Earth and Environmental Sciences

Departmental Offices:
556-7 Schermerhorn; 212-854-4525
106 Geoscience, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8550
http://eesc.columbia.edu

Chair of Department:  

Prof. Sidney Hemming, sidney@ldeo.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies:

Prof. Meredith Nettles, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8613; 557 Schermerhorn Extension; nettles@ldeo.columbia.edu

Director of Academic Administration and Finance:

Sally Odland, 108 Geoscience, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; 845-365-8633; odland@ldeo.columbia.edu

The undergraduate major in Earth and environmental sciences provides an understanding of the natural functioning of our planet and considers the consequences of human interactions with it. Our program for majors aims to convey an understanding of how the complex Earth system works at a level that encourages students to think creatively about the Earth system processes and how to address multidisciplinary environmental problems. The breadth of material covered provides an excellent background for those planning to enter the professions of law, business, diplomacy, public policy, teaching, journalism, etc. At the same time, the program provides sufficient depth so that our graduates are prepared for graduate school in one of the Earth sciences. The program can be adjusted to accommodate students with particular career goals in mind.

The department’s close affiliations with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), the Earth Institute at Columbia (EI), and several departments within the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences afford opportunities for student participation in a wide variety of current research programs. Summer employment, research, and additional educational opportunities are available at Lamont and GISS. The department encourages majors to become involved in a research project by their junior year.

All majors and concentrators, when planning their programs of study, should regularly consult the directors of undergraduate studies and make themselves aware of the requirements for their particular program.

Programs of Study

Environmental Science Major

The environmental science major curriculum provides an introduction to a variety of fields of study relevant to the environment. Environmental science majors are required to take three semesters of introductory courses and to develop a grounding in basic physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics. Here, students may select courses depending on their interest. With this introduction to the Earth’s environment and equipped with a knowledge of the basic sciences, students are prepared to choose a set of upper-level courses in consultation with an undergraduate adviser. All environmental science majors are required to complete a research project, providing a practical application of mastered course work. This research culminates in a senior thesis. The research and the thesis are usually done at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory with guidance from a faculty member or a research scientist. However, other options are also possible.

Environmental science majors have an option to complete the special concentration in environmental biology for environmental science majors.

Earth Science Major

The major in Earth science follows a similar rationale but is designed to allow students to pursue particular fields of the Earth sciences in greater depth. Compared with the environmental science major, one fewer introductory course is required, while one additional advanced course should be part of the plan of study. The Earth science major also offers the possibility of in-depth field experience through a six- to eight-week geology summer field course, arrangements for which are made through another university. The research and senior thesis capstone requirements are the same as for the environmental science major. The geology summer field course may be used as an alternative means of fulfilling the capstone requirement in the Earth science major.

Concentrations

The program for concentrators serves students who want more exposure to Earth and environmental science than is provided by introductory-level courses. The program aims to provide concentrators with experience in data analysis and a thorough introduction to the Earth's systems.

The concentrations in environmental science and in Earth science are designed to give students an understanding of how the Earth works and an introduction to the methods used to investigate Earth processes, including their capabilities and limitations. Concentrators often join the social professions (e.g., business, law, medicine, etc.) and take with them a strong scientific background. They take the same introductory courses as the majors, but fewer basic science and upper-level courses are required.

In addition to the environmental science and Earth science concentrations, the department sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental biology major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental biology major in order to receive credit for the special concentration. There is also a special concentration in environmental biology for environmental science majors sponsored by the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology.

Departmental Honors

The Department of Earth and Environmental Science awards departmental honors to the major or majors in Earth science or environmental science judged to have the best overall academic record. The award is accorded to no more than 10% of the graduating class, or one student in the case of a class smaller than 10. A grade point average of at least 3.6 in the major and a senior thesis or equivalent research of high quality are required. Students who wish to be considered should contact the director of undergraduate studies early in their senior year.

Professors

  • Wallace S. Broecker
  • Nicholas Christie-Blick
  • Joel E. Cohen
  • Peter B. de Menocal
  • Hugh Ducklow
  • Sonya Dyhrman
  • Peter Eisenberger
  • Göran Ekström
  • Arlene M. Fiore
  • Steven L. Goldstein
  • Arnold L. Gordon
  • Kevin L. Griffin
  • Sidney R. Hemming (Chair)
  • Peter B. Kelemen (Associate Chair)
  • Galen McKinley
  • Jerry F. McManus
  • William H. Menke
  • John C. Mutter
  • Paul E. Olsen
  • Stephanie L. Pfirman (Barnard)
  • Terry A. Plank
  • Lorenzo M. Polvani
  • G. Michael Purdy
  • Peter Schlosser
  • Christopher H. Scholz
  • Adam H. Sobel
  • Sean C. Solomon
  • Marc Spiegelman
  • Martin Stute (Barnard)
  • Maria Tolstoy
  • Renata Wentzcovich

Associate Professors

  • Bärbel Hönisch
  • Kerry Key
  • Meredith Nettles

Assistant Professors

  • Ryan Abernathey
  • Jacqueline Austermann
  • Jonathan Kingslake

Adjunct Professors

  • Robert F. Anderson
  • W. Roger Buck IV
  • Denton Ebel
  • John J. Flynn
  • James Gaherty
  • Lisa M. Goddard
  • Arthur Lerner-Lam
  • Alberto Malinverno
  • Douglas G. Martinson
  • Ronald L. Miller
  • Mark A. Norell
  • Dorothy M. Peteet
  • Maureen Raymo
  • Andrew Robertson
  • Joerg M. Schaefer
  • Christopher Small
  • Taro Takahashi
  • Minfang Ting
  • Felix Waldhauser
  • Spahr C. Webb
  • Gisela Winckler

Adjunct Associate Professors

  • Natalie Boelman
  • Alessandra Giannini
  • Andrew Juhl

Lecturers

  • Pietro Ceccato
  • Andreas Turnherr
  • Kevin Uno

Associates

  • Erin Coughlin
  • Brian Kahn
  • Andrew Kruczkiewicz

Emeritus

  • Mark Cane
  • James Hays
  • Paul Richards
  • Lynn Sykes
  • David Walker

Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators

Advising

All majors and concentrators, when planning their programs of study, should regularly consult the directors of undergraduate studies, who can be contacted through the department office on the fifth floor of Schermerhorn. The requirements are different for each major and concentration and must be met in conjunction with the general requirements for the bachelor's degree. Declaration of the major must be approved by the department and filed in the departmental office.

Substitutions and Exceptions

  1. Higher-level courses may be used to satisfy supporting mathematics and science requirements for students with Advanced Placement preparation with the permission of the major adviser.
  2. In addition to the courses listed for the depth, and breadth and related courses requirements, several graduate-level courses offered in the department as well as several advanced courses offered at Barnard may be substituted with the permission of the major adviser.
  3. 1000-level courses in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department can not be used toward meeting the requirements of any of the majors, concentrations, or special concentrations.
  4. The following courses are not suitable for undergraduates and can not be used toward meeting any of the requirements for the majors, concentrations, or special concentrations:
    EESC W4001
    EESC GU4400
    EESC GU4401Quantitative Models of Climate-Sensitive Natural and Human Systems
    EESC GU4930Earth's Oceans and Atmosphere
    EESC GU4404Regional Climate and Climate Impacts

Grading

A grade of C- or better must be obtained for a course to count toward the majors, concentrations, or special concentrations. The grade of P is not acceptable, but a course taken Pass/D/Fail may be counted if and only if the P is uncovered by the Registrar's deadline.


Major in Earth Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The major in Earth science requires a minimum of 45.5 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System

Students who wish to take both EESC UN2100 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System and EESC UN2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System can include one of these under breadth and related fields below.

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

One semester of Calculus at the level of Calculus I or higher (3 credits)
MATH UN1101Calculus I
Select one of the following three-course sequences:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
 - PHYS UN1201
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
and General Physics I
CHEM UN1403
 - PHYS UN1201
 - PHYS UN1202
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
and General Physics I
and General Physics II

Capstone Experience

Select one of the following:
Senior Research Seminar
and Environmental Science Senior Seminar
Senior Research Seminar
and Environmental Science Senior Seminar
A six to eight week summer geology field course

Breadth and Related Fields Requirement

A minimum of 6 points (two courses) chosen with the major adviser are required.

Breadth and related field courses are science courses relevant for an Earth science major that do not require an Earth science background. Several such courses are offered at the 2000-, 3000- and 4000-level in the department and at Barnard. Examples include:

EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System
Field Geology
Environmental Data Analysis
EESC GU4050Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
EESC GU4600Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
EESC GU4917Earth/Human Interactions
Alternative energy resources

Also included among breadth and related fields courses are science, mathematics, statistics, and engineering courses offered by other departments that count toward fulfilling degree requirements in those departments.

Depth Requirement

A minimum of 12 points (four courses) chosen with the major adviser to provide depth in the field of Earth science.

These courses build on the foundation and supporting courses listed above and provide a coherent focus in some area of Earth science. Students should include at least one of the following in their course of study:

EESC UN3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC UN3201 Solid Earth Dynamics

Areas of focus include one of the courses listed above and three or more additional courses. Students are not required to specialize in a focus area, but examples are given below for those who choose to do so.

Geological Science
EESC GU4090Introduction to Geochronology and Thermochronology
EESC GU4113Introduction to Mineralogy
EESC GU4223Sedimentary Geology
EESC GU4230Crustal Deformation
EESC GU4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EESC GU4887Isotope Geology I
EESC GU4947Plate Tectonics
It is strongly recommended that students focusing in geological science take the summer geology field course as their capstone experience.
Geochemistry
EESC UN3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC BC3016Environmental Measurements
EESC BC3200Ecotoxicology
EESC GU4090Introduction to Geochronology and Thermochronology
EESC GU4113Introduction to Mineralogy
EESC GU4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EESC GU4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC GU4887Isotope Geology I
EESC GU4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
It is recommended that students focusing in geochemistry take CHEM UN1403-CHEM UN1404 General Chemistry I and II, and PHYS UN1201 General Physics I as their supporting science sequence.
Atmosphere and Ocean Science
EESC GU4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC GU4920Paleoceanography
EESC GU4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC GU4925Principles of Physical Oceanography
EESC GU4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
It is recommended that students focusing on atmosphere and ocean science also take a course in fluid dynamics and a course in differential equations.
Solid Earth Geophysics
EESC GU4230Crustal Deformation
EESC GU4300The Earth's Deep Interior
EESC GU4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
EESC GU4947Plate Tectonics
EESC GU4949Introduction to Seismology
It is recommended that students focusing in solid Earth geophysics take PHYS UN1201-PHYS UN1202 General Physics I and II, and CHEM UN1403 General Chemistry I as their supporting science sequence and also take MATH UN1201 Calculus II.
Climate
EESC UN3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC BC3025Hydrology
EESC GU4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC GU4330Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate
EESC GU4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC GU4920Paleoceanography
EESC GU4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC GU4925Principles of Physical Oceanography
EESC GU4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
Paleontology
EESC GU4223Sedimentary Geology
EESC GU4550Plant Ecophysiology
EESC GU4920Paleoceanography
EESC GU4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC GU4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
It is recommended that students focusing in paleontology take EESC UN2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System, as one of their foundation courses.

Major in Environmental Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The major in environmental science requires a minimum of 47 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC UN2300Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

One semester of Calculus at the level of Calculus I or higher (3 credits)
MATH UN1101Calculus I
Select one of the following three-course sequences:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
 - PHYS UN1201
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
and General Physics I
CHEM UN1403
 - PHYS UN1201
 - PHYS UN1202
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
and General Physics I
and General Physics II
CHEM UN1403
 - EEEB UN2001
 - PHYS UN1201
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
and Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
and General Physics I

Capstone Experience

EESC BC3800Senior Research Seminar
or EESC BC3801 Senior Research Seminar
EESC UN3901Environmental Science Senior Seminar

Breadth and Related Fields Requirement

A minimum of 6 points (two courses) chosen with the major adviser are required.

Breadth and related field courses are science courses relevant for an environmental science major that do not require an environmental science background. Several such courses are offered at the 2000-, 3000- and 4000-level in the department and at Barnard. Examples include:

EESC BC3017Environmental Data Analysis
EESC GU4050Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing
EESC GU4600Earth Resources and Sustainable Development
EESC GU4917Earth/Human Interactions
EESC UN3010Field Geology

Also included among breadth and related fields courses are science, mathematics, statistics, and engineering courses offered by other departments that count toward fulfilling degree requirements in those departments.

Depth Requirement

A minimum of 9 points (three courses) chosen with the major adviser to provide depth in the field of environmental science.

These courses build on the foundation and supporting courses listed above and provide a coherent focus in some area of environmental science. Students should include at least one of the following in their course of study:

EESC UN3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC UN3201 Solid Earth Dynamics

Areas of focus include one of the courses listed above and two or more additional courses. Students are not required to specialize in a focus area, but examples are given below for those who choose to do so.

Environmental Geology
EESC GU4076Geologic Mapping
EESC GU4480Paleobiology and Earth System History
EAEE E3221Environmental geophysics
It is recommended that students focusing in environmental geology also take EESC W4050 Remote Sensing.
Environmental Geochemistry
EESC UN3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC GU4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC GU4887Isotope Geology I
EESC GU4924Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
EESC GU4888Stable Isotope Geochemistry
EESC GU4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
Hydrology
EESC GU4076Geologic Mapping
EESC GU4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC GU4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC BC3025Hydrology
EAEE E3221Environmental geophysics
Climate Change
EESC UN3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC GU4008Introduction to Atmospheric Science
EESC GU4330Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate
EESC GU4480Paleobiology and Earth System History
EESC GU4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC GU4920Paleoceanography
It is recommended that students focusing in environmental geology also take EESC GU4050 Remote Sensing.
Energy and Resources
EESC GU4076Geologic Mapping
EESC GU4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EAEE E2002Alternative energy resources

Concentration in Earth Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The concentration in Earth science requires a minimum of 25 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
or EESC UN2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System
EESC UN2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

Two science or mathematics courses (6-7 points) selected from among those listed for the Earth science major above.

Depth and Breadth and Related Fields Requirements

A minimum of 10 points (typically three courses) is required as follows:

EESC UN3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC UN3201 Solid Earth Dynamics
One additional course chosen from those listed under Depth Requirement for the earth science major above.
The third course selected from those listed under either Depth Requirement or Breadth and Related Fields Requirement for the earth science major above.

Concentration in Environmental Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The concentration in environmental science requires a minimum of 25.5 points, distributed as follows:

Foundation Courses

EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC UN2300Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Supporting Mathematics and Science Courses

Two science or mathematics courses (6-7 points) selected from among those listed for the environmental science major above.

Depth and Breadth and Related Fields Requirements

A minimum of 6 points (two courses) is required as follows:

EESC UN3101Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet
or EESC UN3201 Solid Earth Dynamics
One additional course selected from those listed under either Depth Requirement or Breadth and Related Fields Requirement for the environmental science major above.

Special Concentration in Environmental Science for Majors in Environmental Biology

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental biology major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental biology major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

The special concentration in environmental science requires a minimum of 31.5 points, distributed as follows:

Introductory Environmental Science (13.5 points)

EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EESC UN2300Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System

Introductory Science (6 points)

Two courses in chemistry, physics, mathematics, or environmental biology from the supporting mathematics and science list for the environmental science major above.

Advanced Environmental Science (12 points)

Four courses at the 3000-level or above chosen from those recommended for the environmental science major above.

Advanced courses used to fulfill requirements in the environmental biology major cannot count toward requirements for the special concentration.


Special Concentration in Environmental Biology for Majors in Environmental Science

Please read Guidelines for all Earth and Environmental Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Special Concentrators above.

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental science major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental science major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

The special concentration in environmental biology requires a minimum of 39 points, distributed as follows:

Introductory Environmental Biology and Environmental Science (17 points)

EEEB UN2001Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
EESC UN2100Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System
EESC UN2200Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System
EEEB UN2002Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere

Introductory Science (13 points)

Select one of the following chemistry sequences:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
CHEM UN1604
 - CHEM UN2507
Intensive General Chemistry (Lecture)
and Intensive General Chemistry Laboratory
One term of statistics such as the following:
STAT UN1101Introduction to Statistics
STAT UN1201Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
Statistics and Research Design
EEEB UN3005Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
EEEB UN3087Conservation Biology

Advanced Environmental Biology (9 points)

Three additional advanced EEEB courses (3000-level and above), each chosen from a different curricular area (evolution/genetics, ecology/behavior/conservation, anatomy/physiology/diversity, biology laboratory courses).

Advanced courses used to fulfill requirements in the environmental science major cannot count toward requirements for the special concentration.

Sustainable Development

Students interested in sustainable development should refer to the Sustainable Development section in this Bulletin.

Students interested in sustainable development should refer to the Sustainable Development section in this Bulletin.

Fall 2018

EESC UN1001 Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures and Lab. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: basic high school science and math.

Lab is a hands-on introduction to geochronology, paleontology, and historical geology with field trips. (See W1401 for lectures only.) Dinosaurs: a spectacular example of a common, highly successful form of life, dominant for 135 million years. Where did they come from? Why were they so successful? Why did they die out? A basic introduction to interface between geology and biology.

Fall 2018: EESC UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1001 001/70242 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Paul Olsen 4 21/40
EESC 1001 001/70242 M 4:10pm - 7:00pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Paul Olsen 4 21/40

EESC UN1401 Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: basic high school science and math.

Dinosaurs: a spectacular example of a common, highly successful form of life, dominant for 135 million years. Where did they come from? Why were they so successful? Why did they die out? A basic introduction to the interface between geology and biology.

Fall 2018: EESC UN1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1401 001/27078 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Paul Olsen 3 41/80

EESC UN1030 Oceanography. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment limited to 160.

Explore the geology of the sea floor, understand what drives ocean currents and how ocean ecosystems operate. Case studies and discussions centered on ocean-related issues facing society.

Fall 2018: EESC UN1030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1030 001/27448 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
501 Northwest Corner
Baerbel Hoenisch 3 107/160

EESC UN1201 Environmental Risks and Disasters. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Priority given to first-years and sophomores.

Prerequisites: high school science and math.

An introduction to risks and hazards in the environment. Different types of hazards are analyzed and compared: natural disasters, such as tornados, earthquakes, and meteorite impacts; acute and chronic health effects caused by exposure to radiation and toxic substances such as radon, asbestos, and arsenic; long-term societal effects due to environmental change, such as sea level rise and global warming. Emphasizes the basic physical principles controlling the hazardous phenomena and develops simple quantitative methods for making scientifically reasoned assessments of the threats (to health and wealth) posed by various events, processes, and exposures. Discusses methods of risk mitigation and sociological, psychological, and economic aspects of risk control and management.

Fall 2018: EESC UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1201 001/73734 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Goran Ekstrom 3 38/50

EESC UN2100 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be reinstated.

Prerequisites: high school algebra. Recommended preparation: high school chemistry and physics; and one semester of college science.

  Origin and development of the atmosphere and oceans, formation of winds, storms and ocean currents, reasons for changes through geologic time. Recent influence of human activity: the ozone hole, global warming, water pollution. Laboratory exploration of topics through demonstrations, experimentation, computer data analysis, and modeling. Students majoring in Earth and Environmental Sciences should plan to take EESC W2100 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with Senior Seminar.

Spring 2018: EESC UN2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/68225 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 33/50
EESC 2100 001/68225 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 33/50
Fall 2018: EESC UN2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/75858 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Jerry McManus, Arlene Fiore 4.5 60/60
EESC 2100 001/75858 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Jerry McManus, Arlene Fiore 4.5 60/60

EESC UN2200 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be necessary.

Prerequisites: high school algebra and chemistry. Recommended preparation: high school physics.

Exploration of how the solid Earth works, today and in the past, focusing on Earth in the Solar system, continents and oceans, the Earth's history, mountain systems on land and sea, minerals and rocks, weathering and erosion, hydrological cycle and rivers, geochronology, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, fossil fuels. Laboratory exploration of topics through examination of rock samples, experimentation, computer data analysis, field exercises, and modeling. Columbia and Barnard majors should plan to take W2200 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with the Senior Seminar.

Spring 2018: EESC UN2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/74644 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Goldstein, Sidney Hemming 4.5 51/55
EESC 2200 001/74644 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Goldstein, Sidney Hemming 4.5 51/55
Fall 2018: EESC UN2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/70006 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Alberto Malinverno, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 37/50
EESC 2200 001/70006 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Alberto Malinverno, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 37/50

EESC UN2330 Science for Sustainable Development. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Provides an introduction to natural science approaches essential to understanding central issues of sustainable development. Topics may include: climate, ecology/agriculture/biodiversity, energy, natural disasters, population dynamics, public health and water resources. Treatment includes background, methods and applications from selected settings throughout the world. Taught by specialists in a number of fields.

Fall 2018: EESC UN2330
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2330 001/20901 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
209 Havemeyer Hall
John Mutter, Ruth DeFries 3 106/110

EESC UN3000 Tutorial Study in Earth and Environmental Sciences. 1-3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: declared major in Earth and environmental sciences and the department's permission.

Students with particular interest in one of the many components of the Earth and environmental sciences should approach a director of undergraduate studies during the registration period so that tutorial-level exposure to the subject can be arranged. Each point requires two hours each week of readings, discussion, and research work under the close supervision of a member of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, American Museum of Natural History, or Goddard Institute for Space Studies. In consultation with the supervisor, the student selects a topic for intensive study and the time and place of the tutorial discussion sessions. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 points, with a maximum of 6 points with each staff member.

Spring 2018: EESC UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3000 001/22219  
Nicholas Christie-Blick 1-3 1/1
EESC 3000 002/26748  
Steven Goldstein 1-3 0/1
EESC 3000 003/71796  
Adam Sobel 1-3 1/1
Fall 2018: EESC UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3000 001/18709  
1-3 1/1

EESC UN3101 Geochemistry for a Habitable Planet. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Any 1000-level or 2000-level EESC course; MATH UN1101 Calculus I and CHEM UN1403 General Chemistry I or their equivalents.

The origin, evolution, and future of our planet, based on the book How to Build a Habitable Planet by Wallace S. Broecker. This course will focus on the geochemical processes that built Earth from solar material, led to its differentiation into continents and ocean, and have maintained its surface at a comfortable temperature. Students will participate in a hands-on geochemistry project at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Fall 2018: EESC UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3101 001/76536 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Terry Plank 3 31/35

EESC UN3700 Environmental Geochemistry and Health in New York City. 3 points.

In this course students will explore environmental contaminants in urban soil, water and air.  We will discuss contaminant source, chemical behavior in the environment, health impacts, human exposure, assessment techniques and mitigation strategies.  Students will develop and practice skills such as researching key information and contaminants as well as graphing and interpreting data.  We will focus in particular on New York City referring to local case studies and data sets, as well as engaging in a local project collecting and analyzing soils samples for lead.


Prerequisites: introductory chemistry and environmental science or the instructor's permission.

Fall 2018: EESC UN3700
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3700 001/61779 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Franziska Landes 3 12/15

EESC BC3800 Senior Research Seminar. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to senior majors (juniors with the instructor's permission). Provides credit for the senior thesis. The Senior Research Seminar can be taken Spring/Fall or Fall/Spring sequence.

Guided, independent, in-depth research culminating in the senior thesis in the spring. Includes discussion about scientific presentations and posters, data analysis, library research methods and scientific writing. Students review work in progress and share results through oral reports. Weekly seminar to review work in progress and share results through oral and written reports. Prerequisite to EESC W3901.

Fall 2018: EESC BC3800
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3800 001/05632 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Martin Stute 3 44

EESC GU4008 Introduction to Atmospheric Science. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: advanced calculus and general physics, or the instructor's permission.

Basic physical processes controlling atmospheric structure: thermodynamics; radiation physics and radiative transfer; principles of atmospheric dynamics; cloud processes; applications to Earth's atmospheric general circulation, climatic variations, and the atmospheres of the other planets. 

Fall 2018: EESC GU4008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4008 001/64583 Th 4:10pm - 6:40pm
214 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Lorenzo Polvani 3 25/25

EESC GU4020 Humans and the Carbon Cycle. 3 points.

Prerequisites: One semester of college-level calculus and chemistry; Plus one semester of college-level physics or geoscience. Or instructor's permission. The accelerating climate change of the current day is driven by humanity’s modifications to the global carbon cycle. This course offers an introduction basic science of the carbon cycle, with a focus on large-scale processes occurring on annual to centennial timescales. Students will leave this course with an understanding of the degree to which the global carbon cycle is understood and quantified, as well as the key uncertainties that are the focus of current research. We will build understanding of the potential pathways, and the significant challenges, to limiting global warming to 2o C as intended by the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. The course will begin with a brief review of climate science basics and the role of CO2 in climate and climate change (weeks 1-2). In weeks 3-4, the natural reservoirs and fluxes that make up the global carbon cycle will be introduced. In week 5-6, anthropogenic emissions and the observed changes in climate associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 will be discussed. In weeks 7-11, we will learn about how the land biosphere and ocean are mitigating the increase in atmospheric CO2 and the feedbacks that may substantially modify these natural sinks. In weeks 12-13, the international policy process and the potential for carbon cycle management will be the focus. In weeks 14, students will present their final projects

Fall 2018: EESC GU4020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4020 001/18646 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Galen McKinley 3 25/25

EESC GU4050 Global Assessment and Monitoring Using Remote Sensing. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required
Enrollment limited to 24. Priority given to graduate students in the natural sciences and engineering.

Prerequisites: Course Cap 20 students. Priority given to graduate students in the natural sciences and engineering. Advanced level undergraduates may be admitted with the instructor's permission. Calculus I and Physics I & II are required for undergraduates who wish to take this course.

General introduction to fundamentals of remote sensing; electromagnetic radiation, sensors, interpretation, quantitative image analysis and modeling. Example applications in the Earth and environmental sciences are explored through the analysis of remote sensing imagery in a state-or-the-art visualization laboratory.

Fall 2018: EESC GU4050
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4050 001/16126 Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Christopher Small 3 10/21
EESC 4050 001/16126 F 9:00am - 10:45am
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Christopher Small 3 10/21

EESC GU4230 Crustal Deformation. 3 points.

Prerequisites: introductory geology and one year of calculus. Recommended preparation: higher levels of mathematics.

Introduction to the deformation processes in the Earth's crust. Fundamental theories of stress and strain; rock behavior in both brittle and ductile fields; earthquake processes; ductile deformation; large-scale crustal contractional and extensional events.

Fall 2018: EESC GU4230
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4230 001/15001 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Heather Savage 3 13/25

EESC GU4330 Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

An overview of the archives in which evidence of terrestrial paleoclimate is preserved, the approaches to developing and applying proxies of climate from these archives, approaches for constraining the time represented by the information, and interpretations that have been developed from such archives. Important archives to be included are ice cores, caves, wetlands, lakes, trees, and moraines. The time interval covered will be mostly the last few tens of thousand years, and chronometers based on radiocarbon, U-series and surface exposure dating will be presented. The course will consist of a formal lecture on one day and a recitation on the second day which will emphasize examples and problem solving.

Fall 2018: EESC GU4330
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4330 001/21383 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Wallace Broecker, Jorg Schaefer 3 17/35

EESC GU4885 The Chemistry of Continental Waters. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a solid background in basic chemistry.

Introduction to geochemical cycles involving the atmosphere, land, and biosphere; chemistry of precipitation, weathering reactions, rivers, lakes, estuaries, and groundwaters; students are introduced to the use of major and minor ions as tracers of chemical reactions and biological processes that regulate the chemical composition of  continental waters.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4885
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4885 001/12043 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Robert Anderson 3 9/50

EESC GU4887 Isotope Geology I. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: basic background in chemistry and physics.

Introduction to nuclear and radiochemistry, origin of the chemical elements, principles of radiometric dating, processes responsible for the chemical makeup of the solar system and the Earth.

Fall 2018: EESC GU4887
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4887 001/63904 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Goldstein 3 19/25

EESC GU4917 Earth/Human Interactions. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment limited to 20. Priority given to senior natural and social science majors, then graduate students.

Based upon the most current understanding of our planet and our impact on it and how we make decisions about the threats we face, a new knowledge-based "green" framework is developed for our relationship to our planet and to each other as well as its general implications for human stewardship of our planet and meeting the needs of 8 billion humans. This new framework is explored using case studies, class participation, and term papers on specific current scientific and policy issues like global warming, renewable energy, carbon dioxide removal and their impact on the sustainability and resilience of our planet and ourselves

Fall 2018: EESC GU4917
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4917 001/64032 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Peter Eisenberger 3 19/25

EESC GU4925 Principles of Physical Oceanography. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a solid background in mathematics, physics, and chemistry.

Physical properties of seawater, water masses and their distribution, sea-air interaction influence on the ocean structure, basic ocean circulation pattern, relation of diffusion and advection with respect to distribution of ocean properties, ocean tides and waves, turbulence, and introduction to ocean dynamics.

Fall 2018: EESC GU4925
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4925 001/28566 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Arnold Gordon, Ryan Abernathey 3 15/25

EESC GU4949 Introduction to Seismology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: advanced calculus and general physics, or the instructor's permission.

Methods and underpinnings of seismology including seismogram analysis, elastic wave propogation theory, earthquake source characterization, instrumentation, inversion of seismic data to infer Earth structure.

Of Related Interest

Environmental Science (Barnard)
EESC BC1001Environmental Science I
EESC BC1011Environmental Science I Lab
EESC BC3014Field Methods in Environmental Science
EESC BC3016Environmental Measurements
EESC BC3017Environmental Data Analysis
EESC BC3025Hydrology
EESC BC3033Waste Management
EESC BC3050Big Data with Python: Python for Environmental Analysis and Visualisation
EESC BC3200Ecotoxicology
EESC BC3300Workshop in Sustainable Development
Physics
PHYS UN1018Weapons of Mass Destruction

Spring 2018

EESC UN1003 Climate and Society: Case Studies. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Explores a series of environmental hazards (ozone depeletion, El Nino, global warming) as examples of risk management. For each module, students will learn the scientific principles underlying each hazard and then will examine how social and economic policies were developed amd implemented to mitigate the perceived risk.

Spring 2018: EESC UN1003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1003 001/14855 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Baerbel Hoenisch 3 45/60

EESC UN1010 Geological Excursion To Death Valley, CA. 2 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.

The trip is restricted to first-years and sophomores from Columbia College/General Studies, Barnard College, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Early application is advised, and no later than November 7. A spring-break excursion focused on the geology of Death Valley and adjacent areas of the eastern California desert. Discussion sessions ahead of the trip provide necessary background. Details at: http://eesc.columbia.edu/courses/v1010/.

Spring 2018: EESC UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1010 001/18580 F 7:30pm - 9:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Nicholas Christie-Blick 2 20/20

EESC UN1011 Earth: Origin, Evolution, Processes, Future. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

What is the nature of our planet and how did it form?  This class explores Earth's internal structure, its dynamical character expressed in plate tectonics and earthquakes, and its climate system. It also explores what Earth's future  may hold. Lecture and lab. Students who wish to take only the lectures should register for UN1411.

Spring 2018: EESC UN1011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1011 001/23170 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Sedelia Rodriguez 4 36/60
EESC 1011 001/23170 Th 1:10pm - 4:00pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Sedelia Rodriguez 4 36/60

EESC UN1411 Earth: Origin, Evolution, Processes, Future: Lectures. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

What is the nature of our planet and how did it form? This class explores Earth's internal structure, its dynamical character expressed in plate tectonics and earthquakes, and its climate system. It also explores what Earth's future may hold.

Spring 2018: EESC UN1411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 1411 001/18262 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Sedelia Rodriguez 3 21/35

EESC UN2100 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Climate System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be reinstated.

Prerequisites: high school algebra. Recommended preparation: high school chemistry and physics; and one semester of college science.

  Origin and development of the atmosphere and oceans, formation of winds, storms and ocean currents, reasons for changes through geologic time. Recent influence of human activity: the ozone hole, global warming, water pollution. Laboratory exploration of topics through demonstrations, experimentation, computer data analysis, and modeling. Students majoring in Earth and Environmental Sciences should plan to take EESC W2100 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with Senior Seminar.

Spring 2018: EESC UN2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/68225 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 33/50
EESC 2100 001/68225 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Mingfang Ting, Gisela Winckler 4.5 33/50
Fall 2018: EESC UN2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2100 001/75858 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Jerry McManus, Arlene Fiore 4.5 60/60
EESC 2100 001/75858 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Jerry McManus, Arlene Fiore 4.5 60/60

EESC UN2200 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Solid Earth System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Laboratory Science (SCI)., Lab Required
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be necessary.

Prerequisites: high school algebra and chemistry. Recommended preparation: high school physics.

Exploration of how the solid Earth works, today and in the past, focusing on Earth in the Solar system, continents and oceans, the Earth's history, mountain systems on land and sea, minerals and rocks, weathering and erosion, hydrological cycle and rivers, geochronology, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, fossil fuels. Laboratory exploration of topics through examination of rock samples, experimentation, computer data analysis, field exercises, and modeling. Columbia and Barnard majors should plan to take W2200 before their senior year to avoid conflicts with the Senior Seminar.

Spring 2018: EESC UN2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/74644 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Goldstein, Sidney Hemming 4.5 51/55
EESC 2200 001/74644 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Goldstein, Sidney Hemming 4.5 51/55
Fall 2018: EESC UN2200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2200 001/70006 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Alberto Malinverno, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 37/50
EESC 2200 001/70006 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Alberto Malinverno, Jonathan Kingslake 4.5 37/50

EESC UN2300 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System. 4.5 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Priority given to Columbia and Barnard earth science, environmental science, and environmental biology majors should enrollment limits be reinstated.

Prerequisites: high school algebra. Recommended preparation: high school chemistry and physics.

Role of life in biogeochemical cycles, relationship of biodiversity and evolution to the physical Earth, vulnerability of ecosystems to environmental change; causes and effects of extinctions through geologic time (dinosaurs and mammoths) and today. Exploration of topics through laboratories, demonstrations, computer data analysis and modeling. REQUIRED LAB: EESC UN2310. Students should see the Directory of Classes for lab sessions being offered and select one.

Spring 2018: EESC UN2300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2300 001/70517 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
329 Pupin Laboratories
Matthew Palmer, Natalie Boelman, Kevin Uno 4.5 38/50

EESC UN2310 Earth's Environmental Systems: The Life System Required Lab: Sections 001, 002, 003, 004,005. 0 points.

This three hour lab is required of all students who enroll in EESC UN2300. There are currently five lab sections.

Spring 2018: EESC UN2310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 2310 001/11664 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Matthew Palmer, Natalie Boelman, Kevin Griffin 0 13/24
EESC 2310 002/13430 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Matthew Palmer, Natalie Boelman, Kevin Griffin 0 17/24
EESC 2310 003/16408 W 4:10pm - 7:00pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Matthew Palmer, Natalie Boelman, Kevin Griffin 0 13/24
EESC 2310 004/76999 Th 4:10pm - 7:00pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Matthew Palmer, Natalie Boelman, Kevin Griffin 0 23/24
EESC 2310 005/25614 Th 4:10pm - 7:00pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Matthew Palmer, Natalie Boelman, Kevin Griffin 0 0/24

EESC UN3000 Tutorial Study in Earth and Environmental Sciences. 1-3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: declared major in Earth and environmental sciences and the department's permission.

Students with particular interest in one of the many components of the Earth and environmental sciences should approach a director of undergraduate studies during the registration period so that tutorial-level exposure to the subject can be arranged. Each point requires two hours each week of readings, discussion, and research work under the close supervision of a member of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, American Museum of Natural History, or Goddard Institute for Space Studies. In consultation with the supervisor, the student selects a topic for intensive study and the time and place of the tutorial discussion sessions. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 points, with a maximum of 6 points with each staff member.

Spring 2018: EESC UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3000 001/22219  
Nicholas Christie-Blick 1-3 1/1
EESC 3000 002/26748  
Steven Goldstein 1-3 0/1
EESC 3000 003/71796  
Adam Sobel 1-3 1/1
Fall 2018: EESC UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3000 001/18709  
1-3 1/1

EESC UN3010 Field Geology. 2 points.

Fee: to be determined.

This course may be repeated for up to 9 points of credit if taken in different areas. Field study in various geologic settings. Plans for the courses are announced at the beginning of each term. Class size will depend on available space. Priority is given to majors in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia College and School of General Studies. Barnard Environmental Science majors may enroll with the permission of the Barnard Environmental Science department chair. All others require the instructor's permission.

Spring 2018: EESC UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3010 001/71503 T 7:30pm - 9:30pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Steven Goldstein 2 15/20

EESC UN3201 Solid Earth Dynamics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: any 1000-level or 2000-level EESC course; MATH UN1101 Calculus I and PHYS UN1201 General Physics I or their equivalents. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS UN1201 is acceptable with the instructor's permission.

Properties and processes affecting the evolution and behavior of the solid Earth. This course will focus on the geophysical processes that build mountains and ocean basins, drive plate tectonics, and otherwise lead to a dynamic planet. Topics include heat flow and mantle circulation, earthquakes and seismic waves, gravity, Earth's magnetic field, and flow of glaciers and ice sheets.

Spring 2018: EESC UN3201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3201 001/70533 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Meredith Nettles 3 11/40

EESC UN3400 Introduction to Computational Earth Science. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Required: at least a semester of calculus and physics; any 1000-level or 2000-level EESC,course. Recommended: EESC3201 (Solid Earth Dynamics).
Computer models are essential for understanding the behavior of complex natural systems in geosciences. This course is an introduction to writing computer models to simulate Earth processes. Students will learn methods for numerical modeling of a variety of geoscience topics, such as seismic waves, groundwater flow, glacier growth, ocean currents and more. Simulations will be created by learning to program with a user-friendly language (Python). Student learning will be facilitated through a combination of lectures, in-class exercises,homework assignments and a final project on a student-selected modeling topic

Spring 2018: EESC UN3400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3400 001/13030 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
252 Engineering Terrace
Kerry Key 3 15/20

EESC UN3901 Environmental Science Senior Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: EESC BC3800 or EESC BC3801 and a good grounding in basic sciences.

Guided, independent, in-depth research culminating in the senior thesis in the spring. Includes discussion about scientific presentations and posters, data analysis, library research methods and scientific writing. Students review work in progress and share results through oral reports. Weekly seminar to review work in progress and share results through oral and written reports.

Spring 2018: EESC UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3901 001/00997 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 Diana Center
Martin Stute 3 12/40

EESC GU4009 Chemical Geology. 4 points.

Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: physical chemistry or the instructor's permission.

Thermodynamics as applied to Earth systems.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4009 001/66071 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Denton Ebel 4 5/20

EESC GU4040 Climate Thermodynamics and Energy Transfer. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: EESC GU4008, advanced calculus, and general physics, or the instructor's permission.

Thermodynamics of atmospheric and oceanic processes fundamental to the climate system.  Physical mechanisms of vertical energy transfer: surface fluxes, boundary layers and convection.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4040 001/67265 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Adam Sobel 3 8/25

EESC GU4210 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. 3 points.

Required course for M.A./Ph.D. candidates focusing in physical oceanography and atmospheric sciences. Elective for undergraduate majors in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

Prerequisites: APMA E3101, APMA E3201 or equivalents and APPH E4200 or equivalent or the instructor's permission.

Fundamental concepts in the dynamics of rotating stratified flows. Geostrophic and hydrostatic balances, potential vorticity, f and beta plane approximations, gravity and Rossby waves, geostrophic adjustment and quasigeostrophy, baroclinic and barotropic instabilities.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4210
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4210 001/77612 Th 4:10pm - 6:40pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Lorenzo Polvani 3 6/35

EESC GU4220 Glaciology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: At least a year of calculus and physics; any 1000-level or 2000-level EESC course. Recommended: EESC2100 (Climate System), EESC2200 (Solid Earth), EESC3201 (Solid Earth Dynamics). Experience using MATLAB.

This course examines processes controlling how glaciers and ice sheets grow, retreat, modify their landscape and interact with the rest of the Earth system. We focus on what controls surface mass balance, the transformation from snow to ice, ice deformation, basal sliding, the temperature and age of ice, the flow of water through ice sheets and glaciers, and the two-way interactions between ice and the oceans, atmosphere and solid earth. Weekly lectures are accompanied by practical computer sessions that equip students with key numerical and data analysis skills used in research of glacial processes.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4220
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4220 001/86499 T 1:10pm - 2:25pm
555 Schermerhorn Hall
Jonathan Kingslake 3 7/20
EESC 4220 001/86499 Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Jonathan Kingslake 3 7/20

EESC GU4300 The Earth's Deep Interior. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: calculus, differential equations, one year of college physics.

An introduction to properties of the Earth's mantle, fluid outer core, and solid inner core. Current knowledge of these features is explored, using observations of seismology, heat flow, gravity, geomagnetism, plus information on the Earth's bulk composition.

EESC GU4404 Regional Climate and Climate Impacts. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Course is required for the MA in Climate and Society program. Open to a maximum of 8 additional graduate students, admitted by application to and with the instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: EESC W4400 and EESC W4401.

The dynamics of environment and society interact with climate and can be modified through use of modern climate information. To arrive at the best use of climate information, there is a need to see climate in a balanced way, among the myriad of factors at play. Equally, there is a need to appreciate the range of climate information available and to grasp its underlying basis and the reasons for varying levels of certainty. Many decisions in society are at more local scales, and regional climate information considered at appropriate scales and in appropriate forms (e.g., transformed into vegetation stress) is key. Students will build a sufficient understanding of the science behind the information, and analyze examples of how the information can and is being used. This course will prepare the ground for a holistic understanding needed for wise use of climate information.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4404
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4404 001/19774 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
603 Schermerhorn Hall
Andrew Robertson, Pietro Ceccato 3 34/45

EESC GU4701 Introduction to Igneous Petrology. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: introductory geology or the equivalent. Recommended preparation: EESC GU4113 and knowledge of chemistry.

Compositional characteristics of igneous and metamorphic rocks and how they can be used as tools to investigate earth processes. Development of igneous and metamorphic rocks in a plate-tectonic framework.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4701 001/13259 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Terry Plank 4 8/20
EESC 4701 001/13259 T 4:10pm - 7:00pm
506 Schermerhorn Hall
Terry Plank 4 8/20

EESC GU4885 The Chemistry of Continental Waters. 3 points.

Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a solid background in basic chemistry.

Introduction to geochemical cycles involving the atmosphere, land, and biosphere; chemistry of precipitation, weathering reactions, rivers, lakes, estuaries, and groundwaters; students are introduced to the use of major and minor ions as tracers of chemical reactions and biological processes that regulate the chemical composition of  continental waters.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4885
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4885 001/12043 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Robert Anderson 3 9/50

EESC GU4920 Paleoceanography. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

The course examines the ocean's response to external climatic forcing such as solar luminosity and changes in the Earth's orbit, and to internal influences such as atmospheric composition, using deep-sea sediments, corals, ice cores and other paleoceanographic archives. A rigorous analysis of the assumptions underlying the use of climate proxies and their interpretations will be presented. Particular emphasis will be placed on amplifiers of climate change during the alternating ice ages and interglacial intervals of the last few million years, such as natural variations in atmospheric "greenhouse gases" and changes in deep water formation rates, as well as mechanisms of rapid climate change during the late Pleistocene. The influence of changes in the Earth's radiation distribution and boundary conditions on the global ocean circulation, Asian monsoon system and El Nino/Southern Oscillation frequency and intensity, as well as interactions among these systems will be examined using proxy data and models. This course complements W4937 Cenozoic Paleoceanography and is intended as part of a sequence with W4330 Terrestrial Paleoclimate for students with interests in Paleoclimate.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4920 001/17968 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Jerry McManus 3 20/30

EESC GU4929 Mixing and Dispersion in the Ocean. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Given in alternate years.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: some background in fluids, as provided by courses like EESC GU4925 or APPH E4200, or the instructor's permission.

Mixing and dispersion in the ocean is of fundamental importance in many oceanographic problems, including climate modeling, paleo and present-day circulation studies, pollutant dispersion, biogeography, etc. The main goal of this course is to provide in-depth understanding (rather than mathematical derivations) of the causes and consequences of mixing in the ocean, and of the properties of dispersion. After introducing the concepts of diffusion and turbulence, instruments and techniques for quantifying mixing and dispersion in the ocean are reviewed and compared. Next, the instabilities and processes giving rise to turbulence in the ocean are discussed. The course concludes with a series of lectures on mixing and dispersion in specific oceanographic settings, including boundary layers, shallow seas, continental shelves, sea straits, seamounts, and mid-ocean ridge flanks.

EESC GU4930 Earth's Oceans and Atmosphere. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a good background in the physical sciences.

Physical properties of water and air. Overview of the stratification and circulation of Earth's ocean and atmosphere and their governing processes; ocean-atmosphere interaction; resultant climate system; natural and anthropogenic forced climate change.

Spring 2018: EESC GU4930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 4930 001/76482 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
417 Schermerhorn Hall
Arnold Gordon 3 8/30

Generally Alternate Year Courses

EESC UN1001Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures and Lab
EESC UN1201Environmental Risks and Disasters
EESC UN1401Dinosaurs and the History of Life: Lectures
EESC UN3015The Earth's Carbon Cycle
EESC GU4009Chemical Geology
EESC GU4040Climate Thermodynamics and Energy Transfer
EESC GU4085Geodynamics
EESC GU4113Introduction to Mineralogy
EESC GU4330Introduction to Terrestrial Paleoclimate
EESC GU4223Sedimentary Geology
EESC GU4300The Earth's Deep Interior
EESC GU4630Air-sea interaction
EESC GU4701Introduction to Igneous Petrology
EESC GU4835Wetlands and Climate Change
EESC GU4885The Chemistry of Continental Waters
EESC GU4887Isotope Geology I
EESC GU4888Stable Isotope Geochemistry
EESC GU4920Paleoceanography
EESC GU4926Principles of Chemical Oceanography
EESC GU4937Cenozoic Paleoceanography
EESC GU4929Mixing and Dispersion in the Ocean
EESC GU4949Introduction to Seismology
EESC GR6111Modern analytical methods in geochemistry
EESC GR6701Igneous and metamorphic processes during the creation and evolution of the tectonic plates
EESC GR6810The Carbon Cycle
EESC GR6901Research Computing for the Earth Sciences
EESC GR6909Advanced Time Series Analysis
EESC GR6920Dynamics of Climate
EESC GR6921Atmospheric Dynamics
EESC GR6922Atmospheric Radiation
EESC GR6928Tropical Meteorology
EESC GR6949Advanced Seismology
EESC GR6930Ocean Dynamics
EESC GR9500SEM-PLANT PHYSIOLOGY & EC