/87846 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Teodolinda Barolini 3 0/30

ITAL G4090 Giacomo Leopardi In His European Context: a Comparative Perspective. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Kindred spirit to Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, and Hölderlin, Leopardi’s 19th-century Romantic sensibility is deeply intertwined with classicism; the Hellenic ideal reworked into a personal philosophy on a par with Schopenhauer and Nietzsche.  His poetic achievement and clarity of vision a crucial term of comparison in the foundations of modernity.

ITAL G4091 Machiavelli. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focus on the principal works of Machiavelli in an effort to understand the various facets of his complex and at times seemingly contradictory literary personality.  His role as political scientist, historian, comic playwright, and short story writer. In English.

ITAL W4091 Dante's Divina Commedia I. 4 points.

ITALIAN MAJORS AND ITALIAN DEPT GRADUATE STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR SECTION 001.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: SECTION 001: reading knowledge of Italian. SECTION 002: none.

A year-long course in which the "Commedia" is read over two consecutive semesters; students can register for the first, the second, or both semesters. This course offers a thorough grounding in the entire text and an introduction to the complexities of its exegetical history. Attention not only to historical and theological issues, but also to Dante's mimesis, his construction of an authorial voice that generations of readers have perceived as "true," and the critical problems that emerge when the virtual reality created in language has religious and theological pretensions. SECTION 001: Lectures in English, text in Italian; examinations require the ability to translate Italian. SECTION 002: Lectures in English, examinations in English; students who can follow lectures with the help of translations but who cannot manage the Italian should register for this section.

ITAL W4092 Dante's Divina Commedia II. 4 points.

ITALIAN MAJORS AND ITALIAN DEPT GRADUATE STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR SECTION 001.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: SECTION 001: reading knowledge of Italian. SECTION 002: none.

A year-long course in which the "Commedia" is read over two consecutive semesters; students can register for the first, the second, or both semesters. This course offers a thorough grounding in the entire text and an introduction to the complexities of its exegetical history. Attention not only to historical and theological issues, but also to Dante's mimesis, his construction of an authorial voice that generations of readers have perceived as "true," and the critical problems that emerge when the virtual reality created in language has religious and theological pretensions. SECTION 001: Lectures in English, text in Italian; examinations require the ability to translate Italian. SECTION 002: Lectures in English, examinations in English; students who can follow lectures with the help of translations but who cannot manage the Italian should register for this section.

ITAL G4093 Machiavelli and Castiglione. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Focus on Machiavelli’s Prince and Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier as philosphical, sociopolitical, historical, and literary documents: points of comparison between the two works.

ITAL G4094 Italian Philosophical and Theoretical Culture: From Vico To Weak Thought. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An intellectual history of modern and contemporary Italy; the canonical figures (Vico, Leopardi, De Sanctis, Labriola, Croce, Gentile, Gramsci, Della Volpe, Vattimo, Eco, Cacciari, Tafuri); articulation of the difference of Italian philosophical and theoretical culture; the post-1968 explosion of theory under—and at times against—the sign of postmodernism; negative and weak thought and developments in feminist theory.

ITAL G4097 The Italian Renaissance Romance Epic I. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An in-depth study of Italy's two major romance epics, Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato and Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, in their literary and historical contexts. Topics include creative imitation, genre, allegory, ideology, and politics. Attention will also be given to the place of these two texts in the global history of the epic.

ITAL G4098 The Italian Renaissance Romance Epic II. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An in-depth study of Italy's two major romance epics, Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato and Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, in their literary and historical contexts. Topics include creative imitation, genre, allegory, ideology, and politics. Attention will also be given to the place of these two texts in the global history of the epic.

ITAL GU4100 Narratives of Modernity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In revisiting two major authors of the Italian modern novel, the course investigates the relation between fiction and the "conditions of modernity" (personal risk, anxiety and lack of control on reality, secularization, to name a few). Special attention will be paid to the response of the novelistic discourse to modernity, and to Italy's peculiarly peripheral position in the modern world. Primary texts will be read in Italian, while theoretical references will be in English.

Spring 2017: ITAL GU4100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4100 001/67765 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Leake 3 4/20

ITAL G4102 Renaissance Chivarlic Epic and Folk Performance Traditions. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine a selection of chivalric narratives, primarily episodes from Boiardo and Ariosto, as they pass from written word to theatrical performance in the form of Sicilian puppet theater and Tuscan-Emilian epic Maggi(folk opera). Classes will be in English, but the performances and some readings are in Italian without available translations.

ITAL G4103 Forgotten Best-Sellers of the Cinquecento. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines popular romances that were frequently printed during the 16th century but are not part of the current canon.  These lesser-known works not only provide an important context for the evolution of the romance-epic genre and the novel, they also help us understand the socio-historical and cultural climate of 16th-century Italy.  Class in English, but reading knowledge of Italian required since texts are not available in translation.

ITAL G4107 Imitation, Genre Theory, and Canon Formation In the Italian Renaissance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is intended to explore the quest for, and emergence of, new literary ideas and programs in the Italian Renaissance, from early Humanism to the late Cinquecento. Emphasis is put on such central issues as imitation, Aristotelian mimesis, poetics and genre, and on the progressive creation of universal norms for literary writing. The reading list includes excerpts from the works of the major theorists and poets: Aristotle, Petrarch, Poliziano, Bembo, Trissino, Giraldi Cinzio, Minturno, Castelvetro, Tasso, and others.

ITAL G4109 Writing the Self: the Tradition of Autobiography in Italy, 19th-20th Centuries. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Against the backdrop of the heated critical debate on the boundaries and limitations of the autobiographical genre, this course addresses the modern and contemporary tradition of autobiographical writings, focusing in particular (but not exclusively) on exploring and positing the potential difference between male and female autobiographers. More specifically, we will question the adequacy of the traditional model of autobiographical selfhood based on the assumption of unified, universal, exemplary and transcendent self to arrive at an understanding of women's autobiography. Topics to be addressed include: the crisis of the subject, "je est un autre", the "man" with a movie camera, strategies of concealment and disclosures. Authors to be studied include: D'Annunzio, Pirandello, Svevo, Fellini, Moretti, Ortese, Ginzburg, Manzini, Cialente, Ramondino. In Italian

ITAL G4110 Representations of the South in Modern Italian Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor.

Literary representations of the Italian South from the late nineteenth century to the present. Special attention to the symbolic importance of the South in modern Italian culture. Short stories and novels by Verga, D'Annunzio, Pirandello, Alvaro, Levi, Lampedusa, and Sciascia.

ITAL GU4111 Academic Affairs - Siena Edition. 4 points.

Grad course taught in Siena, Italy.

ITAL G4125 Italian Tales. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course examines the important Italian contribution to modern and contemporary narrative, especially in the genre of short narrative (short story, novella), with attention also to novels, combining narrative theory with close reading. Authors include A. De Céspedes, E. Morante, as well as S. Vassalli, D. Del Giudice, P. V. Tondelli, etc. Lectures in English, texts in Italian.

ITAL W4140 Fictionalizing History: Fascism in Literature and Film. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course aims at providing students with a broad knowledge of the political and cultural issues affecting Italy in the crucial, dramatic years between 1922 and 1945. Against the backdrop of Mussolinï's politics, our investigation examines the complex, multifaceted ways the dictatorship has been portrayed in fiction and cinema. Our research will require the evaluation of written texts and films produced both during this period and after it. We will analyze some fundamentals of the fascist doctrine and the most prominent strategies through which Fascism succeeded in creating a popular consensus (i.e., social projects and sophisticated techniques of propaganda). Then we will proceed alternating the analysis of historical documents with literary and cinematic works authored by Moravia, Vittorini, and Fellini, among others.

ITAL W4150 Notturno Italiano: 19th- and 20th-Century Italian Mystery Tale. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: knowledge of Italian.

Focus on a little-known genre of modern Italian literature. The works of several writers, both major and minor. Comparisons with the tradition of the mystery tale in other European literatures.

ITAL GU4185 The Making of Italy: The Risorgimento in Global Context. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of Italian is necessary for this course.

This course will examine the history of the Italian Risorgimento by following the major historiographical trends of the recent decades. First, it will approach the Risorgimento through the prism of cultural and intellectual history by investigating a series of topics, such as the discursive  patterns of the ‘Risorgimento canon’, the gendered tropes of nationalism, the creation of a new public sphere through operas, festivals and  plebiscites, the connection of nationalism with religion, and the relation of empire to nation and liberalism. Second, it will look at the  Risorgimento through the eyes of local and regional history by examining local patriotisms, revolutions and civil wars and the division between North and South. Finally, it will offer a new topography of Italian history by placing the Risorgimento in its Mediterranean and global context and by exploring its international aspects: the global icons that it produced (i.e. Garibaldi, Mazzini); the networks of exiles in other Mediterranean and European countries; the war volunteers; and the connection of Italian patriots with the wave of liberalism and revolution that swept the globe from India to Latin America.

Fall 2017: ITAL GU4185
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4185 001/16846 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Konstantia Zanou 3 9/30

ITAL W4190 Multicultural Italy": A European Country of Diversities. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines what can be considered a tremendous Italian diversity. Italy is a multicultural society, not only because of the flow of immigrants throughout the most recent decades, but also because of a too often neglected historical, cultural, linguistic and political ‘inner’ diversity. Linguistic minorities, religious groups, cultural enclaves, ‘nomadic’ cultures, immigrants & refugees, and border residents are the main focus of this course. The seminar will also analyze how these differences constructively cohabitate or how they can represent sources of conflict; it will provide examples of either peaceful pluralism or of conflictual social friction. Videos that can be watched on the computer and alternative readings for those fluent in Italian will be assigned. There are no pre-requisites for this course.

ITAL V4201 Once Upon a Time, In a Far Away Land: the Italian Fairy Tale. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A study of the Italian fairy tale from its oral folk origins to the first literary examples, viewed from a variety of critical approaches including the formalist, folkloric and psychoanalytic.

ITAL G4215 Italy: Emigrants, Immigrants, and Tourists. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar intends to examine migration from Italy with a particular attention to the United States, and migration and tourism to Italy from a global prospective. The establishment of varied enclaves of Italian emigrants abroad (especially in the USA), as well as the development of immigrants' identities in Italy today, will be analyzed. Traditional and historical ‘ethnic migration' and contemporary migrant practices will be studied and compared, while taking into consideration the noticeable range of transnational mobilities. The course will also study tourism as a well rooted industry in Italy, that plays an important role in the international tourism industry, and that keeps evolving and adapting to the challenging changes at a global level. Specific forms of tourism, such as cultural, agro-rural, and religious tourism, will be analyzed. How culture is represented and perceived in touristic spaces, how cultural traditions are reinvented to satisfy tourist expectations, and how and why ‘ethnic' stereotypes are constructed and manipulated for tourism will also be a focus in the seminar. In English.

ITAL G4220 Introduction to the History and Theory of Literary Interpretation. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What is Interpretation? How does it work? What are the major Theories of Criticism in Italy? What is the difference between aesthetics, poetics, critique and the work of art in itself? What is their relationship to other aspects of culture? These and other questions will be addressed in this course,We will begin with a sketch of the Italian tradition from Humanism to the late nineteenth century, then focus on Idealism and its pervasiveness in most realms of culture from the beginning of the twentieth century through the post-WWII period. Subsequently, discussions will be dedicated to a broad variety of critical methods and their relevance as and for interpretive strategies.

ITAL G4250 The Italian Urban Imaginary: City-Theory, City-Image, City-Text From Futurism To Negative Thought.. 3 points.

Open to qualified comparative literature students with the instructor’s permission.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An interdisciplinary study of the representation of the city and urban experience in 20th-century Italian theoretical, visual and literary culture; The role played by cinema in constructing the image and psychogeography of the post-WW II and contemporary Italian metropolis; Case study of individual cities (Rome, Venice, Naples, Milan, Florence); Reading the city as a cultural and spatial text derived primarily from the Italian tradition (Tafuri, Cacciari, Rossi, Calvino, Eco, Vattimo and others), also the comprehensive geneaology of city theorists as it extends from Simmel and Benjamin to Venturi and Koolhaas.

ITAL W4250 Creating Modernity: an Introduction To Early 19th-Century Italian Literature. 3 points.

Explores the emergence of, and quest for, new literary ideas and programs in early-Ottocento Italian poetry and prose.  Emphasis on such central notions as Classicism, Romanticism, and Tradition, and on the strong connection between literary issues (genres, forms, and language) and historical/cultural ones (nation, political struggle, and civil engagement) in the works of the major authors of this period, Ugo Foscolo, Giacomo Leopardi, and Allesandro Manzoni.

ITAL W4252 Antonio Gramsci: Literature, Culture, Power. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

Examines the writings of Antonio Gramsci and their influence on literary criticism, cultural studies, and filmmaking. Includes works by Luigi Pirandello, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, Pier Paolo Pasolini; criticism by Raymond Williams, Edward Said, Stuart Hall; films by Luchino Visconti, the Taviani Brothers, Pasolini.

ITAL G4254 Visible Cities, Visible Machines: Modernity and Urban Portraits In Italian Lyric. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course intends to examine the contrast between such a deeply rooted genre as lyric poetry and the emergence of modernity. Given the extended and often contradictory development of industrial modernity in Italy, Italian poetry becomes a unique case in point. Primary readings will be in Italian and will include Pascoli, DAnnunzio, Marinetti, Palazzeschi, Govoni, Saba, Sbarbaro, Montale, Caproni, Sereni, Fortini. Secondary readings will be in Italian and English, and will include Benjamin, Bermann, Simmel.  The course is conducted in Italian and in English

ITAL W4258 19th- and 20th-Century Italian Epistolary Novels. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focuses on novels written in epistolary form, studying the properties and functionality of the letter within the literary text. Special attention is given to the interrelation between literary production and historical events as well as cultural practices. In Italian

ITAL G4300 Verga and Verismo. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Verga's major works of fiction (I Malavoglia, Mastro-don Gesualdo, and two collections of rustic novelle) in relation to the key cultural trends and historical developments in postunification Italy (the emergence of verismo, the new dimensions of publishing and readership, the genesis of the Southern Question).  Also, selected novelle by Gabriele D’Annunzio and Luigi Pirandello to appreciate how the legacy of Verga and verismo was reelaborated in the new cultural climate of decadentismo.  Lectures in English; text in Italian, comparative literature students who use translation are welcome.

ITAL V4310 Sex, Marriage, and the Family In Early Modern Italy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The institutions of marriage and the family, from the quattrocento through the seicento.  Economic and social factors, as well as intellectual and ideological perspectives.  The Italian peninsula, and emphasis on central and northern Italian states.

ITAL G4340 Italy's Southern Question: Geography, Culture, Power. 3 points.

Open to undergraduates with the instructor's permission.

This course examines Italy's Southern Question from the nineteenth century to the present, investigating the interrelations among cultural representation, geography, and power by focusing on three writers/artists who produced major representations and theorizations of the Southern Question in three different cultural forms: the fiction of Giovanni Verga, the theoretical writings of Antonio Gramsci; the films of Luchino Visconti. Readings and discussion in English. Optional additional readings in Italian.

ITAL G4380 Va, Pensiero: the Culture of the Italian Diaspora In America From the Great Immigration To the Postmodern Condition. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A history of the Italian and Italian American presence in and contribution to American culture from 1880 to the present. The ways in which Italian culture—elite and popular—and the idea of Italy itself have traveled to the U.S. and the manner in which an extra-territorial and transcultural Italian identity has been constructed within the context of (dis)placement and (dis)location. Formal contributions to literature and the arts (theatre, music—classical as well as a popular—dance, visual culture and cinema); the informal contributions to the common culture, whether in the form of everyday practices, including linguistic contributions, or sub-cultural styles.

ITAL G4391 Challenging Genres, Gendering Fiction: the Experience of Italian Women Writers, 1945-90. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Addresses women writers working in Italy from the postwar period to the 1990s. Analyzes the historical novel, fantastic fiction, and autobiography. Against the backdrop of the critical debate on the literary canon, explores the specificity of women's writing and the way these articulated their difference by subverting and altering dominant literary codes. In English.

ITAL GU4395 Fifty Years of Impatience: The Italian Novel between 1950-2000. 3 points.

The course examines some of the most important novels that belong to Italy's period of major social and economic transformations. Only after WWII Italy finally becomes a modern nation, i.e. a republic based on truly universal suffrage, and an industrialized country. Such accelerated progress, though,causes deep social instability and mobility which obviously results in heavy psychological pressures on the people: adaptation becomes crucial and inevitable. Fiction therefore resumes the task to represent such awkwardness of integration into a modern bourgeois society that, contrarily to its European and American counterpart, is extremely tentative and insecure per se, since it's political identity has extremely precarious grounds. Among other authors, primary readings include Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa's The Leopard and Italo Calvinos's If on a Winter's Night a Traveler. Primary Readings in Italian.

Spring 2017: ITAL GU4395
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4395 001/22577 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Leake 3 7/30

ITAL W4395 Fifty Years of Impatience: The Italian Novel between 1950-2000. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course examines some of the most important novels that belong to Italy's period of major social and economic transformations. Only after WWII Italy finally becomes a modern nation, i.e. a republic based on truly universal suffrage, and an industrialized country. Such accelerated progress, though,causes deep social instability and mobility which obviously results in heavy psychological pressures on the people: adaptation becomes crucial and inevitable. Fiction therefore resumes the task to represent such awkwardness of integration into a modern bourgeois society that, contrarily to its European and American counterpart, is extremely tentative and insecure per se, since it's political identity has extremely precarious grounds. Among other authors, primary readings include Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa's The Leopard and Italo Calvinos's If on a Winter's Night a Traveler. Primary Readings in Italian.

ITAL W4400 The Italian Mind: Patterns of Representation. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A critical assessment of some of the main features of the Italian character. Representations of Italianicity (dealing with such issues as Fascism, the Mafia, and Catholicism) analyzed on the basis of literary and cultural readings.

ITAL G4401 WWII, the Resistance and the Holocaust In Italian Literature and Cinema. 3 points.

The political, social, and cultural issues affecting Italy in the crucial, dramatic years between 1943 and 1945. More specifically, the canonical literary and cinematic representations of the war, the "Resistenza" and the Holocaust and the aesthetic issues related to the encounter between history and fiction, reality and imagination. Further examination of how the war has affected women: such an inquiry will require the evaluation of lesser-known women's texts.Topics to be addressed include: war and gender, women as subjects of history, the intersection of the political and the private. Authors to be examined include: Calvino, Fenoglio,Pavese, Levi, Rossellini, Wertmuller, Rosi, Vigano', Milli, Zangrandi, D'Eramo.

ITAL G4410 From '68 Thought To Weak Thought: an Ideological Profile of Contemporary Italy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An intellectual and cultural history of Italy as it passes from its post-1968 period of collective action and cultural protest to its current status as what Gianni Vattimo has called the transparent society, to use a term of postmodern condition that comes from within the Italian culture.  Interdisciplinary study of all forms of cultural production during this period, including developments in visual and architectural culture, with particular emphasis on cinema.  Focus on Italian philosophical and theoretical culture as exemplified in such movements as weak thought and negative thought and the various installments of feminist theory.

ITAL G4420 The Window On the World: Reassessing Italian Neorealism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Luchino Visconti and other Italian filmmakers challenged modes of film production in vogue in the 1940s and 1950s, both in theoretical and practical terms. This course will analyze both the feature films and the theoretical writings of such directors as those mentioned and others, in order to investigate the modes of representation of reality in the immediate postwar years, their relation to the identity of the newborn Italian Republic, and their significance in post-WWII filmmaking. All readings and lectures in English; Films in Italian or French, with English subtitles.

ITAL G4495 Thirteen Ways: Rome as a Cinematic City. 3 points.

Advanced undergraduates may enroll with the instructor's permission. (Paper add/drop form)Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Close analysis of Italian city-films that represent and map out Rome as a real and imagined space. The course attempts to establish a canon of city-films through which to articulate a counter-history of Italian cinema as it passes from neorealism to the present -- from Roma città aperta (1945) to La grande bellezza (2013)  --  and to embed these films within a larger cultural and urban history in which cinematic  Rome plays a crucial role in the Italian construction of a national urban consciousness.

ITAL G4500 Topics in Italian Literature: Leopardi and Nature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will be focused on Leopardi’s Canti, with special reference to the concept of nature. The theme will be explored in connection with the main philosophical sources of Leopardi’s thought, as located within Nineteenth century European philosophy. The course so intends to provide a deep knowledge of Leopardi’s poetry, in which the theme of nature plays a crucial role, as well as a clear vision of its philosophical and literary background. Not only that, the aim of the course is also to familiarize students with problems concerning the relations of nature and human beings, as Leopardi saw them, and as we still see them.  To attend the course, no special competence is required, but for a good knowledge of Italian language. In Italian.

ITAL GU4502 Italian Cultural Studies I: From Unification to World War I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

An interdisciplinary investigation into Italian culture and society in the years between Unification in 1860 and the outbreak of World War I. Drawing on novels, historical analyses, and other sources including film and political cartoons, the course examines some of the key problems and trends in the cultural and political history of the period. Lectures, discussion and required readings will be in English. Students with a knowledge of Italian are encouraged to read the primary literature in Italian.

Fall 2017: ITAL GU4502
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4502 001/09528 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Milbank Hall
Nelson Moe 3 5

ITAL GU4503 Italian Cultural Studies II: From World War I to the Present. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

An interdisciplinary investigation into Italian culture and society in the years between World War I and the present. Drawing on historical analyses, literary texts, letters, film, cartoons, popular music, etc., the course examines some of the key problems and trends in the cultural and political history of the period. Lectures, discussion and required readings will be in English. Students with a knowledge of Italian are encouraged to read the primary literature in Italian.

Spring 2017: ITAL GU4503
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 4503 001/04473 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Milbank Hall
Nelson Moe 3 6

ITAL W4520 See Naples and Die: Portrait of a City. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Explores the cultural history of Naples and the Neapolitans over the past two centuries in diverse areas including literature, film, theatre, and music. Works will include texts by Serao, Croce, Benjamin, Gramsci, De Filippo, and Ortese; films by Rossellini, Rosi, and Pasolini.

ITAL GU4725 Pirandello and Modern Drama. 3 points.

The course will examine the foundations of modern drama and stage representation by analysing Luigi Pirandello's plays and theoretical works in close comparison with the major authors and drama theorists of the XIX century, including Bertolt Brecht, August Strinberg, and Jean Genet.

ITAL G4725 Pirandello and Modern Drama. 3 points.

The course will examine the foundations of modern drama and stage representation by analysing Luigi Pirandello's plays and theoretical works in close comparison with the major authors and drama theorists of the XIX century, including Bertolt Brecht, August Strinberg, and Jean Genet.

ITAL G4771 The Poetry of Giuseppe Ungaretti: Its French and Italian Origins. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A study of Ungaretti's work; its relationship to Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, Valéry, and Italian lyricists from Petrarch to Leopardi, D'Annunzio, and  the Twilight poets. Texts read in the original.

Hungarian Courses

HNGR W1202 Intermediate Hungarian II. 4 points.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

HNGR W2101 Intermediate Hungarian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR W1101-W1102 or the equivalent.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

HNGR W3340 Advanced Hungarian Grammar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR W1201 or the equivalent.

Advanced Hungarian Grammar focuses on the more complex syntactic/semantic constructions of Hungarian in addition to vocabulary enrichment. Readings in literature, oral presentations, translations, and essays serve to enhance the grammatical material.

HNGR W4050 The Hungarian New Wave: Cinema in Kadarist Hungary [In English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Hungarian cinema, like film-making in Czechoslovakia, underwent a renaissance in the 1960's, but the Hungarian new wave continued to flourish in the 70's and film remained one of the most important art forms well into the 80's. This course examines the cultural, social and political context of representative Hungarian films of the Kadarist period, with special emphasis on the work of such internationally known filmmakers as Miklos Jancso, Karoly Makk, Marta Meszaros, and Istvan Szabo. In addition to a close analysis of individual films, discussion topics will include the "newness"of the new wave in both form and content (innovations in film language, cinematic impressionism, allegorical-parabolic forms, auteurism, etc.), the influence of Italian, French, German and American cinema, the relationship between film and literature, the role of film in the cultures of Communist Eastern Europe, the state of contemporary Hungarian cinema. The viewing of the films will be augmented by readings on Hungarian cinema, as well as of relevant Hungarian literary works.