Classical Studies

Departmental Office: 617 Hamilton; 212-854-3902; classics@columbia.edu
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/classics/

Director of Undergraduate Studies (Classics): Prof. Katharina Volk; 212-854-5683; kv2018@columbia.edu 

Director of Undergraduate Studies (Modern Greek Studies): Prof. Nikolas Kakkoufa; 212-854-3902; nk2776@columbia.edu

Director of Academic Administration and Finance: Juliana Driever; 212-854-2726; jd2185@columbia.edu

When one visits Rome or Athens, they also visit the many layers of physical, historical, and cultural development that have contributed to the complex evolution of those cities. When one tours the Roman Forum or the Greek Parthenon, they set foot on monuments whose physical impressiveness symbolizes political strength and historical importance; in a very physical way they experience the past. When one studies Latin and Greek language and culture, they embark on a tour of an alternative kind, making their way through texts and other cultural forms—such as paintings, sculptures, and philosophical ideas—that bring them directly into contact with the Greco-Roman past. Literature, philosophy, history, art and architecture, linguistics, papyrology, religion: all (and more) are branches of investigation to which the modern student of classics/classical studies has access through the surviving literary and material evidence.

But when one studies in the original language Virgil's Aeneid, say, or Plato's philosophical writings, they find that ancient Greek or Latin literature deals with issues and ideas that are, for us, of central contemporary importance: e.g., How can I be happy? What is the best political constitution for our (or any) state? What responsibilities do I have to the society in which I live? What national significance is served or owed by literature?

The study of Greek and Latin language and culture concentrates in one main area (ancient Greece and Rome) and on many of the questions that are of direct pertinence to the ways in which modern lives are shaped and lived; at the same time, Greco-Roman literature and philosophy, so fundamental to the later development of the Western tradition, boast works of great intrinsic worth and interest. While all Columbia students get an introduction to classical texts in Literature Humanities and Contemporary Civilization, classics/classical studies provides a more advanced study of ancient cultural issues and habits of mind already sampled in the Core.

Study abroad in Greece or Italy offers a variety of educational experiences that are continuous with those of the major, enriching both linguistic expertise and cultural awareness. Students in classics have the opportunity to take part in archaeological digs abroad and, on occasion, to assist faculty in research projects that require, for example, bibliographical collection or the checking of research data.

Many majors pursue graduate study in classics and classical studies. Upon earning their graduate degrees, they often embark on teaching careers in universities, colleges, and high schools. Many graduating majors also enter a number of other professional fields, among them law, banking, accountancy, publishing, and museum-work. Employers tend to find that students in classics are articulate on paper, as well as orally; are organized of mind; and have good skills in general reasoning, an ability developed by the study of Greek and Latin language. In effect, the study of classics opens up a wide array of options, both in education and in the wider world.

The program of the department aims for a comprehensive understanding of classical literature and culture, and the mastery of Greek and Latin on which such understanding depends. Careful study of the language occupies the largest part of the first-year courses and is not omitted in the more advanced courses. Although literature becomes the chief subject only in the advanced courses, important authors like Homer, Plato, and Virgil are studied as literary texts already in the intermediate courses. A wide variety of courses are offered in translation.

Through a joint program with Barnard, the department offers a broad range of subjects. The department annually offers four advanced courses in each language (at the 3000- or 4000- level), the content of which changes each year in order to provide a curricular range and to balance authors and genres over a two-year period.

Opportunities for individual projects of reading and research are available. Students are also permitted to take graduate courses if they are sufficiently prepared. Additionally, they can supplement their studies within the department through work in other departments, such as art history and archaeology, history, philosophy, and the other departments of languages and literature.

It is not necessary to have previously studied either language in order to major in it. A student starting Greek or Latin at Columbia can meet all the requirements of a major within an ordinary undergraduate program.

In Fulfillment of the Language Requirement

Students beginning the study of Greek or Latin at Columbia must take four terms of either of the following two-year sequences:

Greek
GREK UN1101
 - GREK UN1102
Elementary Greek I
and Elementary Greek II
GREK UN2101
 - GREK UN2102
Intermediate Greek I Attic Prose
and Intermediate Greek II: Homer
Latin
LATN UN1101
 - LATN UN1102
Elementary Latin I
and Elementary Latin II
LATN UN2101
 - LATN UN2102
Intermediate Latin I
and Intermediate Latin II

With the permission of the director of undergraduate studies, GREK UN2102 Intermediate Greek II: Homer may be taken before GREK UN2101 Intermediate Greek I Attic Prose.

The intensive elementary courses GREK UN1121 Intensive Elementary Greek and LATN UN1121 Intensive Elementary Latin may be substituted for the two-term UN1101-UN1102 sequence. The intensive intermediate courses GREK S2121Q Intensive Intermediate Greek: Poetry and Prose and LATN S2121Q Intensive Intermediate Latin: Poetry and Prose may be substituted for the two-term UN2101-UN2102 sequence.

LATN UN2101 Intermediate Latin I should be taken before LATN UN2102 Intermediate Latin II.

For students with secondary-school training in Greek or Latin, the director of undergraduate studies determines, on the basis of records and test scores, what further work is needed to fulfill the language requirement.

Advanced Placement

The department grants 3 credits for a score of 5 on the Latin AP exam, which also satisfies the foreign language requirement, upon successful completion (with a grade of B or higher) of a Latin class at the 3000-level or higher.

Major Program

The department offers a major in classics and a major track in classical studies. The major in classics involves the intensive study of both Greek and Latin, as well as their cultural matrix; the track in classical studies offers a more interdisciplinary approach. The major in classics is recommended for students planning to continue the study of classics in graduate school. The department also participates in the interdepartmental ancient studies program and offers a concentration in classics; these are all described below.

The major in classics and the track in classical studies are designed in part to build on the experience of the ancient world that undergraduates have acquired at Columbia in the Core Curriculum (especially in Literature Humanities). The major in classics is structured on the principle of gradual and closely monitored linguistic progress from the elementary (1100-level) to the advanced (3000- and 4000-levels) and ultimately to the literature survey courses (GU4105-GU4106) in Greek and/or Latin.

Those majors intending to embark on graduate study in classics are especially encouraged to undertake, in their senior year, an independent research project (UN3998). This option is designed to allow students to personalize their experience in the major by conducting advanced study in a specialized area under the guidance of the specializing faculty member of their choice.

UN3998 is required in the classical studies track. Otherwise, students in classical studies are not required to take advanced courses beyond UN3996 The Major Seminar, but are expected to follow a coherent plan of study by taking a sequence of cognate courses in different but related departments (e.g., art history and archaeology, history, etc.).

The director of undergraduate studies is responsible for overseeing the path of study followed by each student in classics or classical studies. Through close interaction with the director of undergraduate studies, as well as with other faculty members where appropriate, each major is strongly encouraged to debate the strengths and weaknesses of his or her own trajectory of study even as the requirements for the major are being completed.

Students should contact the director of undergraduate studies with any questions about the classics majors and course offerings. The director of undergraduate studies can provide students with a worksheet to help in planning their progress toward major requirements.

Professors

  • Kathy Eden
  • Helene P. Foley (Barnard)
  • Carmela V. Franklin
  • Stathis Gourgouris
  • John Ma (Chair as of July 1, 2018)
  • Kristina Milnor (Barnard)
  • Seth R. Schwartz
  • Deborah T. Steiner 
  • Karen Van Dyck
  • Katharina Volk
  • Gareth D. Williams 
  • Nancy Worman (Barnard)
  • James E. G. Zetzel

Associate Professors

  • Marcus Folch
  • Joseph Howley
  • Elizabeth Irwin
  • Ellen Morris (Barnard)

Senior Lecturer

Elizabeth Scharffenberger

Lecturers

  • Dimitrios Antoniou
  • Caitlin Gillespie
  • Nikolas Kakkoufa
  • Darcy Krasne

Major in Classics

The major in classics involves a program in both Greek and Latin languages and literatures, and in Greek and Roman civilization. Students generally emphasize the study of one of the languages (the primary language), but significant study of the other (secondary) language is required as well.

The major requires the completion of 11 courses (a minimum of 34 points) and must include the following:

  1. In a primary language:
    • Four courses at or above the UN2100-level;
    • The Major Seminar UN3996;
    • Two courses from the following four advanced options: GU4105, GU4106, GU4139, UN3998 (any others may count toward the four upper level requirement).
  2. In a secondary language:
    • Two courses at or above the UN2100-level.
  3. Two ancient culture courses, including:
    • One course in the culture of the primary language;
    • One course in any aspect of ancient history or culture (HIST, AHIS, PHIL, CLLT, CLCV). All substitutions must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

The classical languages follow a standard track of elementary (1100-level) and intermediate (2100-level) levels, followed by 3000- and 4000-level classes that may generally be taken in any order.

Although it is easier to complete the major if at least one classical language is begun no later than the first year, it is possible to begin one classical language in the sophomore year and the other in the junior year and still complete the major.

Those planning to go on to graduate study in classics are urged to take both terms of GU4105-GU4106 if possible, to write a senior research thesis, and to acquire a reading knowledge of German and preferably also of French (Italian is also useful).

To be eligible for departmental honors and prizes, students must take UN3998.


Major Track in Classical Studies

The major track in classical studies requires the completion of 11 courses (a minimum of 35 points) and must include the following:

  1. Five courses, at or above the UN1102-level, in either or both Latin and Greek;
  2. The Major Seminar UN3996;
  3. Four classes in Ancient History, Art, Philosophy, Religion, and Civilization. Note that certain courses may be 6 credits, e.g., ICCS's City of Rome course, and may count as two courses towards this requirement. Students in doubt about a course's relevance should confirm it with the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible;
  4. Senior Thesis UN3998, completed on a chosen aspect of Greek or Roman civilization under the direction of a faculty member (3 points).

Summer courses 1221/1221 are counted as four credits for the purposes of major requirements.


Major in Ancient Studies

Students interested in a major in ancient studies should see the Ancient Studies section in this Bulletin.

Students interested in a major in ancient studies should see the Ancient Studies section in this Bulletin.


Concentration in Classics

Students who declared this program before this date should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their correct course of study.

The concentration in classics is designed for those who cannot fit the complete major into their undergraduate schedule, but still wish to take a substantial program in Greek and Latin.

The concentration requires the completion of seven courses (a minimum of 21 points) and must include the following:

  1. In a primary language, six courses distributed as follows:
    • Five courses above the 1100-level, three of which must be 3000- or 4000-level;
    • One course from the following three advanced options: GU4105, GU4106, GU4139.
  2. One course in Ancient History or Classical Civilization (3 points).

Special Concentration in Hellenic Studies

The courses in the Hellenic Studies program are designed to develop the student’s proficiency in aspects of Modern Greek culture, language, and history. The minimum credit requirement for the Hellenic Studies Concentration is 21 credits and includes:

1. Modern Greek language and culture courses (Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced, Conversation I & II, Reading in Greek; minimum 8 credits). Students will work with undergraduate advisor to determine their level of the language, 2. Modern Greek Studies interdepartmental courses (CLGM, CSGM, HSGM; minimum 12 credits).  The program of study should be planned as early as possible with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies each semester in order to obtain program approval. Opportunities exist for study abroad in Greece, Cyprus and Turkey for the summer or an academic term for credit. Students work closely with the concentration advisor on the selection of the foreign schools and the transfer of credit.

Students may also wish to write a Senior Thesis which will substitute one Modern Greek Studies interdepartmental seminar. While not required for graduation, the thesis enables a student to be considered for departmental honors. It is advisable to begin planning for the thesis during the student’s junior year. Interested students should identify a potential faculty advisor.

Latin

LATN UN1101 Elementary Latin I. 4 points.

For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Spring 2018: LATN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1101 001/15050 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Alice Sharpless 4 9/18
Fall 2018: LATN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1101 001/12527 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Erin Petrella 4 13/18
LATN 1101 002/64989 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Mary-Evelyn Farrior 4 18/18
LATN 1101 003/29846 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
616 Hamilton Hall
Deborah Sokolowski 4 9/18

LATN UN1102 Elementary Latin II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN1101.

A continuation of LATN UN1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Spring 2018: LATN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1102 001/28764 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
607 Hamilton Hall
Caleb Simone 4 8/18
LATN 1102 002/75041 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Mariana Noe 4 8/18
Fall 2018: LATN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1102 001/29720 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Charles Pletcher 4 12/18

LATN UN1121 Intensive Elementary Latin. 4 points.

Designed to cover all of Latin grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare the student to enter LATN UN2101 or un2102.

Fall 2018: LATN UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1121 001/68892 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Nicholas Rynearson 4 17/18

LATN UN2101 Intermediate Latin I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN1101-UN1102, or LATN UN1121, or the equivalent.

Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Spring 2018: LATN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2101 001/10709 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Tristan Power 4 10/18
Fall 2018: LATN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2101 001/17071 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
613 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Heintges 4 13/18
LATN 2101 002/60101 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Lien Van Geel 4 11/18

LATN UN2102 Intermediate Latin II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2101 or the equivalent.

Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Spring 2018: LATN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2102 001/07304 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
617b Hamilton Hall
Kristina Milnor 4 13/18
LATN 2102 002/28082 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Molly Allen 4 19/18
Fall 2018: LATN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2102 003/70350 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Jesse James 4 16/18

LATN UN3012 Augustan Poetry. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.

Selections from Vergil and Horace. Combines literary analysis with work in grammar and metrics.

Fall 2018: LATN UN3012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3012 001/26450 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3 25/30

LATN UN3033 Medieval Language and Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: four semesters of college Latin or the instructor's permission.

This survey focuses on translation, grammatical analysis, and discussion of the literary and cultural contexts of medieval Latin prose and poetry. It includes widely read texts by major authors (e.g. Augustin, Boethius, Abelard and Heloise, Bernard of Clairvaux, Petrarch) as well as lesser-known anonymous pieces (e.g. love lyric from the Cambridge Songs and the Carmina Burana, poetic satire from a rotulus, and a novel, the Historia Apollonii).

Fall 2018: LATN UN3033
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3033 001/20548 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Carmela Franklin 3 12/20

LATN UN3035 Poetry as Neurosis: Lucan’s Bellum Civile. 3 points.

This course is an intensive study of Lucan’s revolutionary and enigmatic Bellum Civile, the epic masterpiece of the Neronian age, which was admired and imitated all through the history of Western culture by authors such as Dante, Montaigne, Milton, Voltaire, Goethe, Shelley, and Baudelaire among others. The course will examine major controversies concerning the form and meaning of the poem, with special emphasis on the poetic tension created by the narrator’s neurotic personality. The narration of the 49 BCE civil war between Caesar and Pompey is for Lucan the pretext for an original and intensely personal reflection on themes such as political oppression, the role of the individual in society, nihilism, self-destructiveness, mental disorder, and artistic creation. The poem will be analyzed from various critical perspectives that include rhetoric, intertextuality, deconstruction, reception theory, and psychoanalysis; no previous knowledge of any of these methodologies is required. Although an acceptable knowledge of Latin (intermediate or above) is assumed, the primary focus of this course is literary and sociological interpretation rather than linguistic competence. In addition to the Latin reading assignments, the poem will also be read entirely in English translation, allowing students to comprehend the whole while they engage with particular sections in the original language. The assignment for each class will include: (1) approximately five hundred lines to be read in English translation; (2) translation of short Latin passages, whose size may be adapted to the level of the class/student; (3) secondary readings.

LATN UN3309 LATIN LITERATURE SELECTIONS. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Fall 2018: LATN UN3309
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3309 001/66388 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
503 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams 3 8/30

LATN UN3310 Selections from Latin Literature: Roman Britain. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: LATN UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3310 001/62849 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
304 Hamilton Hall
Caitlin Gillespie 3 10/25

LATN UN3320 Intensive Reading Course. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2101-UN2102 or the equivalent.

This course is limited to students in the Postbaccalaureate program. The intensive reading of a series of Latin texts, both prose and verse, with special emphasis on detailed stylistic and grammatical analysis of the language.

LATN UN3980 Post-Baccalaureate Seminar. 3 points.

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Fall 2018: LATN UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3980 001/24491 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3 0/15

LATN UN3996 The Major Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: junior standing.

Required for all majors in Classics and Classical Studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Fall 2018: LATN UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3996 001/26221 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
John Ma 3 10/20

LATN UN3997 Directed Readings in Latin Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of reading in Latin literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Spring 2018: LATN UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3997 001/10527  
Kathy Eden 3 0
LATN 3997 002/60720  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
LATN 3997 003/66558  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 0
LATN 3997 004/23303  
Gareth Williams 3 1
LATN 3997 005/11674  
Darcy Krasne 3 0
LATN 3997 006/05680  
Ellen Morris 3 0
LATN 3997 007/12848  
Katharina Volk 3 2
LATN 3997 011/01489  
Kristina Milnor 3 0
Fall 2018: LATN UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3997 001/70221  
Carmela Franklin 3 0/5
LATN 3997 002/62157  
Kathy Eden 3 0/5
LATN 3997 003/71402  
Katharina Volk 3 1/5
LATN 3997 004/73319  
Gareth Williams 3 0/5
LATN 3997 005/11246  
Joseph Howley 3 0/5
LATN 3997 011/01887  
Kristina Milnor 3 0

LATN UN3998 Supervised Research in Latin Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of research in Latin literature. Research paper required.

Spring 2018: LATN UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3998 001/64824  
Kathy Eden 3 0
LATN 3998 002/22076  
Carmela Franklin 3 1
LATN 3998 003/62531  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 3
LATN 3998 004/19903  
Gareth Williams 3 0
LATN 3998 005/25336  
Darcy Krasne 3 0
LATN 3998 006/09402  
Ellen Morris 3 0
LATN 3998 007/72705  
Katharina Volk 3 1
LATN 3998 011/03189  
Kristina Milnor 3 2
Fall 2018: LATN UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3998 001/21194  
Kathy Eden 3 0/5
LATN 3998 002/21731  
Katharina Volk 3 0/5
LATN 3998 003/26573  
Carmela Franklin 3 0/5
LATN 3998 004/15099  
Gareth Williams 3 1/5
LATN 3998 005/66425  
Joseph Howley 3 0/5
LATN 3998 006/04109  
Kristina Milnor 3 0

LATN GU4010 Selections from Latin Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN3012 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: LATN GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4010 001/18492 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3 5/15
Fall 2018: LATN GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4010 001/63866 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Katharina Volk 3 17/20

LATN GU4105 Latin Literature of the Republic. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Latin at the 3000-level or higher.

Latin literature from the beginning to early Augustan times.

Fall 2018: LATN GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4105 001/17552 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams 4 17/20

LATN GU4106 Latin Literature of the Empire. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Latin at the 3000-level or higher.

Latin literature from Augustus to 600 C.E.

Spring 2018: LATN GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4106 001/11943 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams 4 20/20

LATN GR5139 Elements of Prose Style. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least four semesters of Latin, or the equivalent.

Intensive review of Latin syntax with translation of English sentences and paragraphs into Latin.

Fall 2018: LATN GR5139
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 5139 001/03682 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
618 Hamilton Hall
Kristina Milnor 4 8

Greek

GREK UN1101 Elementary Greek I. 4 points.

For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose.

Spring 2018: GREK UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1101 001/76750 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams, Erin Petrella 4 7/18
Fall 2018: GREK UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1101 001/66179 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Caitlin Morgan 4 9/18

GREK UN1102 Elementary Greek II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1101 or the equivalent, or the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK V1101; selections from Attic prose.

Spring 2018: GREK UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1102 001/16831 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Paraskevi Martzavou 4 3/18
GREK 1102 002/12285 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Heintges 4 10/18
Fall 2018: GREK UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1102 001/22336 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Paraskevi Martzavou 4 2/18

GREK UN1121 Intensive Elementary Greek. 4 points.

Covers all of Greek grammar and syntax in one term. Prepares the student to enter second-year Greek (GREK UN2101 or GREK UN2102).

Spring 2018: GREK UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1121 001/21309 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Carina de Klerk 4 4/18
Fall 2018: GREK UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1121 001/29804 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Catherine Lambert 4 5/18

GREK UN2101 Intermediate Greek I Attic Prose. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN1101- GREK UN1102 or the equivalent.

Selections from Attic prose.

Spring 2018: GREK UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2101 001/26170 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 4 8/18
Fall 2018: GREK UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2101 001/66900 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
616 Hamilton Hall
Maria Dimitropoulos 4 10/18

GREK UN2102 Intermediate Greek II: Homer. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN1101- GREK UN1102 or GREK UN1121 or the equivalent.

Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

Spring 2018: GREK UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2102 001/22519 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
607 Hamilton Hall
Caitlin Gillespie 4 10
Fall 2018: GREK UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2102 001/71994 F 11:40am - 12:55pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 4 9/18
GREK 2102 001/71994 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 4 9/18

GREK UN3309 Selections from Greek Literature. 3 points.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit. The topic that will be taught in Fall 2018 is "Plato."

Fall 2018: GREK UN3309
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3309 001/11628 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Deborah Steiner 3 10/30

GREK UN3310 Selections from Greek Literature II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN2101 - GREK UN2102 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: GREK UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3310 001/10558 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3 9/25

GREK UN3980 The Post-Baccalaureate Seminar. 3 points.

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Fall 2018: GREK UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3980 001/68491 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3 7/15

GREK UN3996 The Major Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: junior standing.

Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic changes from year to year, but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Fall 2018: GREK UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3996 001/27843 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
309 Hamilton Hall
John Ma 3 7/20

GREK UN3997 Directed Readings. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of reading in Greek literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Spring 2018: GREK UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3997 001/70788  
Marcus Folch 3 0
GREK 3997 003/21704  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0
GREK 3997 004/18737  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
GREK 3997 005/73856  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
GREK 3997 006/05419  
Ellen Morris 3 0
GREK 3997 007/96048  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 1
GREK 3997 013/09443  
Helene Foley 3 0
Fall 2018: GREK UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3997 001/12679  
Seth Schwartz 3 0/5
GREK 3997 002/65452  
Deborah Steiner 3 1/5
GREK 3997 003/25763  
Elizabeth Irwin 3 0/5
GREK 3997 004/76539  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0/5
GREK 3997 005/70912  
John Ma 3 0/5
GREK 3997 006/04456  
Helene Foley 3 0
GREK 3997 007/04700  
Nancy Worman 3 0
GREK 3997 008/07842  
Ellen Morris 3 0

GREK UN3998 Supervised Research. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of research in Greek literature. Research paper required.

Spring 2018: GREK UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3998 001/19775  
Marcus Folch 3 0
GREK 3998 003/20631  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0/30
GREK 3998 004/26376  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
GREK 3998 005/27579  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
GREK 3998 006/07260  
Ellen Morris 3 0
GREK 3998 013/05025  
Helene Foley 3 1
GREK 3998 014/02571  
Nancy Worman 3 1
Fall 2018: GREK UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3998 001/70633  
Seth Schwartz 3 0/5
GREK 3998 002/77113  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0/5
GREK 3998 003/74466  
Deborah Steiner 3 1/5
GREK 3998 005/68845  
John Ma 3 0/5
GREK 3998 006/01118  
Helene Foley 3 0
GREK 3998 007/05966  
Nancy Worman 3 0
GREK 3998 008/01683  
Ellen Morris 3 0

GREK GU4010 Selections from Greek Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN2101 - GREK UN2102 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes each year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: GREK GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4010 001/05564 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
325 Milbank Hall
Nancy Worman 3 8/15

GREK GU4105 History of Greek Literature I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher.

Readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century B.C.

Fall 2018: GREK GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4105 001/68026 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Deborah Steiner 4 15/15

GREK GU4106 History of Greek Literature II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher.

Greek literature of the 4th century B.C. and of the Hellenistic and Imperial Ages.

Spring 2018: GREK GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4106 001/11695 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
617b Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 4 8/20

Classical Civilization

CLCV UN2441 Egypt in the Classical World. 4 points.

This class traces Egypt's evolving integration into the Classical World from the Saite Dynasty (c. 685 BCE) to the suppression of paganism by the Coptic church. We'll pay close attention to the flashpoints that created conflicts between pagan Egyptians, Greeks, Jews, and Christians and also to integrative aspects of society.

Spring 2018: CLCV UN2441
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 2441 001/02514 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Altschul Hall
Ellen Morris 4 61/66

CLCV UN3158 Women in Antiquity. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Examines the role of women in ancient Greek and Latin literature; the portrayal of women in literature as opposed to their actual social status; male and female in ancient Mediterranean cosmologies; readings from ancient epics, lyric drama, history, historical documents, medical texts, oratory, and philosophy, as well as from contemporary sociological and anthropological works that help to analyze the origins of the Western attitude toward women.

Spring 2018: CLCV UN3158
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 3158 001/08872 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
323 Milbank Hall
Kristina Milnor 3 19/25

CLCV UN3535 Identity and Society in Ancient Egypt. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Fall 2018: CLCV UN3535
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 3535 001/01230 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Ellen Morris 3 22/25

CLCV GU4190 Virtue and Happiness: Philosophy in Classical Rome. 3 points.

This class provides an introduction to philosophical texts and practices of Rome's classical era (1st century BC to 2nd century AD). Why study Roman philosophy? While Romans in the early and middle Republic seem to have been satisfied with the moral code inherited from their ancestors (known as the mos maiorum), from the time of Cicero until the high Empire, Roman intellectuals wrestled with the problem of combining these traditional values with the range of philosophical texts and practices they encountered in the contemporary Greek world. Even though few ancient Romans qualify as original philosophical thinkers, philosophy played an important role in Roman culture, and knowledge of philosophical discourses is thus indispensable to our understanding of Roman society, history, and literature. Furthermore, owing to the vagaries of textual transmission, the majority of our sources for Hellenistic philosophy (most notably, Epicureanism and Stoicism) happen to be Roman, with the result that this important chapter of the history of philosophy cannot be studied without detailed attention to the Roman material. And finally, philosophical texts account for some of the most important and attractive works of Latin—and indeed world—literature. Readings will be in English translation and include works by Lucretius, Cicero, Horace, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and others.

Spring 2018: CLCV GU4190
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 4190 001/23964 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
703 Hamilton Hall
Katharina Volk 3 20/35

Classical Literature

CLLT UN3125 Book Histories and the Classics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA CC1001 or HUMA GS1001COCI CC1101 ,HUMA CC1001 or HUMA GS1001 or COCI CC1101

This seminar will introduce students of classical literature to the history of the Western book, and to the relationship between book history and the transmission and reception history of the literature of ancient Greece and Rome.  Students will also learn how to make use of rare books materials including manuscripts and early printed books......

CLLT UN3127 Hercules: Hero, Murderer, Philosopher, Buffoon. 3 points.

Hercules is one of the most ancient, widespread, and enduring figures to emerge from the ancient Mediterranean. He is a figure of multiples: myriad labors, multiple wives, multiple fathers, and multiple identities. Together we will discover a broad range of literature on this hero and-like ancient writers and thinkers-we will use Hercules to explore mortality, divinity, masculinity, madness, and contradiction. We will read Hercules in different ancient genres, with a particular emphasis on Tragedy, Comedy, and Philosophy. The final units of our course will explore contemporary "heros," including the Hulk, "The Rock," and Disney's Hercules. 

CLLT UN3128 THE ARTIST AND THE DICTATOR: ROMAN WRITERS UNDER NERO. 3 points.

This course aims at highlighting both the most important general features and the most important peculiarities of the literary masterpieces produced in the age of Nero. The basic question we will be addressing in class is what it means to be a literary artist under the rule of a despot. In order to fulfill Nero’s megalomaniac need for exaltation, cope with his absolute power and, at the same time, maintain their personal identity and ethical values as writers, Seneca, Petronius and Lucan strove to balance in their works the emperor’s expectations and their own artistic designs. These artists were not free to write what they wanted to write for present and future generations, but they tried to write it nevertheless. In this course, we will examine the extent of freedom of expression under Nero; the rhetorical techniques Neronian writers resorted to in order to express tactful modes of oblique commentary and criticism; the difficulties of the individual’s liberty in a climate of dictatorial oppression; the ways in which literature helps us discover more about the society of a given time; and, ultimately, the universal and eternal desire for
artists to be themselves and express their own views in spite of mortal dangers. Such issues are all the more pertinent in the present day: in 1989, the novelist Salman Rushdie was sentenced to death by the ayatollah Khomeyni after the publication of The Satanic Verses and fled to the United Kingdom; in 2011, the visual artist Ai Weiwei, whose most recent installation is currently exhibited in New York City, at Washington Square Park, served 81 days in a Chinese prison because of his artwork against dictatorial regimes. He eventually left China and settled in Berlin.No knowledge of Latin is required, as the focus of this course is literary, historical and sociological interpretation rather than linguistic competence.

Fall 2018: CLLT UN3128
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLLT 3128 001/67346 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Isaia Crosson 3 5/18

CLLT UN3132 Classical Myth. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Survey of major myths from the ancient Near East to the advent of Christianity, with emphasis upon the content and treatment of myths in classical authors (Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, Vergil, Livy, Ovid).

Fall 2018: CLLT UN3132
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLLT 3132 001/06333 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Ll103 Diana Center
Helene Foley 3 70/70

Modern Greek

GRKM UN1101 Elementary Modern Greek I. 4 points.

This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape from "parea" to poetry to politics. Special attention will be paid to Greek New York. How do "our", "American", "Greek-American" definitions of language and culture differ from "their", "Greek" ones?

Fall 2018: GRKM UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 1101 001/21200 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 4 15/18

GRKM UN1102 Elementary Modern Greek. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM UN1101 or the equivalent.

Continuation of GRKM UN1101. Introduction to modern Greek language and culture. Emphasis on speaking, writing, basic grammar, syntax, and cross-cultural analysis.

Spring 2018: GRKM UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 1102 001/72558 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 4 11/20

GRKM UN2102 Intermediate Modern Greek II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent.

Continuation of GRKM V2101. Students complete their knowledge of the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax while continuing to enrich their vocabulary.

Spring 2018: GRKM UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 2102 001/11720 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 4 3/20

GRKM UN3001 Advanced Modern Greek I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent.

This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, politics, and identity. We will use materials from literature, critical essays, historiography, film, and mass media as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. In addition we will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time. Materials include: essays (Seferis, Theotokas); newspaper articles; television interviews (Flessa and Papanikolaou); advertisement; stand-up-comedy (Lazopoulos); music (art-song, rebetika, hip-hop); theatre (Demetriades); literature (Roides, Papadiamantis, Kazantzakis, Lymberaki, Karapanou, Galanaki, Charalambides, Chatzopoulos, Chouliaras).

GRKM GU4135 Topics Through Greek Film. 3-4 points.

Optional 1-point bilingual guided reading.

This course explores issues of memory and trauma, public history and testimony, colonialism and biopolitics, neoliberalism and governmentality, and crisis and kinship, all through the medium of Greek film. It brings the Greek cinema canon (Angelopoulos, Gavras, Cacoyiannis, Koundouros, et al.) into conversation with the work of contemporary artists, documentary filmmakers, and the recent “weird wave” and asks: what kind of lens does film offer onto the study of a society’s history and contemporary predicament? The viewing and discussion of films is facilitated through a consideration of a wide range of materials, including novels, criticism, archival footage, and interviews with directors. The course does not assume any background knowledge and all films will have English subtitles. An additional 1-credit bilingual option (meeting once per week at a time TBD) is offered for students who wish to read, view, and discuss materials in Greek.

Fall 2018: GRKM GU4135
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 4135 001/65707 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
201a Philosophy Hall
Dimitrios Antoniou 3-4 9/20

GRKM UN3996 Readings in Modern Greek. 1 point.

Prerequisites: This course may be taken as a 1 point corequisite with GRKM GU4135, or as a separate 1 point course.

The course allows students in Topics through Greek Film (GU4135) with an intermediate to advanced level of Greek to supplement their study of that course’s theme through materials in Greek. Each week we will be reading short texts (excerpts from novels and essays, blogs, newspaper articles) on a theme discussed that week in GU4135. 

Fall 2018: GRKM UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3996 001/91896  
Dimitrios Antoniou 1 0/15

GRKM UN3997 Directed Readings. 1-4 points.

Designed for undergraduates who want to do directed reading in a period or on a topic not covered in the curriculum.

Spring 2018: GRKM UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3997 002/15071  
Stathis Gourgouris 1-4 0

GRKM UN3998 Senior Research Seminar. 1-4 points.

Designed for students writing a senior thesis or doing advanced research on Greek or Greek Diaspora topics.

Spring 2018: GRKM UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3998 001/10366  
Nikolas Kakkoufa 1-4 1
Fall 2018: GRKM UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3998 001/63844  
Karen Van Dyck 1-4 1/8

GRKM UN2101 Intermediate Modern Greek I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM UN1101 and GRKM UN1102 or the equivalent.
Corequisites: GRKM UN2111

This course is designed for students who are already familiar with the basic grammar and syntax of modern Greek language and can communicate at an elementary level. Using films, newspapers, and popular songs, students engage the finer points of Greek grammar and syntax and enrich their vocabulary. Emphasis is given to writing, whether in the form of film and book reviews or essays on particular topics taken from a selection of second year textbooks.

Fall 2018: GRKM UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 2101 001/23868 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 4 9/18

CLGM UN3920 The World Responds to the Greeks: Modernity, Postcoloniality, Globality. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course examines various literary, artistic, and cultural traditions that respond to some of the most recognizable Greek motifs in myth, theater, and politics, with the aim of understanding both what these motifs might be offering specifically to these traditions in particular social-historical contexts and, at the same time, what these traditions in turn bring to our conventional understanding of these motifs, how they reconceptualize them and how they alter them. The overall impetus is framed by a prismatic inquiry of how conditions of modernity, postcoloniality, and globality fashion themselves in engagement with certain persistent imaginaries of antiquity.

Spring 2018: CLGM UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLGM 3920 001/67336 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Stathis Gourgouris 3 34/40

GRKM UN3003 Greece today: language, literature, and culture (in Greek). 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: GRKM UN2102

This course builds on the elements of the language acquired in GRKM1101 through 2102, but new students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. It introduces the students to a number of authentic multimodal materials drawn from a range of sources which include films, literary texts, media, music etc. in order to better understand Greece’s current cultural, socio-economic, and political landscape. In doing so, it aims to foster transcultural understanding and intercultural competence, while further developing the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Topics of discussion include language, gender equality, youth unemployment, education, queer identities, refugees, and the multilayered aspects of the crisis.Pre-requisite for this class: GRKM 2102 or placement test. Instructor’s permission required if the students have not taken GRKM2102 or equivalent.

Fall 2018: GRKM UN3003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3003 001/24780 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 3 0/10

GRKM UN3935 Hellenism and the Topographical Imagination. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course examines the way particular spaces—cultural, urban, literary—serve as sites for the production and reproduction of cultural and political imaginaries. It places particular emphasis on the themes of the polis, the city, and the nation-state as well as on spatial representations of and responses to notions of the Hellenic across time. Students will consider a wide range of texts as spaces—complex sites constituted and complicated by a multiplicity of languages—and ask: To what extent is meaning and cultural identity, sitespecific? How central is the classical past in Western imagination? How have great metropolises such as Paris, Istanbul, and New York fashioned themselves in response to the allure of the classical and the advent of modern Greece? How has Greece as a specific site shaped the study of the Cold War, dictatorships, and crisis?

Fall 2018: GRKM UN3935
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3935 001/13435 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
602 Northwest Corner
Dimitrios Antoniou 3 25/25

CLGM GU4150 C.P. Cavafy and the poetics of desire. 4 points.

This course takes C. P. Cavafy’s oeuvre as a departure point in order to discuss desire and the ways it is tied with a variety of topics. We will employ a number of methodological tools to examine key topics in Cavafy’s work such as eros, power, history, and gender. How can we define desire and how is desire staged, thematized, or transmitted through poetry? How does a gay poet write about desired bodies at the beginning of the previous century? What is Cavafy’s contribution to the formation of gay identities in the twentieth century? How do we understand the poet’s desire for an archive? How important is the city for activating desire? How do we trace a poet’s afterlife and how does the desire poetry transmits to readers transform through time? How does literature of the past address present concerns? These are some of the questions that we will examine during this course. 

Spring 2018: CLGM GU4150
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLGM 4150 001/23322 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
C01 80 Claremont
Nikolas Kakkoufa 4 7/20

CLGM UN3110 The Ottoman Past in the Greek Present . 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Almost a century after the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the Ottoman past lives on in contemporary Greece, often in unexpected sites. In the built environment it appears as mosques, baths, covered markets, and fountains adorned with Arabic inscriptions. It also manifests itself in music, food, and language. Yet Ottoman legacies also shape the European present in less obvious ways and generate vehement debates about identity, nation-building, human rights, and interstate relations. In this course, we will be drawing on history, politics, anthropology, and comparative literature as well as a broad range of primary materials to view the Ottoman past through the lens of the Greek present. What understandings of nation-building emerge as more Ottoman archives became accessible to scholars? How does Islamic Family Law—still in effect in Greece—confront the European legal system? How are Ottoman administrative structures re-assessed in the context of acute socio-economic crisis and migration?

Spring 2018: CLGM UN3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLGM 3110 001/21097 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Dimitrios Antoniou 3 12/15

CLGM UN3005 Dictatorships and their Afterlives . 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

What does the investigation of a dictatorship entail and what are the challenges in such an endeavor? Why (and when) do particular societies turn to an examination of their non-democratic pasts? What does it mean for those who never experienced an authoritarian regime first-hand to remember it through television footage, popular culture, and family stories? This seminar examines dictatorships and the ways in which they are remembered, discussed, examined, and give rise to conflicting narratives in post-dictatorial environments. It takes as its point of departure the Greek military regime of 1967-1974, which is considered in relation to other dictatorships in South America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. We will be drawing on primary materials including Amnesty International reports, film, performance art, and architectural drawings as well as the works of Hannah Arendt and Günter Grass to engage in an interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which military dictatorships live on as ghosts, traumatic memories, urban warfare, litigation, and debates on the politics of comparison and the ethics of contemporary art.

Spring 2018: CLGM UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLGM 3005 001/96398 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Dimitrios Antoniou 3 8/15

Cross-listed Courses

HSCL UN3000The Persian Empire