Biophysics

Departmental Office: 600 Fairchild, 212-854-4581; undergrad@biology.columbia.edu
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/

Director of Undergraduate Studies, Undergraduate Programs and Laboratories:
Prof. Deborah Mowshowitz, 744D Mudd; 212-854-4497; dbm2@columbia.edu

Biology Major and Concentration Advisers:
For a list of current biology, biochemistry, biophysics, and neuroscience and behavior advisers, please visit http://biology.columbia.edu/programs/advisors

Biochemistry Advisers:
Biology: Prof. Brent Stockwell, 1208 Northwest Corner Building; 212-854-2948; stockwell@biology.columbia.edu
Chemistry: Prof. Virginia Cornish, 1209 Northwest Corner Building; 212-854-5209; vc114@columbia.edu

Biophysics Adviser: Prof. Ozgur Sahin, 908 Northwest Corner Building; os2246@columbia.edu

Neuroscience and Behavior Advisers:
Biology: Prof. Jian Yang, 917A Fairchild; 212-854-6161; jy160@columbia.edu
or Prof. Deborah Mowshowitz, 744D Mudd; 212-854-4497; dbm2@columbia.edu
Psychology:

A-E: Professor Carl Hart, 401D Schermerhorn Hall; 212-854-5313; chair@psych.columbia.edu

F-Q: Professor Caroline Marvin, 355B Schermerhorn Ext; 212-854-3608; cbm2118@columbia.edu\

R-Z: Professor Don Hood, 415 Schermerhorn; 212-854-4587; dch3@columbia.edu

For the first term of their introductory biology sequence, students may take either BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology, which has a prerequisite of chemistry, or EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms, which does not require chemistry. EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms may be taken in the first year.

BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology should be taken later, after general chemistry. For more details, see Introductory Courses under Requirements—Major in Biology. All students interested in biology are encouraged to take BIOL UN1908 First-Year Seminar in Modern Biology in the fall semester of their first year.

Premedical students should consult with their advising dean or the preprofessional office for relevant details of medical school requirements. Students interested in graduate school should consult the biology career adviser, Dr. Chloe Bulinski.

Nonscience majors who wish to take a biology course to fulfill the science requirement are encouraged to take BIOL UN1130 Genes and Development. They may also take, with the instructor’s permission, BIOL UN3208 Introduction to Evolutionary Biology or EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms.

Interested students should consult listings in other departments for courses related to biology. For courses in environmental studies, see listings for Earth and environmental sciences or for ecology, evolution, and environmental biology. For courses in human evolution, see listings for anthropology or for ecology, evolution, and environmental biology. For courses in the history of evolution, see listings for history and for philosophy of science. For a list of courses in computational biology and genomics, visit http://systemsbiology.columbia.edu/courses.

Advanced Placement

The department grants 3 credits for a score of 5 on the AP Biology exam. Placement is determined by the department. Students with a 5 on the AP are encouraged to take BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology and BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology, but are not required to do so. For details, visit http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/ug/faqs.html.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credits granted toward the degree are not automatically counted toward the major. The department determines which transfer credits can be counted toward the major. For most majors, at least four biology or biochemistry courses and at least 18 credits of the total (biology, biochemistry, math, physics, and chemistry) must be taken at Columbia. Barnard courses may not be substituted for the required Columbia courses without advance permission from the adviser. For neuroscience and behavior, one of the five biology course and one of the psychology courses may be transferred. Students who wish to count a course from outside Columbia toward their major must receive written approval from their adviser or the director of undergraduate studies. Students must supply a syllabus and/or course description to receive approval.

Advising

Current and prospective biology majors and concentrators whose last names begin with A-H should consult with Prof. Kalderon. Students whose last names begin with I-P should consult with Prof. Heicklen. Students whose last names begin with Q-Z should consult with Prof. Bussemaker. Current and prospective biochemistry majors should consult with Prof. Stockwell for biology course advising and Prof. Cornish for chemistry course advising. Current and prospective biophysics majors should consult with Prof. Sahin. Students who cannot contact their adviser should consult with Prof. Mowshowitz.

For additional information, including office hours, please visit http://biology.columbia.edu/programs/advisors.

Current and prospective biology majors and concentrators whose last names begin with A-L should consult with Prof. Mowshowitz. Students whose last names begin with M-Z should consult with Prof. Tzagoloff. Current and prospective biochemistry majors should consult with Prof. Tzagoloff for biology course advising and Prof. Cornish for chemistry course advising. Current and prospective biophysics majors should consult with Prof. Sahin. Students who cannot contact their adviser should consult with Prof. Mowshowitz.

For additional information, including office hours, please visit http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/pages/undergrad/cur/advising/.

Neuroscience and Behavior Advisers:
Biology: Prof. Jian Yang, 917A Fairchild; 854-6161; jy160@columbia.edu
or Prof. Deborah Mowshowitz, 744D Mudd; 854-4497; dbm2@columbia.edu
Psychology:

A-E: Professor Carl Hart, 401D Schermerhorn Hall; 212-854-5313; chair@psych.columbia.edu

F-Q: Professor Caroline Marvin, 355B Schermerhorn Ext; 212-854-3608; cbm2118@columbia.edu\

R-Z: Professor Don Hood, 415 Schermerhorn; 212-854-4587; dch3@columbia.edu

Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Program

First-year students, sophomores, and juniors are eligible for the department’s paid internship program (SURF). This program is competitive; the department cannot assure every eligible student a place in any given summer.

Students apply to the program early in the spring term. A faculty committee headed by Dr. Alice Heicklen then matches selected students to appropriate labs. The deadline for SURF applications is at the beginning of the spring semester.

SURF students must submit a report on their work at the end of the summer session and participate in the following year’s annual Undergraduate Research Symposium. Although it does not carry any academic credit, SURF can be used toward the lab requirement for majors and toward graduation with honors. For detailed information on all summer research programs and how to apply, please visit the SURF website.

Current detailed descriptions of the SURF program and the application procedure are available at SURF's website, http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/ug/surf/. For more information on the Amgen Scholarship Program, please visit http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/ug/amgen/. Applications to all of these programs are through SURF.

Departmental Honors

Students must apply for departmental honors. Applications are due no later than one day after spring break of their senior year. For details, please visit the departmental website at http://biology.columbia.edu/programs/honors-biological-sciences.

Professors

  • J. Chloë Bulinski
  • Harmen Bussemaker
  • Martin Chalfie
  • Lawrence A. Chasin
  • Julio M. Fernandez
  • Stuart Firestein
  • Joachim Frank
  • Tulle Hazelrigg
  • John Hunt
  • Daniel Kalderon
  • Darcy B. Kelley
  • James L. Manley
  • Ann McDermott (Chemistry)
  • Robert E. Pollack
  • Carol L. Prives
  • Ron Prywes
  • Molly Przeworski
  • Michael P. Sheetz
  • Brent Stockwell
  • Liang Tong
  • Alexander A. Tzagoloff
  • Jian Yang
  • Rafael Yuste

Associate Professors

  • Songtao Jia
  • Ozgur Sahin
  • Guy Sella

Assistant Professors

  • Lars Dietrich
  • Raju Tomer

Lecturers

  • Claire Elise Hazen
  • Alice Heicklen
  • Mary Ann Price
  • Lili Yamasaki

Adjunct Faculty

  • Ava Brent-Jamali
  • Lewis Brown
  • Nataliya Galifianakis
  • Jay Hammel
  • Danny Nam Ho
  • John Loike
  • Deborah B. Mowshowitz
  • Solomon Mowshowitz
  • Vincent R. Racaniello

Guidelines for all Biological Sciences Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors

Returning students should check the departmental website for any last-minute changes and/or additional information. See especially undergraduate updates and list of department courses. All major and concentration requirements are detailed on the website and links provided below.

Exceptions to Requirements

Students must get written permission in advance for any exceptions to the requirements listed below. For the exceptions to be applied toward graduation, the student must notify the biology department in one of the following two ways:

  1. The student can file a completed paper planning form, signed by a faculty adviser, in the biology department office at 600 Fairchild;
  2. The faculty member approving the exception can send an e-mail explaining the exceptions to mes2314@columbia.edu.

Grade Requirements for the Major

A grade of C- or higher must be earned and revealed on your transcript for any course – including the first – to be counted toward the major or concentration requirements. The grade of P is not acceptable. A course that was taken Pass/D/Fail may be counted if and only if the P is uncovered by the Registrar's deadline.

Courses

Courses with the subject code HPSC or SCNC do not count toward the majors or concentrations.


Major in Biology

General Information

The requirements for the biology major include courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics.

The required biology courses are one year of introductory biology, two core courses in biology or biochemistry, two 3-point electives in biology or biochemistry, and an appropriate lab experience. See below for details.

The required courses outside the biology department are chemistry through organic (plus labs), one year of college-level physics (plus lab), and the completion of one year of college-level mathematics (usually calculus).

Alternative sequences to the above may be arranged in special circumstances, but only with the permission of the director of undergraduate studies or a departmental adviser obtained in advance; for example, certain courses listed in the Summer Term Bulletin, the School of General Studies Bulletin, and the Barnard College Bulletin may be applied toward the major. In addition, selected courses at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center are open to advanced undergraduates. Credit toward the major for courses not listed in the Columbia College Bulletin must be discussed in advance with the director of undergraduate studies or a departmental adviser. Students are responsible for notifying the department of all exceptions either in writing or by e-mail as explained above.

Alternative programs must be arranged in advance with the director of undergraduate studies. Students planning graduate work in biology should keep in mind that physical chemistry and statistics are important for many graduate programs.

Introductory Courses

The usual one-year introductory biology sequence is BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology-BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology, taken in the sophomore year, or EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms-BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology, which may be taken in the first year.

Other sequences require permission in advance from the director of undergraduate studies or departmental advisers. Students with a strong background in chemistry or molecular biology may take BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology-BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology in their first year; the permission of one of the instructors is required.

Premedical students usually take BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology-BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology after a year of general chemistry; premedical students interested in the environmental sciences may take EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms followed by BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology.

Students with advanced placement in biology are expected but not required to take EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms or BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology as their initial biology course, because BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology-BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology is taught at a level of detail and depth not found in most advanced placement courses.

Students who wish to skip BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology and start with a higher-level biology course may do so, but they must obtain permission in advance from the director of undergraduate studies. For additional information, see FAQs for first-year students at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/ug/advice/faqs/firstyr.html.

Core Courses

Two out of the following five departmental core courses are required:

BIOL UN3022 Developmental Biology
BIOL UN3031 Genetics
BIOL UN3041 Cell Biology
BIOC UN3501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism
BIOC UN3512 Molecular Biology

Laboratory Courses

A laboratory experience in biology is required. It may be fulfilled by completing any one of the following options:

Option 1:
Select one of the following 5-point laboratory courses:
BIOL UN3050 Project Laboratory In Protein Biochemistry
BIOL UN3052 Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics
BIOL UN3058 Project Laboratory in Microbiology
Option 2:
BIOL UN2501 Contemporary Biology Laboratory
Select an additional 3-point lab such as BIOL UN3040 or a Barnard lab.
Option 3:
Two terms of BIOL UN3500 taken for a letter grade, including the submission of a satisfactory research report at the end of each semester
Option 4:
Completion of all the requirements for one session of the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF). An additional semester of BIOL UN3500 in the same research lab is recommended but not required. Summer lab work under other auspices may not be substituted for the SURF Program.

The laboratory fee ($150) partially covers the cost of nonreturnable items. This fee is charged for all lab courses, including BIOL UN3500 Independent Biological Research.

Upper-Level Elective Courses

Select two additional courses, carrying at least 3 points each, from any of the 3000- or 4000- level lecture courses. BIOL UN3500 Independent Biological Research cannot be used as one of the courses to satisfy the upper-level elective course requirement.

Chemistry

All majors must take chemistry through organic including labs. One of the following three groups of chemistry courses is required:

Option 1:
CHEM UN1403
 - CHEM UN1404
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
and General Chemistry II ( Lecture)
CHEM UN1500 General Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM UN3443
 - CHEM UN2444
Organic Chemistry I (Lecture)
and Organic Chemistry II (Lecture)
CHEM UN2493 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (Techniques)
CHEM UN2494 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (Synthesis)
Option 2:
For students who qualify for intensive chemistry
CHEM UN1604
 - CHEM UN2507
Intensive General Chemistry (Lecture)
and Intensive General Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM UN1507 Intensive General Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM UN3443
 - CHEM UN2444
Organic Chemistry I (Lecture)
and Organic Chemistry II (Lecture)
CHEM UN2545 Intensive Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Option 3:
For students who qualify for first year organic chemistry
CHEM UN2507 Intensive General Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM UN3045
 - CHEM UN3046
Intensive Organic Chemistry I (Lecture)
and Intensive Organic Chemistry II (Lecture)

Physics

Students must take two terms of physics including the accompanying labs. The usual choices are PHYS UN1201-PHYS UN1202 General Physics II and PHYS UN1291-PHYS UN1292 General Physics Laboratory II. Higher-level physics sequences are also acceptable. The 1400-level sequence is recommended for students who plan to take three terms of physics.

Mathematics

Two semesters of calculus or honors mathematics are required. Students may substitute one semester of statistics for one semester of calculus with an adviser's permission. For students with AP credit, completion of MATH UN1102 Calculus II, MATH UN1201 Calculus III, or MATH UN1207 Honors Mathematics A is sufficient. However, students with AP credit are encouraged to take additional courses in mathematics or statistics at Columbia.

For more details on the biology major requirements, visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/biology-major-requirements.


Major in Biochemistry

The required basic courses for the biochemistry major are chemistry through organic, including laboratory, and one year each of physical chemistry, physics, calculus, biology, and biochemistry/molecular biology.

The required additional courses are three lecture courses chosen from mathematics, chemistry, and biology, and two upper-level laboratory courses.

For more details, see the Chemistry section in this Bulletin or visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/biochemistry-major-requirements.

For more details, see the Chemistry section in this Bulletin or visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/biochemistry-major-requirements.


Major in Biophysics

The requirements for the biophysics major are as follows:

One year of introductory biology:
BIOL UN2005
 - BIOL UN2006
Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology
and Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology
Select at least one of the following laboratory courses:
BIOL UN3050 Project Laboratory In Protein Biochemistry
Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics
BIOL UN3058 Project Laboratory in Microbiology
Independent Biological Research
One course in biochemistry or molecular biology:
BIOC UN3501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism
or BIOC UN3512 Molecular Biology
Select one of the following options:
Option 1 - Genetics:
BIOL UN3031 Genetics
Option 2 - Neurobiology:
Neurobiology I: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology
Neurobiology II: Development Systems
Option 3 - Developmental Biology:
Developmental Biology
Select one of the following sequences to be completed at the end of sophomore year:
Introduction to Classical and Quantum Waves
and Introduction To Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics
and Introduction to Classical and Quantum Waves
and Introduction to Experimental Physics
Physics, I: Mechanics and Relativity
and Physics, II: Thermodynamics, Electricity, and Magnetism
and Physics, III: Classical and Quantum Waves
and Experiments in Classical and Modern Physics
Accelerated Physics I
and Accelerated Physics II
and Intermediate Laboratory Work
Select any two physics courses at the 3000-level or above, chosen in consultation with the adviser.
Calculus through MATH UN1202 or MATH UN1208, and MATH V3027
Chemistry through organic including labs; see biology major for options
Select one additional course at the 3000- or 4000-level in either physics or biology.

For more details, see the Physics section in this Bulletin or visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/biophysics-major-requirements.

For more details, see the Physics section in this Bulletin or visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/biophysics-major-requirements.


Major in Neuroscience and Behavior

In addition to one year of general chemistry, ten courses are required to complete the major in neuroscience and behavior—five in biology and five in psychology.

For more details, see the Psychology section in this Bulletin or visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/neuroscience-and-behavior-major-requirements.

For more details, see the Psychology section in this Bulletin or visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/neuroscience-and-behavior-major-requirements.


Concentration in Biology

Students who wish to concentrate in biology must design their programs in advance with the director of undergraduate studies or a departmental adviser.

The requirement for the concentration is 22 points in biology or biochemistry, with at least five courses chosen from the courses listed in the Biological Sciences section of the Bulletin. Additional courses in physics, chemistry, and mathematics are required as detailed below.

A project laboratory and BIOL UN2501 Contemporary Biology Laboratory may not both be counted toward the 22-point total. See the biology major requirements for additional information.

The requirements for the concentration in biology are as follows:

BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology
or EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology
Select at least one of the following core courses:
Developmental Biology
Genetics
Cell Biology
Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism
Molecular Biology
One of these options to fulfill the lab requirement:
Contemporary Biology Laboratory (plus second course including laboratory work, usually BIOL UN3040)
Project Laboratory In Protein Biochemistry
Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics
Project Laboratory in Microbiology
One or two additional biology or biochemistry lecture courses, level 3000 or above, to reach the total Biology credits of 22 points required for the concentration. Either UN2501 or a five-point lab course, but not both, may count towards the 22 point total.
Chemistry through organic including labs; see biology major for options
One year of physics, including laboratory; see biology major for options
One year of college-level mathematics (ordinarily this should be calculus); see biology major for options

For more details, visit http://biology.columbia.edu/pages/biology-concentration-requirements.


Major in Environmental Biology

For a description of the environmental biology major, see the Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology section in this Bulletin.

For a description of the environmental biology major, see the Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology section in this Bulletin.

Fall 2017

BIOL UN1908 First-Year Seminar in Modern Biology
BIOL UN2005 Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology
BIOL UN2401 Contemporary Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics Molecular Biology
BIOL UN2501 Contemporary Biology Laboratory
BIOL UN2700 Past and future of the human genome
BIOL UN3004 Neurobiology I: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology
BIOL UN3005 Neurobiology II: Development Systems
BIOL UN3006 Physiology
BIOL UN3022 Developmental Biology
BIOL UN3034 Biotechnology
BIOL UN3041 Cell Biology
BIOL UN3052 Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics
BIOL UN3073 Cellular and Molecular Immunology
BIOC UN3300 Biochemistry
BIOC UN3501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism
BIOL UN3500 Independent Biological Research
BIOL UN3700 Independent Clinical Research
BIOL UN3995 Topics in Biology
BIOL GU4001 Advanced Genetic Analysis
BIOL GU4260 Proteomics Laboratory
BIOL GU4300 Drugs and Disease
BIOC GU4323 BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

Spring 2017

BIOL UN2006 Introductory Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology
BIOL UN2402 Contemporary Biology II: Cell Biology, Development Physiology
BIOL UN2501 Contemporary Biology Laboratory
BIOL UN3005 Neurobiology II: Development Systems
BIOL UN3006 Physiology
BIOL UN3031 Genetics
BIOL UN3040 Lab in Molecular Biology
BIOL UN3058 Project Laboratory in Microbiology
BIOC UN3300 Biochemistry
BIOL UN3310 Virology
BIOL UN3500 Independent Biological Research
BIOC UN3512 Molecular Biology
BIOL UN3700 Independent Clinical Research
BIOL UN3799 Molecular Biology of Cancer
BIOL GU4008 The Cellular Physiology of Disease
BIOL GU4031 Genetics
BIOL GU4075 Biology at Physical Extremes
BIOT GU4161 Ethics in Biopharmaceutical Patent and Regulatory Law
BIOL GU4305 Seminar in Biotechnology
BIOL GU4510 Genomics of Gene Regulation
BIOL GU4799 Readings In the Molecular Biology of Cancer
SCNC UN3920 Ignorance

All Courses

BIOC UN3300 Biochemistry. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one year each of Introductory Biology and General Chemistry.
Corequisites: Organic Chemistry. Primarily aimed at nontraditional students and undergraduates who have course conflicts with BIOC C3501.

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes within organisms that give rise to the immense complexity of life. This complexity emerges from a highly regulated and coordinated flow of chemical energy from one biomolecule to another. This course serves to familiarize students with the spectrum of biomolecules (carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids, etc.) as well as the fundamental chemical processes (glycolysis, citric acid cycle, fatty acid metabolism, etc.) that allow life to happen. In particular, this course will employ active learning techniques and critical thinking problem-solving to engage students in answering the question: how is the complexity of life possible? NOTE: While Organic Chemistry is listed as a corequisite, it is highly recommended that you take Organic Chemistry beforehand.

Spring 2017: BIOC UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 3300 001/21782 T 7:10pm - 9:30pm
329 Pupin Laboratories
Danny Ho 3 79/85
Fall 2017: BIOC UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 3300 001/23729 T 7:10pm - 9:30pm
Room TBA
Danny Ho 3 65/65

BIOC UN3501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: one year of BIOL C2005 and BIOL C2006 and one year of organic chemistry.

Lecture and recitation. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC C3501 and C3512. C3501 covers subject matters in modern biochemistry, including chemical biology and structural biology, discussing the structure and function of both proteins and small molecules in biological systems. Proteins are the primary class of biological macromolecules and serve to carry out most cellular functions. Small organic molecules function in energy production and creating building blocks for the components of cells and can also be used to perturb the functions of proteins directly. The first half of the course covers protein structure, enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanism. The second half of the course explores how small molecules are used endogenously by living systems in metabolic and catabolic pathways; this part of the course focuses on mechanistic organic chemistry involved in metabolic pathways.

Fall 2017: BIOC UN3501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 3501 001/19218 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
4 133/180

BIOC UN3512 Molecular Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one year of biology. Recommended but not required: BIOC C3501.

This is a lecture course designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The focus is on understanding at the molecular level how genetic information is stored within the cell and how it is regulated. Topics covered include genome organization, DNA replication, transcription, RNA processing, and translation. This course will also emphasize the critical analysis of the scientific literature and help students understand how to identify important biological problems and how to address them experimentally. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOC UN3512
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 3512 001/23721 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
James Manley, Mauricio Arias Hernandez 3 40/101

BIOC GU4501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism. 4 points.

Undergraduates should register for BIOC C3501.

Prerequisites: one year of BIOL C2005 and BIOL C2006 and one year of organic chemistry.

Lecture and recitation. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC C3501 and C3512. C3501 covers subject matters in modern biochemistry, including chemical biology and structural biology, discussing the structure and function of both proteins and small molecules in biological systems. Proteins are the primary class of biological macromolecules and serve to carry out most cellular functions. Small organic molecules function in energy production and creating building blocks for the components of cells and can also be used to perturb the functions of proteins directly. The first half of the course covers protein structure, enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanism. The second half of the course explores how small molecules are used endogenously by living systems in metabolic and catabolic pathways; this part of the course focuses on mechanistic organic chemistry involved in metabolic pathways.

Fall 2017: BIOC GU4501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 4501 001/68045 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
4 0/0

BIOC GU4512 Molecular Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one year of biology. Recommended but not required: BIOC C3501.

This is a lecture course designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The focus is on understanding at the molecular level how genetic information is stored within the cell and how it is regulated. Topics covered include genome organization, DNA replication, transcription, RNA processing, and translation. This course will also emphasize the critical analysis of the scientific literature and help students understand how to identify important biological problems and how to address them experimentally. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOC GU4512
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOC 4512 001/63825 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
614 Schermerhorn Hall
James Manley, Mauricio Arias Hernandez 3 2/20

BIOL W1130 Genes and Development. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: one year of high school or college biology.

This course covers selected topics in genetics and developmental biology, with special emphasis on issues that are relevant to contemporary society. Lectures and readings will cover the basic principles of genetics, how genes are expressed and regulated, the role of genes in normal development, and how alterations in genes lead to abnormal development and disease. We will also examine how genes can be manipulated in the laboratory, and look at the contributions of these manipulations to basic science and medicine, as well as some practical applications of these technologies. Interspersed student-run workshops will allow students to research and discuss the ethical and societal impacts of specific topics (e.g. in vitro fertilization, uses and misuses of genetic information, genetically modified organisms, steroid use, and cloning). SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

BIOL W1300 Environmental Science. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

For nonscience majors. Analysis of the relationships between humans and their environment. The Earth's life-supporting systems; energy and matter requirements of living organisms; land and aquatic ecosystems; human population. Resources: energy, minerals, soil, water, biodiversity. Impact of human activities on the environment: resources' depletion; pollution; climate change. Prospects for sustainable development of the human society.

BIOL UN2401 Contemporary Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics & Molecular Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: a course in college chemistry or the written permission of either the instructor or the premedical adviser.

Recommended as the introductory biology course for science majors who have completed a year of college chemistry and premedical students. The fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics. Website: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/c2005/index.html

Fall 2017: BIOL UN2401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2401 001/24085 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Deborah Mowshowitz, Mary Ann Price 3 114/220

BIOL UN2402 Contemporary Biology II: Cell Biology, Development & Physiology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: a course in college chemistry and BIOL C2005 or F2401, or the written permission of either the instructor or the premedical adviser.

Cellular biology and development; physiology of cells and organisms. Same lectures as BIOL C2006, but recitation is optional. For a detailed description of the differences between the two courses, see the course web site or http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/ug/advice/faqs/gs.html. Website: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/c2006/

,

SPS, Barnard, and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOL UN2402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2402 001/23110 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
309 Havemeyer Hall
Deborah Mowshowitz, Stuart Firestein 3 83/339

BIOL UN2501 Contemporary Biology Laboratory. 3 points.

Enrollment per section limited to 28. Lab Fee: $150.
Fee: Lab Fee - 150.00

Corequisites: Strongly recommended prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL C2005 or BIOL F2401.

Experiments focus on genetics and molecular biology, with an emphasis on data analysis and experimental techniques. The class also includes a study of mammalian anatomy and histology. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOL UN2501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2501 001/11385 M 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 11/28
BIOL 2501 002/18642 T 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 7/28
BIOL 2501 003/62525 W 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 14/28
BIOL 2501 004/14723 Th 6:40pm - 10:30pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 10/28
BIOL 2501 005/14546 F 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 7/28
Fall 2017: BIOL UN2501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2501 001/26008 M 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 0/24
BIOL 2501 002/68604 T 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 0/24
BIOL 2501 003/69378 W 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 0/24
BIOL 2501 004/70363 Th 6:40pm - 10:30pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 0/24
BIOL 2501 005/60133 F 1:10pm - 5:00pm
922 Schermerhorn Hall
Claire Hazen 3 0/24

BIOL W3002 Introduction to Animal Structure and Function. 6 points.

Lab Required
Laboratory fee: $150.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: one year each of biology and college physics.

Both laboratory sessions are required. Introduction to animal form and function, using the vertebrates as examples, with emphasis on the comparative and evolutionary approaches. Interrelationship between the form-function complex with emphasis on the skeletal-muscular systems, and the organismal-environmental interactions; different morphological solutions to the same environmental problem. Laboratories include dissection of vertebrate structure and the analysis of its function. Registration for one of the two lab sections (BIOL W3012) is required. 

BIOL UN3004 Neurobiology I: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: one year of biology; a course in physics is highly recommended.

Lecture and recitation. This is an advanced course intended for majors providing an in depth survey of the cellular and molecular aspects of nerve cell function. Topics include: the cell biology and biochemistry of neurons, ionic and molecular basis of electrical signals, synaptic transmission and its modulation, function of sensory receptors. Although not required, it is intended to be followed by Neurobiology II (see below). The recitation meets once per week in smaller groups and emphasizes readings from the primary literature. 

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3004
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3004 001/70760 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Jian Yang 4 72/115

BIOL UN3005 Neurobiology II: Development & Systems. 4 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL W3004, one year of biology, or the instructor's permission.

This course is the "capstone" course for the Neurobiology and Behavior undergraduate major at Columbia University and will be taught by the faculty of the Kavli Institute of Brain Science: http://www.kavli.columbia.edu/ Science: http://www.kavli.columbia.edu/. It is designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Knowledge of Cellular Neuroscience (how an action potential is generated and how a synapse works) will be assumed. It is strongly recommended that students take BIOL W3004 Neurobiology I: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, or a similar course, before enrolling in BIOL W3005. Students unsure about their backgrounds should check a representative syllabus of BIOL W3004 on the BIOL W3004 website (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/w3004/). Website for BIOL W3005: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/w3005/index.html

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3005 001/11122 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
501 Northwest Corner
Darcy Kelley 4 82/100

BIOL UN3006 Physiology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005 & BIOL C2006 or BIOL F2401 & BIOL F2402, or the instructor's permission.

Major physiological systems of vertebrates (circulatory, digestive, hormonal, etc.) with emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms and regulation. Readings include research articles from the scientific literature. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3006 001/72534 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Mary Ann Price 3 38/140
Fall 2017: BIOL UN3006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3006 001/62192 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Mary Ann Price 3 44/70

BIOL W3008 The Cellular Physiology of Disease. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: one 3000-level course in Cell Biology or Biochemistry, or the instructor's permission.

This course will present a quantitative description of the cellular physiology of excitable cells (mostly nerve and muscle). While the course will focus on examining basic mechanisms in cell physiology, there will be a thread of discussion of disease mechanisms throughout. The end of each lecture will include a discussion of the molecular mechanisms of selected diseases that relate to the topics covered in the lecture. The course will consist of two lectures per week. This course will be of interest to advanced (3000-4000 level) undergraduates that aim to pursue careers in medicine as well as those that will pursue careers in biomedical research. This course will also be of interest to graduate students desiring an introduction to the cellular physiology of nerve and muscle.

BIOL UN3022 Developmental Biology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005-C2006 or equivalent.

Come discover how the union of egg and sperm triggers the complex cellular interactions that specify the diverse variety of cells present in multicellular organisms. Cellular and molecular aspects of sex determination, gametogenesis, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, telomerase as the biological clock, stem cells, cloning, the pill and cell interactions will be explored, with an emphasis on humans. Original research articles will be discussed to further examine current research in developmental biology. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3022
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3022 001/17221 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Alice Heicklen 3 72/60

BIOL W3028 Computer Models in Biology. 0 points.

Prerequisites: Calculus, Cell Biology (or a strong intro class), PChem desirable but not required, or permission from the instructor. Some computer programming desirable, but is neither required nor essential.

This course is intended to introduce students in the biological and physical sciences to techniques in computer programming and the modeling of biological systems. We will meet for 3 hours once a week.  The first hour and a half of each class will be devoted to discussing the fundamentals of a biological system of interest. In the second half of the class, we will introduce a modeling approach to the problem, and divide into groups to begin writing a computer program to analyze the biological system discussed in the first half of the lecture. The first part of the course (weeks 1-6) will cover the basics of programming in Igor (Wavemetrics). We will then move on to basic statistical methods in Igor, including curve fitting and bootstrapping. Students will be asked to complete programming homework assignments designed to develop their skills early on. The second part of the course (weeks 6-12) will present the class with problems in the scientific literature and the algorithms used to solve them. Examples of problems that we will discuss in class include solving the equations for the action potential, modeling diffusion and chemical reactions. This course will be of interest to advanced undergraduates that aim to pursue careers in medicine and basic science research. This course will also be of interest to graduate students desiring an introduction to computer programming and modeling in biological research.

BIOL UN3031 Genetics. 3 points.

Students may receive credit for BIOL W3031 or BIOL C3032, but not both due to overlap in course content.

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005-C2006 or the equivalent.

General genetics course focused on basic principles of transmission genetics and the application of genetic approaches to the study of biological function. Principles will be illustrated using classical and contemporary examples from prokaryote and eukaryote organisms, and the experimental discoveries at their foundation will be featured. Applications will include genetic approaches to studying animal development and human diseases. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pd

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3031
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3031 001/20000 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
517 Hamilton Hall
Claire de la Cova, Iva Greenwald, Michelle Attner 3 57/82

BIOL UN3034 Biotechnology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
For upper-level undergraduates.

Prerequisites: genetics or molecular biology.

The course covers techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function and their applications in medicine and the environment. Part I covers key laboratory manipulations, including DNA cloning, gene characterization, association of genes with disease, and methods for studying gene regulation and activities of gene products. Part II also covers commercial applications, and includes animal cell culture, production of recombinant proteins, novel diagnostics, high throughput screening, and environmental biosensors. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3034
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3034 001/10153 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Lawrence Chasin, Daniel Kalderon 3 11/20

BIOL W3037 Bioinformatics of Gene Expression. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Lab Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: genetics or molecular biology and chemistry or physics.

Treats a number of topics in the emerging fields of genomics and bioinformatics, such as sequence alignment, genome annotation, and DNA microarray analysis, with an emphasis on the proper use of statistics. Provides a practical introduction to the Perl programming language and utilizes a computer lab. Computer lab session on Thursday at either 1:00-2:30pm or 3:00-4:30pm.

BIOL UN3040 Lab in Molecular Biology. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 12. Lab fee: $150.

Prerequisites: one year of biology (C2005-C2006) and Contemporary Biology Laboratory (C2501).

This lab will explore various molecular biology techniques frequently utilized in modern molecular biology laboratories. The lab will consist of three modules: 1) Molecular verification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs); 2) Site-directed mutagenesis; and 3) PCR isolation, cloning, and analysis of the GAPDH gene. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3040 001/75135 W 1:10pm - 5:00pm
1000 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Alice Heicklen 3 8/12
BIOL 3040 001/75135 M 2:40pm - 3:55pm
1000 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Alice Heicklen 3 8/12

BIOL UN3041 Cell Biology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: one year of biology, normally BIOL C2005-C2006, or the equivalent.

Cell Biology 3041/4041 is an upper-division course that covers in depth all organelles of cells, how they make up tissues, secrete substances important for the organism, generate and adapt to their working environment in the body, move throughout development, and signal to each other. Because these topics were introduced in the Intro Course (taught by Mowshowitz and Chasin), this course or its equivalent is a pre-requisite for W3041/4041. Students for whom this course is useful include biology, biochem or biomedical engineering majors, those preparing to apply for medical school or graduate school, and those doing or planning to start doing research in a biology or biomedical lab. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3041 001/10486 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Jeannette Bulinski 3 35/70

BIOL W3050 Project Laboratory In Protein Biochemistry. 5 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: one year of biology (C2005-C2006) plus one upper-level course recommended. Enrollment is not restricted as long as total is no more than 14. Seniors will be given preference in the unlikely event that restriction is necessary. Students with specific questions should e-mail the instructor (jfh21@columbia.edu).

This course provides an intensive introduction to professional biomedical laboratory research. Students conduct a portion of an ongoing biochemical research project and write-up their results in a format suitable for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific research journal. Techniques in molecular biology and protein biochemistry are used to address a problem in mechanistic biochemistry or molecular pharmacology. Students are exposed to the full spectrum of techniques used in contemporary protein biochemistry, including molecular sequence analysis of genomic databases, molecular cloning and manipulation of recombinant DNA, protein expression in E. coli, protein purification, and biophysical characterization (typically including crystallization for x-ray structure determination). The couse emphasizes the use of critical thinking skills in scientific research while giving students the opportunity to apply the basic knowlegde learned in a wide variety of biology and chemistry lecture courses to a real research project. Examples of past projects can be found on the course website: https://www1.columbia.edu/sec/cu/biology/courses/w3050/class/index.html (cunix account required to login).

BIOL UN3058 Project Laboratory in Microbiology. 5 points.

Lab fee: $150.

Prerequisites: one year of Intro Bio. An introductory biology or chemistry lab is recommended.

Bacteria are not just unicellular germs. This lab course will broaden your awareness of the amazing world of microbiology and the diverse capabilities of microbes. The focus will be on bacterial multicellularity, pigment production, and intercellular signaling. Pigment-producing bacteria will be isolated from the wild (i.e. Morningside Campus or your skin), and characterized using standard genetic tools (PCR, DNA gel electrophoresis, transformation, screen) and microbiology techniques (isolation of bacteria and growth of bacterial colonies, media preparation, enrichment techniques for pigments). These techniques will also be applied in the study of bacterial multicellularity and signaling in the standard lab strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3058
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3058 001/20940 T Th 1:10pm - 5:00pm
601c Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Lars Dietrich 5 13/14

BIOL UN3073 Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: two semesters of a rigorous, molecularly-oriented introductory biology course (such as UN2005 and UN2006), or the instructor's permission.

This course will cover the basic concepts underlying the mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity, as well as key experimental methods currently used in the field. To keep it real, the course will include clinical correlates in such areas as infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer immunotherapy and transplantation. Taking this course won't turn you into an immunologist, but it may make you want to become one, as was the case for several students last year. After taking the course, you should be able to read the literature intelligently in this rapidly advancing field. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL UN3073
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3073 001/26323 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Solomon Mowshowitz 3 64/80

BIOL W3190 Stem Cells: Biology, Ethics and Applications. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory Biology (BIOL W2005, W2006), plus one semester of Biology at the 3000 level or above; otherwise seek the instructor's permission (contact ddk1@columbia.edu).

Dramatic advances in Stem Cell biology have created new possibilities for medical research and treatment. Realization of potential benefits requires continued scientific advances but also negotiation of the regulatory terrain and ethical considerations that determine what types of research and applications can and should be advanced. This course addresses the major breakthroughs and possibilities for both pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and adult tissue-specific stem cells, including ethical and regulatory perspectives. Several classes will be predominantly lecture style while others will be largely discussion of ethics, medical applications, or research papers. In addition the course features two public lectures concerning cutting edge stem cell research, an invited expert on regulatory affairs and a visit to the New York Stem Cell Foundation Laboratory. The course can be used as an elective for majors in Biology, Biochemistry, Biophysics, or Neuroscience and Behavior.

BIOL W3193 Stem Cell Biology and Applications. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: three semesters of Biology or the instructor’s permission.

The course examines current knowledge and potential medical applications of pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells), direct conversions between cell types and adult, tissue-specific stem cells (concentrating mainly on hematopoietic and gut stem cells as leading paradigms). A basic lecture format will be supplemented by presentations and discussions of research papers. Recent reviews and research papers, together with extensive instructor notes, will be used in place of a textbook. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

BIOL W3208 Introduction to Evolutionary Biology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: recommended preparation: an introductory course in college biology.

Introduction to principles of general evolutionary theory, both nomological and historical; causes and processes of evolution; phylogenetic evolution; species concept and speciation; adaptation and macroevolution; concepts of phylogeny and classification.

BIOL UN3310 Virology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: two semesters of a rigorous, molecularly-oriented introductory biology course (such as C2005), or the instructor's permission.

The course will emphasize the common reactions that must be completed by all viruses for successful reproduction within a host cell and survival and spread within a host population. The molecular basis of alternative reproductive cycles, the interactions of viruses with host organisms, and how these lead to disease are presented with examples drawn from a set of representative animal and human viruses, although selected bacterial viruses will be discussed.

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3310 001/14739 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Vincent Racaniello 3 71/150

BIOL UN3500 Independent Biological Research. 3-4 points.

Fee: $150. Students must register for a recitation section, BIOL W3510.

Prerequisites: Concurrent with registering for this course, a student must register with the department and provide a written invitation from a mentor; details of this procedure are available at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/w3500/index.htm.
Corequisites: There will not be a recitation section this semester.

The course involves independent study, faculty-supervised laboratory projects in contemporary biology. Concurrent with registering for this course, a student must register with the department, provide a written invitation from a mentor and submit a research proposal; details of this procedure are available at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/w3500/index.htm. A paper summarizing results of the work is required by the last day of finals for a letter grade; no late papers will be accepted. See the course web site (above) for more details.

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3500 001/13968  
Ron Prywes 3-4 56
Fall 2017: BIOL UN3500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3500 001/62024  
Ron Prywes 3-4 42/100

BIOL W3560 Evolution in the age of genomics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: introductory genetics or the instructor's permission.

This course introduces basic concepts in evolutionary biology, from speciation to natural selection. While the lectures incorporate a historical perspective, the main goal of the class is to familiarize students with topics and tools of evolutionary genetics as practiced today, in the era of genomics. Thus, the focus will be on evidence from molecular evolution and genetics and exercises will assume a basic background in genetics. Examples will be drawn from across the tree of life, but with a primary focus on humans.

BIOL W3600 Biological Research Skills. 1 point.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Corequisites: BIOL C3500.

This is a companion course to BIOL C3500 Independent Research. Students will present their research plans and results in order to gain experience in communicating about science and to get feedback (from the instructor and other students) to improve their presentation and research skills. This is a pass/fail course.

BIOL UN3700 Independent Clinical Research. 2-4 points.

Prerequisites: concurrent with registering for this course, a student must register with the department, provide a written invitation from a mentor, and submit a research proposal.

BIOL 3700 will provide an opportunity for students interested in independent research work in a hospital or hospice setting. In these settings, where patients and their needs are paramount, and where IRB rules and basic medical ethics make “wet-lab biology research” inappropriate, undergraduates may well find a way nevertheless, to assist and participate in ongoing clinical research. Such students, once they have identified a mentor willing to provide support, participation, and advising, may apply to the faculty member in charge of the course for 2-4 points/semester in BIOL W3700. This course will closely follow procedures already in place for BIOL 3500, but will ask potential mentors to provide evidence that students will gain hands-on experience in a clinical setting, while participating in a hospital- or hospice-based research agenda. A paper summarizing results of the work is required by the last day of finals for a letter grade; no late papers will be accepted.

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3700
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3700 001/24862  
Deborah Mowshowitz, Ellie Siddens 2-4 9
Fall 2017: BIOL UN3700
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3700 001/76116  
2-4 4/100

BIOL W3990 Readings in Cell Biology. 4 points.

Enrollment strictly limited to 24.

Prerequisites: Cell Biology (3041/4041) and the instructor's permission.

This is an advanced cell biology course that uses detailed discussion of the primary literature to understand fundamental cellular processes. The focus is on dissecting research papers to gain insight into the rationale behind specific experimental approaches, understand how experiments are performed, and critically analyze the data and interpretations. We will start with an introduction to critical thinking and experimental design, and then probe four sequential papers from a prominent research lab that all investigate the same biological process. In this way, students gain an understanding of the creative nature of laboratory research and see how a research project develop and diversifies. Course requirements: Students must read assigned sections of each paper prior to class and be prepared to discuss the experimental approaches, outcomes and interpretations. Students will participate in group discussions, small group activities and must present findings to the class. Assessment will be based on periodic assignments, a midterm take-home exam, a final exam and a folio that students will maintain to track their own progress and document their findings. Participation in class discussions will also contribute to the final grade.

BIOL UN3995 Topics in Biology. 1 point.

Enrollment limited to 18.

Prerequisites: Introductory Biology or equivalent.

Topics in Biology: Radiographic Anatomy and Select Pathology (Section 007 Fall semester)

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Radiographic Anatomy and Selective Pathology is a survey course intended for undergraduate students.  This course is not limited to science majors and would be of value to any student that may have an interest in studying the anatomy of the human body.

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The course is a systematic approach to the study of the human body utilizing medical imaging.  We will be studying neuro-anatomy, anatomy of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis.  Vascular and musculoskeletal imaging will be addressed as well.  Modalities will include CT, MRI, PET/CT, and Ultrasound.  Cross sectional imaging will be supplemented with pathology demonstrated on appropriate cross sectional imaging.

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The class size will be limited to 15 students.  The lecture will be offered Wednesday evenings from 6:10-7:00 pm.  This will be a 1 credit course offered only during the fall semesters.

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Topics in Biology: Crossroads in Bioethics (Section 001 Spring semester)

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This two credit multidisciplinary and interactive course will focus on contemporary issues in bioethics and medical ethics. Each topic will cover both the underlying science of new biotechnologies and the subsequent bioethical issues that emerge from these technologies. Each topic will introduce a bioethical principle that will be explored using case studies. Students are expected to prepare for each class based on the assignment so that classroom time will be devoted to discussion, case presentations, and role playing rather than merely lectures. Topics include stem cell research, human reproductive cloning, bioterrorism, neuroethics, genetic screening, medical stem cell tourism, patents and science, forensic science and the interface of science and culture/religion.

Spring 2017: BIOL UN3995
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3995 001/23463 W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
703 Hamilton Hall
John Loike 1 23/30
Fall 2017: BIOL UN3995
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3995 007/62880 W 6:10pm - 7:00pm
Room TBA
Jay Hammel 1 15/15

BIOL GU4001 Advanced Genetic Analysis. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment limited to 25.

Prerequisites: for undergraduates: Introductory Genetics (W3031) and the instructor's permission.

This seminar course provides a detailed presentation of areas in classical and molecular genetics for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. Topics include transmission genetics, gain and loss of function mutations, genetic redundancy, suppressors, enhancers, epistasis, expression patterns, using transposons, and genome analysis. The course is a mixture of lectures, student presentations, seminar discussions, and readings from the original literature. 

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4001 001/28964 M 1:10pm - 3:55pm
1000 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Martin Chalfie 3 12/28

BIOL GU4004 Neurobiology I: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: one year of biology; a course in physics is highly recommended.

Lecture and recitation. This is an advanced course intended for majors providing an in depth survey of the cellular and molecular aspects of nerve cell function. Topics include the cell biology and biochemistry of neurons, ionic and molecular basis of electrical signals, synaptic transmission and its modulation, function of sensory receptors. Although not required, it is intended to be followed by Neurobiology II (see below). The recitation meets once per week in smaller groups and emphasizes readings from the primary literature. 

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4004
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4004 001/65334 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Jian Yang 4 3/20

BIOL GR4005 Neurobiology II: Development and Systems. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL W4004, one year of biology, or the instructor's permission.

This course is a graduate seminar in Developmental and Systems Neuroscience for students matriculated in a PhD program in Neuroscience. Undergraduate students should instead enroll in W3005y.

Spring 2017: BIOL GR4005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4005 001/25183 Th 6:00pm - 7:15pm
700 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Darcy Kelley, Aniruddha Das 3 31/20

BIOL GU4008 The Cellular Physiology of Disease. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one 3000-level course in Cell Biology or Biochemistry or the instructor's permission.
Corequisites: BIOL GU4009

This course will present a quantitative description of the cellular physiology of excitable cells (mostly nerve and muscle). While the course will focus on examining basic mechanisms in cell physiology, there will be a thread of discussion of disease mechanisms throughout. The end of each lecture will include a discussion of the molecular mechanisms of selected diseases that relate to the topics covered in the lecture. The course will consist of two lectures per week. This course will be of interest to advanced (3000-4000 level) undergraduates that aim to pursue careers in medicine as well as those that will pursue careers in biomedical research. This course will also be of interest to graduate students desiring an introduction to the cellular physiology of nerve and muscle.

Spring 2017: BIOL GU4008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4008 001/73109 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Julio Fernandez 3 21/50

BIOL GR4011 NEURAL SYST:CIRCUITS IN B. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Fall 2017: BIOL GR4011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4011 001/60178 F 9:00am - 11:00am
909 Northwest Corner
Rafael Yuste 3 12/17

BIOL GU4022 Developmental Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005-C2006 or equivalent.

Come discover how the union of egg and sperm triggers the complex cellular interactions that specify the diverse variety of cells present in multicellular organisms. Cellular and molecular aspects of sex determination, gametogenesis, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, telomerase as the biological clock, stem cells, cloning, the pill and cell interactions will be explored, with an emphasis on humans. Original research articles will be discussed to further examine current research in developmental biology. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4022
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4022 001/23456 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Alice Heicklen 3 0/0

BIOL W4028 Computer models in Biology. 0 points.

Prerequisites: Calculus, Cell Biology (or a strong intro class), PChem desirable but not required, or the instructor's permission. Some computer programming desirable, but is neither required nor essential.

This course is intended to introduce students in the biological and physical sciences to techniques in computer programming and the modeling of biological systems. We will meet for 3 hours once a week. The first hour and a half of each class will be devoted to discussing the fundamentals of a biological system of interest. In the second half of the class, we will introduce a modeling approach to the problem, and divide into groups to begin writing a computer program to analyze the biological system discussed in the first half of the lecture. The first part of the course (weeks 1-6) will cover the basics of programming in Igor (Wavemetrics). We will then move on to basic statistical methods in Igor, including curve fitting and bootstrapping. Students will be asked to complete programming homework assignments designed to develop their skills early on. The second part of the course (weeks 6-12) will present the class with problems in the scientific literature and the algorithms used to solve them. Examples of problems that we will discuss in class include solving the equations for the action potential, modeling diffusion and chemical reactions. This course will be of interest to advanced undergraduates that aim to pursue careers in medicine and basic science research. This course will also be of interest to graduate students desiring an introduction to computer programming and modeling in biological research.

BIOL GU4031 Genetics. 3 points.

Open to Biotech M.A. students and other graduate students.

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005-C2006 or the equivalent. Recommended: one term of organic chemistry.
Corequisites: Recommended: one term of organic chemistry.

Students may receive credit for UN3031 or UN3032, but not both due to overlap in course content. General course in genetics dealing with principles of gene structure, function, and transmission. Historical development and experimental basis of current knowledge are stressed. SPS and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOL GU4031
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4031 001/29794 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
517 Hamilton Hall
Claire de la Cova, Iva Greenwald, Michelle Attner 3 5/20

BIOL W4032 Genetics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: EEEB W2001 or BIOL C2005, and C2006 or the equivalent.
Corequisites: one term of organic chemistry.

General course in genetics dealing with principles of gene structure, function, and transmission. Both classical (transmission) and molecular genetics are discussed. Historical development and experimental basis of current knowledge are stressed to familiarize the student with the methods and logical bases of genetic research. Students may receive credit for W3031 or W3032, but not both due to overlap in course content.

BIOL GU4034 Biotechnology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: genetics or molecular biology.

The course covers techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function and their applications in medicine and the environment. Part I covers key laboratory manipulations, including DNA cloning, gene characterization, association of genes with disease, and methods for studying gene regulation and activities of gene products. Part II also covers commercial applications, and includes animal cell culture, production of recombinant proteins, novel diagnostics, high throughput screening, and environmental biosensors.

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4034
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4034 001/64039 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Lawrence Chasin, Daniel Kalderon 3 3/65

BIOL W4037 Bioinformatics of Gene Expression. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Treats a number of topics in the emerging fields of genomics and bioinformatics, such as sequence alignment, genome annotation, and DNA microarray analysis, with an emphasis on the proper use of statistics. Provides a practical introduction to the Perl programming language and utilizes a computer lab.

BIOL GU4041 Cell Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one year of biology, normally BIOL C2005-C2006, or the equivalent.

Cell Biology 3041/4041 is an upper-division course that covers in depth all organelles of cells, how they make up tissues, secrete substances important for the organism, generate and adapt to their working environment in the body, move throughout development, and signal to each other. Because these topics were introduced in the Intro Course (taught by Mowshowitz and Chasin), this course or its equivalent is a pre-requisite for W3041/4041. Students for whom this course is useful include biology, biochem or biomedical engineering majors, those preparing to apply for medical school or graduate school, and those doing or planning to start doing research in a biology or biomedical lab. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4041 001/63798 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Jeannette Bulinski 3 1/20

BIOL W4065 Molecular Biology of Disease. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Enrollment limited to 30.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: open to advanced undergraduates with the instructor's permission. Completion of a 3000-level course in at least one of the following, with completion of two or more preferred: genetics, biochemistry, cell biology.

Molecular and cellular basis of infectious diseases and inherited propensities. Mechanisms of disease examined in discussions based on current research papers. Lectures, discussions, and student presentations. Essay required in lieu of final examination.

BIOL W4070 The Biology and Physics of Single Molecules. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: calculus, chemistry, physics, one year of biology, or the instructor's permission.

This course will examine the fundamental mechanisms underlying the behavior of biological molecules, at the single molecule level. The course will cover the methods used to track single molecules: optical tweezers, single molecule AFM, Magnetic tweezers, Optical techniques and Fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) probes. The course will cover the mechanism of action of mechanical motors, such as myosin dyneyin, kinesin. It will cover the action of DNA binding enzymes such as topoisomerases, helicases, etc. We will also discuss the function of large motors such as the ATP Synthase and the bacterial AAA ATPases. We will discuss the mechanical properties of DNA, RNA, and proteins. The course will consist mainly of reviewing classical experiments in each category, and developing the background physical theories to promote a deep understanding of biological mechanisms at the mesoscopic level.

BIOL GU4073 Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: two semesters of a rigorous, molecularly-oriented introductory biology course (such as C2005 and C2006), or the instructor's permission.

This course will cover the basic concepts underlying the mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity, as well as key experimental methods currently used in the field. To keep it real, the course will include clinical correlates in such areas as infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and transplantation. Taking this course won't turn you into an immunologist, but it may make you want to become one, as was the case for several students last year. After taking the course, you should be able to read the literature intelligently in this rapidly advancing field.

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4073
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4073 001/25903 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Solomon Mowshowitz 3 3/7

BIOL W4077 Survey in Molecular and Cellular Biology: Cellular Stress Responses. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: one year of introductory biology and at least one semester of additional biology courses. Recommended: BIOL W3041 Cell Biology, BIOL C3512 Molecular Biology.

This is an advanced molecular and cellular biology course geared to upper level undergraduates and graduate students. The topic of this year will be cellular stress responses. We will read and analyze a series of reviews on this topic ranging from the stress of DNA damage on cells to metabolic stress to the stress of aging. We will also read key research articles on these topics. The signaling pathways, mechanisms, targets, and biological relevance will be reviewed. An emphasis will be made on understanding how important discoveries were made. Students will develop their own review articles on related subjects and present multiple research proposals.

BIOL W4082 Theoretical Foundations and Applications of Biophysical Methods. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least one year of coursework in single-variable calculus and not being freaked-out by multivariable calculus. Physics coursework through a calculus-based treatment of classical mechanics and electromagnetism. One year of general chemistry (either AP Chemistry or a college course). One year of college coursework in molecular/cellular biology and biochemistry equivalent to Biology C2005-2006 at Columbia.

Rigorous introduction to the theory underlying biophysical methods, which are illustrated by practical applications to biomedical research. Emphasizes the approach used by physical chemists to understand and analyze the behavior of molecules, while also preparing students to apply these methods in their own research. Course modules cover: (i) statistical analysis of data; (ii) solution thermodynamics; (iii) hydrodynamic methods; (iv) light-scattering methods; and (v) spectroscopic methods, especially fluorescence. Recitations focus on curve-fitting analyses of experimental data.

BIOL W4150 The Cell As a Machine: Cell Biophysics and Biosystems Engineering. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: calculus, cell biology or biochemistry, and physics.

Cells are complex micron-sized machines that rely upon basic physical aspects of the cell components (diffusion, mechanics, electrostatics, and hydrophobicity) and energy transduction (by motors, transporters, chaperones, and synthesis complexes) to perform basic cell functions. The biophysical principles involved are described.

BIOL W4158 Seminar in Nucleic Acids: Microbiology & the Control of Infectious Diseases. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This is a seminar course in which the focus will be on noxious germs or substances that might be used by bioterrorists. Ten of the most credible biological threats will be discussed. Each week, a joint seminar on one of these will be presented by three students. There is a substantial literature in this field and our reference librarian Kathleen Kehoe has offered to explain how to access this literature at our first class meeting.

BIOL W4193 Stem Cell Biology and Applications. 3 points.

Corequisites: three semesters of Biology or the instructor’s permission.

The course examines current knowledge and potential medical applications of pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells), direct conversions between cell types and adult, tissue-specific stem cells (concentrating mainly on hematopoietic and gut stem cells as leading paradigms). A basic lecture format will be supplemented by presentations and discussions of research papers. Recent reviews and research papers together with extensive instructor notes will be used in place of a textbook.

BIOL W4205 Origins of Life. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Recommended: one term of biology and one year of chemistry.

Divided into four areas of study: events from the time of the Big Bang to the formation of a habitable planet; the basic strategies of living systems; how basic chemistry works in living systems and how these systems might have evolved in the prebiotic world; and the evolution of living systems.

BIOL GU4300 Drugs and Disease. 3 points.

Prerequisites: four semesters of biology with a firm foundation in molecular and cellular biology.

Introduces students to the current understanding of human diseases, novel therapeutic approaches and drug development process. Selected topics will be covered in order to give students a feeling of the field of biotechnology in health science. This course also aims to strengthen students’ skills in literature comprehension and critical thinking.

Fall 2017: BIOL GU4300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4300 001/69419 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Lili Yamasaki 3 20/100

BIOL W4312 Chemical Biology. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: elementary organic chemistry CHEM C3443, CHEM C3444. Recommended preparation: elementary physical chemistry and biochemistry CHEM C3079, CHEM C3080.

Development and application of chemical methods for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. Review of the biosynthesis, chemical synthesis, and structure and function of proteins and nucleic acids. Application of chemical methods--including structural biology, enzymology, chemical genetics, and the synthesis of modified biological molecules--to the study of cellular processes--including transcription, translation, and signal transduction. This a Chemistry course offered jointly by Chemistry and Biological Sciences, listed as CHEM W4312.

BIOL W4400 Computational Genomics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course will meet as a seminar once weekly and will give a “hands on” introduction to genomics research. It will introduce the computational tools and statistical concepts needed to analyze and interpret next generation sequencing data (primarily RNA-seq). The course will cover machine-learning approaches to model and mine biological data. The course will survey current topics in systems biology, including gene expression, transcriptional regulation, epigenomics, ribosome profiling, enhancer localization, and genome conformation. The course will include a reading of primary literature and a genomics research project.

BIOL GU4510 Genomics of Gene Regulation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: one year of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Courses taken at CU are recommended, but AP courses may be sufficient with the instructor's permission.

This course will provide students with a quantitative understanding of the ways in which molecular interactions between nucleotides and proteins give rise to the behavior of gene regulatory networks. The key high-throughput genomics technologies for probing the cell at different levels using microarrays and next-generation sequencing will be discussed. Strategies for interpreting and integrating these data using statistics, biophysics, and genetics will be introduced. In computer exercises, student will learn the basics of the R language, and use it to perform analyses of genomics data sets. No prior computer programming experience is assumed. This highly interdisciplinary course is intended for advanced undergraduates as well as beginning graduate students in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, and Computer Science. Offered in previous years as CHBC W4510.

Spring 2017: BIOL GU4510
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4510 001/26161 M 2:40pm - 5:25pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Harmen Bussemaker 4 35/40

BIOL W4560 Evolution in the age of genomics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: introductory genetics or the instructor's permission.

This course introduces basic concepts in evolutionary biology, from speciation to natural selection. While the lectures incorporate a historical perspective, the main goal of the class is to familiarize students with topics and tools of evolutionary genetics as practiced today, in the era of genomics. Thus, the focus will be on evidence from molecular evolution and genetics and exercises will assume a basic background in genetics. Examples will be drawn from across the tree of life, but with a primary focus on humans.

BIOL GU4799 Readings In the Molecular Biology of Cancer. 3 points.

Tracing the discovery of the role of DNA tumor viruses in cancerous transformation. Oncogenes and tumor suppressors are analyzed with respect to their function in normal cell cycle, growth control, and human cancers. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Spring 2017: BIOL GU4799
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 4799 001/63973 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Carol Prives 3 16/30

BIOT W4140 Fundamentals of the Bioscience Industry. 3 points.

Open only to students in the M.A. Program in Biotechnology. This course requires competitive application to a certificate program and additional tuitions (portion reimbursed by the Biotech Program) payable to New York State's Center for Biotechnology.

BIOT GU4160 Biotechnology Law. 3 points.

Priority given to Biotechnology Program students.

Prerequisites: at least 4 college-level biology or biotechnology courses.

This course will introduce students to the interrelated fields of patent law, regulatory law, and contract law that are vital to the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors. The course will present core concepts in a way that permits students to use them throughout their corporate, academic, and government careers. SCE and TC students may register for this course, but they must first obtain the written permission of the instructor, by filling out a paper Registration Adjustment Form (Add/Drop form). The form can be downloaded at the URL below, but must be signed by the instructor and returned to the office of the registrar.  http://registrar.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/reg-adjustment.pdf

Fall 2017: BIOT GU4160
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4160 001/11282 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Alan Morrison 3 4/40

BIOT W4161 Ethics in Biopharmaceutical Patent and Regulatory Law. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW (BIOT W4160)

Course Objective This course – the first of its kind at Columbia – introduces students to a vital subfield of ethics focusing on patent and regulatory law in the biotech and pharmaceutical sectors. The course combines lectures, structured debate and research to best present this fascinating and nuanced subject. Successful completion of Biotechnology Law (W4160) is a course prerequisite, since properly exploring this branch of bioethics requires an indepth understanding of biotech and pharmaceutical patent and regulatory law.

BIOT GU4180 Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 12. Priority given to students in the Masters in Biotechnology Program.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The course examines the entrepreneurial process in biotechnology from idea generation through economic viability. Biotechnology companies are unique in that they need a years-to-decades long period of incubation prior to becoming self-sustaining. Students will be introduced to the steps needed to start and nurture a company, and gain an ability to assess the health of potential collaborators, partners or employers. Topics include an overview of the global biotechnology industry, idea generation, business plan formulation, intellectual property protection, funding, personnel management including board composition, regulatory body interaction, and company exits. Course website: http://biot4180.weebly.com/

Spring 2017: BIOT GU4180
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4180 001/83697 F 9:00am - 10:50am
516 Hamilton Hall
David Sable 3 31/40

BIOT GU4200 Biopharmaceutical Development & Regulation. 3 points.

The program aims to provide current life sciences students with an understanding of what drives the regulatory strategies that surround the development decision making process, and how the regulatory professional may best contribute to the goals of product development and approval. To effect this, we will examine operational, strategic, and commercial aspects of the regulatory approval process for new drug, biologic, and biotechnology products both in the United States and worldwide. The topics are designed to provide a chronological review of the requirements needed to obtain marketing approval. Regulatory strategic, operational, and marketing considerations will be addressed throughout the course. We will examine and analyze the regulatory process as a product candidates are advanced from Research and Development, through pre-clinical and clinical testing, to marketing approval, product launch and the post-marketing phase. The goal of this course is to introduce and familiarize students with the terminology, timelines, and actual steps followed by Regulatory Affairs professionals employed in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry. Worked examples will be explored to illustrate complex topics and illustrate interpretation of regulations.

Fall 2017: BIOT GU4200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4200 001/29666 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
601 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Ron Guido 3 50/35

BIOT GU4201 Seminar in Biotechnology Development and Regulation. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOT W4200 (OK without prerequisite).

This course will provide a practical definition of the current role of the Regulatory Professional in pharmaceutical development, approval and post-approval actions. This will be illustrated by exploration, and interactive discussion of regulatory history, its evolution, current standards, and associated processes. The course will seek to clarify the role of Regulatory in development and lifecycle opportunities, demonstrating the value Regulatory adds by participation on research, development and commercial teams. The course will utilize weekly case studies and guest lecturers to provide color to current topical events related to the areas.

Spring 2017: BIOT GU4201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOT 4201 001/60819 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
700 Fairchild Life Sciences Bldg
Ron Guido 3 45/30

HPSC W3201 Philosophy and History of Evolutionary Biology. 4 points.

This course does not carry credit as a biology course.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Explores the philosophical basis and historical development of evolutionary biology as a means of inquiry into causation, explanation, and testing in biology, and the implications for human understanding. Topics include Darwinian evolutionary theory, creationism, theories of inheritance, Mendelism and natural selection, species concepts, and synthetic theory of evolution.

Of Related Interest

Biomedical Engineering
BMEN E4150 The cell as a machine
Chemistry
BIOC UN3501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism
BIOC UN3512 Molecular Biology
Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology
EEEB UN2001 Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms
EEEB GU4321 Human Nature: DNA, Race Identity
History and Philosophy of Science
HPSC W3201 Philosophy and History of Evolutionary Biology
Physics
PHYS W4075 Biology at Physical Extremes
Psychology
PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior