History

Departmental Office: 413 Fayerweather; 212-854-4646
http://www.history.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Caterina Pizzigoni, 321 Fayerweather; cp2313@columbia.edu

Undergraduate Administrator: Sia Mensah; sjm2206@columbia.edu

The history curriculum covers most areas of the world and most periods of history. It encourages students to develop historical understanding in the widest sense of the word: a thorough empirical grasp along with the kind of analytical skills that come with a genuinely historical sensibility. This is done through two types of courses: lectures and seminars. Lectures range from broad surveys of the history of a place or period to more thematically oriented courses. Seminars offer students the opportunity to work more closely with historical sources in smaller groups and to do more sophisticated written work. Because history courses usually have no prerequisites, there are no preordained sequences to follow. It is advisable, however, that students take a relevant lecture course in preparation for a seminar. Majors wishing to follow a more intensive program are advised to enroll in a historiography course and to undertake a senior thesis project. Historically, majors have pursued careers in a very wide range of areas including medicine, law, mass media, Wall Street, and academia.

Advanced Placement

Students may receive 3 credits toward the overall degree requirements for a score of 5 on the AP European History exam or the AP United States History exam. No points count toward or fulfill any requirements of the history major or concentration.

Advising

During their junior and senior years, majors and concentrators are advised by the faculty members of the Undergraduate Education Committee (UNDED). UNDED advisers also review and sign Plan of Study (POS) forms for majors and concentrators at least once per year. POS forms track students’ progress toward completing all major and concentration requirements. New history majors and concentrators may see any member of UNDED. For the most up-to-date information on UNDED members, please see the undergraduate advising page of the departmental website.

Majors and concentrators can also receive pure academic interest advising (non-requirement advising) from any faculty member and affiliated faculty member of the department.

First-years and sophomores considering a history major or concentration can seek advising from UNDED or any other faculty member.

For questions about requirements, courses, or the general program, majors and concentrators can also contact the undergraduate administrator.

Departmental Honors

To be eligible for departmental honors, the student must have a GPA of at least 3.6 in courses for the major, an ambitious curriculum, and an outstanding senior thesis. Honors are awarded on the basis of a truly outstanding senior thesis. Normally no more than 10% of graduating majors receive departmental honors in a given academic year.

Course Numbering

Courses are numbered by type:
UN 1xxx - Introductory Survey Lectures 
UN 2xxx - Undergraduate Lectures 
UN 3xxx - Undergraduate Seminars 
GU 4xxx - Joint Undergraduate/Graduate Seminars 

and field (with some exceptions):
x000-x059: Ancient
x060-x099: Medieval
x100-x199: Early modern Europe
x200-x299: East Central Europe
x300-x399: Modern Western Europe
x400-x599: United States
x600-x659: Jewish
x660-x699: Latin America
x700-x759: Middle East
x760-x799: Africa
x800-x859: South Asia
x860-x899: East Asia
x900-x999: Research, historiography, and transnational

Seminars

Seminars are integral to the undergraduate major in history. In these courses, students develop research and writing skills under the close supervision of a faculty member. Enrollment is normally limited to approximately 15 students. In order to maintain the small size of the courses, admission to most seminars is by instructor's permission or application.

In conjunction with the Barnard History Department and other departments in the University (particularly East Asian Languages and Cultures), the History Department offers about 25 seminars each semester that majors may use to meet their seminar requirements. While there are sufficient seminars offered to meet the needs of majors seeking to fulfill the two-seminar requirement, given the enrollment limits, students may not always be able to enroll in a particular seminar. Students should discuss with UNDED their various options for completing the seminar requirement.

The History Department has developed an on-line application system for some seminars. The department regularly provides declared majors and concentrators with information on upcoming application periods, which typically occur midway through the preceding semester. Students majoring in other fields, or students who have not yet declared a major, must inform themselves of the application procedures and deadlines by checking the undergraduate seminar page of the departmental website.

Professors

  • Charles Armstrong
  • Csaba Bekes (Visiting)
  • Volker Berghahn
  • Richard Billows
  • Elizabeth Blackmar
  • Casey Blake
  • Alan Brinkley
  • Christopher Brown
  • Richard Bulliet (emeritus)
  • Elisheva Carlebach
  • Mark Carnes (Barnard)
  • Zeynep Çelik
  • John Coatsworth (Provost)
  • Matthew Connelly
  • Victoria de Grazia
  • Abram de Swaan (Visiting)
  • Mamadou Diouf (Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies)
  • Catherine Evtuhov 
  • Barbara Fields
  • Eric Foner
  • Carol Gluck
  • William Harris
  • Martha Howell
  • Robert Hymes (East Asian Language and Cultures)
  • Kenneth Jackson
  • Karl Jacoby
  • Matthew Jones
  • Laszlo Karsai (Visiting)
  • Ira Katznelson (Political Science)
  • Joel Kaye (Barnard)
  • Alice Kessler-Harris (emerita)
  • Rashid Khalidi
  • Dorothy Ko (Barnard)
  • Adam Kosto
  • Sunil Kumar (Visiting)
  • William Leach
  • Gregory Mann
  • Mark Mazower
  • Robert McCaughey (Barnard)
  • Stephanie McCurry
  • Jose Moya (Barnard)
  • Mae Ngai
  • Susan Pedersen
  • Pablo Piccato
  • Rosalind Rosenberg (Barnard)
  • David Rosner (Mailman School of Public Health)
  • David Rothman (Physicians and Surgeons)
  • Henry Rousso (Visiting)
  • Simon Schama (University Professor)
  • Seth Schwartz
  • Herbert Sloan (Barnard, emeritus)
  • Pamela Smith 
  • Robert Somerville (Religion)
  • Michael Stanislawski
  • Anders Stephanson
  • Lisa Tiersten (Barnard)
  • Adam Tooze
  • Deborah Valenze (Barnard)
  • Marc Van de Mieroop
  • Richard Wortman (emeritus)
  • Madeleine Zelin (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  •  

Associate Professors

  • Tarik Amar
  • Lisbeth Kim Brandt (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Paul Chamberlin 
  • Meg Jacobs (Visiting)
  • Gregory Pflugfelder (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Caterina Pizzigoni
  • Anupama Rao (Barnard)
  • Samuel Roberts
  • Neslihan Senocak
  • Rhiannon Stephens
  • Carl Wennerlind (Barnard)
  • Eduardo Alberto Zimmermann (Visiting)
  •  

Assistant Professors

  • Manan Ahmed
  • Gergely Baics
  • Simone Bellezza (Visiting)
  • Charly Coleman
  • Elizabeth Esch (Barnard)
  • Andrew Lipman (Barnard)
  • Gulnar Kendirbai (Visiting)
  • Alexandre Roberts
  • Gray Tuttle (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Emma Winter
  •  

Lecturers in Discipline

  • Donna Bilak (2016-2017)
  • Benjamin Breen (2016-2017)
  • Joel Klein (2016-2017)
  • Victoria Phillips (2016-2017)
  • Nathan Pilkington (2016-2017)
  • John Straussberger (2016-2017)
  • Tianna Uchacz (2016-2017)
  • Sam Wetherell (2016-2017)
  •  

On Leave

  • Profs. Blackmar, Brinkley, Fields, Foner, Gluck, Hallett, Harris, Kobrin, McCurry, Stephanson, Tooze, Van de Mieroop (2016-2017)
  • Profs. Howell, Mann, Mazurek, Nguyen (Fall 2016)
  • Profs. Jackson, Ngai (Spring 2017)

Guidelines for all History Majors and Concentrators

For detailed information about the history major or concentration, as well as the policies and procedures of the department, please refer to the History at Columbia Undergraduate Handbook, available for download on the departmental website.


Major in History

Students must complete a minimum of nine courses in the department, of which four or more must be in an area of specialization. Students must fulfill a breadth requirement by taking three courses outside of their specialization.

The breadth requirement itself has two parts, time and space, which are explained below. Two of the courses taken in the major must be seminars, at least one of which must be in the area of specialization.

The requirements of the undergraduate program encourage students to do two things:

  1. Develop a deeper knowledge of the history of a particular time and/or place. Students are required to complete a specialization by taking a number of courses in a single field of history of their own choosing. The field should be defined, in consultation with a member of UNDED, according to geographical, chronological, and/or thematic criteria. For example, a student might choose to specialize in 20th-century U.S. history, European diplomatic history, ancient Roman history, or modern East Asian history. The specialization does not appear on the student's transcript, but provides an organizing principle for the program the student assembles in consultation with UNDED;
  2. Gain a sense of the full scope of history as a discipline by taking a broad range of courses. Students must fulfill a breadth requirement by taking courses outside their own specialization, at least one course far removed in time and two removed in space.
    • Time: majors must take at least one course removed in time from their specialization
      • Students specializing in the modern period must take one course in the pre-modern period (and well before their specialization if the region remains the same).
      • Students specializing in the pre-modern period must take one course in the modern period (and well after their specialization if the region remains the same).
    • Space: majors must take at least two additional courses in regional fields not their own, meaning that the courses should cover regions removed from their chosen specialization
      • For example, students specializing in some part of Europe must take two courses in Africa, East or South Asia, Latin America/Caribbean, Middle East, and/or the U.S.
      • These two courses must also cover two different regions.

Some courses cover multiple geographic regions. If a course includes one of the regions within a student's specialization, that course cannot count towards the breadth requirement unless it is specifically approved by the director of undergraduate studies. For example, if a student is specializing in 20th-century U.S. history and takes the class World War II, the class is too close to the specialization and may not count as a breadth course in Asian or European history.

All courses in the Barnard History Department as well as select courses in East Asian Languages and Cultures; Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies; and other departments count toward the major. Eligible inter-departmental courses may include (AFCV CC1020), Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China (ASCE V2359), Introduction to East Asian Civilization: Japan (ASCE V2361), and/or Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Korea (ASCE V2363). Please see the Courses section on the departmental website to see which of these might count in a given semester. Any courses not listed on the departmental website, however historical in approach or content, do not count toward the history major or concentration, except with explicit written approval of the UNDED chair.

Thematic Specializations

Suitably focused thematic and cross-regional specializations are permitted and the breadth requirements for students interested in these topics are set in consultation with a member of UNDED. Classes are offered in fields including, but not limited to:

  • Ancient history
  • Medieval history
  • Early modern European history
  • Modern European history
  • United States history
  • Latin American and Caribbean history
  • Middle Eastern history
  • East Asian history
  • South Asian history

Additionally, classes are offered in thematic and cross-regional fields which include, but are not limited to:

  • Intellectual history
  • Jewish history
  • Women's history
  • International history
  • History of science

These fields are only examples. Students should work with a member of UNDED to craft a suitably focused specialization on the theme or field that interests them.

Thesis Requirements

Majors may elect to write a senior thesis, though this is not a graduation requirement. Only thesis writers are eligible to be considered for departmental honors. The senior thesis option is not available to concentrators.

The yearlong HIST C4398-HIST C4399 Senior Thesis Seminar carries 8 points, 4 of which typically count as a seminar in the specialization. Students are encouraged to take HIST W4900 Historian's Craft for a more intensive study of historiography. HIST W4900 Historian's Craft does not count toward the specialization or toward the breadth requirements. For the most up-to-date information on the field designations for history courses, please see the Courses section of the departmental website.


Concentration in History

Students must complete a minimum of seven courses in history. At least three of the seven courses must be in an area of specialization, one far removed in time, and one on a geographic region far removed in space. There is no seminar requirement for the concentration.

Fall 2017 History Courses

HIST UN1010 The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.. 4 points.

A review of the history of the Greek world from the beginnings of Greek archaic culture around 800 B.C., through the classical and hellenistic periods to the definitive Roman conquest in 146 B.C., with concentration on political history, but attention also to social and cultural developments.Field(s): ANC

Fall 2017: HIST UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1010 001/27406 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Richard Billows 4 51/90

AFCV UN1020 African Civilizations. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa' and ‘being African.' Field(s): AFR*

Fall 2017: AFCV UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFCV 1020 001/72381  
4 22/22
AFCV 1020 002/10302  
4 12/22

LACV UN1020 Primary Texts of Latin American Civilization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

It focuses on key texts from Latin America in their historical and intellectual context and seeks to understand their structure and the practical purposes they served using close reading and, when possible, translations.  The course seeks to establish a counterpoint to the list of canonical texts of Contemporary Civilization. The selections are not intended to be compared directly to those in CC but to raise questions about the different contexts in which ideas are used, the critical exchanges and influences (within and beyond Latin America) that shaped ideas in the region, and the long-term intellectual, political, and cultural pursuits that have defined Latin American history. The active engagement of students toward these texts is the most important aspect of class work and assignments.

Spring 2017: LACV UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LACV 1020 001/25892 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Caterina Pizzigoni 4 21/22
LACV 1020 002/67195 M W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Rachel Newman 4 13/22
Fall 2017: LACV UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LACV 1020 001/71273  
4 20/22
LACV 1020 002/63278  
4 4/22

HIST UN2026 Roman Social History. 3 points.

Social structure, class, slavery and manumission, social mobility, life expectation, status and behavior of women, Romanization, town and country, social organizations, education and literacy, philanthropy, amusements in the Roman Empire, 70 B.C. - 250 A.D. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2026
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2026 001/61896 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
William Harris 3 34/40

HIST UN2100 Early Modern Europe: Print and Society. 4 points.

Standing at the intersection of the religious, cultural, and scientific upheavals within early modern Europe, the study of print and its intersection with culture allows students to learn how shifts in technology (much like those we are witnessing today) affect every aspect of society. This course will examine the signal cultural, political, and religious developments in early modern Western Europe, using the introduction and dissemination of printed materials as a fulcrum and entry point. From the sixteenth century Europeans were confronted with a technological revolution whose cultural consequences were incalculable and whose closest parallel might be the age of electronic information technology in our own day. From the Reformation of Luther, to the libelles of pre-revolutionary France, from unlocking the mysteries of the human body to those of the heavens, from humanist culture to the arrival of the novel, no important aspect of European culture in the sixteen- through eighteenth centuries can be understood without factoring in the role of print: its technology, its marketing and distribution channels, and its creation of new readers and new "republics." This course will examine key political, religious, and cultural movements in early modern western European history through the prism of print culture.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2100 001/23268 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Elisheva Carlebach 4 23/30

HIST UN2133 Britain and the World Since World War II. 4 points.

This course is a history of Britain and its relationship with the wider world since World War II. We will be discussing the chaotic and violent end of Britain’s empire, the transformation of international politics through institutions such as the UN and Britain’s fraught relationship with Europe. Along the way we will cover the rise and fall of Britain’s welfare state, the transformation of its cities, the new communities and political allegiances formed by mass migration and the new ideas about gender, race, sexuality and youth culture that were formed during these decades. We will also study some of the music, film, literature and architecture produced during this turbulent period. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2133
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2133 001/27497 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Sam Wetherell 4 28/60

HIST UN2447 America, 1918-1945: Prosperity, Depression, and War. 4 points.

This course examines one of the most turbulent periods in modern American history: an era that began with the Great War, saw the nation in both its greatest economic boom and its worst economic collapse, led to another, even more catastrophic world war, and ended with the United States as the most powerful nation in the world. This course will provide students an understanding of how Americans navigated these major events and shaped the following developments that created the American experience as we might know it: the rise of the modern federal state in the New Deal; the transformation of work and business from the Roaring Twenties to the Great Depression and beyond; the crisis of democracy at home and abroad; the rise of the civil rights movement; and the foreign policy struggle between isolationism and internationalism. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2447
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2447 001/13279 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Jarod Roll 4 18/90

HIST UN2478 U.S. Intellectual History, 1865 To the Present. 3 points.

This course examines major themes in U.S. intellectual history since the Civil War. Among other topics, we will examine the public role of intellectuals; the modern liberal-progressive tradition and its radical and conservative critics; the uneasy status of religion ina secular culture; cultural radicalism and feminism; critiques of corporate capitalism and consumer culture; the response of intellectuals to hot and cold wars, the Great Depression, and the upheavals of the 1960s. Fields(s): US

Fall 2017: HIST UN2478
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2478 001/76474 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Casey Blake 3 90/90

HIST UN2488 Warfare in the Modern World. 4 points.

This course is a survey of the transformation of warfare between the American Civil War and 1945. Emphasis will be placed on military strategy, weaponry, and leadership.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2488
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2488 001/73441 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Kenneth Jackson 4 72/90

HIST UN2490 US FOREIGN RELATIONS 1775-1920. 4 points.

Between 1775 and 1920 the US grew from a disparate set of colonies nestled along the eastern seaboard of North America to a sprawling empire that stretched across the continent and projected its influence into the wider world. In this course we will examine this transformation and evaluate the major trends in US foreign relations that drove it. We will comparatively analyze the competing visions for expansion advocated by various groups inside the US and the impact of expansion on peoples outside the growing nation. We will explore the domestic, economic, intellectual, and political origins of expansionism, survey the methods used to extend the nation's borders and influence, and evaluate the impact of these changes on the nation's values, institutions and history. Lectures and readings will introduce a variety of historical controversies and conflicting interpretations, which students will be expected to analyze critically in writing and discussions.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2490 001/70616 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Paul Chamberlin 4 45/60

HIST UN2533 US Lesbian and Gay History. 4 points.

This course explores the social, cultural, and political history of lesbians, gay men, and other socially constituted sexual and gender minorities, primarily in the twentieth century.  Since the production and regulation of queer life has always been intimately linked to the production and policing of “normal” sexuality and gender, we will also pay attention to the shifting boundaries of normative sexuality, especially heterosexuality, as well as other developments in American history that shaped gay life, such as the Second World War, Cold War, urbanization, and the minority rights revolution.  Themes include the emergence of homosexuality and heterosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the changing relationship between homosexuality and transgenderism; the development of diverse lesbian and gay subcultures and their representation in popular culture; the sources of antigay hostility; religion and sexual science; generational change and everyday life; AIDS; and gay, antigay, feminist, and queer movements.      

Fall 2017: HIST UN2533
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2533 001/67191 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
George Chauncey 4 31/70

HIST UN2587 Sport & Society in the Americas. 4 points.

This course explores the ways organized sport constitutes and disrupts dominant understandings of nation, race, gender, and sexuality throughout the Americas. Working from the notion that sport is “more than a game,” the class will examine the social, cultural and political impact of sports in a variety of American contexts in the past and present. While our primary geographic focus will be the United States, Brazil, and the Caribbean, the thrust of the course encourages students to consider sports in local, national, and transnational contexts.  The guiding questions of the course are: What is the relationship between sport and society? How does sport inform political struggles within and across national borders? How does sport reinforce and/or challenge social hierarchies? Can sport provide visions of alternative conceptions of the self and community? Throughout the semester, we will examine such topics as: the continuing political struggles surrounding mega-events such as the Olympics and World Cup, the role of professional baseball in the rise and fall of Jim Crow segregation, the contradictory impact of high school football in Texas, the centrality of tennis to the women’s movement in the United States, and the role of sports in the growth of the city of Los Angeles. Course materials include works by historians, sociologists, social theorists, and journalists who have also been key contributors to the burgeoning field of sports studies. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2587
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2587 001/28082 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Frank Guridy 4 44/70

HIST UN2611 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity. 4 points.

  Field(s): ANC

Fall 2017: HIST UN2611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2611 001/16806 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Seth Schwartz 4 22/30

HIST UN2618 The Modern Caribbean. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This lecture course examines the social, cultural, and political history of the islands of the Caribbean Sea and the coastal regions of Central and South America that collectively form the Caribbean region, from Amerindian settlement, through the era of European imperialism and African enslavement, to the period of socialist revolution and independence. The course will examine historical trajectories of colonialism, slavery, and labor regimes; post-emancipation experiences and migration; radical insurgencies and anti-colonial movements; and intersections of race, culture, and neocolonialism. It will also investigate the production of national, creole, and transborder indentities. Formerly listed as "The Caribbean in the 19th and 20th centuries". Field(s): LAC 

Fall 2017: HIST UN2618
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2618 001/73027 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Natasha Lightfoot 4 70/70

HIST UN2660 Latin American Civilization I. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from pre-Columbian times to 1810. Global Core Approved.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2660
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2660 001/20976 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Caterina Pizzigoni 4 90/90

HIST UN2719 History of the Modern Middle East. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6998 version of this course.

This course will cover the history of the Middle East from the 18th century until the present, examining the region ranging from Morocco to Iran and including the Ottoman Empire. It will focus on transformations in the states of the region, external intervention, and the emergence of modern nation-states, as well as aspects of social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the region. Field(s): ME

Fall 2017: HIST UN2719
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2719 001/63433 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Rashid Khalidi 4 205/200

HIST UN2764 History of East Africa: Early Time to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of East African history over the past two millennia with a focus on political and social change. Themes include early religious and political ideas, the rise of states on the Swahili coast and between the Great Lakes, slavery, colonialism, and social and cultural developments in the 20th century.  This course fulfills the Global Core requirement. Field(s): AFR  

Fall 2017: HIST UN2764
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2764 001/26645 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Rhiannon Stephens 3 53/60

HSME UN2810 History of South Asia I: al-Hind to Hindustan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6998 version of this course.

This survey lecture course will provide students with a broad overview of the history of South Asia as a region - focusing on key political, cultural and social developments over more than two millennia. The readings include both primary sources (in translation) and secondary works. Our key concerns will be the political, cultural and theological encounters of varied communities, the growth of cities and urban spaces, networks of trade and migrations and the development of both local and cosmopolitan cultures across Southern Asia. The survey will begin with early dynasties of the classical period and then turn to the subsequent formation of various Perso-Turkic polities, including the development and growth of hybrid political cultures such as those of Vijayanagar and the Mughals. The course also touches on Indic spiritual and literary traditions such as Sufi and Bhakti movements. Near the end of our course, we will look forward towards the establishment of European trading companies and accompanying colonial powers.

Fall 2017: HSME UN2810
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSME 2810 001/29344 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Manan Ahmed 4 39/60

HIST UN2948 Capitalism in Crisis: A Global History of the Great Recession. 4 points.

The Financial Crisis that struck the United States and Europe in 2007 is the most severe in history. We are still living with its fall out. This course will explore the history of the crisis and the political reaction to it. We will explore how the crisis radiated out from the Atlantic economy where it originated to the rest of the world economy.

Fall 2017: HIST UN2948
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2948 001/86546 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Adam Tooze 4 54/90

HIST UN3061 ISLAM AND EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES. 4 points.

This course explores the encounter between Europe, broadly conceived, and the Islamic world in the period from the seventh to the thirteenth centuries.  While the Latin Christian military expeditions that began in the late eleventh century known as the Crusades are part of this story, they are not the focus.  The course stresses instead the range of diplomatic, commercial, intellectual, artistic, religious, and military interactions established well before the Crusades across a wide geographical expanse, with focal points in Iberia and Southern Italy.  Substantial readings in primary sources in translation are supplemented with recent scholarship.  [Students will be assigned on average 150-200 pages of reading per week, depending on the difficulty of the primary sources; we will read primary sources every week.]

Fall 2017: HIST UN3061
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3061 001/11346 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Adam Kosto 4 15/15

HIST UN3233 From Liberalism to Illiberalism? Economic Ideas and Institutions in Central and Eastern Eu. 4 points.

In Central and Eastern Europe liberalism was just one of the major streams of thought in the 19th century, and illiberalism is only one of the doctrines yearning for dominance today. What happened between the two cannot be squeezed into a –  Spenglerian – story of the “decline of the East” because liberal ideas had a triumphant comeback in the Western half of the region in the middle of the 20th century and in its Eastern half before and after 1989. Following the rise of liberal economic thought and practice in the region throughout the 19th century, Central and Eastern Europe chose blatantly anti-liberal (totalitarian) roads of development, national socialism and/or communism for many decades. After World War II, countries that found themselves on the Western side of the Iron Curtain managed to leave these roads, and develop a variety of models relying on the doctrine of Soziale Marktwirtschaft. When in 1989, countries on its Eastern side followed suit, they started flirting with more radical sorts of liberalism than most of their Western neighbors, to return to the concept of social market economy, or to slide back to soft varieties of illiberalism recently.


The course will present some of the leading economic ideas and institutions in the context of cultural encounters between the East and the West. A special emphasis will be laid on frictions between the dominant discourses of the two parties. In Central and Eastern Europe both liberalism and socialism had their powerful national(ist) versions, socialism was offset by communism, conservativism fraternized with state collectivism, and the takeover of Western concepts was often simulated rather than real.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3233
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3233 001/79279 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
4 12/15

HIST UN3326 History of Ireland, 1700-2000. 4 points.

This seminar provides an introduction to key debates and historical writing in Irish history from 1700.  Topics include:  the character of Ascendancy Ireland; the 1798 rising and the Act of Union; the causes and consequences of the famine; emigration and Fenianism; the Home Rule movement; the Gaelic revival; the Easter Rising and the civil war; politics and culture in the Free State; the Northern Ireland problem; Ireland, the European Union, and the birth of the “celtic tiger”.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3326
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3326 001/23582 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Susan Pedersen 4 15/15

HIST UN3335 20th Century New York City History. 4 points.

This course explores critical areas of New York's economic development in the 20th century, with a view to understanding the rise, fall and resurgence of this world capital. Discussions also focus on the social and political significance of these shifts. Assignments include primary sources, secondary readings, film viewings, trips, and archival research. Students use original sources as part of their investigation of New York City industries for a 20-page research paper. An annotated bibliography is also required. Students are asked to give a weekly update on research progress, and share information regarding useful archives and websites.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3335
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3335 001/17439 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Kenneth Jackson 4 18/15

HIST UN3357 History of the Self. 4 points.

This course is one of a series on the history of the modern self. The works of Montaigne, Pascal, Rousseau, Tocqueville, or another Enlightenment thinker are critically examined in a seminar setting.


Fall 2017 the topic is Tocqueville.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3357
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3357 001/21646 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Mark Lilla 4 12/15

HIST UN3401 Does American Poverty Have a History?. 4 points.

In most societies, some are rich and many more are poor.  So it has been through most recorded history – and so it remains in the United States, where an estimated 43 million Americans are living in poverty as you read this.  The project of our seminar will be to construct a history of America’s poor as vivid and precise as the histories that have long been written of the wealthy and the powerful.  We will look at the experiences of being poor and at changes in the processes of falling into and climbing out of poverty.  We will look at changes in the population of the poor, changes in the economic organization of cities and the countryside, and changes in the general distribution of wealth.  We will look at ideas of poverty and their impact on history.  And we will look, finally, at changes in the treatment of the poor: from charity to modern welfare policies.  At semester’s end, students will be able to interrogate the enduring presence of American poverty in light of its history and transformations.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3401 001/77996 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Christopher Florio 4 15/15

HIST UN3490 The Global Cold War. 4 points.

The superpower competition between the US and the USSR dominated international affairs during the second half of the twentieth century. Though this Cold War was born from ideological differences and initially focused on Europe, it soon became entangled with the concurrent global process of decolonization. In this way, the US-Soviet rivalry shaped events on every continent. This course will examine the intersection of the superpower competition and the emergence of the postcolonial world. Through course readings and class discussion, students will examine the global dimensions of the Cold war. Each student will prepare a research paper on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3490 001/77292 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Chamberlin 4 15/15

HIST UN3577 Culture and Politics in the Progressive Era, 1890-1945. 4 points.

This class begins during the fabled "Gilded Age," when the nation's capitalist expansion created the world's largest economy but splintered Americans' ideals. From the fin-de-siècle through the cataclysms of World War II, we will explore how Americans defined, contested, and performed different meanings of American civilization through social reform movements, artistic expressions, and the everyday habits and customs of individuals and groups. The class will pay particular attention to how gender, race, and location--regional, international, and along the class ladder--shaped perspectives about what constituted American civilization and the national discourse about what it should become. Field(s): US

Fall 2017: HIST UN3577
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3577 001/16526 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Hilary-Anne Hallett 4 6/15

HIST UN3766 African Futures. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The premise of the course is that Africa's collective past - that which has emerged since the ending of the Atlantic slave trade - might usefully be thought of as a sequence of futures that were imperfectly realized.  Those "futures past" represent once-fixed points on the temporal horizon, points toward which African political leaders and intellectuals sought to move, or towards which they were compelled by the external actors who have historically played an outsized role in the continent's affairs.

HIST UN3807 Walking In and Out of the Archive. 4 points.

The seminar seeks to engage with a set of methodological concerns about the practices and probabilities of archives and history writing. It does so via close readings of key historical texts which engage and rearrange the documentary furniture of the archives, from both within and without. The concerns can be broadly articulated as: How statist is the mainstream archives, and how have historians attempted to mine and undermine it? With what apertures and techniques and disciplinary practices to capture the lives and deaths of those who produce goods and services, not documents? What is meant by ‘Historical Fieldwork’, and what are some of the ways in which historians have practiced it, whether writing about well-archived events, or the longue duree of a single village. What transpires when oral tales are written up from within the same cultural milieu as literary stories? What are the peculiarities of Oral History? And what have some of the best Oral Historians been able to accomplish? These questions will guide us through a set of important historiographic works, writings on archives, community histories. The students will develop a close appreciation of the challenges of doing and thinking historically from the margins and listening to the small voices in history.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3807
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3807 001/78441 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Shahid Amin 4 10/15

HIST UN3838 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. 

Fall 2017: HIST UN3838
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3838 001/27001 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Blackmar 4 12/12
HIST 3838 002/26289 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Matthew Connelly 4 12/12
HIST 3838 003/14755 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Marwa Elshakry 4 12/12

HIST UN3911 Medicine and Western Civilization. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors, but other majors are welcome.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar seeks to analyze the ways by which medicine and culture combine to shape our values and traditions. To this end, it will examine notable literary, medical, and social texts from classical antiquity to the present.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3911
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3911 001/76278 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
David Rothman 4 15/15

HIST UN3930 The Eastern Mediterranean in the Late Bronze Age. 4 points.

This course presents a comparative study of the histories of Egypt, the Near East, Anatolia and the Aegean world in the period from c. 1500-1100 BC, when several of the states provide a rich set of textual and archaeological data. It will focus on the region as a system with numerous participants whose histories will be studied in an international context. The course is a seminar: students are asked to investigate a topic (e.g., diplomacy, kingship, aspects of the economy, etc.) in several of the states involved and present their research in class and as a paper.

Fall 2017: HIST UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3930 001/24974 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Marc Van De Mieroop 4 0/15

HIST UN3938 Americans and the Natural World, 1800 to the Present. 4 points.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar deals with how Americans have treated and understood the natural world, connected or failed to connect to it, since 1800. It focuses on changing context over time, from the agrarian period to industrialization, followed by the rise of the suburban and hyper-technological landscape. We will trace the shift from natural history to evolutionary biology, give special attention to the American interest in entomology, ornithology, and botany, examine the quest to save pristine spaces, and read from the works of Buffon, Humboldt, Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Darwin, Aldo Leopold, Nabokov, among others. Perspectives on naming, classifying, ordering, and most especially, collecting, will come under scrutiny.  Throughout the semester we will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the environmentalist movement, confront those who thought they could defy nature, transcend it, and even live without it. Field(s): US

Spring 2017: HIST UN3938
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3938 001/61050 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
William Leach 4 2/12
Fall 2017: HIST UN3938
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3938 001/25669 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
William Leach 4 9/15

HIST GU4217 Women as Cold War Weapons . 4 points.

Cold War ideological campaigns for the “hearts and minds” abutted “hot war” confrontations between 1945 and 1991, and women engaged with both. This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role of women in the United States as a reflection and enactment of Cold War politics; (ii) to provide an understanding of cultural forces in building ideas in foreign markets; (iii) to reframe the understanding of power as a strategy of United States Cold War battles. To this end, the class will open with a history and examination of women and the traditional narratives of the nation at “wars,” and then continue to explore the political power of women, cultural diplomacy, military operations, and conclude with two case studies. This seminar examines the history of government and private sector mechanisms used to export national ideals by and about women in order to enact American foreign policy agendas in the Cold War. To build their knowledge, students will be asked to parse primary materials in the context of secondary readings. They will do class presentations and present at a conference, and will have the opportunity to discuss their interests with leading scholars of the Cold War. The requirements include significant weekly readings, postings, attendance at discussions, a class presentation, and participation in the class conference at the conclusion of the semester.

Fall 2017: HIST GU4217
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4217 001/27279 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Victoria Phillips 4 19/15

HIST GU4285 Post-Stalinism: The Soviet Union and Its Successor Societies, 1953-2012. 4 points.

This class focuses on the history of the Soviet Union and Russia between the death of Stalin/the end of totalitarianism and the present. It spans the turning-point date of 1991 when the Soviet Union abolished itself and was replaced by successor states, the most important of which is Russia. Not ending Soviet history with 1991 and not beginning Russian history with it either, we will seek to understand continuities as well as change. We will also draw on a diverse set of texts (and movies), including history, political science, journalism, fiction, and memoirs, feature and documentary movies. Geographically weighted toward Russia (and not the other also important successor states), in terms of content, this class concentrates on politics and society, including, crucially, the economy. These concepts, however, will be understood broadly. To come to grips with key issues in Soviet and Russian history in the historically short period after Stalinist totalitarianism, we will have to pay close attention to not only our analytical categories, but also to the way in which the political and the social have been understood by Soviet and Russian contemporaries. The class will introduce students to crucial questions of Russia's recent past, present, and future: authoritarianism and democratization, the role of the state and that of society, reform and retrenchment, communism and capitalism, and, last but not least, the nature of authority and legitimacy. 

Fall 2017: HIST GU4285
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4285 001/22307 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Tarik Amar 4 15/15

HIST GU4331 Modern Germany, 1900-2000. 4 points.

The development of Germany in the last century has influenced the history of Europe and, indeed, of the world in major and dramatic ways. Most historians agree that the country and its leaders played a crucial role in the outbreak of two world wars which cost some 80 million lives. Germany experienced a revolution in 1918, hyperinflation in 1923, the Great Depression after 1929, and the Nazi dictatorship in 1933. Between 1933 and 1945 there followed the brutal military conquest of most of Continental Europe and, finally, the Holocaust. After 1945, Germany was divided into two halves in which there emerged a communist dictatorship and a Western-style parliamentary-democratic system, respectively. The division of the country ended in 1989 with the collapse of the Honecker regime and the reunification of East and West Germany. No doubt, Germany’s history is confused and confusing and has therefore generated plenty of debate among historians. This course offers a comprehensive analysis of the country’s development in the 20th century. It is not just concerned with political events and military campaigns, but will also examine in considerable detail German society and its changing structures, relations between women and men, trends in both high and popular culture, and the ups and downs of an industrial economy in its global setting. The weekly seminars are designed to introduce you to the country’s conflicted history and the controversies it unleashed in international scholarship. Both M.A. students and advanced undergraduates are welcome.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4331 001/14583 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Volker Berghahn 4 16/18
Fall 2017: HIST GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4331 001/15398 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Volker Berghahn 4 11/18

HIST GU4532 The American Civil War. 4 points.

Few events in American history can match the significance of the American Civil War and few left a better cache of records for scholars seeking to understand its signal events, actors, and processes. Indeed, between 1861 and 1865, as the war assumed a massive scope it drove a process of state building and state-sponsored slave emancipation in the United States that ultimately reconfigured the nation and remade the terms of political membership in it. This is a research seminar. The course introduces students to key issues and contributions to the literature, and provides an opportunity to undertake independent research on any topic related to the history of the American Civil War. Pedagogically the course pursues a parallel process of reading in the relevant literature and guided research on a topic of the student's choice. The course is designed to model the research and writing process professional historians use, beginning with a paper proposal and bibliography of primary and secondary. sources. It proceeds through the various stages of the research process to produce drafts of the essay and finally the finished essay. All major written work is for peer review. The course fulfills the research requirement for the history major.

Fall 2017: HIST GU4532
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4532 001/73711 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Stephanie McCurry 4 16/15

HIST GU4904 WRITING LIVES: A SURVEY OF HISTORICAL APPROACHES AND TECHNIQUES. 4 points.

Ranging from ancient chronicles and saints’ lives to the emergence of modern subjectivity, the rise of the diary, the novel and the bureaucratic questionnaire, this course explores how historians across the ages have written about people’s lives. It asks what has happened to the notion of a life as a moral example, the changing value of ‘experience’ and the ‘ordinary person’, and charts how democracy altered the sense of what was worth recording and commemorating. It draws for its sources on a very wide range of cultures and epochs and concludes by asking the student to conduct their own life history research.

Fall 2017: HIST GU4904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4904 001/88548 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Mark Mazower 4 5/15

Spring 2017 History Courses

HIST UN1020 The Romans, 754 BC to 565 AD. 3 points.

Rome and its empire, from the beginning to late antiquity. Field(s): ANC

Spring 2017: HIST UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1020 001/68000 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
207 Mathematics Building
Nathan Pilkington 3 91/150

HIST UN2004 The Mediterranean World After Alexander the Great. 4 points.

The conquests of Alexander the Great spread Greek Civilization all around the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East. This course will examine the Hellenised (greek-based) urban society of the empires of the Hellenistic era (ca. 330-30BCE).

Spring 2017: HIST UN2004
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2004 001/29005 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Fayerweather
Richard Billows 4 28/60

HIST UN2072 Daily Life in Medieval Europe. 4 points.

This course is designed as traveller’s guide to medieval Europe. Its purpose is to provide a window to a long-lost world that provided the foundation of modern institutions and that continues to inspire the modern collective artistic and literary imagination with its own particularities. This course will not be a conventional history course concentrating on the grand narratives in the economic, social and political domains but rather intend to explore the day-to-day lives of the inhabitants, and attempts to have a glimpse of their mindset, their emotional spectrum, their convictions, prejudices, fears and hopes. It will be at once a historical, sociological and anthropological study of one of the most inspiring ages of European civilization. Subjects to be covered will include the birth and childhood, domestic life, sex and marriage, craftsmen and artisans, agricultural work, food and diet, the religious devotion, sickness and its cures, death, after death (purgatory and the apparitions), travelling, merchants and trades, inside the nobles’ castle, the Christian cosmos, and medieval technology. The lectures will be accompanied by maps, images of illuminated manuscripts and of medieval objects. Students will be required to attend a weekly discussion section to discuss the medieval texts bearing on that week’s subject. The written course assignment will be a midterm, final and two short papers, one an analysis of a medieval text and a second an analysis of a modern text on the Middle Ages. 

HIST UN2234 Dictators and Dictatorships in 20th Century Europe, 1900-1946. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Corequisite discussion HIST UN2335

In this course we focus on the origins and causes of dictatorship, beginning with the consequences of the Great War.  How do dictatorships and authoritarian regimes compare and contrast in the East and West of Europe?  To what extent can we trace the origins of leftist, Marxist-Leninist-Stalinist dictatorship and those of the right-wing (fascist and Nazi) dictatorships back to the 19th century philosophical and ideological antecedents?

HIST UN2336 Everyday Communism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Coreq discussion section HIST UN2237

This course surveys communism as an idea, political regime, and everyday experience in territories of today's Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, east Germany, Rumania and Balkan countries.  The stress is on social, gender, and economic politics that shaped lived experiences of central and eastern Europeans since the Eurasian revolution of 1905 until the waning of the socialist project in the 1970s and 1980s........

Spring 2017: HIST UN2336
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2336 001/78246 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Malgorzata Mazurek 4 19/50

HIST UN2360 Twentieth Century Britain: Between Democracy and Empire. 4 points.

This course surveys the main currents of British history from 1900 to the present, with particular attention to the changing place of Britain in the world and the changing shape of politics. Throughout this course will will ask:Where is power located in Britain and its empire? What held Britain and the empire together and what tore them apart? What was life like for Britons young and old, men and women, rich and poor, white and black - across the course of this century? When and how did social change happen? How did people respond?

Spring 2017: HIST UN2360
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2360 001/92396 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
633 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Susan Pedersen 4 44/75

HIST UN2377 INTERNATIONAL & GLOBAL HISTORY SINCE WWII. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

In this course students will explore contemporary international and global history, focusing on how states have cooperated and competed in the Cold War, decolonization, and regional crises. But lectures will also analyze how non-governmental organizations, cross-border migration, new means of communication, and global markets are transforming the international system as a whole. Group(s): B, C, D Field(s): INTL

Spring 2017: HIST UN2377
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2377 001/65295 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Matthew Connelly 4 70/120

HIST UN2491 U.S. Foreign Relations, 1890-1990. 3 points.

The aim is to provide an empirical grasp of U.S. foreign relations and to put in question the historiographical views of the periods and critical events that have come up to make that history. Emphasis will be put on determining how "the United States" has been grasped in relation to the world and how historiography has in turn grasped that retrospectively. Group(s): D Field(s): US

Spring 2017: HIST UN2491
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2491 001/27312 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
310 Fayerweather
Paul Chamberlin 3 60/70

HIST UN2555 America in Depression and War. 4 points.

This lecture examines the transforming effect of two cataclysmic events in the twentieth century.  We will study the ways in which both the Great Depression and World War II led to a major reordering of American politics and society.  By focusing on how the government and the country dealt with these national crises, we will explore a significant moment in the evolution of American political culture. Throughout the semester, we will examine how ordinary people experienced depression and war and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them. Topics include unemployment and economic decline, the rise of organized labor, New Deal politics, women in the war effort, the Japanese internment, the development of atomic science, and America as a world superpower.

Spring 2017: HIST UN2555
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2555 001/10941 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
Meg Jacobs 4 94/150

HIST UN2661 Modern Latin American History (Latin American Civilization II). 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Explores major themes in Latin American history from the independence period to the present. It will trace economic, political, intellectual, and cultural trends. Particular attention will be given to the enduring issue of social and racial inequality and the ways that the interactions of dominant and subordinate groups have helped shape the course of Latin American history.

HIST UN2663 Mexico From Revolution To Democracy. 4 points.

Twentieth-Century Mexican History from the revolution to transition  to democracy. The Course review politics, society, culture, foreign relations, and urbanization. Group(s): D Field(s): LA

Spring 2017: HIST UN2663
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2663 001/28004 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Pablo Piccato 4 29/60

HIST UN2711 African History since 1800. 4 points.

This class examines the history of the African continent from the Atlantic Slave trade (c. 1800) to the present, focusing in particular on the social, political, and religious changes and continuities that have shaped the continent over the course of the past three centuries.....

Spring 2017: HIST UN2711
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2711 001/87896 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
301m Fayerweather
John Straussberger 4 17/30

HIST UN2811 South Asia: Empire and Its Aftermath. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: None.

(No prerequisite.) We begin with the rise and fall of the Mughal Empire, and examine why and how the East India Company came to rule India in the eighteenth century. As the term progresses, we will investigate the objectives of British colonial rule in India and we will explore the nature of colonial modernity. The course then turns to a discussion of anti-colonial sentiment, both in the form of outright revolt, and critiques by early nationalists. This is followed by a discussion of Gandhi, his thought and his leadership of the nationalist movement. Finally, the course explores the partition of British India in 1947, examining the long-term consequences of the process of partition for the states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. We will focus in particular on the flowing themes: non-Western state formation; debates about whether British rule impoverished India; the structure and ideology of anti-colonial thought; identity formation and its connection to political, economic and cultural structures. The class relies extensively on primary texts, and aims to expose students to multiple historiographical perspectives for understanding South Asia's past.

Spring 2017: HIST UN2811
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2811 001/08898 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
405 Milbank Hall
Anupama Rao 4 58/103

HIST UN3104 Family, Sexuality & Marriage in Pre-Modern Europe. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This course examines the meaning of marriage in European culture from the early Middle Ages until the eighteenth century, concentrating on the period from 1200 to 1800. It begins with a study of Jewish and Christian teachings about marriage – the nature of the conjugal bond, the roles of men and women within marriage, and marital sexuality. It traces changes in that narrative over the centuries, analyzes its relationship to actual practice among various social groups, and ends in the eighteenth century with an examination of the ideology of the companionate marriage of modern western culture and its relation to class formation. Group(s): A Field(s): EME

Spring 2017: HIST UN3104
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3104 001/21399 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Martha Howell 4 5/15

HIST UN3120 Censorship and Freedom of Expression in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

In this course we will examine theoretical and historical developments that framed the notions of censorship and free expression in early modern Europe. In the last two decades, the role of censorship has become one of the significant elements in discussions of early modern culture. The history of printing and of the book, of the rise national-political cultures and their projections of control, religious wars and denominational schisms are some of the factors that intensified debate over the free circulation of ideas and speech. Indexes, Inquisition, Star Chamber, book burnings and beheadings have been the subjects of an ever growing body of scholarship. Field(s): EME

Spring 2017: HIST UN3120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3120 001/29583 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Elisheva Carlebach 4 12/15

HIST UN3152 Byzantine Encounters in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This seminar examines Middle Eastern and Latin Western encounters with Byzantine society and culture, focusing on the 6th-15th centuries. When merchants, pilgrims, scholars, diplomats, and soldiers visited the lands of the Greek-Christian-Roman empire of the Eastern Mediterranean (today called Byzantium), what did they see? And what did the rest of the world look like to the Byzantines? We will study primary sources left by medieval Greeks, Arabs, Latins, and others, critically examining the hermeneutical acts involved in each cultural encounter, in order to probe the meaning and significance of these encounters in western Eurasian society and culture. Interested students can apply to take the seminar here:  https://goo.gl/forms/ECk3ISsoghel2Enf2

Spring 2017: HIST UN3152
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3152 001/61999 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
306 Hamilton Hall
Alexandre Roberts 4 15/15

HIST UN3189 Composing the Self in Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

This course explores manners of conceiving and being a self in early modern Europe (ca. 1400-1800). Through the analysis of a range of sources, from autobiographical writings to a selection of theological, philosophical, artistic, and literary works, we will address the concept of personhood as a lens through which to analyze topics such as the valorization of interiority, the formation of mechanist and sensationalist philosophies of selfhood, and, more generally, the human person's relationship with material and existential goods. This approach is intended to deepen and complicate our understanding of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and other movements around which histories of the early modern period have typically been narrated. 

Spring 2017: HIST UN3189
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3189 001/23661 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Charly Coleman 4 11/12

HIST UN2213 Early Russian History (to 1800). 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must register for corequisite discussion section HIST UN2214

Early Russian History is the first semester of a full-year survey of Russian history; the second semester, Modern Russian History (Since 1800), will be offered in 2017-18. (Each may also be taken independently.) During this semester, we will first look at societies in the Black Sea region and Eurasian plain – their formation, evolution, and sometimes demise – until the emergence of an early modern empire centered in Moscow. The history of the Russian Empire proper begins with the conquest of the Khanate of Kazan in 1552, and culminates in the modern European empire of Peter I and Catherine II. We will examine, in turn, the Black Sea civilizations of antiquity and the medieval age; the Mongol Empire and its westernmost projection, the Golden Horde; the city of Moscow and the Muscovite Empire (15th –17th centuries) over which it presided; and, finally, the new imperial capital of St. Petersburg and the monarchs, the empire, the foreign policy and society of the eighteenth century. We will pay special attention to religion, cultural interaction, myth, monarchy, empire – all themes essential to current historical scholarship.

Spring 2017: HIST UN2213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2213 001/17298 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
301m Fayerweather
Catherine Evtuhov 4 12/35

HIST UN3305 The European Enlightenment. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will include an in-depth examination of some major tinkers and texts of the French, Germans, and Scottish Enlightenments. By reading works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Lessing, Mendelssohn, and Hume, we will examine their radically divergent responses to the central intellectual quandries of their day, and in many ways our own: the realtionship between rationalism, science, and faith; religion and the state; the individual and the polity; cosmopolitanism and particularism; pluralism and relativism; and the meaning of liberty. Group(s): A, B

Spring 2017: HIST UN3305
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3305 001/18908 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Charly Coleman 4 10/12

HIST UN3437 Poisoned Worlds: Corporate Behavior and Public Health. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

In the decades since the publication of Silent Spring and the rise of the environmental movement, public awareness of the impact of industrial products on human health has grown enormously. There is growing concern over BPA, lead, PCBs, asbestos, and synthetic materials that make up the world around us. This course will focus on environmental history, industrial and labor history as well as on how twentieth century consumer culture shapes popular and professional understanding of disease. Throughout the term the class will trace the historical transformation of the origins of disease through primary sources such as documents gathered in lawsuits, and medical and public health literature. Students will be asked to evaluate historical debates about the causes of modern epidemics of cancer, heart disease, lead poisoning, asbestos-related illnesses and other chronic conditions. They will also consider where responsibility for these new concerns lies, particularly as they have emerged in law suits. Together, we will explore the rise of modern environmental movement in the last 75 years. 

Spring 2017: HIST UN3437
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3437 001/15313 T 8:10am - 10:00am
311 Fayerweather
David Rosner 4 13/12

HIST UN3518 Columbia and Slavery. 4 points.

In this course, students will write original, independent papers of around 25 pages, based on research in both primary and secondary sources, on an aspect of the relationship between Columbia College and its colonial predecessor King's College, with the institution of slavery.

Spring 2017: HIST UN3518
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3518 001/72198 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Karl Jacoby 4 12/18

HIST UN3553 Slavery and Finance in Nineteenth Century America. 4 points.

This research seminar exposes students to selected readings in the history of slavery and finance in the United States, from the American Revolution to the end of the nineteenth century.  The course explores the crucial roles of slavery and finance for the economic growth of the United States.......

Spring 2017: HIST UN3553
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3553 001/28779 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Manuel Bautista Gonzalez 4 9/15

HIST UN3595 American Consumer Culture. 4 points.

This seminar examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the “good life” through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Spring 2017: HIST UN3595
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3595 001/72043 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Meg Jacobs 4 16/15

HIST UN3687 LAT AMER RIGHT IN THE COLD WAR. 4 points.

The historical literature on the nature of international fascism and the transition of fascist ideologies into the Cold War era has been expanding rapidly in recent years, spanning over multiple intellectual debates...


This course sets out to provide the analytic tools for debating the rise of Latin America's post-fascism during the 1960s and 1970s....

Spring 2017: HIST UN3687
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3687 001/81496 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Daniel Kressel 4 15/15

HIST UN3779 Africa and France. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: reading knowledge of French is highly encouraged.

This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current ‘memory wars’ in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa. Group(s): B, C Field(s): AFR, MEU

Spring 2017: HIST UN3779
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3779 001/63448 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Gregory Mann 4 21/15

HIST UN3839 Senior Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

A year-long course for outstanding senior majors who want to conduct research in primary sources on a topic of their choice in any aspect of history, and to write a senior thesis possibly leading toward departmental honors. Field(s): ALL

Spring 2017: HIST UN3839
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3839 001/18822 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Elisheva Carlebach 4 10/10
HIST 3839 002/67187 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 Fayerweather
Adam Kosto 4 11/10
HIST 3839 003/73607 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
208 Casa Hispanica
Natasha Lightfoot 4 10/10

HIST UN3938 Americans and the Natural World, 1800 to the Present. 4 points.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar deals with how Americans have treated and understood the natural world, connected or failed to connect to it, since 1800. It focuses on changing context over time, from the agrarian period to industrialization, followed by the rise of the suburban and hyper-technological landscape. We will trace the shift from natural history to evolutionary biology, give special attention to the American interest in entomology, ornithology, and botany, examine the quest to save pristine spaces, and read from the works of Buffon, Humboldt, Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Darwin, Aldo Leopold, Nabokov, among others. Perspectives on naming, classifying, ordering, and most especially, collecting, will come under scrutiny.  Throughout the semester we will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the environmentalist movement, confront those who thought they could defy nature, transcend it, and even live without it. Field(s): US

Spring 2017: HIST UN3938
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3938 001/61050 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
William Leach 4 2/12
Fall 2017: HIST UN3938
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3938 001/25669 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
William Leach 4 9/15

HIST UN3942 Constitutions and Democracy in the Middle East. 4 points.

Prerequisites: application requirements: SEE UNDERGRAD SEMINAR SECTION OF DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

Where the establishment of sustainable democracies is concerned, the Middle East has perhaps the poorest record of all regions of the world since World War II. This is in spite of the fact that two of the first constitutions in the non-Western world were established in this region, in the Ottoman Empire in 1876 and in Iran in 1906. Notwithstanding these and other subsequent democratic and constitutional experiments, Middle Eastern countries have been ruled over the past century by some of the world's last absolute monarchies, as well as a variety of other autocratic, military-dominated and dictatorial regimes. This course, intended primarily for advanced undergraduates, explores this paradox. It will examine the evolution of constitutional thought and practice, and how it was embodied in parliamentary and other democratic systems in the Middle East. It will examine not only the two Ottoman constitutional periods of 1876-78 and 1908-18, and that of Iran from 1905 onwards, but also the various precursors to these experiments, and some of their 20th century sequels in the Arab countries, Turkey and Iran. This will involve detailed study of the actual course of several Middle Eastern countries' democratic experiments, of the obstacles they faced, and of their outcomes. Students are expected to take away a sense of the complexities of the problems faced by would-be Middle Eastern democrats and constitutionalists, and of some of the reasons why the Middle East has appeared to be an exception to a global trend towards democratization in the post-Cold War era.

HIST UN3962 Technology, Work, and Capitalism: A History. 4 points.

In recent years, public conversations about the relationship between technology and work seem to have been conducted with particular fervor: claims of revolutionary ease and freedom sit side-by-side with dystopian visions of exploitation, surveillance, and growing alienation.  Will technological development lead to widespread deskilling or a new "sharing economy"?  Will it enrich the few at the expense of the many or bring general prosperity?  Are Uber, Etsy, and Amazon vanguards of an ideal future or harbingers of doom?

Spring 2017: HIST UN3962
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3962 001/66300 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Whitney Laemmli 4 16/15

HIST GU4040 Biohistory of the Ancient Mediterranean. 4 points.

We will study the biological standard of living in the ancient Mediterranean with particular reference to the factors that most influenced population growth in the pre-modern world. The class is divided into three parts. To begin, students will explore the human body as historical evidence, learning how to identify evidence of violence and disease in the archaeological and historical records. Next, we will explore the epidemic diseases of antiquity in more detail with special attention given to the three great plagues of the period. Finally, we will consider formal demography and the integration of historical evidence into parametric models of ancient populations.  

Spring 2017: HIST GU4040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4040 001/16150 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
513 Fayerweather
Nathan Pilkington 4 12/15

HIST GU4223 Personality and Society in 19th-Century Russia. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A seminar reviewing some of the major works of Russian thought, literature, and memoir literature that trace the emergence of intelligentsia ideologies in 19th- and 20th-century Russia. Focuses on discussion of specific texts and traces the adoption and influence of certain western doctrines in Russia, such as idealism, positivism, utopian socialism, Marxism, and various 20th-century currents of thought. Field(s): MEU

Spring 2017: HIST GU4223
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4223 001/11379 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg
Richard Wortman 4 7/15

HIST GU4240 The Cold War in Culture, Cultures of the Cold War. 4 points.

In this course we will read and discuss key contributions to a young and growing field, the history of culture in the Cold War, which includes the cultural history of the Cold War and the history of the cultural Cold War, closely related but analytically distinct categories.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4240
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4240 001/21746 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Tarik Amar 4 13/15

HIST GU4234 Genocides and Holocaust. 4 points.

What were the historical roots of the Holocaust, from early Christian Anti-Judaism to the development of "modern", nationalistic, Social-Darwinist, racist Anti-Semitism?  In this course we will examine the victims (mentally ill persons, homosexuals, Roma, etc.) of the Nazi's eugenic policy........

Spring 2017: HIST GU4234
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4234 001/16699 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Laszlo Karsai 4 4/15

HIST GU4331 Modern Germany, 1900-2000. 4 points.

The development of Germany in the last century has influenced the history of Europe and, indeed, of the world in major and dramatic ways. Most historians agree that the country and its leaders played a crucial role in the outbreak of two world wars which cost some 80 million lives. Germany experienced a revolution in 1918, hyperinflation in 1923, the Great Depression after 1929, and the Nazi dictatorship in 1933. Between 1933 and 1945 there followed the brutal military conquest of most of Continental Europe and, finally, the Holocaust. After 1945, Germany was divided into two halves in which there emerged a communist dictatorship and a Western-style parliamentary-democratic system, respectively. The division of the country ended in 1989 with the collapse of the Honecker regime and the reunification of East and West Germany. No doubt, Germany’s history is confused and confusing and has therefore generated plenty of debate among historians. This course offers a comprehensive analysis of the country’s development in the 20th century. It is not just concerned with political events and military campaigns, but will also examine in considerable detail German society and its changing structures, relations between women and men, trends in both high and popular culture, and the ups and downs of an industrial economy in its global setting. The weekly seminars are designed to introduce you to the country’s conflicted history and the controversies it unleashed in international scholarship. Both M.A. students and advanced undergraduates are welcome.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4331 001/14583 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Volker Berghahn 4 16/18
Fall 2017: HIST GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4331 001/15398 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Volker Berghahn 4 11/18

HIST GU4367 Cities in Britain, its Empire and the World. 4 points.

This seminar provides a history of Britain and its empire from the mid nineteenth century  to the present from the perspective of its cities.  By 1880 London was the largest city in the world, larger than Paris, New York, Tokyo, Beijing and Mexico City combined.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4367
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4367 001/97191 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
602 Northwest Corner
Sam Wetherell 4 17/18

HIST GU4470 Cold War Power. 4 points.

Cold War “soft power” ideological campaigns for the “hearts and minds of men” abutted “hot war” confrontations between 1945 and 1991 and beyond. This seminar examines the history of government and private sector mechanisms used to export national ideals and ideas about America in order to enact foreign policy agendas in contested regions. The class will open with an examination of power - hard and soft - propaganda, "truth," and "informational" practices - and then continue to explore cultural diplomacy. Primary sources including radio broadcasts, music, agriculture, and architecture are examined in the context of secondary readings about the Cold War. Because New York City became postwar “cultural capital of the world,” student trips include the Rockefeller Archives Center, the Museum of Radio and Television, Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts archives, and the Oral History Research Center, Rare Book and Manuscript Library.   This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role of culture as a reflection and enactment of Cold War politics; (ii) to provide an understanding of cultural forces in building ideas in foreign markets; (iii) to reframe the understanding of “soft” and “hard” power as a strategy of Cold War battles.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4470
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4470 001/62097 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Victoria Phillips 4 14/15

HIST GU4531 Nature, Labor, and Capital in the Archives. 4 points.

This course explores the connections between workers, capitalists, and the natural environment.  Individual sessions will examine factory labor and the industrial revolution; slavery, farming, and transportation technologies; the rise of the city, and the growth of labor and environmental movements.  Working with Columbia's Rare Book and Manuscript Library.....

Spring 2017: HIST GU4531
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4531 001/04995 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
657 Butler Library
Thai Jones 4 13/15

HIST GU4696 The Social Question and State Building in Latin America. 4 points.

The social question emerged in Latin America at the end of the nineteenth century as a consequence of the process of modernization and economic expansion of the region, coinciding with processes of state consolidation in the new nations.  In his study of the Chilean system of industrial relations, James Morris defined the social question as "all the social, labor and ideological consequences of emerging industrialization and urbanization...

Spring 2017: HIST GU4696
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4696 001/22696 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
302 Fayerweather
Eduardo Zimmermann 4 6/15

HIST GU4769 Health and Healing in African History. 4 points.

This course charts the history of health and healing from, as far as is possible, a perspective interior to Africa. It explores changing practices and understandings of disease, etiology, healing and well-being from pre-colonial times through into the post-colonial. A major theme running throughout the course is the relationship between medicine, the body, power and social groups. This is balanced by an examination of the creative ways in which Africans have struggled to compose healthy communities, albeit with varied success, whether in the fifteenth century or the twenty-first. Field(s): AFR

Spring 2017: HIST GU4769
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4769 001/78779 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Rhiannon Stephens 4 12/15

HIST GU4811 Encounters with Nature: The History of Environment and Health in South Asia and Beyond. 4 points.

This course offers an understanding of the interdisciplinary field of environmental, health and population history and will discuss historical and policy debates with a cross cutting, comparative relevance: such as the making and subjugation of colonized peoples and natural and disease landscapes under British colonial rule; modernizing states and their interest in development and knowledge and technology building, the movement and migration of populations, and changing place of public health and healing in south Asia. The key aim of the course will be to introduce students to reading and analyzing a range of historical scholarship, and interdisciplinary research on environment, health, medicine and populations in South Asia and to introduce them to an exploration of primary sources for research; and also to probe the challenges posed by archives and sources in these fields. Some of the overarching questions that shape this course are as follows: How have environmental pasts and medical histories been interpreted, debated and what is their contemporary resonance? What have been the encounters (political, intellectual, legal, social and cultural) between the environment, its changing landscapes and state? How have citizens, indigenous communities, and vernacular healers mediated and shaped these encounters and inserted their claims for sustainability, subsistence or survival? How have these changing landscapes shaped norms about bodies, care and beliefs? The course focuses on South Asia but also urges students to think and make linkages beyond regional geographies in examining interconnected ideas and practices in histories of the environment, medicine and health. Topics will therefore include (and students are invited to add to these perspectives and suggest additional discussion themes): colonial and globalized circuits of medical knowledge, with comparative case studies from Africa and East Asia; and the travel and translation of environmental ideas and of medical practices through
growing global networks.

Spring 2017: HIST GU4811
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4811 001/77248 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
201a Philosophy Hall
Kavita Sivaramakrishnan 4 9/15

HIST GU4984 Hacking the Archive. 4 points.

This is a hands-on, project-driven, Laboratory Seminar that explores the frontiers of historical analysis in the information age.  it harnesses the exponential growth in information resulting from the digitization of older materials and the explosion of "born digital" electronic records........

Spring 2017: HIST GU4984
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4984 001/71999 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Matthew Connelly 4 16/15

2017-2018 Cross-listed Courses

NOTE: The following courses only count towards the History degree if the instructor is a History faculty member or an affiliate with the History Department. For additional information, please consult Sia Mensah at sjm2206@columbia.edu. All courses from the Barnard History Department also count towards the History degree.


AFCV UN1020 African Civilizations. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa' and ‘being African.' Field(s): AFR*

Fall 2017: AFCV UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFCV 1020 001/72381  
4 22/22
AFCV 1020 002/10302  
4 12/22

LACV UN1020 Primary Texts of Latin American Civilization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

It focuses on key texts from Latin America in their historical and intellectual context and seeks to understand their structure and the practical purposes they served using close reading and, when possible, translations.  The course seeks to establish a counterpoint to the list of canonical texts of Contemporary Civilization. The selections are not intended to be compared directly to those in CC but to raise questions about the different contexts in which ideas are used, the critical exchanges and influences (within and beyond Latin America) that shaped ideas in the region, and the long-term intellectual, political, and cultural pursuits that have defined Latin American history. The active engagement of students toward these texts is the most important aspect of class work and assignments.

Spring 2017: LACV UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LACV 1020 001/25892 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Caterina Pizzigoni 4 21/22
LACV 1020 002/67195 M W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
507 Philosophy Hall
Rachel Newman 4 13/22
Fall 2017: LACV UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LACV 1020 001/71273  
4 20/22
LACV 1020 002/63278  
4 4/22

ASCE UN1359 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: China. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE V2360
Corequisites: NOTE:Students must register for a discussion section, ASCE V2360

The evolution of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on characteristic institutions and traditions.

Spring 2017: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/19107 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Harrison Huang 4 53/80
Fall 2017: ASCE UN1359
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1359 001/13153 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
4 90/90

ASCE UN1361 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations: Japan. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE V2371
Corequisites: NOTE: Students must register for a discussion section ASCE V2371

A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century.

Spring 2017: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/10261 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Gregory Pflugfelder 4 54/80
Fall 2017: ASCE UN1361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCE 1361 001/70734 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
David Lurie 4 90/90

CSER UN3928 Colonization/Decolonization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 22.

Prerequisites: Open to CSER majors/concentrators only. Others may be allowed to register with the instructor's permission.

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; and European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

Spring 2017: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/11217 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
420 Hamilton Hall
Karl Jacoby 4 21/22
Fall 2017: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/17636 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Natasha Lightfoot 4 0/22